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UI in the News

April, 2003

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Scientist Develops Bioterrorism Sensor (Small Times, April 30)
Scientist William Wang, president of Iowa City-based Pharmacom Corp. (a tenant in the UI Technology Innovation Center) is developing a biosensor, about the size and shape as a cellular handset, that will be able to detect between five and 50 pathogens and chemical agents in the air, water, or on a surface within moments. Iowans keeping a close eye on Pharmacom's progress include MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory in Coralville. She says hand-held sensors now used to check for anthrax often produce false positives, resulting in a waste of vital resources as health authorities deploy more resources for extensive testing. "What we would really like to see is a device that is very reliable in the field and would not require much expertise to operate," Gilchrist says. The Small Times covers small tech industry, which includes nanotechnology and microsystems.
http://www.smalltimes.com/document_display.cfm?document_id=5926

Seniors Press for Clean Air, Water Standards (New York Times, April 30)
Seniors and advocates for the elderly are pressing the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for tougher clean air and water standards and tougher laws governing secondhand smoke. Those testifying at a recent EPA fact-finding hearing criticized President Bush for weakening federal emission standards, saying such changes heighten the exposure and health risk of older people with health problems ranging from asthma and emphysema to lung and heart disease. "There is a perception that the Bush administration has the interest of big business ahead of that of the average citizen," said 85-year-old Bob Walsh of Cedar Rapids. "This perception is furthered by this administration's watering down of the Clean Water Act, polluting the Clean Air Act and by failure to protect our national parks and forests." The hearing is part of an ongoing dialogue the EPA is having with the elderly to help craft a new, national initiative to protect them from environmental health hazards. The so-called listening session at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was the third of six in cities across the country. Sessions have already been held in Florida and Texas; others are planned for Pittsburgh, Baltimore and Los Angeles.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-PRI-Environment-Elderly.html
The Associated Press article appeared in YAHOO NEWS, SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS; BALTIMORE SUN; FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL, Ind. ; the LONGVIEW NEWS JOURNAL, Texas, the ROCKY MOUNT TELEGRAM, N.C.; BILOXI SUN HERALD, Miss.; THE GUARDIAN, U.K.; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT, Ill; KANSAS CITY STAR; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minn.; CENTRE DAILY TIMES, State College, Penn.; the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio; the WITCHITA EAGLE, Kans.; MACON TELEGRAPH, Ga.; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, S.D.; GRAND FORKS HERALD, N.D.; and COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER, Ga.

Ebola Virus Used In Gene Therapy (KAAL-TV, April 30)
Researchers at the University of Iowa working on a gene therapy for cystic fibrosis have found an unlikely ally - the deadly Ebola virus. That's according to Doctor PATRICK SINN in today's edition of the Journal of Virology. Sinn says researchers have found that a protein taken from the virus can be used to help deliver genes into the lung's thin layer of airway cells more efficiently than other tested methods. Although research is in its early stages, researchers are cautiously optimistic about the results. KAAL-TV is based in Austin, Minn.The story also appeared on the website of WQAD-TV, Moline, Ill.
http://www.kaaltv.com/article/view/14006/

UI: Ebola Could Help Fight Cystic Fibrosis (UPI, April 30)
Using a modified piece of the Ebola virus could help researchers solve a key problem with developing cystic fibrosis gene therapy. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA say delivering genes into airway cells is inefficient and disrupts the integrity of the cell layer, but by taking a small part of the protein coat from the Ebola virus and putting it on another modified virus, it creates a hybrid vehicle that can attach itself to a receptor on the airway side of lung cells. The genes in the vehicle can then enter the host cell and integrate into the host chromosomes. Previously gene delivery vehicles attached only to the bottom surface, which requires breaching the normally closed cell surface layer. The Ebola virus is modified before using to make it safe for patients.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030430-063632-5190r

Bikers Say 'I Do' Between Races (UPI, April 30)
Between races at the annual Iowa City Criterium Sunday Andrea Mugge and Lee Venteicher placed rings on each other's fingers, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S DAILY IOWAN newspaper reports. Mugge, Iowa women's cyclist of the year, raced in the women's open-class event that began at 11:30 a.m. She was worried about her race all morning, not to mention the wedding. Her groom raced after the wedding -- neither won their events. Bridesmaids and groomsmen dressed in silver skin suits pedaled race bikes to the Old Capital, where an arch had been made of bicycle wheels welded together and adorned with sunflowers. After the ceremony, when the officiating minister said the "results are official" the newlyweds kissed and celebrated their union with a toast of Gatorade. A version of the story also ran April 30 on the website of the WASHINGTON TIMES.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030429-033502-8272r

UI Poet Mentioned (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 30)
A collection of brief reviews of new poetry collections includes "Deposition" (Graywolf Press, 80 pages, $14), a first book by Katie Ford, who teaches at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The writer notes, "The book, with striking cover art by Michelangelo, contains 44 poems in three significant sections alluding to the taking down of the body of Christ from the cross - one of a half dozen meanings of 'deposition.' Ford's sequence - "The First Gospel," "The Stations of the Cross" and "The Wake" - is a lovely medley of free-verse narratives, ranging from clipped lines to long versets. (There's even a blank verse sonnet.) Ford's treatment of her theme is one of the best in poetry since Jean Cocteau's 'The Crucifixion.'"

Bike Lovers Wed On UI Campus (New York Times, April 29)
An old-fashioned wedding it was not - no wedding dress, no walk down the aisle, no champagne - just a couple of bike enthusiasts taking their marriage vows in cycling gear and helmets. Andrea Mugge rode on a tandem bike with her father down a pedestrian path on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus. She met the groom, Lee Venteicher, under an arch made of bicycle tires. "I've never been conventional," Mugge said. "I can't stand wearing dresses, so this was perfect." Versions of the Associated Press story also ran April 29 on the websites of WSET in Virginia, the ALBANY TIMES UNION in New York, THE MISSOULIAN in Mont., FREDERICKSBURG.COM in Virginia, the BISMARCK TRIBUNE in North Dakota, the PORTERVILLE RECORDER in California, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, the BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi, the MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia, the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana, the TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama, the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the WILKES BARRE WEEKENDER in Pennsylvania, the KANSAS CITY STAR in Missouri, WCCO-TV in Minnesota, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, the SEATTLE TIMES in Washington, the WYOMING NEWS and KTUL-TV in Oklahoma.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Bicycle-Wedding.html

Hillyard Quoted On Medicaid (Good Housekeeping, April 29)
A handful of states are participating in an innovative program that puts Medicaid money directly into the hands of the poor and disabled so they can decide how to manage their own care. The program -- Cash and Counseling Demonstration -- bypasses the government agencies that usually provide the help and instead gives the funds directly to the needy to pay for such things as cooking and bathing, allowing recipients to hire whomever they wish, including relatives and friends. "The people are in a much more respectful position," JACK HILLYARD, director of the employment policy group at the University of Iowa's Center for Disabilities and Development, told the Des Moines Register. A version of the story also ran April 29 on the website of the WASHINGTON TIMES and UPI.
http://magazines.ivillage.com/goodhousekeeping/hb/news/article/0,,comtex_2003_04_29_up_0000-4252-~dstgovernment_05~ew~xml,00.html

DeProsse Testifies In Case (IndyStar.com, April 29)
Women who receive state-required or other medical information on abortion before scheduling a procedure do not tend to change their minds, three witnesses - including a retired obstetrician and gynecologist who said he performed or supervised about 40,000 abortions in Iowa -- told a Marion County, Ind., Superior Court judge at a hearing Tuesday. The testimony came during the first morning of a hearing on Indiana's abortion law. At issue is whether information required by the state about abortion and alternatives be given to women in person or by telephone. Dr. CHARLES DEPROSSE, who was director of the abortion clinic at the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City until he retired, said the clinic obtained "informed consent'' from women seeking abortions. The women were counseled and offered information, but not always given all of the information required by Indiana in every case, such as the size of the fetus. "The majority of women who arrive at an abortion clinic have long since done all of that,'' he said. IndyStar.com is the online edition of the INDIANAPOLIS STAR.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/039353-9041-093.html

Pierce Investigation Cited (CBSSportsline.com, April 29)
A story about the controversy surrounding Iowa State basketball coach Larry Eustachy's behavior at a college party also cites the recent internal investigation at the University of Iowa that was critical of the way the school and basketball coach STEVE ALFORD responded to charges by a female athlete that Hawkeyes player Pierre Pierce sexually assaulted her. The report, commissioned by school president WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD, said Alford was wrong to proclaim his belief in Pierce's innocence during the criminal investigation. It claimed Alford "implied that he disbelieved and discredited the claims of the student victim."
http://www.sportsline.com/collegebasketball/story/6343711

Opponents Debate Air Quality Findings (AgriNews, April 29)
A coalition of business and farm groups urged state environmental regulators on Monday to scrap new air quality standards for ammonia and hydrogen sulfide emissions. "The bottom line is we need more time and a balanced approach," said Ed Beaman, of the Agribusiness Association of Iowa. At a Statehouse news conference, the association said the new rules, approved last week by the Environmental Protection Commission, are far too restrictive and not backed by scientific evidence. But Larry Gintner, spokesman for Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, said the new ambient air quality standards are based on scientific study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University. "What they're basically doing is scuttling research by these two prestigious universities we have in this state ... There was peer review of this executive summary and it was considered valid," Gintner said. AgriNews is based in Rochester, Minn.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/324567284619655.bsp

UI Medical Student Mentioned (AgriNews, April 29)
A feature on an Earlham, Minn., family that raises purebred Shorthorns cows says that Zelpha Henderson's daughter Helen is completing her internship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/324567283379801.bsp

Case Against Foundation Dismissed (AgriNews, April 29)
A Franklin County District judge has dismissed the lawsuit of a farmer kicked off a leased farm that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION received as a gift from his former landlord. Larry Holtkamp of rural Dows contended the Foundation ignored Donald Hackbarth's will after Hackbarth's estate donated 412 acres of Franklin County farmland to the foundation for the University Hospitals and Clinics. The will requested that the land not be sold for up to 10 years until the land's tenant retired. Holtkamp sued the foundation in December 2001, asking that the court either force it to honor Hackbarth's will or pay what Holtkamp would have made farming the land. He had estimated losing about $320,000 because the foundation sold 80 of the acres.
http://webstar.postbulletin.com/agrinews/371550954251466.bsp

Author Attended Workshop (Portland Tribune, April 29)
In a feature on author Anthony Swofford, a former Marine who documented his experiences in Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles, Swofford says he started writing in college right after the war and then attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, "where I got to spend my days writing and reading." The Tribune is based in Oregon.
http://www.portlandtribune.com/archview.cgi?id=17666

UI Cyclists Wed (Casper News-Tribune, April 29)
An old-fashioned wedding it was not -- no wedding dress, no walk down the aisle, no champagne -- just a couple of bike enthusiasts taking their marriage vows in cycling gear and helmets. Andrea Mugge rode on a tandem bike with her father down a pedestrian path on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus. She met the groom, Lee Venteicher, under an arch made of bicycle tires. Rick Paulos, who has been a bicycle race official for 23 years, performed the ceremony during the 26th Annual Old Capitol Criterium & Chris Lillig Memorial Cup on Sunday. The event included eight bicycle races. Mugge 26, a medical student at the university, participated in the Women's Open race before the ceremony and Venteicher raced in the Pro 1 & 2 race between the ceremony and reception. The newspaper is based in Casper, Wyo. A version of this article also appeared April 29 on the Web sites of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, WCCO-TV (Minn.) and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.trib.com/AP/wire_detail.php?wire_num=104533

Hunter Comments On Research (UPI, April 29)
Electrical engineer Matthew Lee leads the team at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta working on a project that could make the worst singer sound like the best virtuoso star with the aid of computer tools currently under development. If one broke down a voice to its basic components, each individually would sound like pure tones. Certain groups of these components are called formants. Prior studies revealed that highly trained classical vocalists apparently cluster key formants together, producing a ringing vibrato "that is a desirable quality for good singers," Lee said. "Our project is aimed at taking that data that we and others have collected and applying that to a poor voice." In findings to be presented Wednesday at the annual Acoustical Society of America meeting in Nashville, the researchers will play before-and-after country music audio clips to demonstrate how their programs can break down and reconstruct a voice to improve singing. University of Iowa sound scientist ERIC HUNTER, who did not engage in these experiments, found Smith and Lee's findings "nice. The vibrato was not only the easiest thing to add as far as their calculations go, but it was also the best perceived improvement in voice quality." Hunter, and sound expert INGO TITZE, discovered that professional vocalists apparently sing in crucial portions of the audio spectrum that listeners are most sensitive to. They will also present their findings at the ASA conference Wednesday.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20030428-023003-8915r

UI Student Mentioned (Chicago Sun-Times, April 28)
A series of feature stories on how little teenagers understand about financial matters includes a story that mentions James Pike. Since James went off to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, his younger brother, Alex, has become very aware of the high costs of college. It's got him worried about where he'll be able to go once he graduates next year. "I know it's a lot of money," he says, "and my parents talk about how much it's costing." Sometimes, he says, he wishes they didn't share quite so much with him. "Like the financial stuff," he says, sitting in his family's living room. "It just worries me, and I can't really do anything about it, so I wish...." As he trails off, his father pipes in, "That's just part of growing up."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-teenmain28.html

UI Alumnus On Florida Tech Board (Florida Today, April 27)
Florida Tech's Board of Trustees has a new leader, and he wants to increase the number of grants the professors at the university are pulling in. Allen Henry took over this week for outgoing chairman John Hartley, a retired chairman and CEO from Harris Corp., who served on the board since 1997. Henry is a retired vice president and general manger of JDS Uniphase Broadband Products. The company, headquartered in San Jose, Calif., builds and supplies transmitters for the communications industry. A very active office operates in Melbourne. Florida Tech President Anthony Catanese said he was pleased to have someone of Henry's caliber onboard. Henry has a Ph.D in engineering from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is a 31-year Brevard resident.
http://www.floridatoday.com/!NEWSROOM/localstoryA50859A.htm

Corps Recruiter Is Alumna (Chicago Tribune, April 27)
A story about the Peace Corps, which since its creation 42 years ago has sent almost 170,000 volunteers into more than 136 countries, quotes Peace Corps recruiter Jeri Titus, a former volunteer who worked in Morocco and who is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she earned a degree in English and philosophy.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/q/chi-0304270377apr27,1,4973812.story

Damasio's 'Spinoza' Reviewed (Los Angeles Times, April 27)
Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain, by ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa Medical Center and an affiliate of the Salk Institute in San Diego, is reviewed by Margaret Jacob, a professor of history at the University of California-Los Angeles and author of The Radical Enlightenment: Pantheists, Freemasons and Republicans.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/books/la-bk-jacob27apr27,1,5996251.story

Search Leads To Workshop (Los Angeles Times, April 27)
Two works are reviewed in tandem: The Stones of Summer: A Yeoman's Notes, a novel by Dow Mossman, and Stone Reader, a film written and directed by Mark Moskowitz. The film in particular chronicles Moskowitz's search for the author of the now-out-of-print Stones of Summer who had received his MFA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/books/la-bk-sanchez27apr27,1,4782163.story

Retiring Professor Is Alumnus (Holland Sentinel, April 27)
When the Class of 2003 marks the end of its Hope College tenure in May with graduation, three members of the faculty will be marking the end of theirs with retirement. Among those is Del Michel, a professor of art, who the story says completed his master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1964. The Sentinel is based in Holland, Mich.
http://www.thehollandsentinel.net/stories/042703/loc_042703020.shtml

Barrick Comments (San Antonio Express-News, April 27)
In the fight to secure airplanes against another 9-11 attack, U.S. pilots must pass psychological screening before being given a handgun. Psychological testing - which in its infancy in the late 19th century gave electric shocks to the subjects' ears to see how fast they responded - now encompasses tests of skills, aptitudes, reasoning, and personality traits. Personality tests study five key traits: conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability, openness to new experiences and degree of extroversion - with conscientiousness and emotional stability being by far the bigger indicators of success. "When you're highly conscientious and emotionally stable, you regularly come to work on time, stay with the organization longer, and are less likely to quit," says University of Iowa business professor MURRAY BARRICK. "It also has positives for society in terms of better citizenship."
http://news.mysanantonio.com/story.cfm?xla=saen&xlb=110&xlc=985768

Board Changes Policy (Omaha World-Herald, April 26)
University of Iowa athletic board members who want to go to bowl games will have to start paying their own way. The Board in Control of Athletics approved a new policy that allows only the chairman to receive free trips to postseason events. The chairman could designate another member. Board members approved the change on a 9-7 vote Thursday. The board had allowed each member and a guest to attend Iowa's game in the Orange Bowl at university expense. Some did, at an estimated cost of $2,200 a person. A committee chaired by law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ recommended the policy change. Tomkovicz said the bowl trips, for everyone but the board chairman, had "no specific university purpose."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=724293

Bill Cuts $8.4 Million From UI Budget (KETV, April 26)
The Iowa House passed a bill 51-47 Friday night that cuts $128 million from next year's state budget by taking $17.6 million from state universities and $70 million in property tax replacement funds from local governments. The bill, likely to be signed by Gov. Tom Vilsack, led to more than five hours of heated debate in the Senate early Friday before it narrowly passed 26-23. The cuts come from a Republican drafted bill developed from a controversial Reinventing Government report created by Public Strategies Group, a Minnesota consultant hired by Vilsack. The bill cuts $70 million from cities and counties and $8.4 million from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, $6.6 million from Iowa State University and $2.6 million from the University of Northern Iowa. KETV is based in Omaha. A version of the story also ran April 26 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/education/2160926/detail.html

UI: Ammo Workers Require Follow-Ups (WQAD-TV, April 26)
A new report has identified 80 workers at the Army Ammunition Plant in southeast Iowa who require follow-up care because of job-related illnesses. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA report says most of the workers suffer from exposure to beryllium. The light and very strong metal was used in the nuclear weapons that were assembled at the Middletown plant just west of Burlington from the 1940s to the 1970s. About 4,000 people worked at the plant during that time. Doctors have examined 500 people so far and still hope to see another 800. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill. A version of the story also ran April 26 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1251650&nav=1sW7FUTX

Osterberg Comments (Omaha World-Herald, April 26)
State lawmakers want to block new rules on air pollution from livestock confinements, saying the limits on hydrogen sulfide and ammonia emissions send an unwelcome message to Iowa businesses. Critics said the last-minute move sends an unfortunate message to everyone else. "What this demonstrates to the people of Iowa is that (lawmakers) don't care about neighbors that are suffering from these emissions that are not only a nuisance, but are threatening their health," said former state lawmaker DAVID OSTERBERG, a University of Iowa public health professor who was one of 27 university scientists the governor enlisted to help write the rules.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=724582

Hunnicutt Featured (WBEZ Radio, April 25)
BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a University of Iowa professor of leisure studies, was guest on Chicago Public Radio's program "Odyssey" hosted by Gretchen Helfich. The topic of the program was The Origins and Meanings of "The Weekend.

Singer Studies Internet, Journalism (Poynter.Org, April 25)
Online newspaper editors used Internet sites to pump depth and speed into their 2000 election coverage, a survey finds in the current issue of Journalism and Mass Communication Quarterly. Editors were "proud of offering breadth, depth, and utility not easily available in print," writes author JANE SINGER, assistant professor, University of Iowa. Singer adds online editors believe a newspaper's website enables them to mirror and supplement most of the news coverage found in the print edition.
http://www.poynter.org/column.asp?id=54&aid=31292

Stroke Takes UI Graduate From Medicine To Art (Newark Star Ledger, April 25)
Like a Shakespearean drama, Jon Sarkin is a play within a play. A body ravaged by a stroke; a mind that remains astonishingly unfettered. Something happened deep inside Sarkin's brain when he nearly died in a Pittsburgh hospital 14 years ago. Wires crossed, neurons fired -- no one can really explain how, exactly, it happened, just that when it did and he finally woke up, his primary impulse was to draw. A former chiropractor, the graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is now a noted artist.
http://www.nj.com/living/ledger/index.ssf?/base/living-1/105125277010870.xml

ROTC Cadets Are Wary (Chronicle Of Higher Ed., April 25)
Over the past few months, American students angered by U.S. foreign policy have walked out of classes, marched in the streets, chalked sidewalks, fasted, or even gotten arrested for civil disobedience. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, officials have been worried about harassment of supporters of the war. Instructors have stopped requiring cadets in the Reserve Officer Training Corps to wear their camouflage uniforms to class, out of concern that they might be confronted by students who oppose the war.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i33/33a03601.htm

UI Press Publishes 'Fire Road' (Chronicle, April 25)
In a Q&A about the power of art in a time of war, Donald Anderson, a professor of English, writer in residence at the U.S. Air Force Academy and editor of the journal War, Literature, and the Arts says that in his book “Fire Road” [published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS], he has a piece called "Twenty Ways of Looking at Fire," about methods of destruction. He says, "One of the things in there about the paradox of destruction goes: 'The power of the atomic bomb comes from the forces holding each atom of substance together.' That's the awful paradox of war."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i33/33a01402.htm

Filmmaker Seeks UI Alumnus (LA Weekly April 25)
Mark Moskowitz wasn't meant to be a writer, which isn't to say that he never tried. There were attempts at novels, born out of his lifelong love of reading, pages of hope accumulated, and ultimately abandoned, in some dusty drawer. Moskowitz's true — and no less noble — calling would turn out to be filmmaking, though even that muse was late in coming. Little did he suspect, when he set out in search of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP alumnus Dow Mossman — putting on hold a prolific career as a producer of television political-campaign ads — he would end up with a feature-length documentary film. Stone Reader is a film about his search for Mossman, whose first and only (and long out of print) novel, The Stones of Summer, Moskowitz had picked up and just as quickly put down in 1972, but which, upon re-reading it some 25 years later, now seemed to him a masterpiece.
http://www.laweekly.com/ink/03/23/books-foundas.php

Holub Notes Airline Labor (Houston Chronicle, April 24)
American Airlines is also known for its rancorous labor-management relations. The rift may have spiked last week after it was learned the airline had created special protected pension funding and retention bonuses for some executives at the same time management was wringing huge pay cuts out of its workers in a bid to stave off bankruptcy. The conflict has put the unions in a tough position, said DAN HOLUB, director of the University of Iowa Labor Center in Iowa City. Holub believes that American's failure to reveal the bonuses and pension protections constitutes bargaining in bad faith, but he doesn't see an easy solution. "What should the unions do?" he asked. "Do they throw the whole deal out or just go with it?" Union leaders have to respond to the crisis by calling for a revote, signing off on the original vote or coming up with another solution, Holub said.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/business/1881481

Foundation Case Dismissed (Omaha World Herald, April 24)
A Franklin County District judge has dismissed the lawsuit of a farmer kicked off a leased farm that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION received as a gift from his former landlord.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=722256

Blanck Comments On Case (CNN.com, April 23)
Thousands of small companies could avoid a law requiring special accommodations for disabled workers under a ruling Tuesday by the Supreme Court. In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled against a disabled woman who contended a small company's partners and shareholders should be counted as employees. The decision mainly affects professional service companies like law firms, medical practices and accounting offices, though advocates for the disabled were split on the likely impact. "It's unfortunate that the court has taken a miserly reading of this broad civil rights law," said PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law professor specializing in the disabilities law. "Companies will think twice about whether or not they have to make an ADA accommodation." Versions of this article also appeared April 23 on the Web sites of the MODESTO (Calif.) BEE, the REGISTER-GUARD in Oregon, the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, the BALTIMORE SUN, and the SEATTLE TIMES and April 22 on the Web sites of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.cnn.com/2003/LAW/04/23/scotus.disabilities.ap/

UI 'Classroom Courtship' Ban Cited (Toronto Star, April 23)
University of California professors are contemplating a new question this spring: Does dating your student flunk the ethics test? Faculty are scheduled to vote in May on new rules, completing a process that began well before John Dwyer, the dean of UC's top law school, left amid a sex scandal last fall. A law student alleged she was sexually molested two years ago by Dwyer, after she passed out following a night of drinking with him and other students. Dwyer has acknowledged acting inappropriately but said the incident was consensual. A dating policy would make UC the latest school to ban classroom courtships, joining such institutions as the University of Michigan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Yale. A version of this story also ran April 23 on the websites of the DETROIT NEWS, the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER, the DETROIT NEWS, KVOA-TV in Arizona, CNN INTERNATIONAL, the MODESTO BEE in California, the MID COLUMBIA TRI CITY HERALD in Washington State, the TACOMA NEWS TRIBUNE in Washington State, the SACRAMENTO BEE in California, CBS NEWS, ABC NEWS, the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio, the MACON TELEPGRAPH in Georgia, the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana and WJXX-TV in Florida.
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1035781147113&call_pageid=968332188492&col=968793972154

Nelson Sentenced (Washington Times, April 23)
The widow of a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school dean was sentenced Monday to a maximum of 10 years in prison for fatally stabbing him in the heart during an argument. Phyllis Nelson, 55, was convicted last month of voluntary manslaughter in the death of Dr. Richard Nelson, 54. She could be eligible for parole in 22 months.
http://news.google.com/news?q=%22University+of+Iowa%22&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&scoring=d&start=20&sa=N&filter=0

SARS Concern Brings Student Back To UI (WQAD-TV, April 23)
Iowa college students studying in China are coming home because of the SARS outbreak. Ten students from Central College in Pella are expected back today from a city in southeast China where three cases of the respiratory disease have been identified. A student from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and another from Drake returned home earlier this week from Beijing. At least one Iowa State student has returned from Singapore, and the university has canceled summer programs in China and Thailand. An estimated 4,000 people worldwide have been infected by SARS, and about 250 have died, mostly in Asia. The United States has reported just 38 probable cases and no deaths. No cases have been reported in Iowa. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1245357

Case Against Foundation Dismissed (WQAD-TV, April 23)
A judge has dismissed a lawsuit filed by a farmer who was kicked off a leased farm that was given to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION. Larry Holtkamp of Dows claimed the foundation ignored the wishes of the owner who died in 1997. Donald Hackbarth left the farm to the foundation, and requested that the land not be sold for ten years. Holtkamp sued, seeking to force the foundation to honor the will or to pay him what he would have made farming the land. In his ruling, the judge says Holtkamp had no standing to file the lawsuit because he was not named as a beneficiary, nor was his relationship with the landlord even mentioned. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1245328&nav=1sW7FOY1

Blanck Comments On Case (Denver Post, April 23)
Thousands of small companies could avoid a law requiring special accommodations for disabled workers under a ruling Tuesday by the Supreme Court. In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled against a disabled woman who contended a small company's partners and shareholders should be counted as employees. The decision mainly affects professional service companies like law firms, medical practices and accounting offices, though advocates for the disabled were split on the likely impact. "It's unfortunate that the court has taken a miserly reading of this broad civil rights law," said PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law professor specializing in the disabilities law. "Companies will think twice about whether or not they have to make an ADA accommodation."

Court Rules for Clinic in Disability Case (The Guardian, April 22)
Thousands of small companies could avoid a law requiring special accommodations for disabled workers under a ruling Tuesday by the Supreme Court. In a 7-2 decision, the court ruled against a disabled woman who contended a small company's partners and shareholders should be counted as employees. The decision mainly affects professional service companies like law firms, medical practices and accounting offices, though advocates for the disabled were split on the likely impact. "It's unfortunate that the court has taken a miserly reading of this broad civil rights law," said PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa law professor specializing in the disabilities law. "Companies will think twice about whether or not they have to make an ADA accommodation." Versions of the article also ran April 22 on the websites of the NEW YORK TIMES, the DAYTON DAILY NEWS in Ohio, the NEWS JOURNAL in Texas and on BOSTON.COM, which carries stories from the BOSTON GLOBE and April 23 on the websites of the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, THE TENNESSEAN, NEWSDAY, the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER and the DETROIT NEWS
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-2593542,00.html

Student-Teacher Dating Policy Considered (ABCNews.com, April 22)
University of California professors are contemplating a new question this spring: Does dating your student flunk the ethics test? Faculty are scheduled to vote on new rules this spring, completing a process that began well before the dean of UC's top law school left amid a sex scandal last fall. The policy would make UC the latest school to ban the classroom courtships, joining such schools as the University of Michigan, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Yale. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of THE NEW YORK TIMES; CHICAGO TRIBUNE; BALTIMORE SUN; USA TODAY; SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE; MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE; WJXX-TV, Jacksonville, Fla.; DOYLESTOWN INTELLIGENCER, Penn.; BILOXI SUN HERALD, Miss.; LONGVIEW NEWS-JOURNAL, Texas; DAYTON DAILY NEWS, Ohio; NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE; THE GUARDIAN, U.K.; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT, Ill; KANSAS CITY STAR; TIMES-DAILY, serving Northwest Alabama; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minn.; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, S.D.; CENTRE DAILY TIMES, State College, Penn.; TUSCALOOSA NEWS, Ala.; WILKES-BARRE WEEKENDER, Penn.; SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, Fla.; GRAND FORKS HERALD, N.D.; and YAHOO NEWS.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20030422_193.html

Open Heart Surgery Study Noted (Tallahassee Democrat, April 22)
In an opinion piece about an Open Heart Certificate of Need exemption bill before the Florida Legislature that would regulate who does open-heart surgery, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study is noted, undesirable outcomes such as complications and death are 20 percent more likely to occur in areas that do not regulate open-heart surgery through a Certificate of Need process. This study proves volume equals quality and success rates. The newspaper serves Tallahassee, Fla.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/opinion/5683798.htm

Air, Water Quality Rules Set (Omaha World Herald, April 22)
The State Environmental Protection Commission approved final rules Monday designed to protect air and water quality from contamination from such sources as hog lots, factories and sewage plants. "The ambient air standard is designed to protect human health for the weakest among us, the elderly and the very young," said Wayne Gieselman, Environmental Services Division administrator. He said Iowa is the latest of several states to adopt air quality standards for hydrogen sulfide and ammonia. A year ago, Gov. Tom Vilsack asked the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University to recommend standards for hydrogen sulfide and ammonia to protect the health of rural Iowans, Gieselman said. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=720027

Nelson Sentenced (New York Times, April 22)
The widow of a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical school dean was sentenced Monday to a maximum of 10 years in prison for fatally stabbing him in the heart during an argument. Phyllis Nelson, 55, was convicted last month of voluntary manslaughter in the death of Dr. Richard Nelson, 54. She could be eligible for parole in 22 months. The Associated Press story also appeared on the websites of THE NEW YORK TIMES; BALTIMORE SUN; SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE; LONGVIEW NEWS-JOURNAL, Texas; FORT WAYNE JOURNAL-GAZETTE, Ind.; ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS, S.D.; AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio; NEW YORK NEWSDAY; BILOXI SUN HERALD, Miss.; COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER, Ga.; DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, Minn.; GRAND FORKS HERALD, N.D.; TUSCALOOSA NEWS, Ala.; WILKES-BARRE WEEKENDER, Penn.; KANSAS CITY STAR; BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT, Ill; THE GUARDIAN, U.K.; SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, Fla.; NEW ORLEANS TIMES-PICAYUNE; DAYTON DAILY NEWS, Ohio; WICHITA EAGLE, Kan.; TIMES-DAILY, serving Northwest Alabama; KETV, Omaha, Neb.; the OMAHA WORLD HERALD; and YAHOO NEWS.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Doctor-Stabbed.html (registration required)

UI Tuition Hike Cited (New York Times, April 21)
A story about the desperation of states struggling with their worst financial crises since World War II says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA increased tuition by 18 percent - the largest increase in two decades. A version of the story also ran April 21 on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/21/national/21ECON.html

UI Reaches Diversity Goal (Omaha World Herald, April 21)
Iowa's three public universities have spent more than $24 million a year trying to recruit and retain minority students, and their work may soon become more difficult. The schools have been working toward the Board of Regents, State of Iowa current goal of 8.5 percent minority enrollment. However, only the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has reached the goal. A version of the story also ran April 21 on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=719330

Author Attended Writers' Workshop (WQAD-TV, April 21)
A writer who spent two years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has put his own experience in the Persian Gulf War into a book that's getting a lot of attention. Anthony Swofford of Portland, Oregon, is the author of "Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles." As he wrapped up his time at IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 2001, he realized a character he created named 'Swofford' was him. In the book, he recounts the monotony of waiting, the grind of long hikes with 100-pound backpacks and the fear each time "Gas!" was shouted to signal a suspected Scud missile.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1241632&nav=1sW7FLc9

Sentencing Is Today In Nelson Case (WQAD-TV, April 21)
An Iowa City woman convicted in the death of her husband is scheduled to be sentenced today in Linn County District Court in Cedar Rapids. Fifty-five-year-old Phyllis Nelson was found guilty last month of voluntary manslaughter. Her husband, Richard Nelson, was a dean at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S MEDICAL SCHOOL. He was stabbed to death in his apartment in Cedar Rapids in December 2001. The Nelsons were in the middle of a divorce.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1241608&nav=1sW7FLb6

UI Gets Development Funds (Omaha World-Herald, April 20)
A story about how Iowa State University officials are worried that the linchpin of their economic plan for Ames and the state of Iowa was left out of the $890 million economic development initiative announced last week in the Legislature says that under Gov. Tom Vilsack's plan ISU and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are guaranteed at least $10 million for business incubators, transgenic plant and animal facilities, protein extraction and other facilities.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=718349

UI Lab May Test Lakes (Omaha World-Herald, April 20)
Some of the state's recreational lakes will face tougher water-quality standards this year, state inspectors say. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABRATORY will test a second sample if any samples from the 27 less-vulnerable swimming areas top the limit.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=718559

Student OK After Accident (Omaha World Herald, April 20)
A couple of bumps on the head were the only injuries a car driver and passenger received after being dragged a half-mile down Interstate 80 by a semitrailer. Andrea Harmon, a 21-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, was driving a Saturn sedan with passenger Colin Dooley, 22, of Coralville on Friday when the accident happened. Harmon said she was merging into traffic from a ramp in Coralville when she collided with the truck. A version of the story also ran April 21 on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=718794

ZZ Packer Is UI Alumna (Alameda Times Star, April 20)
A feature on author ZZ Packer, whose debut collection of short stories, "Drinking Coffee Elsewhere," was released in March, says Packer watched friends and other fellow graduates of the famed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP make the jump from the literati radar screen to mainstream recognition. The story also notes that in February, the workshop, a graduate program of the University of Iowa, was awarded a National Humanities Medal by President Bush "for serving as an incubator of literary talent and critical brilliance." The Star is based in Oakland, Calif.
http://www.timesstar.com/Stories/0,1413,125~1549~1338773,00.html

Resident Cited (Omaha World Herald, April 19)
A listing of cases heard by the Iowa Board of Medical Examiners includes that of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA anesthesiology resident who has been put on probation for five years to settle allegations that he acted unethically, and that mental problems harmed his ability to practice medicine safely. Board documents say University Hospitals and Clinics temporarily relieved Dr. Jeffrey Joyce, 31, of clinical duties last summer and ordered him to have a mental evaluation, then allowed him to resume work under probation. Under the separate, state-licensing probation, he must continue to undergo counseling, abstain from drinking during the workweek and have his work supervised by another doctor
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=717876

Steads Donate $25 Million (Omaha World Herald, April 19)
A 1965 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business graduate has made a $25 million gift commitment to the school's business college, school officials said Friday. The gift from Jerre Stead and his wife, Mary Joy, includes outright gifts totaling $1.4 million, to be paid over the next seven years. The money also will go toward a new endowed faculty chair in leadership, support for the STEAD TECHNOLOGY CENTER, prominent speakers for the college's Executive MBA program, and support for maintenance of the business building. The Steads, who live in Scottsdale, Ariz., are natives of Maquoketa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=717927

Kerber Quoted (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 19)
A writer argues that linking merit raises to outside offers may discriminate against female professors with families. Besides being potentially illegal, practices inconsistent with gender equality are often inefficient as well, she says. Linking raises to outside offers "wastes a lot of intellectual energy," observes LINDA KERBER, a historian at the University of Iowa. "It is colleagues who hire and colleagues who have to decide whom to recruit. If we are doing that because there's a realistic opportunity of strengthening our department," it is a worthwhile expenditure of energy. But the practice of linking raises to outside offers ensures that departments spend a lot of energy on candidates who don't really want to move; they just want a raise where they are.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i32/32c00501.htm

UI As Tour Stop? (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 18)
A columnist writing about the Milwaukee Symphony's financial woes proposes it take part - along with the The Minnesota Orchestra and the St. Louis Symphony - in a "Great Orchestras of the Great Midwest" project. In round-robin fashion, the writer says, the MSO would play in the Twin Cities while the St. Louis Symphony plays in Milwaukee and the Minnesota Orchestra plays in St. Louis. The next weekend, everyone rotates. Another way to amortize cost is to spread it around university campuses, he says: The University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Minnesota, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Missouri, Illinois State University and the University of Illinois are all en route.
http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/arts/apr03/134440.asp

Chicken Pox Strain Patented (Omaha World-Herald, April 18)
Scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have patented the first-known mutant strain of chicken pox to help them develop new diagnostic tests and a possible vaccine.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=716849

UI Influence On Author Noted (USA Today, April 17)
“ Jarhead,” a morally questioning soldier's story from the 1991 Gulf War that gained resonance during the new war with Iraq, is the latest selection of the USA Today Book Club. Anthony Swofford, who served as a Marine sniper, started writing his memoir, published last month, a decade after the war. “Jarhead” takes its title from the Marines' "high and tight" haircut. It's full of obscenities but is literary as well, reflecting Swofford's years as a student and teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/news/2003-04-17-jarhead-bookclub_x.htm

Foundation Increases Fees (Omaha World Herald, April 16)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Foundation will begin charging increased fees for its fund-raising services in the budget year that begins July 1. A five percent fee on all nonendowed gifts received by university departments and colleges is necessary to pay for the foundation's services and costs, officials said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=714522

Slave Document Is 'Stunning' (Kansas City Star, April 16)
A story about the discovery in Missouri of over 4 million historic court records by and about African-American slaves says that before this cache of documents was discovered, historians had no idea how many slaves had put their faith, and their fates, in the courts. They thought Dred Scott was an anomaly. Now they are uncovering evidence of an underground grapevine that passed word about the freedom suits from slave to slave, emboldening men and women, and even teen-age children, to sue. Dozens won their cases, persuading juries of 12 white men to set them free. A few even won damages against their masters. "This is a stunning find. It's just phenomenal," said LEA VANDERVELDE, a law professor at the University of Iowa who is writing a book on the freedom suits.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/entertainment/5638914.htm

Entertainment Reporter Dies (Contra Costa Times, April 16)
Entertainment journalist Tom King, who wrote the Wall Street Journal's influential "Hollywood Journal" column and a bestselling biography of Hollywood mogul David Geffen, died Sunday. He was 39. A native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, King joined the Journal as a news assistant in December 1986, after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Mr. King was in the Hamptons in New York visiting Jeffrey Seller, producer of the Broadway hit "Rent" and others. Seller said Mr. King had been in good spirits but complained of a headache, although it seemed nothing out of the ordinary. Seller said he discovered Mr. King shortly before 8 a.m. Sunday collapsed on a bathroom floor. Mr. King was taken to Southampton Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the exact cause of death.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/news/5645052.htm

UI Journalism Alumnus Tom King Dies (Gay.com, April 16)
A story about the death of Wall Street Journal entertainment journalist says King, originally from Cedar Rapids, started at The Wall Street Journal as a news assistant in 1986, after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. His first job as a reporter for the paper started in 1989 when he was assigned to cover the advertising industry. Gay.com is a news and information website based in the UK. A version of the story also ran on the website of Planet Out.
http://uk.gay.com/headlines/4153

Student Cleans Whale Bones(Anchorage Daily News, April 16)
There's been lots of jawboning in Whitby, England, lately, about jawbones from Barrow, Alaska -- two 16-foot, 350-pound remnants of a bowhead whale that have finally been installed as an arch at the historic seaport. The whale was taken in the fall of 1996. The bones lay on the beach for about four years. Regulations for transporting the bones required that they be dry and clean. In fall 2000, the bones had been steam-cleaned and covered in plastic wrap in Barrow, but algae and mildew developed as the bones waited there through 18 months of permitting hassles. In stepped Claire Knudsen-Latta, now a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who volunteered to oversee the cleaning to satisfy part of the requirements for a Girl Scout Gold Award.
http://www.adn.com/alaska/story/2953008p-2987595c.html

Savan Is Alumnus (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 15)
A story on his death April 14 at 49 of Glenn Savan, author of the best-selling novel "White Palace," which was made into a movie of the same name, says Savan, who had been suffering from Parkinson's disease and other degenerative joint ailments, received a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S PRESTIGIOUS WRITER'S WORKSHOP in 1982.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/entertainment/DFA78ED2B8E699DD86256D09004B15C6?OpenDocument&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa&headline=%22White+Palace%22+author's+work+was+edgy,+thoughtful

Student Treated At UI (St. Catharine's Standard, April 15)
A story about 18-year-old Andy Gindroz, who has a brain tumor, says that on Thursday he and his parents will return to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City to meet with specialists who are trying to determine how best to rid the young man of the non-cancerous growth. He will have an MRI to see if the walnut-sized tumor, which was discovered about 19 months ago, has grown since his last visit three months ago. No increase means doctors will have more time to determine his treatment. If it has grown, risky surgery to cut out a large portion of the growth may become necessary. The Standard is based in Ontario.
http://www.stcatharinesstandard.ca/webapp/sitepages/content.asp?contentid=29075&catname=Local+News

Child Treated At UI (KETV, April 15)
A Columbus Junction boy found in a running washing machine at his family's home has died. Police found Andrew Alarcon, 3, on Sunday after his parents reported him missing. The child was flown to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City. Louisa County Sheriff Curt Braby said he was in critical condition and later died. Braby said the boy apparently climbed on top of the dryer and then ended up inside the washing machine. KETV is based in Omaha.
http://www.theomahachannel.com/news/2113557/detail.html

Entertainment Journalist Tom King Dies (Los Angeles Times, April 15)
Entertainment journalist Tom King, who wrote the Wall Street Journal's influential ``Hollywood Journal'' column and a bestselling biography of Hollywood mogul David Geffen, died Sunday. He was 39. A native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, King joined the Journal as a news assistant in December 1986, after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Mr. King was in the Hamptons in New York visiting Jeffrey Seller, producer of the Broadway hit ``Rent'' and others. Seller said Mr. King had been in good spirits but complained of a headache, although it seemed nothing out of the ordinary. Seller said he discovered Mr. King shortly before 8 a.m. Sunday collapsed on a bathroom floor. Mr. King was taken to Southampton Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. An autopsy will be conducted to determine the exact cause of death.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-king15apr15,1,5017813.story
The story also appeared April 15 in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

Columnist Tom King Dies (New York Times, April 15)
Tom King, the Hollywood columnist of The Wall Street Journal, died on Sunday while he was visiting friends on Long Island, The Journal reported yesterday. He was 39 and lived in Los Angeles. The cause of death was not known, pending an autopsy. A native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Mr. King earned a bachelor's in journalism and mass communication from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986, the year he joined The Journal in New York as a news assistant. Two years later he became a staff reporter covering advertising agencies.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/15/obituaries/15KING.htmlPublic

Health Program Noted (Erie News-Times, April 15)
Veterinarians are increasingly being trained to recognize and report diseases that can be passed from animals to humans. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has trained hundreds of veterinarians across the nation to diagnose animal diseases that are found in other parts of the world but are rare or unknown in the United States. Another sign that animal and human health are linked: Iowa State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA recently began a program in which students can get a dual degree in veterinary medicine and public health. The News-Times is based in Erie, Penn.
http://goerie.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GE&Date=20030415&Category=NEWS06&ArtNo=104150289&Ref=AR
Versions of the article also ran April 14 on the websites of the NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA NEWS and KYW-TV in Philadelphia, and the DOYLESTOWN INTELLIGENCER, Penn.

Indian Law Seminar Held at UI (Indian Country Today, April 15)
Overhauling federal Indian law could be in tribes' best interests, but not without extensive review of existing statutes, and not if it's done by the Department of Interior, legal scholars say. "I think it's a very valuable academic project, but can we trust it to the government? Absolutely not," said Frank Pommersheim, Professor at the University Of South Dakota School Of Law and Associate Justice for the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Supreme Court. Pommersheim, author of "Braid of Feathers" (American Indian Law and Contemporary Tribal Life), was joined by six other Indian Law scholars presenting at the Indigenous Nations Law Symposium held March 14 at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. Professor Robert Odawi Porter, enrolled Seneca Nation of Indians, called the symposium because he was curious what other legal scholars were thinking about proposed changes to United States Code Title 25 - Indian law. http://www.indiancountry.com/article/1050332538

Iraqi Poetry Collection Noted (The Scotsman, April 15)
In a review of poetry, the author notes, "Some of the best recent Iraqi poetry has been collected in a special edition of Daniel Weissbort's redoubtable Modern Poetry in Translation, edited by Saadi Simawe who served a jail sentence for opposition to the Baath Party before moving to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's celebrated writing workshop."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=660091851c0a4bd728a537a9cea66864&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlAl&_md5=4a4f67e2e6e574d7875b7bb14453a637

Poet to Read (Northwest Arkansas Morning News, April 15)
Award-winning poet Gerald Stern will read Wednesday in Giffels Auditorium on the University of Arkansas campus. For many years, he was a teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.nwaonline.net/282301987163581.bsp

Cain Quoted About Taxes (The Advocate, April 15)
UI law professor PATRICIA CAIN was quoted in a story about how antigay bias carries over into the federal tax code. "Straight people can choose to get married or stay single, depending on what's advantageous for them taxwise. For gay people there's no choice," she said. She also points out that gay couples can claim unequal treatment on behalf of Vermont's same-sex couples law if they have been joined in a civil ceremony in the state. The story appears only in the print edition of the magazine.

Research Foundation Gets Patent (Science Daily, April 14)
The University of Iowa Research Foundation has been issued a patent for the first-known mutant chicken pox virus. The initial discovery was made in 1998 by CHARLES GROSE, M.D., UI professor of pediatrics and director of the UI Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, and Richard Santos, M.D., Ph.D., a graduate of the UI Medical Scientist Training Program and now a resident in internal medicine at Washington University in St. Louis. The U.S. Patent 6,528,066 was issued on March 4. The patent is useful for the potential development of a new diagnostic test for chicken pox, Grose said. The current chicken pox diagnostic test has been available since 1984 and cannot screen for the mutant form. Until Grose and Santos' finding, chicken pox was thought to be the same strain worldwide.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2003/04/030416090245.htm

UI Alumnus Tom King Dies (Reuters, April 14)
Tom King, a longtime Hollywood reporter at the Wall Street Journal and author of a controversial biography of David Geffen, has died. He was 39. King, who worked in the Journal's Los Angeles bureau, collapsed and died Sunday morning while visiting friends on Long Island, according to a memo by Paul Steiger, the Journal's managing editor. King was a native of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986 with a bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communication.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=2565202
The story also appeared in YAHOO NEWS.

Keyser Comments on Network Software (Computerworld, April 14)
The University of Iowa expects to migrate from NetWare (a network server operating system ) to Windows servers within two years. But according to systems administrator KEVIN KEYSER, that decision was made by senior management, not by the people who know and use the product. "So far, nobody who is a user or works at the administrative level is in a hurry to get off NetWare," Keyser said. "I hate Windows, personally, since we spend our lives nursing it with daily restarts. "Novell needs to get the mind share of CIOs and CEOs," Keyser said, "just as Microsoft has done by flying top executives to events to sell them."
http://www.computerworld.com/networkingtopics/networking/story/0,10801,80264,00.html

Souaiaia To Teach Islamic Course (WQAD-TV, April 14)
The University of Iowa plans to hire its first tenure-track faculty member to teach Islamic studies courses. University officials have reported a rise in student interest in Islam following the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on the United States. The religious studies department hopes to announce the appointment in March 2004. The school has hired professor AHMED SOUAIAIA on a one-year contract to teach Islamic studies until the new professor is hired. A version of the story also ran April 14 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1231299&nav=1sW7FDXI

Lee Studies Elderly Depression (Dr.Koop.com, April 14)
Screening elderly patients in an outpatient eye clinic may be an effective way to monitor them for dementia, depression and functional impairment, shows a new pilot study. Researchers from the University of Iowa screened 50 eye clinic outpatients by asking them to complete a questionnaire regarding their daily living activities, to answer a question on depression, and to complete a simple clock-drawing task to monitor for dementia. Twelve percent of the study participants showed signs of functional impairment, 20 percent showed signs of depression, and 20 percent had signs of dementia. ANDREW G. LEE, M.D., from the University of Iowa, says, "Early detection can help patients obtain early treatment and help the quality of life for both patients and their caretakers. Unfortunately, very little screening is done now." A version of the same story also ran April 14 on the websites of HEALTHCENTRAL, Orlando, Fla.-based IVANHOE BROADCAST NEWS, the country's largest television news-gathering organization covering medical breakthroughs, family health and consumer news for women.
http://drkoop.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=93&id=8005928

Perlman Praises SARS Expert (Knoxville News-Sentinel, April 14)
A Vanderbilt University physician who studies the viruses believed responsible for the deadly SARS outbreak is helping health officials and the public better understand the disease. Since the outbreak began a couple of weeks ago, Dr. Mark Denison says he has spent about six hours a day consulting with national health officials and journalists about coronaviruses. "If there's an acronym of a news organization, I've talked to it," Denison told The Tennessean newspaper in Nashville. "CNN, CBS, NBC, ABC. ... " Dr. STANLEY PERLMAN, an infectious disease expert on coronaviruses at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, said Denison's understanding of the molecular biology of coronaviruses and his skill in pediatric infectious diseases makes him "an ideal kind of expert" to study SARS. The News-Sentinel is based in Tennessee.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/state/article/0,1406,KNS_348_1886607,00.html

Baldus Comments On Death Penalty Study (Washington Post, April 14)
A story about how the death penalty debate has stalled in the Maryland General Assembly cites University of Maryland criminologist Raymond Paternoster's study, released in January, of nearly 6,000 homicide cases across the state from 1978 to 1999. The study concluded that prosecutors were far more likely to pursue the death penalty for black suspects charged with killing white victims. Paternoster also found that geography was a major factor in determining whether a suspect faced a capital charge. Numerous lawmakers pushed for further review of the research. University of Iowa law professor DAVID C. BALDUS, who has studied Maryland's system, said he expects the reaction would have been far different had Paternoster found significant disparity flowing from defendants' backgrounds. While the distinctions shouldn't matter legally -- "both violate the Constitution," Baldus said -- "a claim based on the race of the defendant carries much greater weight from a moral standpoint than disparity based on the race of the victim."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19329-2003Apr13.html

SARS Research Gained Interest At UI (The Tennessean, April 13)
A feature on Dr. Mark Denison says he studied coronaviruses for 11 years at Vanderbilt University Medical Center until a couple of weeks ago, when SARS - severe acute respiratory syndrome - reared its head. Suspected of being a coronavirus and a relative of the type that causes the common cold, SARS has been blamed for 119 deaths and 2,960 illnesses worldwide. Ever since, Denison's labors have continually been interrupted by consultations with national health officials and calls from TV and print journalists. In the past two weeks, the Nashville professor and pediatrician has spent an average of six hours a day at these extra duties and trying to keep up with his regular work ''after my family has gone to bed.'' Denison, a native of Kansas City, said he began studying coronaviruses while working on an infectious disease fellowship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS and ended up ''getting fascinated'' with the unique biology of a ''sort of unknown virus'' that was a side project of some of his colleagues at the time.
http://www.tennessean.com/local/archives/03/04/31533361.shtml?Element_ID=31533361

Blizek Opposes 21-Only Ordinance (Arizona Republic, April 13)
There is a new group in town with a new focus: stopping a proposed Iowa City ordinance that bans underage patrons from entering bars. "Right now we are calling it Students Against the 21-only Ordinance," said MATT BLIZEK, 22, former University of Iowa Student Government vice president.

Hunnicutt Comments On Job Switches (Cincinnati Enquirer, April 13)
A story about a growing trend among people in high-power, high-salaried and high-stress jobs to switch to less demanding jobs quotes BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. "This is a trend limited primarily to middle- and upper-income people, management types," he says. "It hasn't percolated down below that."

UI Activities Are A Draw For Retirees (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 13)
Many boomers apparently have no intention of riding off into the sunset -- or Sun Cities -- when they retire. Large numbers of them are staying put, with fewer than one in 20 moving across state or county lines to relocate, according to a recent AARP survey. But for those who do move, many are looking to college towns or places in the new West to reinvent their lives and continue, according to the survey. In the May/June issue of AARP the Magazine, feature editor Ron Geraci and his staff looked at dozens of towns and chose 15 that were considered ideal for retirees. One of the 15 places was Iowa City, which the magazine describes as "perched on the Iowa River (with) a small-town atmosphere that has big-city attractions, from football games to literary functions on the campus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/living/0403/13retire.html

Student Writes About War Protests (Chicago Tribune, April 12)
JOSH NICHOLS, a freshman at the University of Iowa, writes in a letter to the editor: " Since becoming a student at the University of Iowa, one of the most liberal colleges in the nation, I have experienced many things in a short amount of time. More than anything else, protesting has become the most annoying. The thing that makes me the angriest is the lack of respect for our president. Were we protesting the war or the man who made the decision of war?"
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/letters/chi-0304120028apr12,1,3719434.story

UI Business Alumna Named CEO (Valley News Dispatch, April 12)
A feature on Cindy K. Schamp being named chief executive officer of the Alle-Kiski Medical Center -- part of the West Penn Allegheny Health System - includes a sidebar that says Schamp holds a bachelor's degree in gerontology/business administration from the University of Oregon and a master's degree in health administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Dispatch is based in Tarentum, Penn.
http://www.pittsburghlive.com/x/valleynewsdispatch/news/s_129015.html

Wilkins Comments On Deeded Body Program (Omaha World-Herald, April 12)
The city and the University of Iowa plan to expand a memorial for those who have donated their bodies to the university for research. The small site at Oakland Cemetery, which has been used since 1967, is full. DARRELL WILKINS, director of the university deeded body program, said one grave site is used each year. He said that while 65 to 80 bodies are memorialized at the local cemetery annually, there is no room to list all the names. "But there are individual containers for each year, and families can place flowers on the site marker," he said. About 210 people donate their body to the university for research annually, Wilkins said. He said some families choose to keep the ashes at other locations.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=711040

UI Dorm Rates To Go Up (Omaha World-Herald, April 12)
The cost of living in dormitories at Iowa's three public universities will increase next year. The Board of Regents, State of Iowa on Thursday approved increases in the price of double-occupancy dorm room and full meal plans at the three schools. Rates for the 2003-04 school year will increase 8.5 percent at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, 14.3 percent at Iowa State University and 6 percent at the University of Northern Iowa. With the increase, the cost of the dorm room and meal package will be $5,701 at Iowa, $5,740 at ISU and $4,918 at Northern Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=711022

UI Would Get Tech Advisor (Omaha World Herald, April 11)
Two new advisers would be hired - one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and one at Iowa State University - to advise the state on ways to create new businesses from technology being developed at the schools under a new economic development plan proposed by legislative Republicans.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=709967

Alumnus’ Murals Adorn School (Daily Southtown, April 11)
Six brightly painted murals greet students and visitors as they walk through the stately entrance of Bloom Township High School, a national historic site in Chicago Heights. The Depression-era murals are the work of the late fresco painter Edgar Britton, who studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with artist Grant Wood. Britton was commissioned by the Works Progress Administration to create the frescoes shortly after the school opened in 1934, according to the Illinois Historic Preservation Agency.
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/yrtwn/swest/111swyt5.htm

UI ROTC Incident Cited (San Francisco Chronicle, April 10)
Military ROTC officials report few incidences of trouble since the start of the war in Iraq. One of the rare conflicts has been vandalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s Army ROTC building that prompted officials to temporarily grant cadets the option of not wearing uniforms on campus.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2003/04/10/national1444EDT0713.DTL

Billett: Tracking Stocks Complex (New York Times, April 10)
General Motors, the originator of tracking stock, is retiring its last such issue in a deal that treats G.M. quite differently from the investors who bought the stock. G.M. will get $3.3 billion in cash, and a stake in the News Corporation, Rupert Murdoch's holding company, from the disposal of Hughes Electronics, whose principal asset is the DirecTV satellite television business. Members of the public who invested in Hughes through G.M. Class H shares will get a quite different deal, consisting of stock in Hughes and in the News Corporation, but no cash. Tracking stock was supposed to be a bit like real stock, but not exactly. Legally, it was stock in the parent company, but it was entitled to dividends based on the operations of a part of the company. The parent company would report earnings for that subsidiary, and it was hoped that investors would value the tracking stock in a different manner from that of the parent, increasing the overall market value of the parent company. MATTHEW T. BILLETT, an assistant professor of finance at the University of Iowa who has studied tracking shares, said yesterday that many companies that have eliminated tracking stocks have pointed to the advantages of a simplified capital structure. "They said it created too much complexity and confused investors," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2003/04/10/business/10PLAC.html

Writer Is UI Alumnus (Harare Daily News, April 10)
Three acclaimed, contemporary Zimbabwean authors, renowned for the gritty honesty of their books take the stage tonight at the Book Café to read excerpts from recent writings. A special evening indeed with Shimmer Chinodya, Rory Kilalea and Virginia Phiri. What really links these three is that they are held in exceptionally high esteem by their contemporaries – writers and critics – as modern Zimbabwean authors who confront, in a deeply personal way, unusually “thorny” social and political themes. After attending school at Goromonzi and graduating from the University of Zimbabwe, Shimmer Chinodya gained his MA in Creative Writing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1985. Harvest of Thorns, his fourth novel, won a prize for the best novel in the Africa Section of the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize in 1990. (The newspaper is based in Zimbabwe.)
http://www.dailynews.co.zw/daily/2003/April/April10/11889.html

Iowa City Passes New Fine (Omaha World Herald, April 10)
People younger than 21 would be fined $250 for being in a bar after 10 p.m. under an ordinance given preliminary approval Tuesday. The City Council voted 5-2 to approve the ordinance on first reading with the measure to become effective Aug. 1, just as UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students prepare to start their fall semester.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=708903

Ex-Marine Is Workshop Graduate (Chicago Tribune, April 10)
Watching TV coverage of the war in Iraq, Anthony Swofford says, he can identify with "the fatigue, the fear" and above all the boredom of the young combatants. He remembers himself as a rah-rah, blood-lusting 20-year-old Marine recruit for whom the nastiest bits of "Platoon" and "Full Metal Jacket" were "like pornography" -- sexy and addictive. A veteran of the first Gulf War, his memoir is, "Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles." He says the gulf war reminiscence genre is still pretty much an open field. He's grateful to one of his former instructors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP for suggesting the subject, which he admits he'd been trying to dodge ever since he started writing fiction in community college several years ago, after flailing around unsuccessfully trying to become a banker. "It was tough emotionally" to write, Swofford says. "I mean, I was as desperate and as full of despair as I say I was in the end of the book."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0304100083apr10,1,3914602.story

Report Finds Slow Response (CNN-SI.com, April 10)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA responded slowly and, at times, poorly to a female student who was assaulted last fall by basketball player Pierre Pierce, according to a faculty report issued Wednesday.
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/basketball/college/news/2003/04/09/pierce_report_ap/

UI Alumnus Pleads Guilty (Minneapolis Star Tribune, April 9)
Marvin Goldstein, a former senior executive with Dayton Hudson Corp. and a prominent Twin Cities investor, pleaded guilty Tuesday to two counts of securities fraud for his role in an insider trading scheme focused on convicted stock felon George Kline. Goldstein has been part of the Twin Cities business community since 1966, when he joined the Dayton Co. as a merchandise trainee in Minneapolis after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/3813315.html

Hart Speaks At UI (Omaha World-Herald, April 9)
The Bush administration has been deceptive about the goals and costs of the war in Iraq to hide a much more ambitious agenda, former Sen. Gary Hart said Tuesday. Hart also said Bush has failed to shore up the nation's defenses against what he called an inevitable terrorist attack in response to the war. "We are kicking open a hornet's nest," Hart said. Hart, a former senator from Colorado, was using meetings with Democratic activists and a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to spell out his opposition to the war, which he said comes largely because Bush has been less than candid.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=707556

Writer Murray Attended UI Workshop (San Francisco Chronicle, April 9)
A story about John Murray, a doctor specializing in international health and epidemiology as well as a fiction writer whose first collection of short stories, "A Few Short Notes on Tropical Butterflies" has just been published by HarperCollins, says the stories were written in the town the Australian-born Murray has made his home base -- for now -- Iowa City, Iowa, where he lives with his wife and children after a happy stint at the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "We stayed on (in Iowa) because we have two young kids and it's a good place to raise kids," he says.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/04/09/DD226643.DTL

Cruz Wins Pulitzer (Hartford Courant, April 8)
The 2003 Pulitzer Prize for drama went to "Anna in the Tropics" by Nilo Cruz, a lecturer in playwriting at Yale University in New Haven. Cruz has also taught at Brown University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Courant serves Hartford, Conn.
http://www.ctnow.com/entertainment/stage/hc-pulitzerarts.artapr08,0,1519289.story?coll=hc-ent-headlines-breaking

State Funding Examined (Omaha World Herald, April 8)
It's too soon to tell whether a bill that adds $25 million to the Iowa Board of Regents' operating budget for next year will be enough to avoid budget cuts or another tuition increase, a regents spokeswoman said. Under the bill approved by the House last week, the money for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa would come from the state's general fund. In exchange, the schools agreed not to ask for any money for salary increases, which would cost up to $24 million under the latest negotiated contract. The bill goes to the Senate. Despite assurances from majority Republicans that the state appropriation would provide stable funding, the full effect is not yet known, regents spokeswoman Barbara Boose said. Democrats and regents have warned that it could force cuts or tuition increases because it does not replace the $25 million in one-time funding legislators used to cover university salaries this year, Boose said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=706208

Author Recalls Gulf War (Alameda Times-Star, April 7)
Anthony Swofford author of "Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles" acknowledges that the Gulf War reminiscence genre is still pretty much an open field. He's grateful to one of his former instructors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP for suggesting the subject, which he admits he'd been trying to dodge ever since he started writing fiction in community college several years ago, after flailing around unsuccessfully trying to become a banker. The Times-Star newspaper serves Alameda, Calif. http://www.timesstar.com/Stories/0,1413,125~1549~1307239,00.html
The article also appeared April 6 on the website of the MEMPHIS COMMERCIAL APPEAL http://www.gomemphis.com/mca/screens/article/0,1426,MCA_511_1860779,00.html

Author Reads (Oregon State U. Daily Barometer, April 7)
Pulitzer Prize winning author of "The Hours," Michael Cunningham will be reading some of his work at Oregon State University and discussing his career Monday at the LaSells Stewart Center. Cunningham, a 1999 Pulitzer Prize winner, also won the 1982 Michener Fellowship Award from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://barometer.orst.edu/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/04/07/3e91972d9d8ed

ROTC Uniform Day Noted (Portland Oregonian, April 7)
At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, ROTC students were advised not to wear their uniforms for fear of harassment or unnecessary confrontations. Not so at Oregon State University, where Thursday is uniform day, and the routine remains the same. Except now, ROTC students are keenly aware of two comrades killed in action. http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/news/1049716643293180.xml

Ross Comments On Harkin, Presidential Forums (Boston Globe, April 7)
U.S. Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) has yet to endorse a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination, and he said he wants to remain an ''honest broker'' as he plays host to the candidates. Nonetheless, arranging forums in Iowa and making it hard for the candidates to avoid them will inevitably boost Harkin's stature and make him someone the candidates ignore at their peril. ''I think that's his motivation, almost entirely,'' said RUSSELL ROSS, professor emeritus at the University of Iowa and past chairman of the school's political science department. ''This is something that is relatively new and unusual.''
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/097/nation/Democrats_test_waters_in_homespun_Iowa_forums+.shtml

Emeritus Professor Opposes Muslim Camp (Chicago Tribune, April 7)
A story about a dispute over plans by the Muslim Youth Camps of America, a nonprofit group in nearby Cedar Rapids, to use a former Girl Scout summer camp as the site of a 17,500-square-foot conference center, 10 cabins, a caretaker's residence and a 36-foot prayer tower says that JERRY KUHN of Iowa City wrote to the Army Corps of Engineers that the camp could provide camouflage for terrorist training or attacks. He pointed to nearby dams, a nuclear power plant and athletic events at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as potential targets in a letter he sent to the corps and Iowa congressmen. "This is in no way to suggest that the application group is connected to terrorists," wrote Kuhn, a World War II veteran and retired University of Iowa professor. "Rather, they could easily, unwillingly and unknowingly, provide cover in an area where law enforcement is already inadequate."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0304070175apr07,1,2023082.story

Squire Comments (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, April 6)
Since the war in Iraq began, Democratic Presidential candidate Howard Dean has stepped up his anti-war rhetoric while other candidates are taking a more cautious approach. Dean's unrestrained opposition has drawn campaign contributions and endeared him to many Democrats, particularly activists in Iowa and New Hampshire, site of the first nomination contests next year. " Dean has really solidified his position as the leading voice in the anti-war community," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "It's been a way to energize his campaign, given that he doesn't have a lot of money to start with." The Sun-Sentinel is based in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/nationworld/iraq/sfl-awarpolitics06apr06.story

UI Alumnus Cited In College Dispute (Marin Independent Journal, April 6)
A story about a vote of no confidence leveled last week at College of Marin President James Middleton says Middleton received a doctorate in English language and literature at the University of Michigan, and three other graduate degrees in English and higher education from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Leeds in England. The Journal is based in Novato, Calif.
http://www.marinij.com/Stories/0,1413,234~24407~1303995,00.html

Author Cunningham Is UI Alumnus (Tacoma News Tribune, April 6)
A feature on novelist Michael Cunningham says he received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1980. The Tribune is based in Tacoma, Wash.
http://www.tribnet.com/entertainment/story/2899215p-2934768c.html

Iowa Sued In Stuttering Case (Boston Globe, April 6)
The state of Iowa has been sued on behalf of five orphans who were ''taught'' to stutter as part of research conducted by a renowned speech pathologist in 1939. The six-month research project at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was led by the late Wendell Johnson. He induced stuttering in orphans to prove his theory that stuttering was not an inborn condition but something children learned from parents who seized on minor speech imperfections. The study captured national attention when it was made public for the first time in 2001 by the San Jose Mercury News. The lawsuit, filed in Johnson County District Court on Thursday, seeks unspecified damages. Only two of the five defendants are still alive. One of the plaintiffs, Mary Nixon of Marshalltown, was 12 and living in the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home when she was selected to take part in the research. Nixon, according to the lawsuit, and others as young as 6 were deemed normal speakers by researchers at the start of the study. They were subjected to conditioning therapy designed to induce stuttering behavior, according to the lawsuit. Versions of the story also ran April 6 on the websites of the WASHINGTON TIMES, the WASHINGTON POST, CNN.COM, WOOD-TV in Michigan, WRIC-TV in Virginia, KAMC-TV in Texas, WHNS-TV in Greenville, S.C., KSFY-TV in South Dakota, KRON4.COM in California, KRQE in New Mexico, KAIT in Arkansas, WTVM in Georgia, WBAY in Wisconsin, WALB-TV in Georgia, WMC-TV in Tennessee, KTVO in Missouri, WPMI in Alabama, WCAX in Vermont, WHBF in Illinois, WKRN in Tennessee, WSTM-TV in New York, KRNV in Nevada, WKBN in Ohio, WPVI in Pennsylvania, KFVS in Missouri, KPLC-TV in Louisiana, WAVY-TV in Virginia, WTVO in Illinois, WLOX in Mississippi, WISH in Indiana, KFOR-TV in Oklahoma, WECT in North Carolina, the ARIZONA DAILY SUN, WHNT in Alabama, KESQ in California, WLUC-TV in Michigan, WAFF in Alabama, WLUC-TV in Michigan, the VENTURA COUNTY STAR in California, the CANTON REPOSITORY in Ohio, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, the PRESS-ENTERPRISE in California, the DAYTON DAILY NEWS in Ohio, the NEWS JOURNAL in Texas, the GUARDIAN in the United Kingdom, the COLUMBUS LEDGER-ENQUIRER in Georgia, the CENTRE DAILY TIMES in Pennsylvania, the TIMES DAILY in Alabama, the ABERDEEN AMERICAN NEWS in South Dakota, NEWSDAY in New York, the FORT WAYNE JOURNAL GAZETTE in Indiana, the BILOXI SUN HERALD in Mississippi, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL in Ohio, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE in Florida, the DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE in Minnesota, the BELLEVILLE NEWS-DEMOCRAT in Illinois, the GRAND FORKS HERALD in North Dakota, the KANSAS CITY STAR in Missouri, the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas, the TUSCALOOSA NEWS in Alabama, the MACON TELEGRAPH in Georgia, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/096/nation/Iowa_sued_over_role_in_stuttering_project+.shtml

Medical School Alumnus Returns To School At 83 (Cincinnati Post, April 5)
At 83, Dr. Gordon Mindrum is believed to be the oldest medical fellow in the country, possibly in the world. A fellowship is the step in the medical training process that follows residency. Mindrum, an internist and occupational medicine specialist for five decades, joined a two-year addiction psychiatry program at Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Corryville, Ohio in October 2001. The fellowship will earn him a certificate, but more important, it's given him an excuse to study more. Mindrum earned his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1950.
http://www.cincypost.com/2003/04/05/resid040503.htm

House Spares UI In Budget Cuts (Omaha World-Herald, April 5)
The Iowa House has approved a bill that avoids a $25.1 million budget cut for the state's three public universities. Under a bill approved Thursday, the money for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa would come from the state's general fund. In exchange, the schools agreed not to ask for any money for salary increases, which would cost up to $24 million under the latest negotiated contract. Lawmakers funded salary increases this year with a one-time allocation. A legislative proposal in early March said the three schools would have to pay for subsequent raises out of their operational budgets. During the past two years, state lawmakers have cut $127 million from Iowa's three public universities. Since fall 2000, the Board of Regents, State of Iowa has approved about 30 percent in tuition increases, with an additional 19 percent in store for the 2003-04 school year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=704028

Iowa Rankings Cited (Omaha World-Herald, April 5)
The University of Nebraska College of Medicine operates the 22nd best primary-care program in the United States, according to the latest rankings by U.S. News and World Report. NU's medical school received only 777 applications last year, while Creighton's medical school received 3,820 applications. Medical schools at the UNIERSITY OF IOWA and University of Kansas Medical Center received 2,345 and 1,343 applications, respectively. Iowa's medical school ranked ninth for primary care and 24th for research.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=703752

Hawkeye Arrested (Omaha World-Herald, April 5)
Iowa defensive lineman Matt Roth was arrested early Friday for public intoxication and using another person's identification card, police and athletic department officials said. Roth, 20, was arrested inside a downtown Iowa City bar after police were called to handle a complaint about an altercation involving the player and bar staff, Sgt. Troy Kelsay said. Citing the police report, Kelsay said Roth was verbally abusive when officers arrived, refused two breath tests and was later treated for minor facial injuries at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. Kelsay said the report did not specify Roth's injuries or whether others were injured. Iowa Coach KIRK FERENTZ said Friday that the team would handle the matter internally.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=704035

Montes Named Artistic Director (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 5)
JEAN MONTÈS
has been named the fourth artistic director in the 31-year history of the Greater Twin Cities Youth Symphonies. Montès, a native of Haiti who left medical school to study music, is music director of the Greater Cedar Rapids Youth Symphony as well as orchestra director of St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa, where he also teaches cello. He is orchestra manager at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he is about to complete his doctoral degree in conducting. Montès, 31, replaces Paul Jan Zdunek, who resigned last year to take a job in business development at Mankato Kasota Stone.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1434/3805475.html

Woman Speaks Against War At UI (Baltimore Sun, April 5)
A feature on 85-year old Waterloo, Iowa resident and war opponent Peg Mullen, whose son, Michael, was killed by "friendly fire" in Vietnam at the age of 25, says that her and her husband Gene's national crusade against the Vietnam War were the subject of a book titled "Friendly Fire" and later of an Emmy award-winning movie chronicling their activism and their struggle to learn the details of the incident that killed their son. "I don't regret anything I've done," Mullen said last month, speaking at a forum on women and peace at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "You just have to become obnoxious. You have to get thick skin. You just have to do things you never thought you would do in your life."
http://www.sunspot.net/features/bal-to.mullen05apr05,0,3039932.story?coll=bal-features-headlines

'Jarhead' Author Attended Writers' Workshop (The Commercial Appeal, April 5)
In a story about writer Anthony Swofford's memoir, Jarhead: A Marine's Chronicle of the Gulf War and Other Battles, Swofford says that the Gulf War reminiscence genre is still pretty much an open field. And he says he's grateful to one of his former instructors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP for suggesting the subject, which he admits he'd been trying to dodge ever since he started writing fiction in community college several years ago, after flailing around trying to become a banker. "It was tough emotionally" to write, Swofford says. "I mean, I was as desperate and as full of despair as I say I was in the end of the book." The article ran on GoMemphis, the Commercial Appeal's news, information and entertainment website based in Memphis, Tenn.. A similar version of the story also ran April 5 on GOERIE.COM based in Erie, Penn.
http://www.gomemphis.com/mca/screens/article/0,1426,MCA_511_1860779,00.html

UI Case Cited (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4)
A story about Quincy Troupe, author of books and articles on jazz, sports, and the streets of St. Louis, winner of two American Book Awards and one of the best-known black poets in the United States, says that shortly after his being named California's Poet Laureate it was discovered Troupe had never completed a college degree despite claiming otherwise on his curriculum vitae. The story says the Troupe case raises questions about whether academic credentials really matter in certain fields, like poetry and art. Nor was Troupe the first professor or college administrator to be caught fabricating his résumé. Pat J. Palmer worked for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for 11 years as a research scientist before it was discovered last summer that she had never earned any of the four degrees she claimed on her CV -- not the doctorate from Iowa itself, nor two master's degrees, nor a B.A. from the University of Northern Iowa. Following that finding, she was charged with falsifying public documents, a misdemeanor punishable by up to one year in jail and a $1,500 fine. In the wake of the Palmer case, the university has begun checking the academic credentials of all faculty and staff members before they are hired.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i30/30a01001.htm

ROTC Is Target (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4)
The Reserve Officer Training Corps has become a target at two college campuses as protests of U.S. military action against Iraq increase. University of New Mexico officials are investigating nine separate instances of messages being spray-painted on campus buildings after the war started, including the one that houses the Navy and Air Force ROTC. The messages included "Bush is a terrorist" and "War is murder." No one claimed responsibility for the defacements. Similar graffiti and vandalism at the University of Iowa prompted officials to try to camouflage military presence on the campus by dropping the requirement that cadets wear uniforms to class. Lt. Col. CAROL ST. JOHN, a professor of military science who oversees the University of Iowa's ROTC program, insists that the physical safety of the 150 cadets in the program was not an issue. Nonetheless, she says, "many cadets walk around campus, and if they are out there they are a very large profile. There are antiwar protests on campus: These are emotional young people who may not respond appropriately."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i30/30a00802.htm

UI Ties In Rankings (Birmingham Business Journal, April 4)
The University of Alabama at Birmingham's School of Medicine is among the nation's Top 25 graduate schools, according to the 2004 U.S. News & World Report ranking of best colleges. The magazine ranked UAB No. 24 in the research category, tying it with Case Western Reserve University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Harvard University was No. 1 on that list. The Business Journal is based in Alabama.
http://birmingham.bizjournals.com/birmingham/stories/2003/03/31/daily48.html

Military Uses UI Heat Data (San Francisco Chronicle, April 4)
A story about the 100-degree temperatures the soldiers may face in Iraq this week includes a graphic with information the military uses to calculate how much to rest and how much water to drink, depending on the temperature. The data is attributed to the U.S. Navy Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, the Virtual Naval Hospital at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Penn State University Weather Communications Group.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/04/04/MN251943.DTL

Kelch On Tuition (U.S. News and World Report, April 4)
Budget deficits exist in nearly 40 states. What does this mean for grad students? For med students, about half of medical school funding comes from professional fees physicians charge at university-affiliated hospitals, and this is where schools have taken the biggest hit. The Association of American Medical Colleges estimates that cuts in Medicare reimbursement will cost the nation's teaching hospitals $4.2 billion over the next five years. The situation is grave for the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine. This year Carver will receive fewer total state dollars than it did six years ago--while the cost of healthcare in that period has gone up 36 percent. "We just can't raise tuition anymore and be competitive," says ROBERT KELCH, the school's former dean. Less money and more medical responsibilities, he says, mean "we have to give less attention to our core missions of education and social services."
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/articles/premium/04state.php

Dreher Quoted (U.S. News & World Report, April 4)
If demand for physicians is strong, it's nothing compared with the need for registered nurses--1 million by 2010, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nursing schools are responding with "accelerated career-entry" programs designed for people who already have a bachelor's. Accelerated or "generic" master's degrees, which generally take three years, let students spend the first year earning a B.S.N., with the remainder for a master's of science in nursing. "Why would a bachelor's-prepared applicant...want to get [only] a second bachelor's in nursing when they can get a professional master's or doctorate in every other healthcare field?" asks MELANIE DREHER, dean of the University of Iowa College of Nursing. Iowa's professional master's takes just four semesters, including a semester-long clinical internship.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/grad/articles/premium/04med.box.php

Heat May Affect Troops (San Francisco Chronicle, April 4)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE is noted as a source for a chart of data accompanying an article about how heat could affect troops approaching Baghdad.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2003/04/04/MN251943.DTL

Clinton Speaks At UI (U. of South Florida Oracle, April 3)
Former President Bill Clinton was scheduled to speak Thursday at the University of Florida's O'Connell Center to discuss the ongoing crisis with Iraq. Recently, Clinton spoke at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where he showed support for President George W. Bush's controversial plan to remove Saddam's regime and rebuild Iraq. The Oracle is the student newspaper of the University of South Florida. http://www.usforacle.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2003/04/03/3e8c4227af772

Black Presents At Conference (Los Angeles Times, April 3)
Some of the top robotics researchers are gathering at Harvey Mudd College for a workshop on man, machine and the potential sociology of a mechanized future. "Social Studies of Social Robotics" began Thursday and runs through Saturday. DONALD W. BLACK, M.D., University of Iowa presented "The Phenomenology of Compulsive Computer Use."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/ontario/news/la-ivo-robots03apr03,1,112947.story

UI Study Noted (Cleveland Plain Dealer, April 3)
An article about lawn care notes that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates all 223 chemicals approved for use in lawn pesticides. The EPA review process is designed to ensure that none of these chemicals, when used correctly, causes "unreasonable adverse effects on humans, the environment and nontarget species." But the EPA does make mistakes. Diazinon, an insecticide used to control insects and grubs, is being phased out of the market because of its toxic effect on birds. In addition, several studies have linked the use of pesticides with elevated rates of disease. The Journal of the American Cancer Society published a study in 1999 linking the weedkiller glyphosate to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; childhood leukemia was linked to indoor and outdoor pesticide use in a 1987 study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute; and in 1994, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found elevated rates of brain cancer and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma among golf course superintendents who work with pesticides.
http://www.cleveland.com/living/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/living/1049366182137010.xml

UI Student Sues Bar (Omaha World Herald, April 3)
A fourth UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student has sued a downtown nightclub where a fiery bar stunt flamed out of control and injured nine people last year. Taryn Von Bartheld filed the lawsuit in Johnson County District Court last week, accusing the former owner of Et Cetera of negligence in the April 18, 2002 incident.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=701599

Author Attended UI (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, April 2)
A profile of novelist Ann Packer notes that she earned a master's degree in fine arts from the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/entertainment/4CFA4EDCC4FD51A686256CFD000105BB?OpenDocument&highlight=2%2CUniversity%2Cof%2CIowa&headline=Ann+Packer+is+honored+with+Kate+Chopin+Award

UI Writing Festival Noted (MSNBC, April 2)
An article about budget travel recommends the Iowa Summer Writing Festival, “one of the country’s most celebrated programs for novices and semi-professionals, and justifiably so. With a strong history of successful visiting professor writers (John Irving, Kurt Vonnegut), the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has the chops to make a summer series worth attending.”
http://www.msnbc.com/news/893861.asp?cp1=1

Perlman Comments On SARS (Salon.com, April 2)
Researchers scrambling to identify the cause of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) believe it may result from the genetic mixture of two strains of a previously innocuous organism called the coronavirus, or possibly of a coronavirus and another bug. This chance recombination might have occurred inside a mouse, a chicken or a pig before the virus jumped to humans. Human coronavirus infections -- responsible for about a quarter of all common colds -- are usually so mild that no one has ever tried to make a vaccine to prevent them or a drug to treat them. That's no one's fault, considering the seemingly limited threat posed by the infections, but it puts the world at a disadvantage. While intensive care can keep most SARS patients alive, there are no drugs designed to combat the infection. Only a handful of labs worldwide are working with coronaviruses. "No one thought [coronaviruses] were very important," says STAN PERLMAN, a virologist at the University of Iowa.
http://www.salon.com/news/feature/2003/04/02/sars/index.html

UI Protester Juggled (WQAD, April 2)
Organizers of war protests on Iowa's college campuses are handing out free food and playing music as a way to draw students into political activism. Fliers for a peace rally at Iowa State University yesterday promised "fun and games." A man on a unicycle juggling torches at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA protest drew crowds and cheers last month. (The station is based in Moline, Ill.)
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1211340&nav=1sW7Ez3G

DI Reporters Broke Law (Omaha World Herald, April 2)
Daily Iowan reporters who did an investigative story showing they bought alcohol without providing identification also broke the law, authorities said. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student newspaper sent three underage reporters with reporters older than 21 to buy alcohol at Hancher Auditorium, a performing arts venue on campus. The underage reporters were served during two shows in December and one in February. The newspaper ran the story Monday, noting that Hancher employees broke state law by serving the minors alcohol without asking for identification. But the reporters' actions broke the law, said Johnson County Attorney J. Patrick White. "Even if they didn't actually drink what they purchased, they still couldn't legally conduct their own sting operation without law enforcement sponsorship and participation," White said. White said he needs more specific information before he could determine if charges could, or should, be filed. The campus police will be following up, said Sgt. DUANE PAPKE.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=700404

UI Alumna Had Early Buzz (Houston Press, April 2)
The name ZZ Packer sounds like the kind of pseudonym you'd find on the poetry slam circuit, and the title of her collection of short stories, “Drinking Coffee Elsewhere,” does little to change that impression. But as it turns out, the name's no gimmick. "My real name is Zuwena, but my family always called me ZZ," Packer says. “Drinking Coffee” is Packer's first book, but the literary world has been buzzing about her for some time. Packer published her first story in Seventeen magazine at the age of 19 and appeared in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITER'S WORKSHOP anthology, Twenty-Five and Under, before even earning her writing degree. Then one of her stories was selected for The New Yorker's Debut Fiction issue, making Packer perhaps the most talked-about writer without a book.
http://www.houstonpress.com/issues/2003-4-3/calendar.html/1/index.html

Coleman On Diversity (Christian Science Monitor, April 1)
Mary Sue Coleman, who was a guest at the newspaper’s “breakfast on affirmative action,” assumed the presidency of the University of Michigan last August. Before being named president at Michigan, she served as president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA where she was also a professor of biochemistry and biological sciences. Commenting on the stakes as the Supreme Court hears challenges April 1 to the use of affirmative action at the University's law school and undergraduate college, she said, “Research has proven the profound educational benefits that come from a diverse classroom and a diverse campus.... There is no effective substitute [for] affirmative action to achieve that diversity.”
http://search.csmonitor.com/search_content/0401/p25s02-usmb.html

UI Evaluates Parking (Omaha World Herald, April 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wants to know if it has enough parking spaces for visitors. The university has about 2,500 visitor spaces on the east side of campus, but officials think there is a need for more. The university hired an independent consultant to study if enough parking spaces are available on the portion of campus east of the Iowa River, which includes the Pentacrest and the main campus area.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=699415

Hoch Named Dean at Kentucky (Lexington Herald Leader, April 1)
STEVEN HOCH, currently associate provost at the University of Iowa, will start work as the dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of Kentucky July 1. A similar story was published in the Louisville Courier Journal
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/news/local/5529605.htm

Nagle Is Quoted (Chicago Tribune, April 1)
A feature on Verdin Co., which was founded 170 years ago and repairs clocks, bells, carillons and glockenspiels, says that when fire destroyed the Old Capitol dome at the University of Iowa in November 2001, Verdin was called to replace the 137-year-old bell that tolled 20 times a day to signal the start and end of classes. The university wanted a bell cast in the same period as the one that was destroyed. Verdin had one in its inventory. "We looked all over the country for a replacement bell," said GARY NAGLE, the university's project manager. "We had 15 to 20 people offering bells of all sizes, but none fit as well as the one the Verdin Co. had. They cleaned it up and put an inscription on it for us ... and now it's hanging up in the bell tower."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0304010014apr01,1,572260.story

UI Parking Needs Studied (Omaha World Herald, April 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has hired an independent consultant to study if enough parking spaces are available on the portion of campus east of the Iowa River, which includes the Pentacrest and the main campus area.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=699415

Marvin Gets NEH Research Grant (The Chronicle, April 1)
The National Endowment for the Humanities has announced 288 new grants to museums, colleges, and other educational institutions across the United States. The grants, totaling $25.2-million, fall into four areas: preservation and access, research, education, and public programs. Among them is a summer research grant to ROBERTA MARVIN, associate professor of music.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2003/04/2003040106n.htm

Yin Explains Job Search (ABA Student Lawyer, April 2003)
UI law professor TUNG YIN's successful job search is profiled in this publication of the American Bar Association aimed at law students. The magazine explains Yin's background is a model for would-be law professors-graduation from a top national law school (University of California-Berkeley), a long list of research and publication credits, and work at an elite Los Angeles law firm. One year after being hired by UI, "teaching is pretty much as I expected it to be, but I hadn't expected the collegiality," he said, especially "going to lunch each day with a bunch of smart people..."This story is in the print edition of the magazine only.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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