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CONTACT: GARY GALLUZZO
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Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0009; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: gary-galluzzo@uiowa.edu

Release: Sept. 6, 2002

Sept. 16 talk to discuss 'cross-fertilization' in the sciences

The University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts and Sciences department of physics and astronomy will sponsor a colloquium hosted by Usha Mallik on "The Many Splendors in Sciences at a Linear Collider" at 8 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16 in Lecture Room 1 of Van Allen Hall.

The free, public talk will be presented by Barry C. Barish, Ronald and Maxine Linde Professor of Physics and director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) at the California Institute of Technology. Barish, who was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2002, will discuss how cross-fertilization among various scientific disciplines is helping scientists to benefit from one another's research. In particular, he will discuss how the upcoming high-energy linear collider project can benefit fields such as femtochemistry, microbiology and nanoscale studies.

As an experimental high-energy physicist at Caltech since 1963, Barish has been involved in some of the foremost U.S. and international projects. He was responsible for the definitive experiment at Fermilab that provided evidence of the "weak neutral current," the linchpin of the electroweak theory for which Sheldon Glashow, Abdus Salam, and Steven Weinberg won the Nobel Prize. Since 1997, he has directed the LIGO project, an NSF-funded collaboration between Caltech and MIT for detecting gravitational waves from exotic sources such as colliding black holes. He is currently involved in the neutrino experiment inside the Soudan Underground Mine in Minnesota.

Individuals with disabilities are encouraged to attend all UI-sponsored events. People requiring an accommodation in order to participate in this program are asked to contact the department of physics and astronomy at 319-335-1686.