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UI in the News

November 2002

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WATSON COMMENTS ON DISTRACTIONS (New York Times Magazine, Nov. 30)
In an effort to provide drivers with the latest electronic gadgets -- cell phone, DVD players, navigation devices, etc. -- without making the dashboard look like a cockpit, BMW's 2002 745i reduced by half the number of buttons and readouts its predecessor had and replaced them with its "iDrive." The heart of this new system is a single multipurpose controller that looks like a large dial stuck atop a video-game joystick. Mounted on the spot ordinarily occupied by a standard gearshift, it can move forward, backward and sideways and be rotated like a knob and depressed like a button. Dialing up a particular radio station -- one of 700 functions iDrive controls -- requires almost all of these movements, as well as a fair amount of attention to a dashboard screen. Critics say the new system isn't much of an improvement over the old. And studies indicate no matter how they're configured, multiple controls make for confused drivers. "We know that people have a hard time doing two things at once," says GINGER WATSON, the chief application scientist at the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the University of Iowa. "The question is to determine whether it's the physical aspect of multitasking or the cognitive that's the problem." Watson has just finished designing a study for the highway safety administration that will test subjects' ability to drive and carry on memory-intensive phone conversations. After viewing some preliminary results, Watson herself won't talk even on a hands-free cell phone unless she has pulled her car completely off the road.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/01/magazine/01PROBLEM.html?ex=1039323600&en=538f546b4650d6b8&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

GRANT COMMENTS ON TITLE IX (Lancaster Eagle Gazette, Nov. 30)
Title IX, which turns 30 this year, mandated equal opportunity for female athletes. The legislation also provided opportunities for college scholarships and, ultimately, careers in athletics. The number of female high school athletes nationwide has increased from 294,000 in 1971 to nearly 2.8 million in 2001. "For many institutions, Title IX may have been the biggest wakeup call for athletics in the 20th century," said CHRISTINE GRANT, a professor of athletic administration at the University of Iowa and an expert on gender equity. "Today, I'm afraid we still have some people who think it's OK to have discriminatory practices. I think, fortunately, they're a small minority," she said. The Eagle-Gazette is based in Lancaster, Ohio.
http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/news/stories/20021130/localnews/480400.html
A version of the story also ran Nov. 30 on the website of the CANTON REPOSITORY in Ohio.
http://www.cantonrep.com/index.php?Category=13&ID=73844&r=0
A version of the story also ran Nov. 30 on the website of the DAYTON DAILY NEWS in Ohio.
http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/local/daily/1130ohfairplay.html

MERRILL SPEAKS OUT ON BOOK JUDGE CONFESSION (The Guardian, Nov. 30)
The paper reports on the startling confession by the journalist Michael Kinsley, one of the U.S. National Book Award judges, that he only even looked inside 50 of the 402 books competing for the prize -- and he will only admit to "at least turning every page" of Robert Caro's winning magnum opus, a biography of President Lyndon Johnson. Kinsley wrote in the online news magazine Slate that "we gave the award to Caro. But did I actually read every page? I'll never tell." Kinsley's account raised the hackles of CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, chairman of the judges and director of the International Writing Program at the University of Iowa. "I would argue that he has demeaned not only the hard work of his fellow judges, but also the winner of this year's award," Merrill responded on Slate. "His failure to read more books represents an abdication of responsibility -- and a cynicism about the literary enterprise. When was the last time someone boasted in print of not doing his job?" Merrill concedes he did not read every book from cover to cover, either -- "but I read enough of each book to know whether it merited further consideration." The Guardian is based in London.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/international/story/0,3604,850922,00.html

COMMUNITY REACTS TO PIERCE CASE (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29)
When a star player for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA men's basketball team was accused of felony sexual assault against a female student athlete, well-connected attorneys brokered a guilty plea to a lesser charge, and he was benched. But weeks after authorities closed the criminal case against 19-year-old Pierre Pierce, many in the community remain fixated on the sex scandal, according to the article, charging that Hawkeye sports stars enjoy the benefits of a double standard. The article quotes or mentions basketball coach STEVE ALFORD, interim UI President WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD and several students.

STUDY: WOMEN CLOSING Ph.D. GAP (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29)
Women are closing the gender gap when it comes to earning doctorates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but gains are not being made in certain fields traditionally dominated by men, university officials said. According to annual reports from the registrar's office, women received 49 percent of the doctoral degrees awarded last academic year, earning 160 of the university's 325 PhDs. In the 1996-97 school year, women received about 40 percent of the PhDs awarded, or 148 of 365. With a male-female ratio of 51 percent to 49 percent for doctoral degrees awarded in the last year, the school is outpacing national trends. According to the Chronicle for Higher Education, women earned 17,901, or about 44 percent, of the 40,670 doctoral degrees awarded across the country last year.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0211290131nov29.story

UI STUDENT IS ONE OF FIRST WITH EAR IMPLANT (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29)
Tim Brandau, a University of Iowa freshman who celebrated his 19th birthday Oct. 30, was the first child born in the United States with congenital deafness to receive a cochlear implant. Now he plays alto saxophone in the University of Iowa Hawkeye Marching Band. "It's fun to prove that a deaf person can play in the band," he said in an interview. "Seeing 70,000 fans in front of you, it's a huge thrill. It's the ultimate." Brandau, who hopes to major in biomedical engineering, is from the small northeastern Iowa town of Rudd, population 431. Just before Brandau's 4th birthday in 1987, doctors at University Hospitals fitted him with a cochlear implant -- a device that electrically stimulates nerves in the ear, which enables the wearer to hear. Doctors were not sure whether the device would help Brandau learn to understand language and speak normally, because he never had been able to hear. "This was a risk to take with Tim and his parents," said BRUCE GANTZ, a University of Iowa professor of otolaryngology who joined the faculty in 1980 and installed Brandau's implant. Today, university doctors have fitted more than 150 children and nearly 600 patients with the implants.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0211290028nov29.story

PIERCE DECISION QUESTIONED BY SOME (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29)
When a star player for the University of Iowa men's basketball team was accused of felony sexual assault against a female student athlete, well-connected attorneys brokered a guilty plea to a lesser charge, and he was benched. But weeks after authorities closed the criminal case against 19-year-old Pierre Pierce, many here remain fixated on the sex scandal, charging that Hawkeye sports stars enjoy the benefits of a double standard. Protesters picketed last week outside the university's arena before a basketball game, calling for the firing of coach STEVE ALFORD. Even the university's top administrator is questioning whether there is substance to the widespread complaints of favoritism for Pierce, a former prep basketball star at Westmont High School in Chicago's western suburbs. Last year, he was voted the No. 2 high school player in Illinois. "There is concern in the community that the athletes are treated separately," the university's interim president, WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD, said in a recent interview. "I don't know if that's so or not, but I want that concern put to rest." Boyd, former president of the Field Museum in Chicago, said he has asked university officials to investigate their handling of the Pierce case and draft new policies regarding student violence. Pierce remains in class on a full athletic scholarship and still is a member of the Hawkeyes basketball squad. He practices with his teammates but sits out the games.
http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/college/showcase/cs-0211290194nov29,0,2910024.story?coll=cs-home-headlines

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIVE SHOPPING (Miami Herald, Nov. 29)
For about 8 percent of the U.S. adult population -- or about 25 million people -- the heavy seasonal push by retailers is akin to putting a bottle in front of an alcoholic. They buy compulsively, hiding the bills and filling their closets with unopened boxes. Like gambling addicts, they indulge their passion even as it destroys their relationships and sends them into a financial tailspin. What distinguishes a conscious spender from a compulsive shopper? The answer lies in the degree to which the shopping affects his or her life, said DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's School of Medicine and a leading expert in compulsive shopping and shoplifting. "If it's affecting your social life, your relationships, your marriage and your financial health, you had better take a look at it,'' Black said.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/4627350.htm

AUTHOR CISNEROS ATTENDED WORKSHOP (Arizona Republic, Nov. 29)
A feature on author Sandra Cisneros, whose new novel is "Caramelo," says she studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP, from which she graduated in 1978.
http://www.arizonarepublic.com/smartliving/articles/1129cisneros29.html

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIVE SHOPPING (Tampa Tribune, Nov. 29)
What distinguishes a conscious spender from a compulsive shopper? The answer lies in the degree to which the shopping affects his or her life, said DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine and a leading expert in compulsive shopping and shoplifting. "If it's affecting your social life, your relationships, your marriage and your financial health, you had better take a look at it," said Black. Compulsive shoppers routinely hide credit card bills from family members, take out secret loans and stash merchandise to hide their habit. In fact, much of the merchandise compulsive shoppers cart home sits unused and even unopened, hidden in closets and under beds. They often don't even bother to take off the price tags, said Black. Black treated one woman who would routinely see a blouse or slacks she liked on her daily shopping trips and end up buying one in every color. It wasn't because she planned to wear these clothes. She just got a high of sorts from the buying. Versions of the article also ran Nov. 19 in THE STATE (Columbia, S.C.) and Nov. 5 in the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE:
http://www.sltrib.com/11052002/tuesday/13517.htm

BONO TO SPEAK ON AIDS AT UI (The Boston Channel, Nov. 27)
The stigma and discrimination that shadow AIDS victims are major obstacles to effective prevention and care, according to the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS. Thus, World AIDS Day 2002-2003, which will be celebrated Sunday, bears the slogan "Live and let live." The two-year campaign will focus on eliminating the discrimination AIDS and HIV victims face. World AIDS Day, which was first observed Dec. 1, 1988, seeks a greater tolerance and exchange of information of AIDS and HIV among international health ministers. Bono, lead singer for U2, will recognize the day by speaking at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Dec. 2. The Boston Channel is the website for WCVB-TV Channel 5 in Boston, Mass.
http://www.thebostonchannel.com/sh/health/stories/health-180579820021125-141132.html
Versions of the story also ran Nov. 27 on the websites of NBC affiliate KSBW-TV, which covers Monterey, Salinas and Santa Cruz, Calif.
http://www.theksbwchannel.com/sh/health/stories/health-180579820021125-141132.html
WRAL-TV in Raleigh, NC.
http://www.wral.com/health/1805798/detail.html
KHBS-TV in Fort Smith, Ark.
http://www.thehometownchannel.com/sh/health/stories/health-180579820021125-141132.html

VAN ALLEN ASSOCIATE SPEAKS TO STUDENTS (Winchester Star, Nov. 27)
George Ludwig, 75, of Shawneeland, Va., spent an hour with John Handley High School's Technology Student Association students Thursday describing his experiences during the early days of the space race between the United States and the now-defunct Soviet Union, and of working with JAMES VAN ALLEN. Ludwig, while a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said he was attending a cocktail party at the Soviet embassy in Washington, D.C., on Oct. 4, 1957, when the announcement was made that the Soviets had beaten the United States in the race to be the first to launch a satellite into space with the success of Sputnik I. The Winchester Star is based in Virginia.
http://www.winchesterstar.com/TheWinchesterStar/021127/Area_ludwig.asp

FREYER A FELLOW IN UI SCHOOL OF ART (St. Petersburg Times, Nov. 26)
JOHN D. FREYER, whose book All My Life for Sale displays in catalog fashion all the personal possessions he sold over eBay, is currently a Bodine Fellow in the School of Art and Art History at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

KLATT: JERSEY NUMBER SELECTIONS 'UNFORTUNATE' (Boston.com, Nov. 26)
The University of Iowa is 0-for-2 in choosing numbers on the football and basketball jerseys sold to fans this year. Before the season, the university picked No. 34 for its football jersey. That number belonged to running back Aaron Greving, who quit the team last month. For its basketball jersey, the Hawkeyes picked No. 3, the number worn by guard Pierre Pierce. He was charged with sexual assault, pleaded guilty to a lesser charge and is not playing this season. ''It's an unfortunate coincidence,'' RICK KLATT, associate athletic director of external affairs, said Tuesday. GEORGE HERBERT, general manager of the university's bookstores and Hawk Shops in Iowa City, said the basketball jersey has been pulled from the stores, as well as from the Hawk Shop's Web site. "This was the appropriate thing to do," he said. Boston.com is the website of the Boston Globe.
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/330/sports/Names_in_the_Game_:.shtml
Versions of the story also ran Nov. 26 on the websites of FOX SPORTS:
http://foxsports.lycos.com/content/view?contentId=775160
The SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2002/11/26/sports1805EST0419.DTL

UI RAISED TUITION (New York Times, Nov. 26)
A story about the state's fiscal problems noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA increased tuition and fees this year by 18.5 percent, the biggest increase in more than two decades, after an increase of 9.9 percent in the prior year. The Board of Regents, State of Iowa is considering further increases for the next academic year.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/26/national/26STAT.html

MERRILL COMMENTS ON BOOK CONTEST (Salt Lake Tribune, Nov. 26)
As a nonfiction judge for the National Book Awards, you get six months to read some 400 books on everything from environmental science to backroom politics. At least one of this year's voters, columnist and television commentator Michael Kinsley, says he didn't even try. In a column posted Thursday on the online magazine Slate, Kinsley acknowledged he looked at only a fraction of the submissions. He likened the awards to choosing "the best rhubarb pie at the state fair" and hinted that he didn't complete Wednesday's winner: Robert Caro's 1,000-page "Master of the Senate," the third volume of his Lyndon Johnson biography. The chairman of the nonfiction panel, CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, said Kinsley was only speaking for himself and added that he was not surprised by the column. Merrill said he and other members of the nonfiction committee had enjoyed a "period of maniacal reading." "I read books I never expected to read," said Merrill, director of the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "'Master of the Senate' is a book I would have otherwise never read. I would have said, 'This is an important book and I'll get to it, someday.' But now I know the sweep of Caro's vision and what he brought to this ambitious project." http://www.sltrib.com/11262002/tuesday/5566.htm

MERRILL RESPONDS TO BOOK AWARDS EDITORIAL (Slate.com, Nov. 26)
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL
, director of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM, writes in response to an editorial about the National Book Awards published first in Slate and then in the Washington Post in which Slate's founding editor, Michael Kinsley announced that he had read very few of the books nominated for the nonfiction prize. "As chair of that panel, I would argue that he has demeaned not only the hard work of his fellow judges, but also the winner of this year's award, Robert Caro, whose biography of Lyndon Johnson, "Master of the Senate," is an important addition to the tradition of political literature and a gripping read. When the nonfiction panel met on Nov. 20 to decide the winner, Michael Kinsley cast his vote for Robert Caro with the rest of us. I was under the impression that he had finished the book. However, we now know that Kinsley dislikes books and prizes," Merrill wrote.
http://slate.msn.com/?id=2074579

AULT DISCUSSES CERVICAL CANCER (Health 24, Nov. 26)
The likelihood that cervical cancer will become less of a killer has taken a huge step forward. Researchers report that a vaccine against a virus responsible for half of all cases of the disease, which is the second-leading cause of cancer deaths among women worldwide, has a perfect success rate. more than 30 varieties of the human papillomavirus (HPV) do have a clear link to cancer. Genital herpes does not lead to cancer, but more than 30 varieties of the human papillomavirus (HPV) do have a clear link to cancer. The human papillomavirus was not identified until 1983. Even then, however, only tiny amounts of infectious particles could be detected because of the virus's relatively basic genetic structure. "HPV only has about 10 genes, so it's a pretty simple little thing even though it causes a heck of a lot of trouble," says Dr. KEVIN AULT, a co-author of the study and an assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. Health 24 is a health information website in South Africa.
http://www.health24.co.za/news.asp?action=art&SubContentTypeId=34&ContentID=20111

AHRENS ON ADVISORY BOARD (Raleigh-Durham Business Journal, Nov. 25)
Research Triangle Park-based Oriel Therapeutics has formed a scientific advisory board to provide independent scientific and medical perspectives as well as objective advice to the management team as the company launches partnerships with pharmaceutical manufacturers to develop its technology. Oriel is an inhaled drug delivery company developing technology for improved treatment of respiratory and pulmonary diseases. The scientific advisory board, which plans to meet twice a year, includes RICHARD C. AHRENS, a professor of pediatrics at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE The Business Journal covers the Raleigh-Durham, N.C. business community.
http://triangle.bizjournals.com/triangle/stories/2002/11/25/daily10.html

ARNOLD TALKS ABOUT COMIC CAREER (National Public Radio, Nov. 25)
Talking about his early career on NPR's "Fresh Air" actor and comedian Tom Arnold talks about comedian Joel Hodgson "I saw him at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and he stayed at my house. And I said, 'OK. What do I do to become a comic?' And he says, 'Well, you have to have a persona.' And I was like, 'OK.' And he left town and I thought, 'That's my persona. I'll be Joel Hodgson. He's funny.' So I started being very dry. And I moved to Minneapolis."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=33e7cc0f4a6fba7206975425362be073&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-lSlAl&_md5=b521407e6c6c900d0e866be01ca9e82c

MERRILL COMMENTS ON BOOK CONTEST (Washington Post, Nov. 25)
As a nonfiction judge for the National Book Awards, you get six months to read some 400 books on everything from environmental science to backroom politics. At least one of this year's voters, columnist and television commentator Michael Kinsley, says he didn't even try. In a column posted Thursday on the online magazine Slate, Kinsley acknowledged he looked at only a fraction of the submissions. He likened the awards to choosing "the best rhubarb pie at the state fair" and hinted that he didn't complete Wednesday's winner: Robert Caro's 1,000-page "Master of the Senate," the third volume of his Lyndon Johnson biography. The chairman of the nonfiction panel, CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, said Kinsley was only speaking for himself and added that he was not surprised by the column. Merrill said he and other members of the nonfiction committee had enjoyed a "period of maniacal reading." "I read books I never expected to read," said Merrill, director of the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Master of the Senate is a book I would have otherwise never read. I would have said, 'This is an important book and I'll get to it, someday.' But now I know the sweep of Caro's vision and what he brought to this ambitious project."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/IncrementalGatherServlet?node=admin/registration/incrementaltest&destination=incremental&nextstep=gather&application=3-Point-style&applicationURL=http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A34855-2002Nov24.html
A version of the Associated Press article also ran Nov. 23 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/entertainment/custom/wire/sns-ap-book-awards-wayward-judge1123nov23.story
CNN.
http://www.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/books/11/25/bookawards.waywardjudge.ap/
The SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=books23&date=20021123&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22
The SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/11/22/entertainment1551EST0704.DTL
The MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/675/3451850.html
NEWSDAY.
http://www.newsday.com/entertainment/news/wire/sns-ap-book-awards-wayward-judge1123nov22,0,7091664.story?coll=sns-ap-entertainment-headlines
CBS News.
http://cbsnews.cbs.com/stories/2002/11/22/print/main530578.shtml
ABC News.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/wire/Entertainment/ap20021123_416.html
YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20021123/ap_en_ot/book_awards_wayward_judge_5
JAM! (part of CANOE, a Canadian news and information website)
http://www.canoe.ca/JamBooks/nov22_judge-ap.html

UI GRAD HEADS UP ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Saratogian, Nov. 25)
Earlier this year, the associate director of the Environmental Studies program at Skidmore College organized a conference on climate change that drew representatives from more than 40 colleges and universities in the Northeast. Karen Kellogg, who is responsible in part for developing the Environmental Studies major in her four years at Skidmore, is currently working with students to audit the campus for greenhouse gas emissions in hopes of finding realistic alternatives for reduction. Kellogg was not always studying the environment. She graduated in 1988 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a B.S. in Industrial Engineering. Within two weeks of graduation, she was traveling to Amsterdam and other countries around the world as a computer programmer for Anderson Consulting in Chicago. The Saratogian is based in New York.
http://www.saratogian.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6175960&BRD=1169&PAG=461&dept_id=17708&rfi=6

SHAW, TRUE COMMENT ON ENDOWMENT (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 23)
The economic downturn has affected the University of Iowa's endowment, which could mean fewer student scholarships, school officials said. The school's endowment declined 9.5 percent during the quarter that ended Sept. 30, University of Iowa Foundation officials said. That brings its total drop in 2002 to 14.5 percent. But TIFFANI SHAW, the foundation's chief financial officer and treasurer, said their investments are holding their own. DOUG TRUE, Iowa's vice president for finance and university services, said: "Clearly, as the market goes down, there will be less money for spending, but our objective is to try and dampen that by looking at three-year averages. Right now, we are looking at what would be less money for spending, but it would not be dramatic."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=574127
A version of the article also ran Nov. 23 on the website of WQAD-TV, based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1024622

LOHFF CITES WHOOPING COUGH CASES (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 23)
State health officials say 11 cases of whooping cough have been reported in eight Iowa counties, but they do not expect an outbreak as serious as the one last year. Dr. CORT LOHFF, assistant state epidemiologist, said Thursday that the state routinely sees a smattering of cases but doesn't usually have as many at once. He urged doctors who suspect it to send samples to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY for testing.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=573480

FORMER UI EMPLOYEE JOINS AIDS PROJECT (The Desert Sun, Nov. 23)
Doug Flater is the Desert AIDS Project's new director of resource development. He will be in charge of projects such as the Steve Chase Humanitarian Awards Gala and the Desert AIDS Walk. Most recently director of development at Hi-Desert Medical Center, Flater worked for the Virology Clinic at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS and served on the board of ICARE, the Iowa Center for AIDS Research and Education. The Desert Sun is based in Palm Springs, Calif.
http://www.thedesertsun.com/news/stories/business/1038028176.shtml

UI GRAD TAKES PART IN CONSULTING (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 22)
A story says the Carlson School of Management has developed such hands-on programs as the Consulting Enterprise to give students an edge in the job market, attract international and national students and, ultimately, to distinguish itself from the competition. The student-run business competes with professional consulting firms. Since the program's inception last summer, it has generated $100,000 in revenue. So far, they have finished several projects for five public and private companies, including Northwest Cargo and Guidant Corp. One student who took part in the program, Colombian-born Ana Ponguta, is an international student who wants to stay and work in Minnesota. She went back to Colombia after attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a scholarship but wanted to return to the Midwest. "I love the people here," she said. She also thought there would be more job opportunities here because fewer people would want to live in the cold weather.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/535/3448498.html

COLEMAN'S UI DAYS RECALLED (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov. 22)
Norm Coleman, who won a turbulent Minnesota campaign to help the GOP win control of the Senate, was a radical Democrat and president of the law-school students during his days at the University of Iowa. "You would not be surprised that he wound up as a United States senator. He was a campus politician," said UI interim President SANDY BOYD, who knew Coleman as a student leader. Coleman received his law degree with honors in 1976 and said he partially credits the UI for giving him the needed tools for leadership. "I received a tremendous education at Iowa," he said in a telephone interview with The Daily Iowan. "It helped me to be a better thinker and writer, but it was a lot of hard work." ARTHUR BONFIELD, who as a law professor taught Coleman, said he was an "engaged student." "He was a guy who seemed to work hard and be interested in what he was taught," he said. Coleman said he still roots for the Hawkeyes "except when they play Minnesota."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/3450257.html

RESEARCHER DEVELOPS VACCINE (International Herald Tribune, Nov. 22)
An experimental vaccine that prevents infection by a virus that causes cervical cancer is effective in virtually every case, according to test results in Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine. Kevin Ault of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a co-author of the study, told Reuters that when a vaccine is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, it will probably protect against several types of HPV.
http://www.iht.com/articles/77768.html

FACULTY TABLES FOOTBALL REQUEST (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 22)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Faculty Assembly has tabled a resolution asking the NCAA to reduce the number of football scholarships and campus recruiting visits for Division I football programs.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=572310

IOWA PUTS OLD CAPITOL HISTORY ON WEB SITE (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 22)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has launched a new Web site for the Old Capitol. The university announced the site on Wednesday, one year to the day after a fire destroyed the building's historic dome. The site can be found at http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/spec-coll/exhibits/oldcapitol/.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=572296

GRONBECK RECEIVES AWARD (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 22)
BRUCE E. GRONBECK
, a professor of public address at the University of Iowa, is one of six people who will be honored as mentors for their teaching and scholarship, particularly as it encourages, motivates, and stimulates the work and careers of others in the field. The awards are being presented this weekend at the annual meeting of the National Communication Association.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/11/2002112210n.htm

LEWIN EDITS BOOK (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 22)
A new anthology, Out in Theory: The Emergence of Lesbian and Gay Anthropology (University of Illinois Press, September), edited by William L. Leap, a professor of anthropology at American University, and ELLEN LEWIN, a professor of anthropology and women's studies at the University of Iowa, explores the challenges of understanding same-sex desires and behaviors in all their complexity. "We think of this as a foundational text for this new subfield," says Ms. Lewin. ("OK," she adds, with a laugh, "that's a little immodest.")
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i13/13a02001.htm

AULT COMMENTS ON CANCER VACCINE (Washington Post, Nov. 21)
An experimental vaccine designed to protect against the virus that causes virtually all cases of cervical cancer was completely effective in a study being published today. If the same results are found in a large, international study now underway, this finding could lead to the first human vaccine whose specific purpose is to prevent cancer. The vaccine protects against a form of the human papilloma virus (HPV), which causes a painless infection of the cervix, the necklike entrance to the womb. It is extremely common, occurring in about half of American women sometime during their lives. While relatively few of those women go on to develop cervical cancer, nearly all cervical cancers that do occur are the result of long-standing HPV infection. The new study looked at the experience of about 1,500 women between the ages of 16 and 23 who were randomly assigned to get either three shots of the vaccine or three placebo shots over six months. In the year and a half after the last shot, 41 cases of HPV-16 infection were detected, nine accompanied by precancerous changes in the cervix. All HPV-16 infections were in women who got placebo shots; women who got the vaccine had none. Each group also included 22 women with precancerous changes not associated with HPV-16 infection (but presumably arising from infection with other HPV types). "It was certainly a wonderful surprise when we got the preliminary analysis. This is very exciting news," said KEVIN A. AULT, an obstetrician and gynecologist at the University of Iowa and one of the authors of the report appearing in today's New England Journal of Medicine. If routine vaccination becomes reality he said, "all these women with mildly abnormal Paps that we spend a lot of time treating would no longer be a problem. And it would be a tremendous benefit to women's health in countries where cervical cancer is still a terrifying diagnosis."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A17709-2002Nov20.html
Versions of this article also appeared Nov. 21 on the Web site of:
The New York Times
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/news/news-health-cancer.html
Oakland (Calif.) Tribune.
http://www.oaklandtribune.com/Stories/0,1413,82%257E1865%257E1004660,00.html
Tri-Valley Herald, which is based in California.
http://www.trivalleyherald.com/Stories/0,1413,86%257E10669%257E1004567,00.html
The Daily, University of Washington’s student newspaper.
http://thedaily.washington.edu/news.lasso?-database=DailyWeb.fp5&-layout=List&-response=newspage.lasso&-recordID=33950&-search&-Token.Count=8
Newsday
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/newyork/ny-hsvacc213012793nov21.story
The Detroit News.
http://www.detnews.com/2002/health/0211/21/health-16737.htm
Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/palmbeach/sfl-pacervical21nov21,0,7536944.story?coll=sfla-news-palm
Reuters
http://asia.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=topnews&StoryID=1778429
ABCnews.com
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/reuters20021121_229.html
This Reuters news article also appeared Nov. 21 in the Biloxi Sun Herald
http://www.sunherald.com/mld/sunherald/news/breaking_news/4572400.htm
The Centre Daily Times
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/4572400.htm
The St. Paul Pioneer Press
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/4567673.htm
Stuff.com, a New Zealand news web site
http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/0,2106,2118041a7144,00.html
Philadelphia Inquirer
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/news/front/4567868.htm
Miami Herald.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/4566268.htm
Grand Forks (N.D.) Herald.
http://www.grandforks.com/mld/grandforks/news/4566268.htm
Duluth (Minn.) News Tribune.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/news/4566268.htm
The State (Columbia, S.C.)
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/news/local/4566268.htm
Wilkes Barre (Pa.) Times Leader.
http://www.timesleader.com/mld/timesleader/news/4566268.htm
Macon (Ga.) Telegraph.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/news/4566268.htm
Wichita Eagle.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/news/4566268.htm
BayArea.com, the web site for several California newspapers.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/bayarea/4566268.htm
Aberdeen (S.D.) American News.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/4566268.htm
Columbus (Ga.) Ledger-Enquirer
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/4566268.htm
Fort Wayne (Ind.) News Sentinel.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/4566268.htm
The Guardian (UK)
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1687.51853?z=1728_00000_1000_ln_01

WebMD, Nov. 20
http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1687.51853?z=1728_00000_1000_ln_01
HealthCentral.com, Nov. 20
http://www.healthcentral.com/news/NewsFullText.cfm?id=510383

HANCHER COMMISSIONED DANCE PIECE (New York Times, Nov. 21)
In "Hibiki (Resonance From Far Away)," Ushio Amagatsu, the founder and director of the Japanese Butoh dance group Sankai Juku, is concerned with the verities of time. Performing again as part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival, Sankai Juku looks familiar but different. "Hibiki," presented on Tuesday night for a run through Sunday afternoon, has all the earmarks of Mr. Amagatsu's poetic style and polished theatrical beauty. Sankai Juku is true to the signature theme of all Butoh: destruction and creation. A Japanese dance form whose implicit reference has been the bomb, Butoh has made the idea of rebirth after catastrophe a familiar motif. Mr. Amagatsu, however, has always gone his own way within this genre. The cataclysm in "Hibiki" (commissioned by HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as well as a French and a Japanese sponsor) is oblique. In Mr. Amagatsu's production, the catastrophe occurs offstage, and the viewer is privy to the reaction of those who are affected by it onstage.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/21/arts/dance/21HIBI.html

CISNEROS ATTENDED UI (Sarasota Herald Tribune, Nov. 21)
An article about author Sandra Cisneros notes that she majored in English at Chicago's Loyola University, where she later served as a counselor for minority students. She then studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP, from which she graduated in 1978.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021120&Category=APE&ArtNo=211201065&Ref=AR

HEALTH TRUST CHIEF, A UI GRAD, TO RESIGN (Miami Herald, Nov. 21)
An article about the pending resignation of Ira C. Clark, president and chief executive of the Public Health Trust, the governing body of Jackson Memorial Hospital, noted that Clark earned a master's degree in hospital and health administration at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

HOOVER COMMENTS ON TESTING (San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 20)
A story about growing debate over whether takers of standardized tests should be timed says some experts argue that there are strong operational reasons to time tests. Schools want to know when their classrooms will be free for other uses, parents want to know when to collect their kids, and the test companies need to budget for proctors. The SAT also worries about a wily test taker walking away with a test booklet if students are allowed to leave whenever they choose. And grade schools worry about giving up teaching time. "There's too much going on in school, too much to learn to give unlimited time. It's wasteful," says H.D. HOOVER, professor of education at the University of Iowa and the senior author of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/11/20/financial0955EST0048.DTL

UI GRAD TO PLAY FAMOUS ORGAN (Seattle Times, Nov. 20)
A massive, ornate organ has put Trinity Lutheran Church in Lynnwood, Wash., on the organists' map, with musicians from as far away as Germany and the Netherlands sitting down at its console to play. It's also the focus of Trinity's five-concert Artists at the Organ series, which on Sunday will feature organist Norma Aamodt-Nelson in a performance of compositions by Johann Sebastian Bach, Antonio Vivaldi, Tomas Albinoni and others. Trumpeter George Steward also will be featured. Aamodt-Nelson had been acquisitions editor for music and worship at Augsburg Fortress Publishers in Minnesota, and has degrees in music from Pacific Lutheran University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=organ20n&date=20021120&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

EDITORIAL: DROP STUDENT CHARGES (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 20)
An editorial reads: "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA A.D. has apologized for Hawkeye fans tearing down the Metrodome's goalpost, and offered to replace it. The University of Minnesota A.D. has apologized for blasting Hawkeye fans with ear-splitting screech noise during their on-field victory party after Saturday's game. Now it's Minneapolis prosecutors' turn to make nice. How about announcing that when the Iowans make good on their offer to replace the goalpost, charges will be dropped against the three Hawkeye fans unlucky enough to be arrested Saturday night? After all, their deed had several thousand accomplices, celebrating a Big Ten championship-clinching 45-21 victory over the Gophers. Minneapolis police might also allow as how spraying happy Hawkeye fans with pepper spray as they stormed the Metrodome field was a mite ungracious."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/562/3442502.html

UI EARNS $8.1 MILLION IN ROYALTY FEES (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 20)
The University of Iowa's research campus earned a record $8.1 million in royalty and license fee income during fiscal year 2002, according to an annual report. The school's Oakdale Research Park also executed a record 37 license and option agreements for inventions patented by the university. Royalty revenue is split between the inventor, that person's academic department and the school's research funds. MARK STINSKI, a microbiology professor, discovered the human cytomegalovirus, for example, which is used in five drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The university negotiated licenses for the cytomegalovirus with 66 industrial partners, as of June.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=570197

STUDENT DIED OF DIABETES COMPLICATIONS (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 20)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student found dead in her dorm room died from complications related to diabetes, an official said Monday. Karen Louise Brock, 19, of Lake Bluff, Ill., had diabetes and died from complications of the disease, said Johnson County Medical Examiner David White. Brock, a sophomore studying nursing, was found unresponsive by her roommate on Sunday night, said Cindy Funk, Johnson County medical examiner investigator. Authorities pronounced Brock dead at the scene.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=569889

UI WILL REPLACE GOALPOST (Detroit Free Press, Nov. 20)
When he files his expenses from Saturday's football game against the Gophers, University of Iowa athletics director BOB BOWLSBY may have a $5,000 bill itemized under "miscellaneous." Bowlsby on Monday told Gophers athletics director Joel Maturi that Iowa will replace the Metrodome goal post Hawkeyes fans tore down after their team finished a perfect Big Ten Conference season with a 45-21 victory over the Gophers. "We can't take responsibility for everything our fans do," Bowlsby said, "but it's a good bet Gopher fans did not tear down the goal post."
http://www.freep.com/sports/college/zoner20_20021120.htm

UI STATISTICIANS HELP MARK BIRTHDAY (Ball State Daily News, Nov. 20)
Not all professors can say they have a 320-page journal dedicated to them. Mir Masoom Ali, professor of statistics and mathematical sciences at Ball State University, can. The Journal of Statistical Studies recently published a special issue commemorating Ali's 65th birthday. The issue features an article by the editor of the special volume along with 24 articles by leading statisticians. One article in Ali's tribute was written by Dale Umbach, chair of the mathematical sciences department. Statisticians from Oxford University, the University of Toronto and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA submitted letters of congratulations.
http://www.bsudailynews.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2002/11/20/3ddb40ba0f87c

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA (Grand Rapids Press, Nov. 19)
The Supreme Court will consider shielding states from lawsuits from disabled Americans who use state accommodations and challenge things like inaccessible polling places or inadequate public transportation. The 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act forbids discrimination against the disabled and requires governments to provide "services, programs or activities" to those with special needs. The case puts the court in the midst of another dispute over states' rights. Justices have split 5-4 in a series of federalism cases that limited Congress' power. PETER BLANCK, a law professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in the ADA, said the court's intervention could spur more state legislatures to pass their own disability laws. "Hopefully the irony of this federalism theory is that we will have much stronger state anti-discrimination laws," he said. FindLaw is a website that provides news and resources for legal professionals, businesses, students and individuals. The Press is based in Michigan.

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA (FindLaw.com, Nov. 19)
The Supreme Court will consider shielding states from lawsuits from disabled Americans who use state accommodations and challenge things like inaccessible polling places or inadequate public transportation. The 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act forbids discrimination against the disabled and requires governments to provide "services, programs or activities" to those with special needs. The case puts the court in the midst of another dispute over states' rights. Justices have split 5-4 in a series of federalism cases that limited Congress' power. PETER BLANCK, a law professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in the ADA, said the court's intervention could spur more state legislatures to pass their own disability laws. "Hopefully the irony of this federalism theory is that we will have much stronger state anti-discrimination laws," he said. FindLaw is a website that provides news and resources for legal professionals, businesses, students and individuals.
http://news.findlaw.com/ap_stories/a/w/1154/11-19-2002/20021119011502_12.html

UI STUDENT DIES IN DORM ROOM (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 19)
A Lake Bluff woman died apparently after she had a diabetic attack in her dorm room at the University of Iowa, authorities said Monday. Karen Louise Brock, 19, was found dead around 8:30 p.m. Sunday, according to a university spokeswoman in Iowa City. Dr. David White, Johnson County medical examiner, said preliminary tests indicated Brock, a sophomore, died of complications from severe diabetes.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/mchenry/chi-0211190392nov19.story

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 19)
The Supreme Court will consider shielding states from lawsuits from disabled Americans who use state accommodations and challenge things like inaccessible polling places or inadequate public transportation. The 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act forbids discrimination against the disabled and requires governments to provide "services, programs or activities" to those with special needs. The case puts the court in the midst of another dispute over states' rights. Justices have split 5-4 in a series of federalism cases that limited Congress' power. PETER BLANCK, a law professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in the ADA, said the court's intervention could spur more state legislatures to pass their own disability laws. "Hopefully the irony of this federalism theory is that we will have much stronger state anti-discrimination laws," he said.
http://www.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/srchlist.cgi?words='University+of+Iowa'&searchIn=all&pubDate=all&orderBy=date&perPage=10
A version of the story also ran Nov. 19 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/search/bal_all.jsp

ROSS COMMENTS ON IOWA LEGISLATURE MAKEUP (PokerMag, Nov. 19)
An influx of new members to the Iowa Legislature will give the lawmaking body a more urban profile, potentially influencing debate on issues ranging from economic development to money for schools. … Forty-five legislators are from cities with populations larger than 50,000 -- an increase of five members from 10 years ago. In addition, 20 legislators are from towns with populations under 1,000 -- six fewer members than in 1993. "That would certainly indicate it's moving in the direction of larger cities," said RUSSELL ROSS, a retired University of Iowa political science professor and longtime observer of Iowa politics. The shift could influence debate on such issues as livestock confinements, the school aid formula, money for school buildings, gambling, the Vision Iowa community attractions program and economic development. PokerMag is an online publication with news for, and about, the gaming industry.
http://pokermag.com/managearticle.asp?c=150&a=304

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA (ABCNEWS.com, Nov. 19)
The Supreme Court will consider shielding states from lawsuits from disabled Americans who use state accommodations and challenge things like inaccessible polling places or inadequate public transportation. The 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act forbids discrimination against the disabled and requires governments to provide "services, programs or activities" to those with special needs. The case puts the court in the midst of another dispute over states' rights. Justices have split 5-4 in a series of federalism cases that limited Congress' power. PETER BLANCK, a law professor at the University of Iowa who specializes in the ADA, said the court's intervention could spur more state legislatures to pass their own disability laws. "Hopefully the irony of this federalism theory is that we will have much stronger state anti-discrimination laws," he said.
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Politics/ap20021119_266.html
The Associated Press article also appeared Nov. 19 on the websites of: the NEW YORK TIMES
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Scotus-Disabilities.html;
the WASHINGTON POST
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8528-2002Nov19.html;
the AUSTIN AMERICAN STATESMAN
http://www.austin360.com/aas/news/ap/ap_story.html/Washington/AP.V8656.AP-Scotus-Disabili.html;
the SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021119&Category=APW&ArtNo=211190622&Ref=AR;
the GUARDIAN newspaper (United Kingdom)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-2182293,00.html;
WSOC-TV (Charlotte, N.C.)
http://www.gocarolinas.com/shared/news/ap/ap_story.html/Washington/AP.V8656.AP-Scotus-Disabili.html
WFTV-TV (Orlando, Fla.)
http://www.icflorida.com/partners/wftv/news/ap_story.html/Washington/AP.V8656.AP-Scotus-Disabili.html;
the DAYTON DAILY NEWS
http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/news/ap/ap_story.html/Washington/AP.V8656.AP-Scotus-Disabili.html;
and YAHOO! NEWS
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20021119/ap_on_go_su_co/scotus_disabilities_5.

STUDENT DIED FROM DIABETES COMPLICATIONS (WQAD-TV, Nov. 19)
Authorities say a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student died from complications related to diabetes. Karen Louise Brock was found unresponsive by her roommate on Sunday night. The 19-year-old was from Lake Bluff, Illinois. Johnson County medical examiner investigator Cindy Funk says Brock was pronounced dead at the scene. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1018221
The article also appeared on the website of WMAQ-TV, Chicago.
http://www.nbc5.com/news/1793579/detail.html
An earlier Associated Press version of the story appeared on the website of the OMAHA WORLD HERALD
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=568512

ANTIBIOTIC MAY HELP FIGHT CANCER (Heathandage.com, Nov. 19)
A molecule related to tetracycline can help stop the spread of cancer cells, according to new experiments. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have been looking at a new drug called COL-3, which is related to the well-known antibiotic tetracycline. In a series of experiments, they find that COL-3 acts upon the tissue surrounding a tumour, making that tumour less likely to spread throughout the body.
http://www.healthandage.com/Home/gm=1!gid1=2658;!149013949!174479253!7537!7002

UI WILL REPLACE GOALPOST (St Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 19)
When he files his expenses from Saturday's football game against the Gophers, University of Iowa athletics director BOB BOWLSBY may have a $5,000 bill itemized under "miscellaneous." Bowlsby on Monday told Gophers athletics director Joel Maturi that Iowa will replace the Metrodome goal post Hawkeyes fans tore down after their team finished a perfect Big Ten Conference season with a 45-21 victory over the Gophers. "We can't take responsibility for everything our fans do," Bowlsby said, "but it's a good bet Gopher fans did not tear down the goal post."
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/4551518.htm

'LIFE FOR SALE' BOOK REVIEWED (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Nov. 19)
In his book "All My Life for Sale," John D. Freyer documented how he sold his belongings on the Internet. With his possessions gone, he made a surprising decision -- to stay in Iowa rather than move to New York. "After living out of the trunk of my car, location no longer seemed as relevant. I wanted a place to be grounded. I wanted to stop starting over," he writes in his book. Freyer, who is currently a Bodine Fellow in the School of Art and Art History at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, not only wrote but also designed his book. "If you spend time and go through it, I hope you get a sense that we're much larger than the things that we own," he says.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/printer2/index.asp?ploc=t&refer=http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/books/96144_lifeforsale19.shtml

UI FANS TEAR DOWN GOALPOST (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 19)
In a piece about how UI fans tore down the goalpost in the Metrodome after the Nov. 16 Hawkeye victory, columnist Doug Grow wrote: "Fans who attended Saturday's game between the University of Minnesota and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA won't ever forget the day Iowa's fans tore a goalpost down at the Metrodome. This turned out to be the historic day on which a piercing series of electronic screeches were unleashed over the public address system. This apparently was a high-tech approach to crowd control intended to make celebrating fans so uncomfortable, they'd leave the Dome. The effort was a screeching flop."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/465/3440889.html

MORE WOMEN EARNING DOCTORATES AT UI (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 19)
Women are closing the gender gap when it comes to earning doctorates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but gains are not being made in certain fields traditionally dominated by men, university officials said. According to annual reports from the Office of the Registrar, women received 49 percent of the doctoral degrees awarded during the last academic year, earning 160 of the university's 325 Ph.D.s. In the 1996-97 school year, women received about 40 percent of the Ph.D.s awarded, earning 148 of 365. With a male-female ratio of 51 percent to 49 percent for doctoral degrees awarded during the last year at Iowa, the school is outpacing national trends.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=568519

WEIR COMMENTS ON SAVING DNA (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 19)
An Iowa funeral home is offering to save a genetic piece of departed loved ones. James Fullerton, owner of Fullerton Funeral Homes, said the uses for DNA data are almost endless - but the window of extracting opportunity is limited. Once a body is cremated or embalmed, taking DNA is difficult if not impossible. Currently, DNA data can help identify genetic predispositions to certain hereditary diseases and settle paternity disputes. A number of uses could arise as the technology and understanding of DNA evolve. "There are so many unanswered questions about DNA," said ROBERT WEIR, director of Biomedical Ethics at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "We learn something new almost every day." Consent, ownership and access to the human genetic code are factors in medical debates about DNA, Weir said. Taking DNA samples from the dead is the biggest issue with the extraction at funeral homes, Weir said. If the person gave consent before death, most ethical problems could be avoided.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=568355

TRANEL COMMENTS ON RESEARCH (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Nov. 18)
With a new respect for the science of emotion, researchers are charting the anatomy of social graces, capturing neuralimpulses of fairness and shame that guide behavior. In findings made public this week at a meeting of 24,000neuroscientists in Orlando, researchers documented how the primal mood circuits of the brain can color manners, cooperation and judgment, even as scientists revealed a new understanding of how the human capacity for emotion changes over a lifetime. "There has been a shift to looking for brain patterns," University of Iowa psychologist DANIEL TRANEL said. "Emotion is a topic that has been deliberately eschewed by neuroscientists for a long time. It was a nuisance in our data and we tried to get rid of it. Now, we deliberately focus on it."

UI FARM HEALTH PROGRAM WILL EXPAND (WQAD-TV, Nov. 18)
An Iowa program that operates clinics that focus on the health and safety of farmers plans to expand. AgriSafe Network, started by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CENTER FOR AGRICULTURAL SAFETY AND HEALTH, wants to expand its current network of 22 clinics to more sites and other states. The clinics have nurses trained to identify early symptoms related to the health risks of farming. WQAD is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1016918

ERWIN COMMENTS ON KID TRACKING (Norwich Bulletin, Nov. 18)
Kevin Warwick, a cybernetics professor from the University of Reading in England, is in the process of developing a tracking microchip for children. If the technical details can be worked out -- and if the necessary medical ethics committees give approval -- before the year is over, he plans to implant the device in an 11-year-old volunteer. Warwick's proposal has sparked a fierce debate over how far a parent -- or society -- should go in limiting personal freedoms in the interest of safety. However, legal and ethical issues will prevent it from becoming available in the United States any time soon, predicts CHERYL ERWIN, an assistant professor of family medicine who specializes in biomedical ethics and medical humanities at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City. Because the chip would be an experimental product, its creators would be required to follow certain guidelines, she says. Normally that entails years of testing in animals first to make sure the procedure doesn't cause more harm than good, then incorporating children into the research only after it has been proven safe in less vulnerable populations. For the chip to get a green light in this country, the benefits would need to outweigh the risks, Erwin says. In this case, that means weighing the miniscule threat of a child being abducted against the chance of hurting a child by implanting an unknown, untested, unproven device in his or her body. "I think this is totally unacceptable," Erwin says. "I think this would never happen in this country -- at least not until we have a good deal more information on this sort of thing." (The Norwich Bulletin is based in Connecticut.)
http://www.norwichbulletin.com/news/stories/20021118/living/394258.html

UI BENEFITS FROM PATENT DONATION (New York Times, Nov. 17)
At DuPont, researchers found a way to make a valuable chemical that leaves water as the byproduct instead of tons of acid. At Eastman Chemical, they devised a plastic packaging that could more than double the shelf life of beer and soda. At Procter & Gamble, there were discoveries that could help doctors reduce skin discoloration from burns, wounds and grafts. In each case, the research produced a pile of patents the companies decided they could neither use nor license easily to another business. So this year they used a solution that was pioneered in the mid-1990's and has become increasingly common -- they donated the inventions to universities, hospitals or nonprofit institutions and turned what had been wasting away into multimillion-dollar tax write-offs. While no one is tracking donations, appraisers say the total in the last few years has exceeded several hundred million dollars. That includes $64 million in gifts by DuPont to Pennsylvania State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Virginia Polytechnic Institute on the day three years ago when DuPont disclosed its donation program. The best way to ensure that the I.R.S. does not come calling with questions is to value patents correctly. Companies don't count on recipients to support valuations. "It's essentially a gift of opportunity for us," said W. BRUCE WHEATON, executive director of the University of Iowa Research Foundation, which administers donated corporate patents. "The recipient isn't on the hook for validating the value. All we have to do is take a good healthy swing at it."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/17/business/17PATE.html

CANIN INTERVIEWED ABOUT STORY, MOVIE (Idaho Statesman, Nov. 17)
ETHAN CANIN
, author of the short story that inspired the movie “The Emperor’s Club,” is interviewed along with director Michael Hoffman. “I always tell my students where I teach writing at the University of Iowa´s Writers’ Workshop, that as writers we are told the character should change about two-thirds into the story,” Canin says. “I tell my students, no. Nobody ever changes. Characters never change. Get away from that. You may have a moment of understanding yourself. You might see for a glimpse that little dark, fur covered animal inside you that is yourself. But you don´t change, certainly not in the course of a story, or even a novel.”
http://204.228.236.37/News/story.asp?ID=25839

DEBATER ATTENDED UI CAMP (Honolulu Star Bulletin, Nov. 17)
Adriana Alghussein, one of the stars of Kahuku High School's champion debate team, is headed for the big time as the first Hawaii student ever chosen for the U.S. International Debate Team. "It's like the Olympics," said Alghussein, a 16-year-old who is junior class president. "I'm so thrilled and honored." She and four teammates from across the country will fly to Stuttgart, Germany, next month for a European contest, one of several leading up to the World Championship Debate in Lima, Peru, in August. Team members attended summer programs at Yale, Stanford, UCLA and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this summer, she said.
http://starbulletin.com/2002/11/17/news/index3.html

TRANEL RESEARCHES SCIENCE OF EMOTION (Buffalo News, Nov. 17)
With a new respect for the science of emotion, researchers are charting the anatomy of social graces, capturing neural impulses of fairness and shame that guide behavior. In findings made public this week at a meeting of 24,000 neuroscientists in Orlando, researchers documented how the primal mood circuits of the brain can color manners, cooperation and judgment, even as scientists revealed a new understanding of how the human capacity for emotion changes over a lifetime. By focusing on the neural networks that drive feelings, scientists have embraced an objective inquiry into the subjective, emotional life of the mind. Until recently, scientists could make only educated guesses about the nature of the emotional chords struck by joy or sadness. New noninvasive medical imaging techniques, however, allow scientists to plumb the wellsprings of the mind more precisely. Recording the interplay of neural patterns, they seek explanations for the subtle mood changes that influence our decisions and shape the way we treat each other. "There has been a shift to looking for brain patterns," UI psychologist DANIEL TRANEL said. "Emotion is a topic that has been deliberately eschewed by neuroscientists for a long time. It was a nuisance in our data and we tried to get rid of it. Now, we deliberately focus on it."

ADOLPHS COMMENTS ON NEUROSCIENCE OF HUMOR (Science News, Nov. 16)
At the Society for Neuroscience meeting in Orlando earlier this month, Dr. William Kelley, a researcher at Dartmouth College, described his work using episodes from "Seinfeld" and "The Simpsons" and magnetic resonance imaging to record the brain's response to humor. As a study participant viewed something funny, MRI scans showed regions of the left hemisphere of the participant's brain crackling with activity. A few seconds later, as the participant responded to the humor, brain regions called the insula and amygdala became active across both brain hemispheres. Studying the brain's response to humor is a challenge, and Kelley's effort is innovative, said RALPH ADOLPHS of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. "It seems that actually watching a full-length episode [of a sitcom] is going to elicit humor in a more realistic, intense fashion than if you just read or hear a punch line in a lab," Adolphs said.

UI CITED IN STORY ON NIPPLE PIERCING RISKS (Yahoo! News, Nov. 15)
A story reports that lactation can be added to the list of potential hazards of body piercing. Doctors in Boston report that a young woman began producing milk, apparently because her nipple rings stimulated her breasts into thinking she was nursing. This is believed to be the first time that anyone has reported a connection between body piercing and lactation. The story refers readers to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA VIRTUAL HOSPITAL's web page "Tattooing and Body Piercing: Decision Making for Teens."
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20021116/hl_hsn/nipple_piercing_led_to_lactation

BODY OF UI STUDENT FOUND IN WOODS (WQAD-TV, Nov. 15)
The body of a woman found in a wooded area has been identified as a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student who had been missing more than seven weeks. Police say 21-year-old Quyen Chau was reported missing September 21st. Authorities say there was no evidence of foul play. The Polk County Medical Examiner's office says there were signs of hypothermia and dehydration, but no injuries. Police say Chau suffered from depression. The investigation continues.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1014133

IOWA INVADES TWIN CITIES (Minneapolis StarTribune, Nov. 15)
Hotels and restaurants in Minneapolis and St. Paul will be filled with black and gold this weekend as thousands of Hawkeye fans trek north to watch the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football and wrestling teams take on the Gophers.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/3432877.html
(St. Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 14)
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/4513170.htm

UI TUITION INCREASES 17.6 PERCENT (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 15)
The cost of attending Iowa's three public universities will be higher next year as the Board of Regents, state of Iowa voted Thursday to raise tuition 17.6 percent. The double-digit tuition increase, the second in two years, will raise the base cost for resident students by $650, and $1,300 for non-resident students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/twincities/news/4513170.htm
(Omaha World Herald, Nov. 15)
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=565014

UIHC TO TREAT CANADIAN CANCER PATIENT (The Standard, Nov. 15)
The family of an 18-year old Canadian boy who will receive treatment for a tumor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS because the treatment isn't available in Canada is wondering how they will pay for the procedure. The Standard is a newspaper in St. Catharines, Canada.
http://www.canada.com/stcatharines/story.asp?id=%7BE2A5895E-DB2C-4C8B-B261-C8A42C2F2655%7D

TV REDISCOVERS SMALL TOWNS (Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 15)
"People who live in cities ... really want to be reassured that there are smart, hip people in small [towns]," said Kembrew McLeod, a communication studies professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, about the spate of recent television shows set in small town USA.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/1115/p15s02-altv.html

UI RESEARCHERS TEST ANTI-CANCER DRUG (bio.com, Nov. 15)
Building on previous research, University of Iowa scientists have discovered that a drug already being tested as an anti-cancer agent could potentially be used in conjunction with other cancer therapies to reduce the likelihood of cancer recurrence by targeting the tumor microenvironment. UI scientists in the laboratory of MARY HENDRIX, Ph.D., the Kate Daum Research Professor and head of anatomy and cell biology, previously discovered that aggressive tumor cells can modify their local environment and can induce less aggressive tumor cells encountering this modified environment to become more aggressive. This suggested that in addition to treating tumor cells, changes to the surrounding tissue caused by an aggressive tumor should also be treated to reduce the likelihood of recurrence.
http://www.bio.com/newsfeatures/newsfeatures_research.jhtml;jsessionid=IUUYRYRAEOZT1R3FQLMCFEWHUWBNSIV0?action=view&contentItem=88530923&Page=1

FILM EXPERT RECALLS UI DAYS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 15)
Thomas Doherty, an associate professor of film studies at Brandeis University, writes that "'Sirkian' is an adjective little-known outside the refined realm of academic film studies, but to the cognoscenti the term is as evocative as appellations like 'Chaplinesque' or 'Hitchcockian.' Heralded by swelling strings, a lush melodrama exposes a buttoned-down and girdled milieu where anguished lovers are entwined in a cold-war containment policy more gendered than geopolitical. Orchestrating the artistry -- or ladling out the kitsch -- was the maestro of the Hollywood soap opera, 950s vintage, the auteur of sobs and sacrifices, Douglas Sirk. … At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1970s, I well remember, graduate students in film trudged wearily to the exemplary works of the feminist avatar Chantal Ackerman, but flocked to the Sirk screenings with a zeal not entirely scholarly."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i12/12b01601.htm

UI ALUMNUS INSPIRES GIFT (Seattle Times, Nov. 14)
One of the hallmarks of a life well-lived is that it inspires others to create something lasting in your name. One need look no further for a shining example than UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate Dr. Homer Harris. An anonymous donor, citing Dr. Harris' life as admirable and inspirational, has given $1.3 million to the Seattle Parks Foundation to create a Central Area park in the doctor's name. The money will be used to purchase and develop a half-acre lot on the southeast corner of 24th Avenue and East Howell Street. The gift is the largest donation to any Seattle park, including the zoo and aquarium. And it is a fitting tribute to Dr. Harris, a lifelong Seattleite whose hard work and dedication are so strong that he didn't retire from his medical practice until two years ago, at age 84. Dr. Harris graduated from the University of Iowa, where he played football and became the first black football team captain in the Big 10.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=parksed14&date=20021114&query=%22university+of+iowa%22

UI WEB SITE LISTED (The Guardian, Nov. 14)
The newspaper’s Web Watch column lists several web sites related to the Sun Rings performance by the Kronos Quartet at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/online/story/0,3605,839038,00.html

CONTROVERSIAL ARTIST ATTENDED UI (Rocky Mountain News, Nov. 14)
A prize-winning painting by a local artist has so disturbed some students at the Art Students League of Denver that they want it moved to a less-prominent spot in the school. School officials refuse to do that. The 4-foot-by-6-foot oil painting by Cong Lu, 24, depicts a young Asian man pulling up his shirt to reveal explosives strapped around his midsection. A pistol is tucked into his waistband. The piece is entitled, Self Portrait of a Martyr. A handful of students have complained about the painting, which they interpret as hostile, anti-American, anti-Semitic and anti-Christian. They also object to the title, which equates suicide bombers with martyrs. Lu, who signs his paintings as Lucong, lived in Shanghai until his family came to the United States when he was 11. He grew up in Iowa and has degrees in biology and fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.insidedenver.com/drmn/local/article/0,1299,DRMN_15_1544480,00.html

POET ATTENDED UI (Winston-Salem Journal, Nov. 14)
One of the participants in Salem College’s Native American Writer’s Festival is poet Joy Harjo, who earned her MFA at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.journalnow.com/wsj/MGB0H3ZPH8D.html

UI SORORITY HOUSEMOTHER’S QUOTE LISTED (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 13)
A compilation of noteworthy quotes from other publications includes the following from Real Simple magazine, which quotes Polly Brotherton, 48, who became a housemother to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sorority after a traumatic divorce: “One of the lessons I've learned is that you take the joys in your life and you take the losses and the sorrow. ... It all works together to make you the person that you are."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0211130052nov13.story

UI GRADUATE PENS COLUMN (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 13)
A man writing a first-person column in the form of a letter to his wife on the occasion of their 10th wedding anniversary notes that they met and fell in love as students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0211130039nov13.story

MENCZER CREATES WEB SEARCH TOOL (Technology Research News, Nov. 13)
Internet search engines regularly use information about the text contained in pages and the links between pages to return relevant search results because the approach works reasonably well, but less is known about why these relationships exist. A researcher from the University of Iowa has expanded the utility of using text and links in search engines with a mathematical model that divides a large network like the Internet into small local Webs. A Web crawler designed to completely traverse a small Web will provide more comprehensive coverage of a topic than typical search engines, according to FILIPPO MENCZER, an assistant professor of management sciences at the University of Iowa. "My result shows that it is possible to design efficient Web crawling algorithms -- crawlers that can quickly locate any related page among the billions of unrelated pages in the Web," he said.
http://www.trnmag.com/Stories/2002/111302/Webs_within_Web_boost_searches_111302.html

WORKSHOP GRADUATE TOPS CHINESE DANCE (Shanghai Daily News, Nov. 13)
A writer who is distracted by words, a choreographer who insists his dancers learn meditation, a director who strands his audience between fantasy and reality. Lin Hwai-min, founder and resounding presence behind the Taiwan-based Cloud Gate Dance Theater, whose Shanghai premiere of "Legacy" nine years ago is still raved about today, returns with "Bamboo Dream," a new production that confirms his place at the forefront of contemporary Chinese dance, writes Claudia Sun. Lin, who was trained as a dancer by the legendary Martha Graham, says that the plotless performance is a metaphor for life, which "swings between reality and fantasy." In 1969, Lin traveled to the United States, where he received a master's degree of fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. http://english.eastday.com/epublish/gb/paper1/722/class000100006/hwz96344.htm

CASE MAY KEEP STUDENT FROM PLAYING UI FOOTBALL (Pantagraph, Nov. 13)
Isaac Monts' father claims a major misunderstanding with the Illinois High School Association will keep his son from playing football for a major university next year. The Rev. Robert Monts said Big Ten schools such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Northwestern University expressed interest in his son after his junior season at South Streator High School. But scouts wanted to see the standout quarterback compete against tougher competition, and that wasn't possible. Allegations of recruiting violations surrounding Isaac Monts' transfer to Pontiac Township High School led the IHSA to revoke his sports eligibility for his senior year. The case focuses on allegations that Pontiac football coach Mick Peterson, who has filed his own legal challenge to a one-year suspension handed down by the IHSA, exerted "undue influence" by showing Monts' parents a video about the football program. The IHSA has described the tape as a highlight video that depicted the football program as superior to other schools, in violation of an IHSA bylaw that prohibits distributing materials to lure transfers. Located in Bloomington, Ill., the Pantagraph is a daily newspaper that services eight counties and more than 60 communities in Central Illinois.
http://www.pantagraph.com/stories/111302/new_20021113033.shtml

SUSPECT IN UI RAPE CASE GOES TO TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 13)
A former traveling comedian began his fourth trial on campus rape charges Tuesday after previously being convicted of similar charges in Davenport, Iowa, and Nebraska. Vinson Champ faces a second life sentence if convicted of raping a 19-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in the early morning hours of Aug. 6, 1996. His trial on first-degree kidnapping charges in Johnson County District Court is expected to last three or four days, although attorneys say jury selection may take longer than usual because of the public's knowledge about Champ.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=562803

WILSON: UI SEEKS FUNDS TO SPRUCE UP CAMPUS (WQAD-TV, Nov. 13)
University of Iowa officials hope to raise $14 million to spruce up the campus. A private fund-raising drive is under way as part of the university's $850 million capital campaign. Campus Planner LARRY WILSON says the school's appearance is important in recruiting and retaining students. Plans include landscaping, preserving an outdoor commons area, adding new paths and improving the area near the Iowa River. Officials hope to raise $8 million for campus projects, $4 million for an endowment for future enhancements and $2 million for other improvements. WQAD-TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1009042
A version of the story also ran Nov. 13 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=563063

ACT SCORES UP FOR UI INCOMING FRESHMEN (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 13)
Freshmen who entered Iowa's public universities this fall have higher ACT scores than the national average, according to a Board of Regents, State of Iowa report. The average score for freshmen entering the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was 24.6, and the average for freshman at Iowa State University was 24.4, according to the report. University of Northern Iowa freshmen scored an average 22.9. The highest score possible is 36, and the national average was 20.8.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=563062

UI MAY GIVE STUDENTS GHB TEST KITS (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 13)
University of Iowa police want to give students kits that test drinks for so-called date-rape drugs. Campus Police Officer BRAD ALLISON says he wants to have the kits available by next semester. The kits include a credit card- or coaster-sized test strip that changes color when dabbed with liquid that contains the drug GHB or ketamine. The colorless, tasteless and odorless drugs can be used in drinks to incapacitate people, leaving them vulnerable to sexual assault. Other universities nationwide have begun offering the kits.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=562863
A version of the article also ran Nov. 12 on the website of WQAD-TV, based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1009023

CIVIC CLUB GIVES UI STUDENT SCHOLARSHIP (Honolulu Advertiser, Nov. 13)
A list of scholarships says that the Hawaii Chinese Civic Club awarded a scholarship recently to Jonathan Lui, a graduate of Maryknoll High School in Honolulu who is currently majoring in biomedical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2002/Nov/13/ln/ln38a.html

UI OFFERS MEDICAL INFORMATION ONLINE (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 11)
A growing number of academic medical centers and teaching hospitals are opening their virtual doors to the public, putting consumer health information on their Web sites and offering free access to their medical libraries. Many offer free e-mail newsletters with health and medicine updates. It only makes sense: These institutions are where new medical knowledge and research are being generated on a daily basis, be it the latest cancer clinical trials or the current science on treating a nail fungus. If you want to learn more about ophthalmology issues like corneal transplants or glaucoma, there's a wealth of information on the Web site of the University of Iowa's Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences (webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu).
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1036533075874108828-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

RZONCA SUPPORTS ICN USE (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 12)
Budget cuts and an increasing demand for Web-based courses have led to a slide in the number of college students taking classes on the state's fiber-optic network. According to a report by the Iowa Board of Regents, enrollment in classes offered by the state's three public universities on the Iowa Communications Network was down 5.4 percent in the 2001-02 academic year. The number of classes dropped by 21. Budget cuts forced the elimination of faculty positions and some network sites at the University of Iowa and Iowa State University. The University of Northern Iowa was the only state school that reported an increase in network use. CHET RZONCA, interim dean of continuing education at Iowa, said more classes will use the fiber-optic network next year, and more faculty are learning how to use the technology. "I don't think there's another state that's equipped with a system like the ICN," he said. "It's not problem-free, but I think it's an asset, and we ought to use it."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=562043
A version of the story also ran Nov. 12 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/templates/misc/printstory.jsp?slug=sns%2Dap%2Dstate%2Dspotlight1112nov11

UI IS PARTNER IN 'TREE OF LIFE' RESEARCH (Alphagalileo.com, Nov. 12)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is a partner in an ambitious, multi-disciplinary, 15-20 year program recently launched by the National Science Foundation to fill in and flesh out the Tree of Life. Field Museum of Chicago scientists will help lead three of the seven grants recently awarded to researchers around the world to construct a new framework for understanding the evolutionary relationships between all species, extinct and living. These three projects will focus on birds, spiders, and archosaurs (birds, dinosaurs, pterosaurs and crocodiles). They represent more than half of the $12 million that NSF awarded for the first year of the Assembling the Tree of Life program. The Alphagalileo website, based in London, touts itself as the "Internet press center for European science and arts."
http://www.alphagalileo.org/index.cfm?fuseaction=readRelease&Releaseid=11560

ALUMNI RETURN FOR UI EXHIBITION (Art Museum Network News, Nov. 12)
Two of the University of Iowa's most distinguished alumni from the School of Art and Art History return to Iowa City with their simultaneous exhibitions "Miriam Schapiro's Art: A Journey" and "Paul Brach: The Negative Way, Geometry of Faith and Music of the Spheres." The exhibitions will feature works that the artists have completed in the past decade, 15 "femmages" by Schapiro and 22 paintings and a print series by Brach. Schapiro and Brach met at the UI more than 50 years ago. Both had grown up in New York City and came to Iowa to pursue a Master of Fine Arts degree from the UI. They married less than a year after they met. Today, the two 78-year-olds continue to be one of the most remarkable couples in American art. "Each of them has made an indelible imprint on the American art world, Paul especially as a teacher and Miriam as a painter," HOWARD COLLINSON, director of the Museum of Art, said, noting that they've both won lifetime achievement awards from the College Art Association.
http://news.amn.org/press.jsp?id=1137

TEEN WANTS TO FARM (San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 12)
Down on the farm, times are so hard that a desire to raise crops is viewed as a sign of misguided youth. Not that it afflicts many young people here. Half the students at Union High School, located deep in crop country, have grown up on farms. Yet a recent survey showed that of the 97 Union High seniors this year, only one wants to be a farmer: Joe Docekal. The La Porte City student's girlfriend of a year, Rachel Knipfel lives on a farm, too, but she wants to go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or the University of Northern Iowa and find a job in retail fashion.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/11/12/financial0957EST0038.DTL

UI INVOLVED IN SMALLPOX VACCINE TEST (Baltimore Sun, Nov. 12)
Vanderbilt University has given smallpox vaccinations to about 150 volunteers. Doctors are researching what dosage level will protect people and whether the inoculations can spread the disease to the unvaccinated. Similar research is being done at both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Cincinnati. State officials last week said they would inoculate residents if smallpox is used in a terrorist attack.
http://www.sunspot.net/templates/misc/printstory.jsp?slug=sns%2Dap%2Dstate%2Dspotlight1112nov11

AUTHOR ATTENDED WRITERS' WORKSHOP (New York Times, Nov. 12)
Sandra Cisneros has written a novel called "Caramelo." This is only her second novel; her first was the hugely successful "House on Mango Street," published in 1984. Cisneros attended the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/12/books/12CISN.html?ex=1037768400&en=3cebfaef4aa72ab0&ei=5062

STUDENT OPPOSES TUITION HIKE (WQAD-TV, Nov. 12)
A student leader at the University of Iowa wants a proposed 19 percent tuition hike to pass with a stipulation. Student government president NICK HERBOLD says that he wants the increase to be reduced if state appropriations are higher than last year. Herbold will present his plan at the Board of Regents meeting on Wednesday and Thursday in Ames. WQAD TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1008755
The Associated Press story also appeared in the Nov. 12 OMAHA WORLD-HERALD
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=562034

FORMER SEC OFFICIAL SPEAKS AT UI (WQAD-TV, Nov. 12)
The former chief accountant for the Securities Exchange Commission says investor confidence in financial markets will return. Lynn Turner says that will happen when public accounting firms reassert their independence and ethical standards. He also says the financial scandals and corporate fraud of the past year can be blamed as much on accountants as they can be on executives and corporate boards. Turner made his comments Monday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1008739

STUDENT BORN DEAF PLAYS IN BAND (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 12)
Tim Brandau ,18, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA freshman from the northeastern Iowa town of Rudd, was the first congenitally deaf child in the United States to receive a cochlear implant. Now he plays alto saxophone in the UI Hawkeye Marching Band. "It's fun to prove that a deaf person can play in the band," Brandau said. Just before Brandau's fourth birthday in 1987, doctors at University Hospitals fitted him with a cochlear implant -- a device that electrically stimulates nerves inside the ear and enables the patient to hear.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=561829

SEATTLE PARK NAMED TO HONOR HOMER HARRIS (Seattle Times, Nov. 12)
An anonymous donor has given the Seattle Parks Foundation $1.3 million to build a Central Area park in honor of Dr. Homer Harris, a hall-of-fame football hero, renowned physician and a pioneer in the black community. On a football scholarship Harris went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- which he chose over the University of Washington because, as a black man, he would not have been allowed to live on the UW campus. In Iowa, he was voted most valuable player in the Big Ten Conference. The following year he became the league's first black captain -- and the first black captain of any sport in Iowa. Three months ago, he was inducted into the Iowa Athletics Hall of Fame as much for the barriers he broke as for the game he played. "This was a very significant moment: Homer really was a pioneer," said Les Steenlage, executive director of the National Iowa Varsity Club. "It says a lot about him that his mates chose him to be their leader."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/134574360_homerharris12m0.html

TEEN WANTS TO FARM (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 12)
Down on the farm, times are so hard that a desire to raise crops is viewed as a sign of misguided youth. Not that it afflicts many young people here. Half the students at Union High School , located deep in crop country, have grown up on farms. Yet a recent survey showed that of the 97 Union High seniors this year, only one wants to be a farmer: Joe Docekal. The La Porte City student's girlfriend of a year, Rachel Knipfel lives on a farm, too, but she wants to go to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or the University of Northern Iowa and find a job in retail fashion.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1037052779743781348-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

HARRIS REMEMBERED (Seattle Post-Intellegencer, Nov. 12)
An anonymous donor has given $1.3 million to create a half-acre park in Seattle in honor of Homer Harris. The gift is believed to be the largest single private donation made toward a park in the city's history. Harris excelled in football at Garfield High School in Seattle. On the urging of his Garfield football coach, Leon Brigham, who played for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Harris headed to Iowa City to play ball. In 1937, he became the first African-American player to captain a Big Ten team. His teammates chose him because they called him "the greatest end" and "the best man on Iowa's line," according to an article in the Chicago Daily Tribune. Harris also made front-page headlines in the Des Moines Register for winning the Most Valuable Player that same year. "It was a big honor," Harris said, scanning a black-and-white Iowa team photograph. "Because some guys at that point had so much prejudice that they didn't even want you to come to the locker room." Last August, Harris made a trip back to Iowa City with his grandson for the first time since graduation. During the half-time season opener, Harris was inducted into the University of Iowa Hall of Fame.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/95206_park12.shtml

DYKEN COMMENTS ON NAP BREAKS AT WORK (Asbury Park Press, Nov. 11)
The go-go mentality that has created a 24-7 world where the average workday is no longer confined to 8 hours has also created a nation of zombies. Napping, once thought to be a luxury of the wealthy or slothful, is now catching on in the corporate world. "A lot of workers do a lot better with a 15-minute nap," said MARK DYKEN, a neurologist and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Catnaps of 15 to 30 minutes can do a lot to refresh someone who is ready to nod off. While it won't replace a good night's rest, a brief snooze can help people focus better on their work, he said.

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIVE SHOPPING (Daily Oklahoman, Nov. 11)
What distinguishes a conscious spender from a compulsive shopper? The answer lies in the degree to which the shopping affects his or her life, said DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine and a leading expert in compulsive shopping and shoplifting. "If it's affecting your social life, your relationships, your marriage and your financial health, you had better take a look at it," said Black. Compulsive shoppers routinely hide credit card bills from family members, take out secret loans and stash merchandise to hide their habit. In fact, much of the merchandise compulsive shoppers cart home sits unused and even unopened, hidden inclosets and under beds. They often don't even bother to take off the price tags, said Black. Black treated one woman who would routinely see a blouse or slacks she liked on her daily shopping trips and end up buying one in every color. It wasn't because she planned to wear these clothes. She just got a high of sorts from the buying. A version of the article also appeared in the Nov. 10 edition of the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE.

COLEMAN JUMPS INTO 'HOT SEAT' AT UM (Crain's Detroit Business, Nov. 11)
Legal scholar Lee Bollinger positioned the University of Michigan to become a life-sciences powerhouse, but experts believe scientist Mary Sue Coleman understands industry partnerships and technology transfer enough to really make that happen. Coleman, a former cancer researcher, left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in August to succeed the Columbia University-bound Bollinger as UM's 13th president at $475,000 a year. She jumped into a hot seat. Barely three months into her tenure, Coleman oversaw last week's self-imposed penalties for the university's men's basketball program stemming from loans allegedly given to members of the "Fab 5" and other 1990s teams. In examining the basketball program, Coleman drew on the depth of her experience with the National Collegiate Athletic Association.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f650ad2d5cfb4b6f6a930319e8aa52f7&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlAl&_md5=65f6ed85d5d494bf80149f8f6de35b9a

MAN RECEIVES MEDICAL MARIJUANA (Freezerbox.com, Nov. 11)
Afflicted with a rare neurological condition, George McMahon, age 51, is the fifth U.S. citizen to receive legal medical marijuana from the U.S. government. Convinced that using small amounts of pot daily helped ease his discomfort without life-threatening side effects, McMahon smoked marijuana illegally for several years. Finally, he tracked down a doctor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who took a special interest in helping him get marijuana legally. He put McMahon through an investigation protocol and a spastic pain evaluation. A native Iowan, George then contacted assistants at Senator Charles Grassley's office, and was pleased at their willingness to help.
http://www.freezerbox.com/archive/article.asp?id=248

DAMASIO: FREUD'S INSIGHTS ON MIND MAY BE RIGHT (Newsweek, Nov. 11)
Sigmund Freud has been out of the scientific mainstream for so long, it's easy to forget that in the early-20th century he was regarded as a towering man of science -- not, as he is remembered today, as the founder of the marginalized form of therapy known as psychoanalysis. At the start of his career, he wanted to invent a "science of the mind," but the Victorian tools he had were too blunt for the task. So he dropped the "science" part and had his patients lie on a couch, free-associating about childhood, dreams and fantasies. … But a funny thing happened to Freud on the way to becoming a trivia question: as researchers looked deeper into the physical structure of the brain, they began to find support for some of his theories. Now a small but influential group of researchers are using his insights as a guide to future research; they even have a journal, Neuropsychoanalysis, founded three years ago. "Freud's insights on the nature of consciousness are consonant with the most advanced contemporary neuroscience views," wrote ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Note that Damasio did not refer to psychoanalysis or the Oedipus complex. Instead the work is going on at the fundamental level where emotions are born and primitive passions lurk in the shadows of dreams.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/829644.asp

UI IS PART OF SMALLPOX STUDY (The Tennessean, Nov. 11)
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center and two other universities are pricking volunteers with dull needles and giving them weeping sores to try to ensure that a smallpox vaccination of emergency personnel won't infect the rest of the population. Approximately 150 Middle Tennesseans ages 18 to 32 have been inoculated with varying amounts of long-frozen Aventis Pasteur smallpox vaccine. The aim is to find out whether the vaccine is effective in full, 20 percent-strength and 10 percent-strength dosages, and whether the people to whose shoulders it is applied can be contagious to friends and family. So far, so good. The trials -- in progress at Vanderbilt, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Cincinnati -- proceed under the looming specter of war with Iraq and federal-mandated preparations to safeguard Americans at home as soon as possible. Last week, under Bush Administration deadlines, Tennessee Health Department officials announced a plan to find 117 Tennessee emergency clinic sites and 20,000 volunteer workers to staff them by Feb. 28. The Tennessean is based in Nashville.
http://www.tennessean.com/local/archives/02/11/25119018.shtml?Element_ID=25119018

ARTICLE TOUTS UI VIRTUAL HOSPITAL (Yahoo! Finance, Singapore, Nov. 11)
The best place to get medical information online may be the same place your doctor learned it. A growing number of academic medical centers and teaching hospitals are opening their virtual doors to the public, putting consumer health information on their Web sites and offering free access to their medical libraries. Many offer free e-mail newsletters with health and medicine updates. It only makes sense: These institutions are where new medical knowledge and research are being generated on a daily basis, be it the latest cancer clinical trials or the current science on treating a nail fungus. If you want to learn more about ophthalmology issues like corneal transplants or glaucoma, there's a wealth of information on the Web site of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S DEPARTMENT OF OPHTHALMOLOGY AND VISUAL SCIENCES (webeye.ophth.uiowa.edu).
http://sg.biz.yahoo.com/021111/72/34l0u.html

BROKAW ATTENDED UI (Aberdeen American News, Nov. 11)
A feature about veteran NBC anchor Tom Brokaw says he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for a year before leaving to take classes at the University of South Dakota.
The Aberdeen American News is based in South Dakota.
http://www.aberdeennews.com/mld/aberdeennews/news/4492891.htm

NELSON 911 TRANSCRIPTS REQUESTED (WQAD-TV, Nov. 11)
A Linn County judge will hear arguments this week about a request to release transcripts of emergency calls a woman made to police after her husband was stabbed. Phyllis Nelson is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Doctor Richard Nelson. He was the executive dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CARVER COLLEGE OF MEDICINE. Nelson's lawyer wants to have the transcripts suppressed permanently. The Cedar Rapids Gazette has renewed its request for the release of the transcripts after Judge Thomas Horan rejected the newspaper's initial request in June. WQAD TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1006433

UI EXPERIENCE PREPARED COLEMAN FOR NEW JOB (Michigan Daily, Nov. 11)
After a mere 100 days, University President Mary Sue Coleman has reduced the gap between students and herself and plans to continue to expand upon available opportunities in order to enrich the already thriving University community. "I've really enjoyed getting to know the people here," she said. "They're just really good people." Although she gives credit to the talented and friendly staff she works with, Coleman said it is her previous experience that has allowed her to assimilate so quickly into her role as president. After working as president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for seven years, she said she understands that complicated situations will inevitably arise, but said she has learned to confront these challenges. Michigan Daily is the student newspaper of the University of Michigan.
http://www.michigandaily.com/vnews/display.v/ART/2002/11/11/3dcf3e5ed3c7a

ACCLAIMED NOVELIST ATTENDED WORKSHOP (Poughkeepsie Journal, Nov. 11)
A story about Emily Barton, whose novel "The Testament of Yves Gundron" was hailed as a remarkable achievement for a first-time author, says Barton, who attended Harvard and later the prestigious WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Poughkeepsie Journal is based in New York.
http://www.poughkeepsiejournal.com/today/lifeentertainment/stories/li111102s1.shtml

LEWIS-BECK PONDERS ELECTION RESULTS (Washington Times, Nov. 11)
Across the nation, the results of last week's elections — like no others in living memory — threw all the rules and expectations out the window and tempted some prognosticators to jump out after them. "It couldn't happen, but it really did happen," says MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a University of Iowa political science professor who co-wrote "Forecasting Elections" and had predicted a net Republican loss of eight seats in the House and three in the Senate. To the befuddlement of Mr. Lewis-Beck, who says he is hiding while figuring out how to explain his miscalculation, Republicans locked up two additional Senate seats to take control no matter how the two seats that remained in doubt are resolved.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20021110-893346.htm

FORMER UI PROFESSORS STARTED THEATER (Lansing State Journal, Nov. 11)
A story about the BoarsHead Theater in Lansing, Mich., says John Peakes, the theater's co-founder and driving force for 36 years, its artistic director and its favorite actor, along with Peakes' wife, Judith, the theater's managing director, plan to leave by June 2004. Peakes and Richard Thomsen, both former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professors, started the theater in 1966. It was a low-budget, summer-only operation at the Ledges Playhouse in Grand Ledge. William Hurt -- who went on to become an Oscar-winner -- remembers making less than $30 a week there.
http://www.lsj.com/things/theater/021111_boarshead.html

GURNETT SINGS PRAISES OF 'SUN RINGS' (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 10)
For 40 years, University of Iowa physics professor DONALD GURNETT has been recording whistlers and other space sounds gathered by instruments he designs for NASA spacecraft. Over the years, Gurnett has supplied tapes of the sounds to numerous composers who have requested them. But he can't recall any of those composers' names, because none of them ever called back. As far as he knows, whistlers never found their way into music. But now they have, and in a sensational form. Terry Riley's "Sun Rings," a multimedia extravaganza for string quartet, chorus, space sounds and video, was given its premiere at Iowa's Hancher Auditorium two weeks ago. Written for the Kronos Quartet and illustrated by new-media artist Willie Williams, it is the music of the spheres and then some -- an incomparable love letter to the stars and the planets, including our own.
http://www.calendarlive.com/music/swed/cl-ca-swed10nov10,0,5105940.story?coll=cl%2Dsuncal

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION'S LINDQUIST STARTED ACT (New York Times, Nov. 10)
Since its debut in 1959, the ACT Assessment -- formerly known as the American College Testing Program -- has emphasized achievement over aptitude. Questions on the three-hour, four-part test are drawn from high school curriculums, not general knowledge, designed to test how much students have learned rather than how smart they are. ACT's founder, E.F. Lindquist, who died in 1978, was a professor of education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Before the ACT, he invented the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, still one of the premier standardized assessments for grade-schoolers, and its high school version, the Iowa Tests of Educational Development; he also helped create the original high school equivalency exam, the G.E.D. Next came a machine known as Mark I, which quickly scanned bubble sheets, counting 50,000 right answers in a second -- and doing in a week what it had taken 60 women to do in six.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/10/edlife/1110WIT.html

FORMER UI STUDENT WROTE PAPER ON DRUG (Detroit News, Nov. 10)
As more immigrants from East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula settle in the United States, federal drug agents report a rise in an unwelcome custom: the use of khat, an amphetamine-like drug illegal in the United States but as culturally entrenched in parts of Africa as coffee-drinking is here. While seizures of khat don't compare with those of marijuana and cocaine, they are increasing, Drug Enforcement Administration agents say. "It has been used for thousands of years, generation after generation," said Yigzaw Belay, an Ethiopian national residing in Nashville who said he avoids the plant. "People don't see it as a narcotic." Belay, who wrote a graduate-level paper on khat at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said that khat is entrenched in religious and social rituals in many countries. Men often sit together, chew khat and talk about social and political issues, he said. Many think the drug is therapeutic.
http://www.detnews.com/2002/nation/0211/10/a12-6368.htm

PIERCE CASE DRAWS CRITICISM (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 10)
Some members of the Board of Regents, State of Iowa say they're not happy with the settlement of a sexual abuse case involving University of Iowa basketball player Pierre Pierce. Pierce pleaded guilty to assault causing injury and received a deferred judgment. He was initially charged with third-degree sexual abuse. The plea agreement allows him to redshirt this season and keep his scholarship. Regent Clarkson Kelly says he doesn't think Pierce should be allowed to stay on the team. He says recent problems involving athletes at the state's universities is a "big problem." Regent Neala Arnold says she doesn't feel like there were any consequences for Pierce. She also says she was frustrated with the way coach STEVE ALFORD defended Pierce. Arnold says Pierce has gone nearly unpunished. Alford declined to comment on the matter. Regent David Fisher says he thinks University of Iowa officials might want to consider stricter punishments in future cases. Interim Iowa president WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD last week ordered an internal review of athletic officials' involvement in the settlement.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=560537
A version of the story also ran Nov. 9 on the website of WQAD-TV, based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1005917

LAW GRADUATE TO SERVE ON COUNCIL (The Holland Sentinel, Nov. 10)
Warner Norcross & Judd LLP said that Mark K. Harder will serve on the Probate Council of the Michigan State Bar Probate and Estate Planning Section. Harder, chairman of the Warner Norcross Trust and Estates practice group, was elected to a three-year term to the Probate Council, which supervises and guides the actions of the Probate and Estate Planning Section of the Michigan Bar. Harder joined Warner's Holland office in 1990 and became a partner in 1996. He earned both his bachelor's degree and his doctorate of jurisprudence from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and practiced law in Milwaukee from 1986 to 1990. The Sentinel is based in Holland, Mich.
http://www.thehollandsentinel.net/stories/111002/bus_111002058.shtml

ROBILLARD IS DEAN OF COLLEGE OF MEDICINE (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 10)
The University of Iowa has a new dean for its medical school. Doctor JEAN ROBILLARD has been named the dean of the Carver College of Medicine. He'll begin the job on February first. He succeeds Doctor Robert Kelch, who's stepping down to focus on his duties for statewide health services. Robillard is chairman of pediatrics at the University of Michigan medical school and physician-in-chief at CS Mott Children's Hospital, where he has been on the faculty since 1996. Before that, he held positions at Iowa's medical school and University Hospitals. Robillard came to Iowa from UCLA in 1973 and stayed for 20 years.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=560671
A version of the same story also ran Nov. 8 on the website of WQAD TV, based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1005172

LOPES: ECONOMY AFFECTS GRADUATION RATE? (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 9)
Fewer students at the University of Iowa are graduating in four years, despite a growing number of students signing the school's four-year graduation contract. School officials point to a sour economy nationwide as a possible reason for the decline. "Our best guess is that this is a market phenomenon," said LOLA LOPES, associate provost for undergraduate education. Iowa Student Government President NICK HERBOLD said he thinks fewer course offerings could be making it harder for students to graduate in four years.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=559645

PSYCHOLOGIST RESEARCHES SCIENCE OF EMOTION (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8)
With a new respect for the science of emotion, researchers are charting the anatomy of social graces, capturing neural impulses of fairness and shame that guide behavior. In findings made public this week at a meeting of 24,000 neuroscientists in Orlando, researchers documented how the primal mood circuits of the brain can color manners, cooperation and judgment, even as scientists revealed a new understanding of how the human capacity for emotion changes over a lifetime. By focusing on the neural networks that drive feelings, scientists have embraced an objective inquiry into the subjective, emotional life of the mind. Until recently, scientists could make only educated guesses about the nature of the emotional chords struck by joy or sadness. New noninvasive medical imaging techniques, however, allow scientists to plumb the wellsprings of the mind more precisely. Recording the interplay of neural patterns, they seek explanations for the subtle mood changes that influence our decisions and shape the way we treat each other. "There has been a shift to looking for brain patterns," UI psychologist DANIEL TRANEL said. "Emotion is a topic that has been deliberately eschewed by neuroscientists for a long time. It was a nuisance in our data and we tried to get rid of it. Now, we deliberately focus on it."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-sci-shame8nov08004446.story

KOONTZ DISCUSSES OREGON LAWSUIT (Salem Statesman Journal, Nov. 8)
Richard Koontz, coordinator of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA NONPROFIT RESOURCE CENTER, is quoted in a story about an Oregon civil racketeering lawsuit brought against Oregon Taxpayers United by the state's two largest teacher unions. The Salem Statesman Journal is located in Salem, Ore.
http://news.statesmanjournal.com/article.cfm?i=51494

JONES COMMENTS ON ELECTION SECURITY (Washington Times, Nov. 8)
High-tech voting devices passed the test Tuesday, making it more likely that state elections officials will retire punch cards and lever machines and introduce a new era of digital democracy. But there is a growing debate over the security of electronic ballots because few people have access to the software code running electronic-voting machines, said DOUGLAS JONES, UI associate professor of political science. The software code should be more broadly available, he said. "The fundamental problem is that the code is proprietary. The fear is that an individual or group of individuals could include malicious features in software that would evade notice and allow skewing of the results," Jones said.
http://www.washtimes.com/business/20021107-73408676.htm

MENTAL HEALTH STUDY GETS $1.7 MILLION (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 8)
The National Institutes of Health have approved a $1.7 million grant for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study a new treatment for borderline personality disorder. People with the disorder can experience self-damaging or impulsive behaviors or suicidal thoughts and often do not respond to medication and individualized psychotherapy.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=558551

TRANEL COMMENTS ON EMOTION RESEARCH (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8)
With a new respect for the science of emotion, researchers are charting the anatomy of social graces, capturing neural impulses of fairness and shame that guide behavior. In findings made public this week at a meeting of 24,000 neuroscientists in Orlando, researchers documented how the primal mood circuits of the brain can color manners, cooperation and judgment, even as scientists revealed a new understanding of how the human capacity for emotion changes over a lifetime. "There has been a shift to looking for brain patterns," University of Iowa psychologist DANIEL TRANEL said. "Emotion is a topic that has been deliberately eschewed by neuroscientists for a long time. It was a nuisance in our data and we tried to get rid of it. Now, we deliberately focus on it."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-sci-shame8nov08004446.story?null

UI TO USE VIRAGE STREAMING VIDEO SOFTWARE (Streaming, Nov. 8)
Virage on Thursday announced that Academic Technologies, a group within Information Technology Services at the University of Iowa, is deploying Virage publishing software for two significant streaming video projects. As part of these projects, thousands of hours of video footage will be encoded, indexed and delivered to students and faculty across campus, and to remote locations worldwide. Faculty and students will have instant access to these large video collections directly from a web browser. "Virage provided us with a solution that meets all of our requirements," said KASPAR STROMME, senior computing consultant, Academic Technologies. The first project, a five-year effort funded by the National Science Foundation, will provide political science students with tools to analyze news coverage from major broadcasters, such as BBC and CNN. Using Virage, the news content will be automatically indexed via closed-caption text or speech recognition. The resulting metadata will be placed online where political science students can perform advanced searches on the data, anytime and anywhere. The second project is an undertaking to provide online access to an oral history of Iowa's rich tradition in journalism. During earlier stages of the project University students interviewed an array of distinguished veteran journalists.
http://www.streamingmagazine.com/viewentry.asp?ID=240202&PT=Daily+Digest&TI=dailydigest
A version of the story also ran Nov. 7 on the PRIMEZONE MEDIA NETWORK website:
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b2083f32f65c35f8ebd8b9bc50dbec0f&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVlz-lSlAl&_md5=8f378617e7878d5b1b60554852584460

LOPES COMMENTS ON FOUR-YEAR GRADUATION RATE (WQAD-TV, Nov. 8)
The four-year graduation rate the University of Iowa is dropping, despite a growing number of students signing the four-year graduation contract. School officials point to a sour economy as a possible reason for the decline. Spokeswoman LOLA LOPES says the job market is bad, so students are choosing to stay in school. This spring, Iowa graduated about 36 percent of the students who entered the school in 1998. That year, 65 percent of the class signed the contract. The contract guarantees students will graduate in four years if they declare their majors during their sophomore year and take full class loads every semester. The percentage of students graduating from Iowa in four years is higher than at Iowa State and Northern Iowa. However, both those schools posted increases in their four-year graduation rates this year. WQAD TV is based in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1005215

COLEMAN COMMENTS ON CASE (Miami Herald, Nov. 7)
When she was appointed president of the University of Michigan in May, Mary Sue Coleman stood at a podium at the Michigan Union, looked straight at the television cameras and promised to get to the bottom of the scandal involving booster Ed Martin. "Whatever it takes," she said. On Thursday, Coleman stood at the same podium facing another phalanx of reporters and cameras and announced she had gotten to the truth of the scandal that has hung over the university for six years. In that moment, Coleman accomplished what had eluded four previous U-M presidents: a near resolution of the biggest sports scandal in U-M history. Coleman succeeded because she had what her predecessors had lacked: the power of the federal government, a grand jury and its subpoenas. And as the Big Ten representative to the NCAA Board of Directors and a former president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Coleman brought more knowledge of college athletics than her predecessors. Coleman first heard about the Ed Martin saga in 1997 at the University of Iowa. "I did not know the details and did not know whether U-M had done an investigation," she recalled.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/4469320.htm

WATSON INTERVIEWED (PrimeTime Live, ABC News, Nov. 7)
GINGER WATSON
, a researcher at the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS) at the University of Iowa, was interviewed on camera for a segment on driver reaction time in an accident, particularly driver reaction to foggy highway conditions. The program focused on the recent multi-car pileup on a California freeway that injured dozens of people. The segment also showed videotape of the NADS in operation.

UI STUDENT GIVES HIS LIFE AWAY ON E-BAY (ABCNews.com, Nov. 7)
Think of your most prized possession. It might be a worn baseball glove, an Atari videogame console, or a faded concert T-shirt. At some point all of these memories, knickknacks, and furniture take over your living space. But would you get rid if it all and start fresh? UI grad student JOHN FREYER decided to do just that -- sell it all.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/TechTV/techtv_lifeauction021107.html

BLACK COMMENTS ON SHOPLIFTING (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 7)
Actress Winona Ryder has not said what prompted her to take more than $5,500 in clothes and accessories from Saks Fifth Avenue last year. But psychiatrists say people who shoplift to serve a compulsive urge may suffer from a treatable mental disorder. Medication by itself rarely turns people's lives around, psychiatrists say. Most compulsive shoplifters also need to identify and avoid the situations that get them into trouble, such as fancy display cases, jewelry counters or shopping after a stressful workday. Instead, experts say, they must learn to distract themselves when they feel the urge. Weekly therapy sessions can help; so can supportive friends and family members. "With some of my patients, I have to tell them they simply cannot go into a store again, unless they have someone with them," said Dr. DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa who studies impulse control problems. "If you've got someone with you who knows about the problem, you're much less likely to take anything."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-shoplift7nov07.story?null

UI GRADUATE INVESTIGATING HARASSMENT (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 7)
Reeling from allegations of sexual harassment, the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District has hired an outside attorney to launch a fair and impartial investigation, the board of commissioners announced Wednesday. Chicago attorney Callie L. Baird, former chief administrator of the Chicago Police Department's Office of Professional Standards, will begin immediately investigating the allegations by a group of African-American female employees. Baird, a former Cook County public defender, left the Office of Professional Standards in January after nearly four years to open a private practice with Thomas Needham, Chicago Police Supt. Terry Hillard's former chief of staff. She is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0211070173nov07.story?null

BROKAW COMMENTS ON UI (The Tribune, Nov. 7)
A feature on NBC anchor Tom Brokaw says that in his fourth book in four years, "A Long Way from Home: Growing Up in the American Heartland," Brokaw discusses his childhood, including his days in high school and college. In an effort for full disclosure, there's even a chapter about his freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he flopped as a student. The chapter is called, "Failure Is an Option." (The Tribune is based in Port St. Lucie/Fort Pierce, Fla.)
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1c4f1011e4593a07036553440b9bd770&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLbVzz-lSlAl&_md5=eaf0b9b6aa8c8cd1cb866b30d85c7051

NEWLY-ELECTED SENATOR COLEMAN ATTENDED UI (USA Today, Nov. 6)
An article about Minnesota's new Republican Senator, Norm Coleman, notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/politicselections/2002-11-06-coleman_x.htm

UI CITED IN ELECTION STORY (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 6)
Democrat Tom Vilsack Tuesday won a second term as governor of Iowa. Joe Householder, communication director for Vilsack's campaign, said heavily Democratic Johnson County, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, had a record turnout.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=555923

BROKAW COMMENTS ON UI (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Nov. 6)
A feature on NBC anchor Tom Brokaw says that in his fourth book in four years, "A Long Way from Home: Growing Up in the American Heartland," Brokaw discusses his childhood, including his days in high school and college. In an effort for full disclosure, there's even a chapter about his freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he flopped as a student. The chapter is called, "Failure Is an Option."
http://home.post-dispatch.com/channel%5Cpdweb.nsf/TodayWednesday/86256A0E0068FE5086256C690045EC80?OpenDocument
The same story also ran Nov. 6 on STLToday.com, or St. Louis Today, an online news and information cite that carries content of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch newspaper.
http://www.stltoday.com/stltoday/entertainment/stories.nsf/Entertainment/81026B3A4F8D720186256C680072781F?OpenDocument&headline=From+Yankton+to+Yankee+town

SON OF INDIAN CANDIDATE ATTENDS UI (Rediff.com, Nov. 6)
Swati Dandekar of the Democratic Party was elected from the 36th district to the Iowa state assembly, making her the first Indian American woman to be elected to a legislative body in the United States. The 51-year-old Nagpur-born Dandekar got 6,727 votes (57 per cent of the total cast) as against 4,983 (43 per cent) for her opponent Karen Balderston, a farmer and substitute teacher. Dandekar, who got her high school diploma from the J N Tata Parsi School, Nagpur, earned a postgraduate diploma in dietetics from Bombay University in 1972. Her husband Arvind is CEO/president of Fastek International of Hiawatha, Iowa. Their two sons, Ajai, 26, and Govind, 23, are graduates of Linn-Marr High School and Stanford University. Currently, Ajai is a fourth year student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the MD/PhD programme. Rediff.com India Ltd. is one of India's leading Internet, communications and media companies serving Indians globally, both online and offline. http://www.indiaabroad.com/us/2002/nov/06us.htm

IEM SAW REPUBLICAN VICTOR (Financial Review, Nov. 6)
There was only one place in the U.S. where you could legally put a bet on the outcome of Tuesday's election for Congress. While all the major opinion polls were saying the result was too close to call, the investors in the University of Iowa's futures contracts on the vote had a pretty clear view of where it was heading. "We traditionally do better than most of the polls anyway, within 1.5 per cent of the final result," said the director of IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, JOYCE BERG.
http://afr.com/world/2002/11/06/FFXQ23QN48D.html

GROUP WANTS NCAA TO CUT SCHOLARSHIPS (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 5)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA faculty committee concerned about increased funding for athletics when academic programs are cut wants the NCAA to reduce the number of football scholarships and campus recruiting visits for Division I-A teams. The nine-member educational policy committee within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences passed a resolution that supports cutting the number of football scholarships from 85 to 72 and the number of annual campus recruiting visits from 61 to 51. "Every component of the institution must cooperate and make sacrifices, including student athletics," the resolution says. It will be debated Nov. 20 among the college's Faculty Assembly. If approved, the Faculty Senate could take it up.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=554694

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIVE SHOPPING (Salt Lake Tribune, Nov. 5)
What distinguishes a conscious spender from a compulsive shopper? The answer lies in the degree to which the shopping affects his or her life, said DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine and a leading expert in compulsive shopping and shoplifting. "If it's affecting your social life, your relationships, your marriage and your financial health, you had better take a look at it," said Black. Compulsive shoppers routinely hide credit card bills from family members, take out secret loans and stash merchandise to hide their habit. In fact, much of the merchandise compulsive shoppers cart home sits unused and even unopened, hidden in closets and under beds. They often don't even bother to take off the price tags, said Black. Black treated one woman who would routinely see a blouse or slacks she liked on her daily shopping trips and end up buying one in every color. It wasn't because she planned to wear these clothes. She just got a high of sorts from the buying.
http://www.sltrib.com/11052002/tuesday/13517.htm

DASCHLE VISITS UI CAMPUS (Boulder Daily Camera, Nov. 5)
Tom Daschle makes a small entrance. He arrives commotion-free, a few minutes early for a campaign rally for Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Memorial Union. As he waits for Harkin, Daschle doesn't so much work the room as mill through it, gently, shaking hands and telling everyone how "terrific it is to be in Iowa" in a deep voice that's barely audible. No one besides George W. Bush has stood so prominently -- and precariously -- in the middle of so many recent Washington news cycles as Tom Daschle. He is a political figure wholly ensconced in this American moment, someone who always seems to be standing on the brink of, or in the aftermath of, something monumental. Daschle, 54, has just come to Iowa from Minnesota, where he had spent the weekend comforting the family and staff of Sen. Paul Wellstone, who died in a plane crash the previous Friday. He is just a few days from the election that will determine whether he keeps his job as majority leader. Nearly everyone in this Democratic crowd admires Daschle -- although few seem to realize that he's even here, in a smallish ballroom that holds about 120 people. The Boulder Daily Camera is based in Boulder, Colo.
http://www.bouldernews.com/bdc/nation_world_news/article/0,1713,BDC_2420_1524225,00.html

'LIFE FOR SALE' BOOK TOUR BEGINS (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 5)
John Freyer has begun a 16-city book tour to promote "All My Life for Sale" The tour began Nov. 1 at Prairie Lights Books in Iowa City. The 29-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate's project, www.allmylifeforsale.com, was an online art piece that used eBay to clear out 600 items from his personal inventory. It earned Freyer international recognition and a book contract highlighting some of the items and updates gathered from visits he made to the new owners of his old stuff.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=554889

FORMER UI INDIAN LAW PROFESSOR IS AT ASU (Arizona Republic, Nov. 4)
A story about how confusing Indian gaming laws are in Arizona quotes Robert Clinton, an Arizona State University law professor specializing in Indian law. The story says Clinton taught Indian law at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for 28 years before joining ASU a year and a half ago.

THINK TANK NOTES IEM AS ELECTION PREDICTOR (UPI, Nov. 4)
In a daily digest covering opinion pieces, reactions to recent news events and position statements released by various think tanks, the National Center for Policy Analysis notes the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. As the election gets down to the wire, pundits of all kinds are speculating on the outcome. Usually, they look at polls, debates, press coverage, advertising and such. Economists prefer to look at markets. They are signaling that maintenance of the status quo is the most likely outcome, with continued Republican control of the House and Democratic control of the Senate. For some years, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has run a futures market on key elections. Investors can buy contracts for various electoral outcomes, with prices changing depending on events. Right now, contracts are available for four possible outcomes on Tuesday: Republican House/Republican Senate, Republican House/Democratic Senate, Democratic House/Republican Senate, and Democratic House/Democratic Senate. As of Oct. 31, the prices showed that there is a 1-in-2 chance of Republicans keeping the House and Democrats keeping the Senate. In other words, even money. http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=20021104-051856-5526r

IEM TRADERS BUY FUTURES ON ELECTION (Forbes.com Nov. 4)
Twenty-one thousand traders from across the country have put up a total of $157,000 on the outcome of Tuesday's elections in electronic markets at the University of Iowa. And so far, it's too close to call the result. A Republican-controlled House and a Democrat-controlled Senate, retaining the status quo, has the most bids, with 58 cents on the dollar. But it's still way too early. Other options are a GOP sweep, a Democratic Congress and a Democrat controlled House and Republican Senate. "That's actually surprisingly uncertain for this stage in the election," says THOMAS RIETZ, professor of finance at Iowa who helps oversee the markets. The contract needs at least a 90-cent bid on the dollar to call an election, he says. As in any market, prices rise and fall according to how many people want to buy or sell.
http://www.forbes.com/markets/newswire/2002/11/04/rtr777539.html

PUBLIC UTILITY CONTROL INVESTIGATED (Wall Street Journal, Nov. 4)
In the past year, the nation's investor-owned utilities have been hit hard by missteps that have discredited power-market deregulation. Now, from Florida to New York through Iowa and into the Pacific Northwest, state and local governments are moving to take control of their local electric utilities. Iowa City has banded together with 15 other Iowa cities and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- all served by two investor-owned utilities -- to take the first step toward public power. The group is splitting the costs of hiring a consultant to study whether it makes financial sense.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1036372590476788548-search,00.html?collection=wsjie%2F30day&vql_string=%22University+of+Iowa%22%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29

ZIMMERMAN COMMENTS ON 'BREAKTHROUGH' (Stamford Advocate, Nov. 4)
A story about the New Haven, Conn., school system's adoption of the Breakthrough to Literacy reading program, which uses phonics, teacher training and computerized lessons which give teachers printouts of how students are progressing. JERRY ZIMMERMAN, the University of Iowa researcher who co-founded Breakthrough to Literacy, said what sets it apart from other reading programs is the focus on the role of the teacher. The Advocate is based in Stamford, Conn.
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/local/state/hc-04120655.apds.m0925.bc-ct--litenov04,0,4685180.story?coll=hc-headlines-local-wire

BROKAW BOOK REVIEWED (New York Daily News, Nov. 4)
In a review of Tom Brokaw's memoir, "A Long Way From Home," the anchor of "NBC Nightly News" is quoted "The last chapter will surprise a lot of people. When I went skidding off the tracks." He spent his freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA cruising coeds, drinking beer and playing pool. Retreating to the University of South Dakota for his sophomore year, he continued to blow off classes as he nursed hangovers. Eventually he dropped out. Having already made a start in broadcasting, Brokaw took a job at a CBS affiliate in Rapid City, S.D. But harsh words from friend Meredith Auld, who would become his wife, and others brought him back to college and into the fold.
http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/story/32705p-31010c.html

UI RELIES ON MARKET TO PREDICT ELECTION (Washington Times, Nov. 4)
As the election gets down to the wire, pundits of all kinds are speculating on the outcome. Usually, they look at polls, debates, press coverage, advertising and such. Economists prefer to look at markets. They are signaling that maintenance of the status quo is the most likely outcome, with continued Republican control of the House and Democratic control of the Senate. For some years, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has run a futures market on key elections. Investors can buy contracts for various electoral outcomes, with prices changing depending on events. Right now, contracts are available for four possible outcomes tomorrow: Republican House/Republican Senate; Republican House/Democratic Senate; Democratic House/Republican Senate; and Democratic House/Democratic Senate.
http://www.washtimes.com/commentary/20021104-24804.htm

DASCHLE VISITS UI CAMPUS (Washington Post, Nov. 4)
Tom Daschle makes a small entrance. He arrives commotion-free, a few minutes early for a campaign rally for Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's MEMORIAL UNION. As he waits for Harkin, Daschle doesn't so much work the room as mill through it, gently, shaking hands and telling everyone how "terrific it is to be in Iowa" in a deep voice that's barely audible. No one besides George W. Bush has stood so prominently -- and precariously -- in the middle of so many recent Washington news cycles as Tom Daschle. He is a political figure wholly ensconced in this American moment, someone who always seems to be standing on the brink of, or in the aftermath of, something monumental. Daschle, 54, has just come to Iowa from Minnesota, where he had spent the weekend comforting the family and staff of Sen. Paul Wellstone, who died in a plane crash the previous Friday. He is just a few days from the election that will determine whether he keeps his job as majority leader. Nearly everyone in this Democratic crowd admires Daschle -- although few seem to realize that he's even here, in a smallish ballroom that holds about 120 people.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64226-2002Nov3.html

ZIMMERMAN COMMENTS ON 'BREAKTHROUGH' (New Haven Register, Nov. 4)
A story about the New Haven, Conn., school system's adoption of the Breakthrough to Literacy reading program, which the article says is the latest tool in the city's effort to turn around disappointing reading scores and close the achievement gap between New Haven children and their suburban peers, quotes JERRY ZIMMERMAN, the University of Iowa researcher who co-founded Breakthrough to Literacy. Zimmerman said what sets it apart from other reading programs is the focus on the role of the teacher. "The variable that accounts for most of the impact of any program is the integrity of the implementation, and we focus on that more than anybody," he said. Under the program, New Haven kindergarten teachers attend six to eight 45-minute "team meetings" a year and are visited by a literacy coach, every two to three weeks.
http://www.newhavenregister.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=5937305&BRD=1281&PAG=461&dept_id=7573&rfi=6

CARLSON COMMENTS ON SEARCH (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 4)
The list of potential candidates for the top job at the University of Iowa has more than doubled in the past three weeks. Since Oct. 8, the number of presidential hopefuls has grown from about 30 to more than 70, said JONATHAN CARLSON, the chairman of the presidential search committee. "We're trying to fill out the candidate pool and gather as much information as we can on the candidates before we narrow it down," Carlson said last week. The UI is seeking to replace former President Mary Sue Coleman, who left in July to become president of the University of Michigan.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=554021

COLEMAN CITED IN CINCINNATI SEARCH STORY (Cincinnati Enquirer, Nov. 4)
The next president of the University of Cincinnati faces uncertain state funding, increasing competition for students from private schools and the burgeoning cost of staying technologically competitive. So UC's Board of Trustees, which is assembling a committee to select Joseph Steger's successor, will cast a wide net to find the right person to lead the second largest university in Ohio and the largest employer in Cincinnati, with 14,274 employees. Neither a woman nor a minority has ever held the presidential post, but both will be strongly considered in the search. "We would be foolish not to," Board Chairman George Schaefer said. "Look at major universities like Ohio State and Michigan." Both schools recently selected women to lead their institutions. Karen Holbrook took the helm at OSU in October after serving as senior vice president for academic affairs and provost as well as a professor of cell biology at the University of Georgia. Mary Sue Coleman was named president of the University of Michigan in August. Before that, she served as president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and as a professor of biochemistry in Iowa's College of Medicine.
http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/11/04/loc_stegerfolo04.html

GREEN REVIEWS ECO BOOK (New York Times, Nov. 3)
PETER GREEN
, an adjunct professor of classics at the University of Iowa, reviews, "Baudolino," a new novel by Umberto Eco, author of the best-selling novel "The Name of the Rose." "Eco's text is spattered with chunks of Latin and other languages, often left untranslated. He can't draw characters to save his life: what he gives us are flat cartoon figures spouting ideas. Theological digressions are everywhere. There's no real plot. The successive invasions of Italy confuse. No matter. Thanks in part to the unobtrusive skill of Eco's regular translator, William Weaver, "Baudolino," with its richly variegated haul of medieval treasures, remains compulsively readable," writes Green.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/11/03/books/review/03GREENT.html

SQUIRE DISCUSSES POLITICAL ADS (National Public Radio, Nov. 3)
Rep. Jim Leach (R-Iowa) says he dislikes TV ads attacking opponent Julie Thomas, but the National Republican Congressional Committee is paying an undisclosed amount to put them on Iowa's air anyway. University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE says the National Republican Congressional Committee-sponsored ads undercut Leach's stance of not accepting outside money. "Certainly the NRCC's raised money from around the country from lots of special interests, and they're spending that money on his behalf. And for voters, they're not going to be able to distinguish ads that are Leach's vs. ads that are the NRCC or some of the special interest groups that are running ads for him," Squire said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=1f2c49ba6148e6fc1c7591041e99d24d&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=e3ae4315dcb935c190cf86fd8bbf21ae

ALUMNUS HEADS ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES PROGRAM (News-Gazette, Nov. 3)
Although the Asian American Studies Program at the University of Illinois began just two years ago, it is already one of the strongest programs east of California, said its new director, Kent Ono. He is the first permanent director of the program, which has been overseen by George Yu, director of the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies, since 1997, when a committee first began looking at creating an academic program in Asian American studies. Ono received his bachelor's degree in English from DePauw University, a master's in communication at Miami University of Ohio and a doctorate in rhetoric at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The News-Gazette is based in Champaign-Urbana, Ill.
http://www.news-gazette.com/story.cfm?Number=12627

IWP WRITER COMMENTS ON U.S. EXPERIENCE (New Zealand Herald, Nov. 3)
Gordon McLauchlan, a New Zealand writer taking part in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM, says in a column that he and his fellow international writers were asked to participate in a public panel, with each making a brief presentation and then all of them discussing the "Images of America" they will take away from their stay in the United States. He writes, "Tricky business for me. I've been coming here fairly regularly for 30 years and right now the U.S. seems to me to be more deeply in trouble as a society than at any time since the McCarthyism days of the 1950s. Even during the Vietnam War, a sense that young people would redeem the nation was pervasive. The two major symptoms of decay are: Politically the country is awash with money intent on compromising people and hiring votes at any level; and socially the nation is awash with guns."
http://www.nzherald.co.nz/storyprint.cfm?storyID=3002212

COLEMAN ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 3)
Twice Norm Coleman has run for statewide office, and twice he has been redirected by unexpected turns of fate. Coleman ran strong in the 1998 gubernatorial contest against Hubert Humphrey III, the son of a DFL legend, only to be swamped in the final days by the unprecedented insurgence of third-party candidate Jesse Ventura. He returned to work as mayor of St. Paul the following day, fueled by his innate optimism and consoled by a sense that he had done his best. Coleman migrated from New York to Minnesota after he was recruited by the attorney general's office upon his graduation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's LAW SCHOOL. His shift toward conservatism came with age. He climbed the ranks in the attorney general's office and learned that not everyone behind bars is a political prisoner. "There's lots of bad people out there," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/587/3405369.html

BRENZEL: SLOTH IS STAR OF UI MUSEUM (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 3)
Iowa's first Capitol sits smack-dab in the middle of Iowa City's Pentacrest, a hillside cluster of stoic buildings overlooking the Iowa River. Even with the presence of Old Main, the Capitol under renovation as a historic site, you can't miss the fact that you're on the University of Iowa campus. Classic stone buildings with towering columns across broad stairways practically shout academia. But all is not as stuffy as it seems. Behold the sloth. The Ice Age re-creation looms almost 10 feet high and surprises most visitors to the Museum of Natural History at Macbride Hall. It gets some giggles, too. If you happen to hit the museum near a holiday, the giant sloth may be donning the duds of a pilgrim, Santa or even Zorro. He's become "our star," said museum coordinator DAVID BRENZEL. The sloth represents one of many mammoth-size creatures that roamed the prehistoric woodlands of Iowa. It's part of Iowa Hall, a sprawling gallery delving 500 million years into the state's geology, ecology and native cultures. (SEE RELATED STORY BELOW)
http://www.startribune.com/stories/425/3394209.html

UI MENTIONED IN IOWA CITY FEATURE (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 3)
In a brief companion piece to the previously cited story on Iowa City, the author writes: "The downtowns of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa City flow together, making it a fun, youthful and cultured area for exploring. Music, book, gift and clothing stores, cafes and a handful of galleries line Iowa, Washington, Clinton and Dubuque streets. Among the notable destinations is the Prairie Lights Bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St., which draws authors from around the world for its nationally broadcast readings. This is a writer's town, with a celebrated creative writing program at the university. There are even quotes about writing etched in the downtown sidewalk along Linn Street."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1513/3394214.html

UI ART, NATURAL HISTORY MUSEUMS CITED (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 3)
A listing of natural history museums around the country includes mention of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY, which is inside Macbride Hall. The major exhibition spaces are: Mammal Hall, where animals ranging from aardvarks to zebras are displayed. High above is the skeleton of a whale; The Taking Flight Hall of Birds. This is one of the biggest collections in the Midwest. More than 1,000 specimens of North American birds are here. It also has the Laysan Island cyclorama that presents a 1911 Hawaiian bird sanctuary; Iowa Hall, which takes visitors on a 500-million year journey through Iowa's past, beginning with a 380-million-year old coral reef. On the other side of the Iowa River, which splits the campus, is the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART, whose permanent collections include European, American, African and pre-Columbian art, plus Indian art of the Southwest.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=526&u_sid=550833

UI COMMITTEE TO STUDY ARRESTS (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 2)
A faculty and student committee at the University of Iowa has been appointed to study undergraduate arrest rates. In a Chronicle of Higher Education study released this year on college drug arrests, the university ranked fourth in the nation among colleges with more than 28,000 students. The study found there were 205 drug arrests on or near Iowa's campus in 2000. Concern over press reports showing the figures prompted the university to create a committee to gather data about student arrest and citation rates at the university, other Iowa campuses and comparable campuses nationwide. They will focus on alcohol- and drug-related incidents, said University of Iowa Faculty Senate President JEFFREY COX and University of Iowa Student Government President NICK HERBOLD in a press release.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=552311

UI PRESS PUBLISHES POEMS ABOUT BIRTH (Washington Post, Nov. 2)
There's an audacious moment in John Berryman's long poem "Homage to Mistress Bradstreet" in which he dramatizes Anne Bradstreet giving birth to her first child in 1633. Berryman had to take a giant imaginative leap in order to create an idiom wherein the 17th-century American poet could speak of her labor even as she was having it. Berryman's poem comes to mind because in a splendid new anthology, "Birth: A Literary Companion" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS), Kristin Kovacic and Lynne Barrett identify a genre they call "birth literature." They deliver an imaginative guidebook -- a spiritual Baedeker -- to the daunting country of parenthood. The poems and stories are arranged chronologically from early pregnancy to late infancy. The centerpiece of the book is a section called "Notes from the Delivery Room." It contains Lee Upton's witty and ferocious poem "Women's Labors," which plays off the cliché that a woman's work is never done and ends with a feeling of true timelessness, absolute freedom.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A49179-2002Oct31.html

SQUIRE COMMENTS ON VOTER TURNOUT (Kansas City Star, Nov. 2)
Party leaders in Missouri predict that the tight Senate battle and competitive General Assembly races will bring more people to the polls than expected. High turnout usually bodes well for Democrats, who must outnumber the more vote-dependable Republicans in order to win, political scientists say. However, The Star's poll found, almost twice as many Democrats as Republicans said they were still undecided. "What the two campaigns have to do is try to make a case to the peripheral voters that there is more at stake than they might realize," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, political science professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascity/news/4425288.htm

COLEMAN ATTENDED UI (Newsday, Nov. 1)
In a story about U.S. Senate race in Minnesota, Republican candidate Norm Coleman is profiled. He is a Brooklyn native who holds a bachelor's degree from Hofstra University and a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, served 17 years with the Minnesota attorney general as a chief prosecutor and solicitor general
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=af4a95fb2cf4df2b8ec9bc78815797af&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=a8a69bf302e23f042975e2203218e494

FORMER UI STUDENT NOW A WITCH (San Francisco Chronicle, Nov. 1)
Most folks have already packed away their witch wardrobe or their ghostly gear after indulging their mystical sides during Halloween. But for modern-day Neo-pagans and witches, many celebrations are still to come. "We have a lot more holidays than just Halloween," said Lon Sarver of Oakland, 32, while moving boxes of candles at the mystic store Ancient Ways in Oakland, where he has worked for four years. Sarver, a soft-spoken man whose long, straight, dark hair falls past his shoulders, is a pagan spiritual counselor who holds a degree in transpersonal psychotherapy from John F. Kennedy University in Orinda. Sarver became a witch while studying psychology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 14 years ago. Sarver pointed out that witches celebrate seven other major holidays, including Yule (the winter solstice, which falls on Dec. 22 this year), the spring equinox celebration of Beltane (May 1), Imbolc (Feb. 2 -- sometimes referred to as the pagan Groundhog Day), and the autumn harvest season of Mabon, similar to Thanksgiving (Sept. 21).
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/11/01/EB234632.DTL

UI LAW SCHOOL GRAD FACES LONG ODDS FOR SENATE (Newsday, Nov. 1)
With the death of Sen. Paul Wellstone and the emergence of former Vice President Walter Mondale as his replacement in the U.S. Senate race, Republican candidate and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW alumnus Norm Coleman is faced with running a four-day campaign against two Minnesota icons -- one living and one dead. Observers now say that Coleman, who was forced to wait on the sidelines during a five-day mourning period even as Mondale's name was surfacing, faces an even tougher fight now that the campaign has resumed.
http://www.newsday.com/news/local/longisland/politics/ny-usminn012986741nov01,0,2580193.story?coll=ny%2Dlipolitics%2Dheadlines

BLOOM WRITES OF JEWS IN POSTVILLE (Kansas City Jewish Chronicle, Nov. 1)
There is hardly a Jew alive who has not personally faced anti-Semitism, or at least read about it. It's an age-old tale. But when was the last time you heard a story about a group of Jews being rude, cruel and obnoxious to the non-Jewish residents of a community, just because they weren't Jewish? Chances are you haven't, unless you've read STEPHEN BLOOM's "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Bloom will be one of the visiting guest authors for the eight annual Kansas City Jewish Book Fair. Bloom's book tells the tale of a group of Chasidic Jews who move en masse from New York to open a kosher slaughterhouse just outside of Postville, Iowa, population 1,465. The economic activity generated by the Lubavitchers gives new life to the town, and the novelty attracts attention. And yet the Chasids by and large refuse to interact with or even acknowledge the non-Jewish people of Postville.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=5914728&BRD=1425&PAG=461&dept_id=154733&rfi=6

UI WILL GET LEVEL 3 BIO LAB (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 1)
The new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENICS LABORATORY will most likely be a Biosafety Level 3 lab and not a Level 4, the highest level lab equipped to handle the most lethal biological warfare agents, according to the lab's director.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=551240

UI HAS SHORTAGE OF MEASLES VACCINE (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 1)
A shortage of the measles vaccine has prompted UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials to exempt about 2,780 students from showing proof that they have been vaccinated for the disease.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=551239

AUTHOR CITES DAMASIO'S WORK (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 1)
A story on British writer David Lodge, who published his first novel The Picturegoers in 1960 at the age of 25 and wrote half a dozen other academic novels, says Lodge is interested in the philosophy of mind, as well as accounts of research in the fields of artificial intelligence and the study of the brain. He cites the work of ANTONIO DAMASIO, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, who describes storytelling as "a brain obsession" -- something that organisms do automatically, and all the time, as they interact with their environment.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i10/10a01401.htm

BERRY PRAISES WORK OF ACTORS (Savoy Magazine, November 2002)
The magazine profiles the work of three African-American television actors, Chi McBride of "Boston Public," Steve Harris of "The Practice" and Jesse L. Martin of "Law & Order." VENISE BERRY, associate professor at the school of Journalism and Mass Communications at the University of Iowa, says what she likes most about these three actors is that they have made their characters grounded in their culture. "They are a part of American society," says Berry, "but who they are is dictated in each of their roles by where they came from."

UI HOUSING STUDY NOTED (Planning, November 2002)
In a story about the establishment of a national housing trust fund, Jim Cain executive director of the Iowa Coalition for Housing and the Homeless, notes a disparity between the cost of housing and what people earn in Iowa, principally in inner city and rural parts of the state. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA did a study on housing needs in 2000, and one of the findings was that 68 out of 99 Iowa counties had stagnant or declining markets."

UI LAW ALUMNA IS JUDGE CANDIDATE (Chicago Lawyer, November 2002)
Rita B. Garman, who is on the ballot for Illinois Supreme Court from the 4th District, is listed as a 1968 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF LAW.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=bc9e3cc66ded91838ca91dfcd0093060&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLbVtb-lSlAl&_md5=cbe7d22f5480d6988fb7d0d7525df20d

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIONS (Kiplinger Personal Finance, Nov. 2002)
Between 2 percent and 8 percent of adults in the U.S. are compulsive shoppers (most of them women), for whom spending money delivers an intoxicating rush, according to DONALD BLACK, a psychiatrist and a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, who researched compulsive shopping in the 1990s. They shop several times a week, for hours at a stretch, often alone. As soon as they get their fix, their mood crashes, usually out of guilt or remorse.
http://www.kiplinger.com/magazine/archives/2002/November/spending/addiction.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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