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Release: Nov. 5, 2002

Krajewski elected fellow of American Meteorological Society

Witold F. Krajewski, Joseph & Rose Summers Professor of Water Resources Engineering in the University of Iowa College of Engineering, has been elected a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (AMS).

The honor recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to atmospheric, related oceanic, or hydrologic sciences, or their applications. A formal recognition of the honor and presentation of a certificate are scheduled in conjunction with the Feb. 9, 2003 AMS 83rd Annual Review and Fellows Awards at the Long Beach Convention and Entertainment Center, Long Beach, Calif.

Krajewski (pronounced "cray-EFF-ski") is an internationally known researcher in the fields of remote sensing of precipitation, uncertainty assessment and hydrometeorology and is considered a leading expert in developing algorithms for quantitative precipitation estimation using weather radar observations.

Krajewski, who came to the UI in 1987, is also a research engineer at the university's IIHR--Hydroscience & Engineering, where his special fields of knowledge include hydrology and hydrometeorology; radar and satellite remote sensing; and water resources systems. His current research focuses on radar and satellite estimation of rainfall; statistical modeling of rainfall fields and error structure of rainfall observations; real-time hydrometeorological forecasting; and validation of remote sensing in hydrology. He is involved in developing algorithms for NEXRAD, the national network of weather radars, and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, a join U.S.-Japan satellite mission devoted to observations of rainfall in the tropics for use in climate modeling and prediction.

Krajewski received his master's degree and doctorate in environmental engineering in 1976 and 1980, respectively, from the Warsaw University of Technology, Poland. At the UI, he has supervised more than 15 doctoral students, published more than 90 articles in peer-reviewed journals and served as principal or co-principal investigator on more than 50 grants and projects attracting some $6 million in funding from such agencies as NASA, NOAA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). His many professional activities and memberships include member of the Science Advisory Team to the Global Precipitation Climatology Project, World Meteorological Organization; associate editor for several scientific and engineering journals and membership in the American Geophysical Union and the AMS.