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UI in the News

May 2002

See UI in the New Archive Index

SINGH COMMENTS ON BIOFILMS (Wall Street Journal-Europe, May 31)
A natural component of bodily secretions seems to stop bacteria from forming tough, drug-resistant sheets, new research shows. Drugs that mimic the protein could starve chronic infections into submission. Biofilms—bacteria bunched into hardy layers—are a major medical problem. These antibiotic-resistant sheets can coat artificial joints and catheters, and can cause ultimately lethal infections in the lungs of cystic-fibrosis patients. A protein called lactoferrin in tears, mucus, and human milk stops bacteria from getting together say PRADEEP SINGH and his colleagues at the University of Iowa. He believes the protein may help to keep healthy lungs and orifices biofilm-free.

COLEMAN'S ACCEPTANCE OF MICHIGAN POST NOTED (Toledo Blade, May 31)
The University of Michigan Board of Regents selected the first female president in its history yesterday (May 30) to lead it through a maze of controversial issues receiving national attention. MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa since 1995, will take her new post Aug. 1 and immediately have to deal with challenges to the school's affirmative action policies and an investigation of a former athletic booster. Coleman, 58, will take the helm at a university that has an annual operating budget of $3.8 billion and 53,000 students spread over three campuses and that has been busy defending itself against two lawsuits challenging its affirmative action policies.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/artikkel?SearchID=73100634684546&Avis=TO&Dato=20020530&Kategori=NEWS21&Lopenr=105300087&Ref=AR
Similar stories reporting Coleman's move to Michigan were reported May 29 in the DETROIT NEWS and on the website of the ANN ARBOR NEWS in Michigan on June 2 at:
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/news-0/102299283577963.xml
On May 31 at:
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/news-0/1022856030287490.xml
And on May 30 at:
http://www.mlive.com/news/aanews/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/news-0/1022769618180060.xml

UI ALUMNA BENSON WAS 'AGENT FOR CHANGE' (Capital Times, May 31)
As Mildred Benson she was an unforgettable character -- a reporter for the Toledo Blade who worked until the day she died, at age 96, earlier this week. As Carolyn Keene she created an unforgettable character -- Nancy Drew -- pumping out 13 Nancy novels in one year alone while working full time as a newspaper reporter. Benson penned the very first Nancy Drew book and created, as she said, a person who believed in her own freedom. The stories were formulaic but Nancy wasn't. “The girls were ripe for a change in literature,” Benson said in a 1999 interview. And Benson -- the first person to earn a master's in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- was ripe to be the agent for that change. Eighty million copies proved her point. (The Capital Times is a daily newspaper in Madison, Wisc.)
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a840e40345067b82686302688c9cc125&_docnum=8&wchp=dGLStS-lSlzV&_md5=d79707e18667c17c01bbec79b2f8caec

NANCY DREW AUTHOR IS UI ALUMNA (Hartford Courant, May 31)
Carolyn Keene, the original author of the Nancy Drew series of books about a girl detective, has been the nom de plume of as many as six writers and counting. But the creator of the teenage sleuth who has been solving literary mysteries since 1930 was Mildred Wirt Benson, who died this week at age 96. Mrs. Benson was hired to write the first 23 novels in the famous series aimed at pre-adolescent girls. The syndicate that produced Nancy Drew books (as well as Tom Swift, the Hardy Boys and the Bobbsey Twins series) would send her a plot and she'd flesh out the story and characters. She received no credit or royalties, just $125 a book. But she is the one who gave Nancy an independence unusual for the day, so much so that Mrs. Benson's editor called the character "too flip." The author knew something about independent women. She was the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1927. She worked most of her life at the Toledo Times and later the Toledo Blade, covering city hall and the courts among other beats.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d1cf755ada6953241ab0bd2aa2a5586e&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLSlS-lSlAl&_md5=400b7f62edfa8053d154003fb2a3a1f9

NANCY DREW AUTHOR WAS UI ALUMNA (St. Paul Pioneer Press, May 31)
The real mother of Nancy Drew, Everygirl's favorite detective, died this week after a storied life. Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, 96, went to the office of the Toledo Blade to write her regular newspaper column on Tuesday, fell ill and died that night. In retrospect, it is easy to see how Nancy Drew emerged from the imagination and passion for writing that began during Millie Augustine's Iowa childhood. She, like the detective who encouraged millions of girls to read and project themselves into exciting places, forged ahead in a society barely ready for women who wanted to live out loud. Benson was the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She had to persist even to get a newsroom job in 1944, and subsequently was threatened with ouster to make room for male reporters returning from World War II service.
http://www.twincities.com/mld/pioneerpress/3368037.htm

NANCY DREW AUTHOR EARNED DEGREE AT UI (Wall Street Journal, May 31)
In the beginning there was a young newspaperwoman, an Underwood typewriter and an outline from Edward Stratemeyer, the owner of the syndicate that had already produced Tom Swift, the Bobbsey Twins and the Hardy Boys. But Millie Augustine breathed life into that outline. And in the process, she gave birth to arguably the most popular female character in American fiction: Nancy Drew, girl detective. The year was 1930, and it's not hard to see the attraction. At a time when girl heroines tended to be what Millie called "namby pamby," 16-year-old Nancy Drew was a profile in freedom. She motored around in a blue roadster. She had a handsome father (Carson Drew) who adored her and two stout-hearted girl chums -- Bess and George -- who were always up for some sleuthing. Most of all, Nancy was just plain smart: Even the cops deferred to her. No doubt part of Nancy's pluck came via the author, who wrote under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. Born in the tiny Iowa town of Ladora (she would set Nancy in the fictional Iowa city of River Heights), Millie was a diving champion and the first woman to earn a journalism degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA .
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1022801799618871520.djm,00.html

NANCY DREW AUTHOR HONORED AT UI (The Independent, May 31)
As the leading writer among the various other figures who appeared under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene, it was Mildred Wirt Benson more than anyone else who created the character of the famous girl detective Nancy Drew, whose adventures were eventually translated into 17 languages while selling millions of copies. With a short story published when she was still a child, she went on to study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, becoming the first woman there to receive a master's degree in journalism. In 1994, she was finally recognized at a special Nancy Drew conference hosted by the University of Iowa in her honor, an event that received much national attention (although on the way to the conference, it was claimed, Benson confided in a New York Times reporter that "I'm so sick of Nancy Drew I could vomit"). The Independent is based in London.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b0b905f3d185f1608dbee71062fd4c60&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=27e000812ffb1af2fb3f7ddb39219576

UI: PROTEIN COULD WARD OFF BACTERIA (Investors Business Daily, May 31)
A protein found in body secretions helps prevent the formation of deadly, drug-resistant bacteria, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists said.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b0b905f3d185f1608dbee71062fd4c60&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=a8d9cd595c8a16002b7311c0890ca8cb

COLEMAN IS MICHIGAN'S FIRST FEMALE PRESIDENT (Seattle Times, May 30)
University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN was chosen yesterday to become the first female president of the University of Michigan. Coleman, a biochemist, will replace Lee Bollinger, who left to become president of Columbia University. The vote by the Michigan board of regents was unanimous. "I am passionate about public-university education," said Coleman, 58. "That is why it is such a great thrill for me to be at the best public university in the country."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=ndig30&date=20020530&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22

SINGH EXPLORES FIGHTING BIOFILMS (University Science News, May 30)
During the development of a chronic infection, bacteria often undergo what could be called a lifestyle change; instead of living as individual organisms, they form community structures known as biofilms. Bacteria in biofilms are extremely resistant to antibiotics. And resistance to antibiotics in chronic bacterial infections is a difficult and sometimes deadly medical problem. Now findings from University of Iowa investigators shed light on how the body normally prevents biofilm development. … "Biofilm infections are a major medical problem, and our group is looking for new strategies to treat or prevent them," said PRADEEP SINGH, M.D., UI assistant professor of internal medicine. "Though the human body is constantly exposed to disease-causing bacteria, biofilms do not normally form unless a person's defenses have been compromised by disease. This lack of biofilm formation suggested to us that the body might have a natural anti-biofilm defense mechanism."
http://unisci.com/stories/20022/0530025.htm
A similar story also ran May 30 on the website of the biotechnology magazine BIOWORLD TODAY.

UI ADMINISTRATORS PRAISE COLEMAN (Detroit Free Press, May 30)
The paper profiled UI President MARY SUE COLEMAN in the wake of the University of Michigan's announcement that it had selected Coleman to be its next president – and first female president. "She's very engaging, very spirited and very committed to higher education," said University of Iowa Provost JON WHITMORE. The story says one University of Iowa administrator used to wonder how someone so small could get those around her to do so many things. "She's small but she's powerful," said FRANK CONROY, director of the famed University of Iowa Writers Workshop. Conroy said things haven't been easy for Coleman lately. Her tenure, particularly the last two years, was beset with funding cuts from the state legislature. Last year the university lost $37.9 million and, as a result, 107 faculty members. Still, many in the administration and faculty recall Coleman's grace and determination in pressing lawmakers. "She reached out to the politicians and made them keep commitment to higher education in the state," said Professor AMITAVA BHATTACHARJEE, the outgoing president of the faculty senate. JAY SEMEL, the director of the school's center for advanced studies, says Coleman has been an extremely strong supporter of the arts and humanities. "She helped a few years back to persuade the strapped legislature to provide $350,000 to support the work of Iowa humanity scholars and artists," he said.
http://www.freep.com/news/education/iowa30_20020530.htm

COLEMAN TO LEAD MICHIGAN (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 30)
The University of Michigan's Board of Regents on Wednesday chose MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, to be the new president of the three-campus institution, and the first woman to hold that job. Coleman said in an interview Wednesday that she welcomed the opportunity to take the helm at Michigan. She will tackle plans that are now under way to expand the university's programs in the life sciences and will follow through with the university's defense in affirmative-action litigation that was begun under its previous president, Lee C. Bollinger, who stepped down last fall to become president of Columbia University. "It represents, for me, a wonderful and exciting challenge," she said.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/05/2002053003n.htm

COLEMAN NAMED MICHIGAN PRESIDENT (Chicago Tribune, May 30)
University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN was selected Wednesday as the president of the University of Michigan, becoming the first woman to hold that position at the Ann Arbor campus. Coleman, 58, is a biochemist who has served in the top post at Iowa since 1995. The appointment, effective Aug. 1, was approved unanimously by the Michigan board of regents. Coleman will assume the leadership at a time of great controversy. The university is defending itself against a pair of lawsuits challenging its affirmative-action admission policies.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0205300289may30.story

DYER COMMENTS ON NANCY DREW AUTHOR (Washington Post, May 30)
For generations of girls, Nancy Drew has been a part of our lives, a heroine we felt we knew, starring in a series of adventures we hoped would never end… perhaps we were a bit disappointed to learn later, as adults, that Carolyn Keene was but a pseudonym, a name attached to a series of ghostwriters hired by the Stratemeyer Syndicate (which also produced "The Hardy Boys," "Tom Swift" and "The Bobbsey Twins" series) to churn out novels according to a pre-established plot. But the original Carolyn Keene -- the first, and best, of the ghostwriters, the one who gave Nancy her personality and her keenness, her independence and her spunk -- is exactly what we'd hope to find. Her name was Mildred Wirt Benson, and she died Tuesday night in Toledo at the age of 96. "She was feisty and acerbic, sometimes funny, and basically took no nonsense," says CAROLINE DYER (sic), a University of Iowa professor of communications who has known Benson through her work for nearly a decade. "If she had one, she would have worn a fedora with a press pass in the headband."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A30241-2002May29.html
A version of this article appeared June 2 on the Web site of the FORT WAYNE (Ind.) NEWS SENTINEL.
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/fortwayne/3380496.htm

UI CONFERENCE FOCUSED ON NANCY DREW (Washington Post, May 30)
Mildred Wirt Benson, 96, whose early tales of a fearless teenage detective, Nancy Drew, spawned a publishing phenomenon and helped generations of girls dream of courage and independence, died May 29 at a Toledo hospital, reportedly of a heart attack. Writing under the pen name of Carolyn Keene, Mrs. Benson launched the Nancy Drew series in 1930 with "The Secret of the Old Clock." For 50 years, Millie Benson was blocked by contractual agreement from revealing her identity. It wasn't until 1980, during litigation involving the syndicate and publisher, that she was identified as the original author. It made her a celebrity overnight with Nancy Drew fans around the world. In 1993, she was the star of a Nancy Drew conference at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that explored issues ranging from Nancy Drew as subversive literature to Nancy Drew as enduring role model.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A30677-2002May29.html

DYER: BENSON WAS 'A REVOLUTIONARY'(Chicago Tribune, May 30)
At a time when the world expected girls to investigate clothes rather than careers, Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson was the imaginative force behind a young female sleuth who became one of the most popular fictional detectives in publishing history: Nancy Drew. Benson, who died Tuesday at age 96, wrote the first Nancy Drew mystery, "The Secret of the Old Clock," in 1930, just a decade after women had been granted the right to vote. Her 16-year-old heroine had brains, pluck and independence -- qualities that typically weren't associated with women in that era. "[Benson] was a revolutionary," said CAROLYN STEWART DYER, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa who organized a 1993 conference on Nancy Drew. "Nancy Drew was a representation of things women might be."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0205300277may30.story

DYER: DREW WAS ROLE MODEL FOR GIRLS (Toronto Star, May 30)
Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, who only late in her life was acknowledged as the original author of the popular mystery series Nancy Drew, died Tuesday. She was 96. While pursuing a master's in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Benson sent a manuscript for the Ruth Fielding series to the Stratemeyer Syndicate. Impressed, owner Edward Stratemeyer proposed a new series about girl detective Nancy Drew. Benson was paid $125 per title, with no royalties. She also had to sign away nearly all of the rights, including use of the name Carolyn Keene. CAROLYN DYER, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, said Benson was pleased with the recognition she got in later years. "She was more of a tough news person, the sort who would wear her press pass on her fedora," Dyer said with a laugh. "And she brought that feistiness in her characters. For the women who are now in their 40s and 50s, Nancy Drew represented a character who was unlike most characters then. She was from the upper middle class. She had a housekeeper. She had her own car, which was unheard of then. She could do whatever she wanted. She also went to teas and formal things. She was a proper girl except for her adventures. She represented a goal that many girls aspired to reach."
http://www.thestar.com/NASApp/cs/ContentServer?pagename=thestar/Layout/Article_Type1&c=Article&cid=1022099732279&call_page=TS_News&call_pageid=968332188492&call_pagepath=News/News
NANCY DREW AUTHOR WAS UI ALUMNA (Los Angeles Times, May 30)
Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, original author of the Nancy Drew series of mysteries, which have intrigued and inspired generations of adolescent girls who identified with the spunky heroine, has died. In recent years, after she was discovered as Nancy's originator, Benson scoffed at theories of Nancy Drew's purported lesbianism and didn't much care for the character's 1990s persona as a Mustang-driving, gloveless journalism major. Never mind that Benson was wearing turquoise pantsuits and had been the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which prides itself on training writers.
http://www.latimes.com/templates/misc/printstory.jsp?slug=la%2D000038072may30
A version of this article appeared May 30 in the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/150/obituaries/Mildred_Benson_96_inspired_generations_with_Nancy_Drew+.shtml
A version of this article appeared May 30 in the STAMFORD (Conn.) ADVOCATE.
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/obituaries/scn-sa-obitbenson-obit-a162705-290957may31.story

NANCY DREW AUTHOR PUBLISHED AT UI (Philadelphia Inquirer, May 30)
It would take 50 years before fans found out that Nancy Drew author Carolyn Keene was Mildred Wirt Benson, a gutsy, hard-working, fiercely independent journalist from Toledo, Ohio, with a penchant for adventure, both real and imagined. Ms. Benson, 96, who died Tuesday night just hours after filing her column for the Toledo Blade, was a lot like her plucky girl detective. Born on July 10, 1905, in Ladora, Iowa, Ms. Benson, who was then Mildred Augustine, always wanted to be a writer and sold her first story at age 14. Her first book was published while she was still a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she was also a championship diver. After becoming the first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism from the school, in 1927, she started writing for the Stratemeyer Syndicate, which produced formulaic series such as the Bobbsey Twins, Tom Swift, and the Hardy Boys.
http://www.philly.com/mld/inquirer/3365625.htm

NANCY DREW AUTHOR, UI ALUMNA DIES (Washington Times, May 30)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who brought a young sleuth named Nancy Drew to life as the original author of the popular children's mystery series, has died. She was 96. Benson began writing in Ladora, Iowa, where she was born July 10, 1905, to Lillian and Dr. J.L. Augustine. "I always wanted to be a writer from the time I could walk," she said. "I had no other thought except that I wanted to write." She wrote children's stories when she was in grade school and won her first writing award at 14. In 1927, Benson became the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20020530-8405117.htm
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the Web site of the TORONTO GLOBE AND MAIL.
http://www.globeandmail.ca/servlet/RTGAMArticleHTMLTemplate/D/20020529/wbens?hub=homeBN&tf=tgam%252Frealtime%252Ffullstory.html&cf=tgam/realtime/config-neutral&vg=BigAdVariableGenerator&slug=wbens&date=20020529&archive=RTGAM&site=Front&ad_page_name=breaking
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 on the NEWSDAY Web site.
http://www.newsday.com/news/printedition/ny-usdrew302725425may30.story?coll=ny-news-print
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 on the ARIZONA REPUBLIC Web site.
http://www.arizonarepublic.com/news/articles/0530benton30.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the SAN DIEGO UNION TRIBUNE Web site.
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/obituaries/20020529-1317-obit-benson.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the DALLAS MORNING NEWS Web site.
http://www.dallasnews.com/obituaries/stories/052902dnnatnancydrewobit.7d3b9.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 on the RICHMOND (Va.) TIMES DISPATCH Web site.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/obits/MGB2HOQYT1D.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 on the DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS Web site.
http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/news/0530ohbensonobit.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 on the CANTON (Ohio) REPOSITORY Web site.
http://www.cantonrep.com/cantonrep01/menus.php?ID=47376&Category=13

UI GRADUATION PLAN IS COMPETITIVE (Omaha World Herald, May 30)
The University of Nebraska system is considering guaranteeing that freshmen who take certain steps, such as not working more than 20 hours a week in part-time jobs, will graduate in four years -- something only one in five UNL students do. Staying competitive with other universities that offer four-year guarantees, such as Iowa State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is a key reason NU is considering making its own pledge. Improving NU's academic reputation and addressing parents' concerns about college costs are also factors. The NU Board of Regents is expected to take action on the guarantee Saturday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=406849

UI ALUMNA, AUTHOR DIES (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, May 30)
Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, a pioneering female journalist and the author of the first 23 Nancy Drew mysteries, died Tuesday in Toledo, Ohio. She was 96. Benson was born Mildred Augustine, the daughter of a small-town doctor, in Ladora, Iowa, on July 10, 1905. She sold her first story to the now-defunct St. Nicholas Magazine in 1919. Her first book was published while Benson was an undergraduate at the University of Iowa, where she was also a champion diver — an early indication of the breadth of interests she carried throughout her life. Benson sold almost 100 short stories while in college and also worked as a reporter for Iowa's Clinton Herald. "Journalism was what I was interested in," Benson once said. "It was just opening for women back then." Benson eventually became the first woman to earn a master's degree in journalism, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While earning her degree, she submitted a trial manuscript for the Ruth Fielding series to the Stratemeyer Syndicate, which led her to the Nancy Drew.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/southflorida/sfl-benson053002.story?coll=sfla-home-headlines

COLEMAN TO FACE CHALLENGES AT MICHIGAN (Detroit Free Press, May 30)
When University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN takes charge at the University of Michigan this summer, she faces some pressing issues that could have national repercussions. Coleman, selected Wednesday as Michigan's first female president, will need to defend the school's affirmative action policies, investigate a former booster accused of illegally lending money to athletes, and push the school's Life Sciences Initiative. Educators say she's up for the challenge. "She's absolutely first rate, (Michigan's) lucky to get her," University of Miami President Donna Shalala said. Shalala, who served as secretary of health and human services under former President Clinton, became the first woman to lead a Big Ten university in 1988 when she was named chancellor of University of Wisconsin-Madison.
http://www.freep.com/news/statewire/sw56730_20020530.htm

NANCY DREW AUTHOR IS UI ALUMNA (USA Today, May 30)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who brought a young sleuth named Nancy Drew to life as the original author of the popular children's mystery series, has died. She was 96. Benson began writing in Ladora, Iowa, where she was born July 10, 1905, to Lillian and Dr. J.L. Augustine. "I always wanted to be a writer from the time I could walk," she said. "I had no other thought except that I wanted to write." She wrote children's stories when she was in grade school and won her first writing award at 14. In 1927, Benson became the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/books/2002/2002-05-29-nancy-drew-author-obit.htm
A version of this Associated Press article appeared May 30 in the DETROIT FREE PRESS.
http://www.freep.com/news/obituaries/benson30_20020530.htm
A version of this Associated Press article appeared May 30 in the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-drew30.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared May 30 in the WORCESTER (Mass.) TELEGRAM & GAZETTE.
http://www.telegram.com/features/time_out/benson.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared May 30 in the KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS-SENTINEL.
http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/obituaries/article/0,1406,KNS_370_1176271,00.html

UI ALUMNA BENSON WAS NANCY DREW AUTHOR (Stamford Advocate, May 30)
Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, original author of the Nancy Drew series of mysteries that have intrigued and inspired adolescent girls who identified with the spunky heroine for generations, has died. She was 96. The Nancy Drew books are written by "Carolyn Keene." Mrs. Benson, whose identity became known only when she testified in a court case in 1980, was the first Carolyn Keene who had created Nancy Drew half a century earlier and wrote 23 of the original 30 books. In recent years, after she was discovered as Nancy's originator, Mrs. Benson scoffed at theories of Nancy Drew's purported lesbianism and didn't much care for the girl's '90s persona as a Mustang-driving, gloveless university journalism major. Never mind that Mrs. Benson herself was wearing turquoise pantsuits and had been the first woman to earn a master's in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which prides itself on training writers.
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/obituaries/scn-sa-obitbenson-obit-a162705-290957may31.story

NANCY DREW AUTHOR WAS UI ALUMNA (New York Times, May 30)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who wrote 23 of the first 30 Nancy Drew novels – those spine-chilling tales of the fearless teenage sleuth who motored about in a blue roadster solving crimes -- died on Tuesday in Toledo, Ohio. She was 96. After graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1925, she worked for a year for a newspaper in Clinton, Iowa. She then went to New York City, where she met Edward Stratemeyer, a book packager who employed a stable of anonymous writers called the Stratemeyer Syndicate to produce a series of fiction books, which he would sell to publishers. Among the series his book factory produced were the "Bobbsey Twins," "Tom Swift" and the "Hardy Boys." She left a writing sample and returned to the University of Iowa for graduate work. Stratemeyer wrote to offer her a chance to write for his faltering "Ruth Fielding" series. She was then offered a chance to write the first Nancy Drew book. "The plots provided me were brief, yet certain hackneyed names and situations could not be bypassed," she wrote. "Therefore, I concentrated upon Nancy, trying to make her a departure from the stereotyped heroine commonly encountered in the series books of the day." In 1993, the University of Iowa, where Ms. Benson in 1927 was the first person to earn a master's in journalism, held a symposium to discuss the importance of Nancy Drew.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/30/obituaries/30BENS.html
This article also appeared May 30 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/06/01/BA55485.DTL

SINGH COMMENTS ON BIOFILMS (Daily Telegraph, May 30)
Tears breast milk and saliva contain a chemical that prevents the build up of antibiotic resistant bugs in the body, a study has shown. The compound, found in all bodily secretions, is part of the first line of defence against infection. It prevents bacteria forming communities called "biofilms" which are extremely difficult to destroy with drugs. Dr PRADEEP SINGH, of the University of Iowa, who led the study in today's Nature magazine, said the discovery could have implications for fighting bacterial infections. It could also lead to safer medical implants such as pacemakers and artificial joints.
http://www.dailytelegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml;$sessionid$IRQVYLQAAF2P3QFIQMFSFGGAVCBQ0IV0?xml=/news/2002/05/30/wmilk30.xml&sSheet=/news/2002/05/30/ixworld.html&_requestid=286705
SINGH: BIOFILMS A ‘MAJOR MEDICAL PROBLEM’ (New Scientist, May 29)
A component of bodily secretions, including mucus and tears, stops bacteria forming potentially deadly biofilms. These slime-encased colonies frequently clog up medical implants and the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. They are highly resistant to antibiotics. “Biofilm infections are a major medical problem," says PRADEEP SINGH of the University of Iowa, who led the new work. "But though the human body is constantly exposed to disease-causing bacteria, biofilms do not normally form unless a person's defences have been compromised by disease. This suggested to us that the body might have a natural anti-biofilm defence mechanism.”
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99992347

NANCY DREW AUTHOR, UI ALUMNA DIES (CBSnews.com, May 29)
Mildred Wirt Benson, a dedicated newspaperwoman for six decades who wrote the first "Nancy Drew" mystery stories about the intrepid teen-age detective, has died. Benson, 96, fell ill at her desk at the Toledo Blade newspaper Tuesday and later died at a hospital. In a way, she was a lot like the character she made famous - independent and adventurous. Benson was the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1927, according to the school.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/05/29/print/printable510493.shtml

SINGH COMMENTS ON BIOFILM RESEARCH (Nando Times, May 29)
Scientists have discovered a protein produced by the body prevents bacteria from grouping together and forming biofilm, a process that occurs in cystic fibrosis and certain infections and makes bacteria nearly impervious to antibiotics and other treatments. The findings could lead to new treatments for preventing biofilm infections, which present a major medical problem because "bacteria living in these structures are incredibly resistant to killing," PRADEEP SINGH, assistant professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa and leading author of the study, told United Press International.
http://www.nandotimes.com/healthscience/story/417985p-3332197c.html

SINGH COMMENTS ON BIOFILM RESEARCH (YahooNews, May 29)
A protein found in body secretions helps prevent the formation of bands of deadly, drug-resistant bacteria, according to new research. Bacteria can become less vulnerable to antibiotics when they form a "biofilm," a network of bacteria that thwarts the efforts of normally effective drugs. Biofilms form on tissue already damaged from disease, such as the lungs of a cystic fibrosis patient, wounds of patients with diabetes, and damaged heart valves. "It is now understood that in many chronic infections, bacteria are not living as individuals, but are rather living in groups--community structures," lead author Dr. PRADEEP K. SINGH of the University of Iowa in Iowa City told Reuters Health.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=594&ncid=751&e=4&u=/nm/20020529/hl_nm/bugs_fluids_

UI TUITION HIKE NOTED (U.S. News and World Report, April 29)
In an article about increasing college costs and options for payment, it's noted that many universities are raising tuitions due to budget crunches, depressed endowments, higher energy costs and health insurance costs, and shrinking state support. Tuition at Ohio State University will increase 18.9 percent for in-state freshmen to around $15,000 for non-residents, students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will see a 19 percent jump, and costs at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill will shoot up 21 percent.

SINGH STUDIES PROTEIN IN BODILY SECRETIONS (New Scientist, May 29)
A component of bodily secretions, including mucus and tears, stops bacteria forming potentially deadly biofilms. These slime-encased colonies frequently clog up medical implants and the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. They are highly resistant to antibiotics. "Biofilm infections are a major medical problem," says PRADEEP SINGH of the University of Iowa, who led the new work. "But though the human body is constantly exposed to disease-causing bacteria, biofilms do not normally form unless a person's defenses have been compromised by disease. This suggested to us that the body might have a natural anti-biofilm defense mechanism."
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99992347

SINGH: MILK PROTEIN CAN FIGHT BIOFILMS (Yahoo! News, May 29)
A protein found in body secretions helps prevent the formation of bands of deadly, drug-resistant bacteria, according to new research. Bacteria can become less vulnerable to antibiotics when they form a "biofilm," a network of bacteria that thwarts the efforts of normally effective drugs. Biofilms form on tissue already damaged from disease, such as the lungs of a cystic fibrosis patient, wounds of patients with diabetes, and damaged heart valves. "It is now understood that in many chronic infections, bacteria are not living as individuals, but are rather living in groups--community structures," lead author Dr. PRADEEP K. SINGH of the University of Iowa in Iowa City told Reuters Health. Now, Singh and his colleagues have shown that the protein lactoferrin, which occurs naturally in tears, mucus and breast milk, can prevent bacteria biofilms from forming, thereby inhibiting the deadly infections.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=594&ncid=751&e=10&u=/nm/20020529/hl_nm/bugs_fluids_1

NANCY DREW AUTHOR, UI ALUMNA DIES (Salon, May 29)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who brought a young sleuth named Nancy Drew to life as the original author of the popular children's mystery series, has died. She was 96. Benson began writing in Ladora, Iowa, where she was born July 10, 1905, to Lillian and Dr. J.L. Augustine. "I always wanted to be a writer from the time I could walk," she said. "I had no other thought except that I wanted to write." She wrote children's stories when she was in grade school and won her first writing award at 14. In 1927, Benson became the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.salon.com/books/wire/2002/05/29/benson/index.html

COLEMAN NAMED MICHIGAN PRESIDENT (New York Times, May 29)
University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN was chosen Wednesday to become the first female president of the University of Michigan. Coleman, a biochemist, will replace Lee Bollinger, who left to become president of Columbia University. The vote by the Michigan board of regents was unanimous. "I am passionate about public university education,'' said Coleman, 58. ``That is why it is such a great thrill for me to be at the best public university in the country."
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Michigan-President.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A27248-2002May29.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the website of the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/149/nation/University_of_Iowa_s_Coleman_n:.shtml
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2867183.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020529/ap_wo_en_po/us_michigan_president_1

NANCY DREW AUTHOR, UI ALUMNA DIES (New York Times, May 29)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who brought a young sleuth named Nancy Drew to life as the original author of the popular children's mystery series, has died. She was 96. Benson began writing in Ladora, Iowa, where she was born July 10, 1905, to Lillian and Dr. J.L. Augustine. "I always wanted to be a writer from the time I could walk," she said. "I had no other thought except that I wanted to write." She wrote children's stories when she was in grade school and won her first writing award at 14. In 1927, Benson became the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/obituaries/AP-Obit-Benson.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020529/ap_on_en_ot/obit_benson_6
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A28854-2002May29.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 29 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/sns-ap-obit-benson0529may29.story
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/books/72464_nancydrew30.shtml
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the INDIANAPOLIS STAR.
http://www.starnews.com/article.php?nancydrewmp0529.html,news
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the NANDO TIMES.
http://www.nando.net/entertainment/story/417069p-3326167c.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/2866670.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the TAMPA TRIBUNE.
http://ap.tbo.com/ap/breaking/MGANIPW0T1D.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the SACRAMENTO BEE.
http://www.sacbee.com/24hour/entertainment/story/417069p-3326167c.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the GUARDIAN (U.K.)
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-1769389,00.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS.
http://www.adn.com/24hour/entertainment/story/417069p-3326167c.html
A version of the same Associated Press story also ran May 30 in the RECORD (Hackensack, N.J.)
http://www.therecord.com/entertainment/e052921A.html

NANCY DREW AUTHOR A UI GRAD (United Press International, May 29)
Nancy Drew author Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson died Tuesday after taking ill while working on her column for The Toledo Blade. She was 96. Benson, who wrote under the pen name Carolyn Keene, authored the initial Nancy Drew mysteries but was not allowed to reveal her true identity until a 1980 court case overturned the secrecy clause in her contract with the publisher. … In 1927, Benson became the first woman to receive a masters degree in journalism from the University of Iowa. Her first book won publication while she was still at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she financed her education by selling nearly100 short stories.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f6579c9f3a0135a649570b1dd9120844&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStV-lSlAl&_md5=d46ef823d9f01aaa302f8ac2d616691a

DYER REMEMBERS NANCY DREW AUTHOR (All Things Considered, May 29)
Mildred Wirt Benson, the author of 23 of the 30 "Nancy Drew" mysteries has died. Mildred Wirt Benson was the primary author of the books written under the pseudonym Carolyn Keene. She was 96 years old. Liane Hansen talks with CAROLYN DYER, a University of Iowa journalism professor and co-editor of "Rediscovering Nancy Drew." The book is published by University of Iowa Press, 1995.
http://search1.npr.org/opt/collections/torched/atc/data_atc/seg_144126.htm

NANCY DREW AUTHOR BENSON WAS UI ALUMNA (CNN.com, May 29)
Millie Benson, the author who captivated generations of young girls with her Nancy Drew mystery books, died Tuesday night. Benson was born and raised in Ladora, Iowa, and began writing as a child. She graduated from high school in three years, and received a master's degree in journalism from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.cnn.com/2002/SHOWBIZ/books/05/29/obit.benson/index.html

SINGH HEADS RESEARCH ON MOTHER'S MILK (Agence France Presse, May 29)
Scientists have found a weapon in tears and mother's milk to fight bacteria that are chronic risk to people with medical implants. The arm is a protein that in effect denies a home to these bugs, preventing them from forming colonies called biofilms that resist the patient's immune system and even the toughest antibiotics. The protein, lactoferrin, is abundant in secretions such as tears, nasal mucus and breast milk, according to a team led by PRADEEP SINGH at the University of Iowa. Lactoferrin gobbles up iron, depriving the bacteria of an essential nutrient and forcing them to "wander across the surface instead of forming cell clusters and biofilms," they report Thursday in the British weekly Nature.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f6579c9f3a0135a649570b1dd9120844&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStV-lSlAl&_md5=f161141045d4b920ad31f164b1f52ff0

INVENT IOWA TO GET $100,000 (Omaha World-Herald, May 29)
The Council Bluffs School District has been chosen to receive $500,000 from the U.S. Education Department, Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, said. The district will use the money to create a learning project with the PLATO Web Learning Network, focusing on math curriculum. Iowa Public Television, the University of Northern Iowa and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA also will receive funding, Grassley said. The U of I will be awarded $100,000 for Invent Iowa, a program that's designed to encourage children to invent and display their creations at conventions.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=406111

BAYNTON COMMENTS ON SIGN LANGUAGE (Omaha World-Herald, May 29)
Foreign language classrooms across the country are growing increasingly silent. Instead of tackling French, German or other more commonly taught languages, students are learning to speak with their hands. While many schools are offering ASL as a foreign language, the idea is not universally accepted. At issue for educators and lawmakers is whether ASL has the components of a bona fide language - a set of unique linguistic components, a culture, a body of literature, all components of other languages. "I think one of the reasons that people will be skeptical is because they're so used to thinking of languages as being spoken," said DOUGLAS BAYNTON, an ASL professor at the University of Iowa. "The idea that you can have a language on your hands is just very foreign."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=405583

COLEMAN CHOSEN NEXT MICHIGAN PRESIDENT (Detroit Free Press, May 29)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA President Mary Sue Coleman was selected Wednesday as the president of the University of Michigan and the first woman to hold the position. The search began five months ago when Lee Bollinger left to become president of Columbia University. Coleman faces a number of pressing issues as she takes the helm of the state's premier institution of higher education. Michigan continues to defend itself against a pair of lawsuits challenging its affirmative action policies.
http://www.freep.com/news/latestnews/pm9425_20020529.htm
A version of this ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared May 29 on MLIVE.com, the Web site of the ANN ARBOR News:
http://www.mlive.com/news/statewide/index.ssf?/stories/news/20020529_umprez_named.html

COLEMAN NAMED MICHIGAN PRESIDENT (Michigan Radio, May 29)
The University of Michigan named its first female president this morning, MARY SUE COLEMAN. She's the president of the University of Iowa. The 58-year-old Coleman is a biochemist who came to the University of Iowa in 1996 after serving as provost and vice president for academic affairs at the University of New Mexico. Michigan's presidential search was its first since a 1999 state Supreme Court decision allowing all but the regents' final vote to be held in private.
http://www.michiganradio.org/news_story.asp

FBI'S ROWLEY IS UI LAW SCHOOL GRADUATE (USA Today, May 29)
 A story compares the "whistleblowing" of Sherron Watkins on Enron's alleged mismanagement and Coleen Rowley on the FBI's alleged mismanagement and says Rowley -- who wanted to join the FBI since she was in fifth grade -- obtained a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before joining the bureau, where she loyally served for 21 years.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=adf5ece434d546e9b8aa2c63eb86a9c0&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStS-lSlzV&_md5=3e6eded95fbba726ee0a777ad9144d26

UI CONFERENCE RAISED AUTHOR'S PROFILE (Toledo Blade, May 29)
Mildred Augustine Wirt Benson, a newspaper reporter for more than eight decades and author of the first 23 Nancy Drew mysteries that inspired generations of readers, died last night in Toledo Hospital. She was 96. Mrs. Benson became ill at The Blade yesterday afternoon while working on her column and was later taken from her Old Orchard home by rescue squad to the hospital’s emergency room where she died about 8 p.m., said her daughter, Peggy Wirt. Beginning in 1990, when she was 84, Mrs. Benson authored a popular, weekly column, which became "On the Go with Millie Benson." She described the work as a projection of the Nancy Drew philosophy. Her acclaim reached a crescendo in 1993, when she was the guest at a Nancy Drew conference at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she was the first woman to receive a master’s degree in journalism in 1927. The conference attracted visitors from around the world. But the star was Mrs. Benson, who was profiled in newspapers nationwide and interviewed on national radio and television programs.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=TO&Date=20020529&Category=NEWS17&ArtNo=105290069&Ref=AR

NANCY DREW AUTHOR, UI ALUMNA DIES(Baltimore Sun, May 29)
Mildred Wirt Benson, who brought a young sleuth named Nancy Drew to life as the original author of the popular children's mystery series, has died. She was 96. Benson began writing in Ladora, Iowa, where she was born July 10, 1905, to Lillian and Dr. J.L. Augustine. "I always wanted to be a writer from the time I could walk," she said. "I had no other thought except that I wanted to write." She wrote children's stories when she was in grade school and won her first writing award at 14. In 1927, Benson became the first person to receive a master's degree in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sunspot.net/entertainment/news/bal-artslife-news-nancydrew29.story?coll=bal%2Dentertainment%2Dheadlines
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE May 29:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2866697.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE May 29:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/29/obituary0552EDT0493.DTL

FBI WHISTLEBLOWER IS UI ALUMNA (Seattle Times, May 28)
Colleen Rowley has emerged as a singular, critical voice from within: a whistle-blower who set off what one former Minnesota prosecutor called "a steam whistle" last week in challenging FBI headquarters' decisions in the Sept. 11 terrorism investigation. Not only did Rowley, a 1980 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law school graduate, know and follow the law, but her job also has been to interpret the law. "She's very highly ethical," former FBI agent Larry Brubaker said. "She's our ethics person. She gave classes in ethics to our agents every year." (This article originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times.)
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=rowley28&date=20020528&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

UI TRACKING STOCK STUDY NOTED (Wall Street Journal, May 28)
Tracking stocks always looked like a sleight of hand. But in a bear market the weaknesses of trackers are all too obvious. Tracking shares normally trade at a discount to their peers. Rightly so, on academic evidence. According to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA analysis published in February, trackers held over an average of almost three years underperformed a range of benchmarks by between 7 percent and 12 percent. But the combined performance of tracker and "core" stocks wasn't meaningfully different from the benchmarks. So trackers may transfer value, but they don't create it. The analysis also studied companies unhappy with their trackers that chose to eliminate them. In most cases the common stock outperformed.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1022527918897138160,00.html

MAN INJURED IN BLAST TAKEN TO UI (Omaha World-Herald, May 28)
Neighbors rescued two elderly people who were injured in an explosion at a rural Burlington home Monday. West Burlington fire officials said an explosion occurred at the property, about three miles south of Burlington off U.S. Highway 61 at around 9 a.m. Flossie Shaffer, 75, and her brother-in-law Carrol Shaffer, 84, were injured in the blast. Alan Fraser said he and Kevin Timmerman, both neighbors, rescued the pair. Carrol Shaffer was airlifted to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City. His condition was not immediately available. Flossie Shaffer was listed in fair condition at Great River Medical Center Monday afternoon.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=404990

UI LAW ALUMNUS IS SECURITY ADVISER (Seattle Times, May 27)
Maj. Gen. Timothy Lowenberg is Washington Gov. Gary Locke's top security adviser, untangling the knotty, sometimes dysfunctional communication lines among these myriad agencies is a daily task. As commander of the Washington National Guard and head of the governor's domestic-security panel, the 55-year-old two-star general is to Locke what Tom Ridge is to President Bush. He acts as liaison between Olympia and the White House, where he is a frequent visitor, and receives regular counterterrorism briefings from Ridge and the FBI. Raised in Fort Madison, Iowa, Lowenberg earned his bachelor's and law degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=lowenberg27m&date=20020527

FBI WHISTLEBLOWER IS UI GRAD (CNN.com, May 27)
Few Americans love anything about their government as much as Coleen Rowley loved the FBI. Friends say she protested when her dean at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL refused to let an FBI recruiter on campus; she lost the battle but applied for a job on her own and was hired as a special agent after earning her law degree in 1980. All of which helps explain why friends and colleagues of Rowley were impressed but not altogether surprised when she put her career on the line last week to blow the whistle on the terrible failings of her beloved FBI. Rowley, unable to sleep at 3 a.m. one night in early May, drove to the office and wrote the first draft of a memo that accuses the bureau of deliberately obstructing measures that could have helped disrupt the Sept. 11 attacks. The FBI responded by marking the letter classified. Note: This article was reprinted from Time magazine.
http://www.cnn.com/2002/ALLPOLITICS/05/27/time.fbi/index.html

RAPE CONVICT MOVED TO LOCAL JAIL (Omaha World Herald, May 27)
A traveling comedian convicted of raping a St. Ambrose University graduate student in Davenport has been moved to the Johnson County jail to relieve crowding at the Scott County jail. Vinson Champ, 40, was convicted last week in Scott County of first-degree kidnapping, second-degree sexual assault and simple assault. The attack happened in 1997. Although his sentencing in pending, Champ has been moved to Johnson County, where he will stand trial this summer on charges of raping a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in 1996.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=404454

WEINGEIST COMMENTS ON "FLOATERS" (Chicago Tribune, May 26)
Most of us occasionally are aware of little dots or squiggly lines in our eyes. These vitreous opacities, known as floaters, are often considered by doctors to be completely benign, but in 10 percent of patients, they can be visually impairing and debilitating. One reason floaters often are dismissed is that ophthalmologists regularly see conditions that are far more serious and visually threatening. Dr. THOMAS WEINGEIST, head of the ophthalmology and visual sciences department at the University of Iowa, is skeptical about treatment for floaters being readily available. "I do have a problem with people seeing something on the Internet and running off to have the treatment without assessing all the risks involved with procedures in the eye," he said. "There are so few cases where floater treatment is a medical necessity, why would anyone subject himself to risks just because of floaters?" But Weingeist added, "If the floater is such an annoyance and people want it taken care of, then we perhaps do need to ask ourselves, 'Aren't we helping by making procedures available?' even if we personally question the need for treatment."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0205260187may26.story

STATES PASS ANTI-CLONING BILLS (New York Times, May 26)
After nearly a year of emotional arguments in Congress — but no new federal laws — the national debate over the future of human cloning has shifted to the states. Six states have already banned cloning in one form or another, and this year alone 38 anti-cloning measures were introduced in 22 states. The Iowa Legislature passed such a bill now cloning experiments are a felony in Iowa, punishable by up to 10 years in prison. After several more amendments, the final bill banned reproductive and research cloning and remained silent on embryonic stem cell research. For MARK BRAUN, who led the University of Iowa's lobbying effort against the measure, that was victory enough. "We are able to do research using embryonic stem cells, and we believe that research will be fruitful," he said. "The proponents had a conversation among themselves, about do we want the whole thing or nothing? And in the end, they decided to go for half a loaf."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/26/politics/26CLON.html

FBI WHISTLEBLOWER IS UI LAW GRAD (Los Angeles Times, May 26)
Colleen Rowley has emerged as a singular, critical voice from within: a whistle-blower who set off what one former Minnesota prosecutor called "a steam whistle" last week in challenging FBI headquarters' decisions in the Sept. 11 terrorism investigation. Not only did Rowley, a 1980 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law school graduate, know and follow the law, but her job also has been to interpret the law. "She's very highly ethical," former FBI agent Larry Brubaker said. "She's our ethics person. She gave classes in ethics to our agents every year."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000037159may26.story
The story also appeared in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE May 27:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0205270118may27.story

FBI CRITIC EARNED UI LAW DEGREE (New York Times, May 25 )
Coleen Rowley, 46, a longtime agent who has spent the last 12 years of her career in Minneapolis, refused to comment today about the 13-page letter that she sent this week to a congressional committee. In the letter, she criticized the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, Robert S. Mueller III, and other top officials and accused them of hindering the pre-Sept. 11 investigation by the Minneapolis office into Zacarias Moussaoui. Rowley earned a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1980. Before that, she ran cross country as an undergraduate student in Iowa and remains a dedicated runner.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/05/25/national/25WHIS.html

ROWLEY IS UI LAW GRAD (Washington Post, May 25)
A letter from Coleen Rowley, general counsel of the FBI's Minneapolis field office, to FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III was described yesterday as a scathing indictment of FBI culture and its impact on the way FBI headquarters handled the case of Zacarias Moussaoui, the alleged "20th hijacker" in the Sept. 11 attacks. Rowley, a 47-year-old mother of four who competes in triathlons, lives in Apple Valley, a suburb of St. Paul, and is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW, according to records and acquaintances. A native of northeast Iowa, Rowley came to the Minneapolis field office more than a decade ago from New York, where she had worked on organized crime and other sensitive cases, acquaintances said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7214-2002May24.html

FBI WHISTLEBLOWER IS UI GRAD (Time, May 25)
Few Americans love anything about their government as much as Coleen Rowley loved the FBI. Friends say she protested when her dean at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL refused to let an FBI recruiter on campus; she lost the battle but applied for a job on her own and was hired as a special agent after earning her law degree in 1980. All of which helps explain why friends and colleagues of Rowley were impressed but not altogether surprised when she put her career on the line last week to blow the whistle on the terrible failings of her beloved FBI. Rowley, unable to sleep at 3 a.m. one night in early May, drove to the office and wrote the first draft of a memo that accuses the bureau of deliberately obstructing measures that could have helped disrupt the Sept. 11 attacks. The FBI responded by marking the letter classified.
http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,249994,00.html

UI TO PUBLISH FREEDMAN ESSAY (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 24)
James O. Freedman, president emeritus of Dartmouth College and of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the author of an essay about honorary degrees. Despite problems with such degrees, Freedman writes, on balance the practice of awarding honorary degrees "strikes me as salutary. For all the occasional abuses, frivolities, incongruities, and howlers, there are still too few opportunities in our society for recognition of men and women who have made contributions of genuine significance. If universities honor such people, they also honor their own essential values. When I was president of the University of Iowa, I always regretted that we did not award honorary degrees, because of faculty hesitation. Even though I appreciated the concern that political influence might trivialize the process, I believed that we missed an important opportunity." A longer version of the essay will appear in Liberal Education and the Public Interest, to be published by the University of Iowa Press early next year.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i37/37b01001.htm

SOFTWARE CEO INTERVIEWED AT UI (Business Week Online, May 24)
Alfred Chuang, chief executive of BEA Systems, a billion-dollar Internet software company, is profiled in this article. After graduating from USF in 1982, he earned a master's in computer science at the University of California and was well on his may to a doctorate when the economic realities of academia hit him. "I went for an interview for an assistant professor job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," remembers Chuang. "Then I realized you make about $21,000 per year."
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/may2002/tc20020524_9199.htm
The article also appears in YAHOO NEWS May 26:
http://biz.yahoo.com/bizwk/020526/tc200205249199_1.html

UI INVOLVED IN STUTTERING STUDY (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 23)
The University of Illinois has received a $4 million grant to head a five-year study of what causes stuttering in children and the best ways to treat it. The Stuttering Research Project received the grant from the National Institutes of Health-National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. The study will involve 11 scientists from seven universities: Illinois, Northern Illinois University, Eastern Illinois University, University of Chicago, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and Purdue University.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/2856051.html

COLEMAN, PARROTT COMMENT ON BUDGET (Omaha World Herald, May 23)
State university officials unveiled their budget forecasts for the coming year Wednesday, in expectation of large state budget cuts to be announced after a special legislative session next week. University of Iowa officials say they are expecting a $9 million shortfall. Salaries could also be underfunded by $12 million, said President MARY SUE COLEMAN. "This presents a lose-lose situation," Coleman said. "If we don't provide competitive salary increases, we risk losing more of our best faculty members." Under the budget proposal announced by Republicans, funding for economic development programs, such as the Oakdale Research Park, would also be cut, Iowa officials said. Additional cuts will most likely include cutting class offerings and increasing student-to-teacher ratios, spokesman STEVE PARROTT said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=401215

HOSPITALS CUTS JOBS TO SAVE FUNDS (Omaha World Herald, May 22)
In a move to save money, officials at University of Iowa Hospitals say they will cut the equivalent of 117 full-time jobs next fiscal year. The hospital already has notified 28 staffers that their positions are being cut, officials said Monday. Three other staffers have been told that their hours will be reduced. ANNE MADDEN RICE, the hospital's interim director and chief executive, said maintaining nurse-to-patient ratios was important when deciding where to cut jobs. "Our goal," Rice said, "was to do everything possible to avoid eliminating positions, but faced with expense increases that exceed revenue increases, we no longer meet that goal." Other expenses to be cut are in travel, supplies and services purchased by the hospital.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=400176

COLEMAN CO-CHAIRS INSURANCE STUDY (Omaha World Herald, May 22)
More than 18,000 working-age adults died prematurely in 2000 because they lacked health insurance, according to a report released Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine. While previous studies have shown that the uninsured get less medical care and generally are in poorer health than people with insurance, this is the most comprehensive such report. It is also the first to calculate how many deaths are hastened by the irregular medical care, late-stage diagnoses of life-threatening conditions and nonaggressive treatment common among those without health insurance. "We assume that the uninsured manage to get the care they need, but the evidence refutes that assumption," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa and co-chairwoman of the committee that wrote the report. The report was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The Institute of Medicine is a private research organization with a mandate from the congressionally funded National Academy of Sciences to provide advice on health-care policy.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=400310

COLEMAN COMMENTS ON INSURANCE STUDY (Hartford Courant, May 22)
More than 18,000 American adults die prematurely each year because they do not have health insurance, an influential research organization reported Tuesday. The deaths, from such diseases as cancer, hypertension and HIV, come because patients without health insurance often get care later than those who are insured. The delay can be fatal, said the report prepared by the Institute of Medicine, an arm of the National Academy of Sciences. Overall, the report found that American adults without health insurance are more likely to receive too little medical care and receive it too late; to be sicker and die sooner; and to receive poorer care when they are in the hospital. "The fact is that the quality and length of life are distinctly different for insured and uninsured populations," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa and co-chairwoman of the 16-member committee that wrote the report.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/local/hc-health0522.artmay22.story

COCHRAN COMMENTS ON GRUMPINESS (Coxnews.com, May 22)
Today is the Great American Grump-Out. Attention soreheads and fussbudgets: You are now instructed to put on a happy face. Mood has an impact on health, says Janice Hathy, and depressed moods are associated with a weakened immune system and an increased susceptibility to stress-related illnesses. This is why she is promoting drive-by smilings and other activities today. A stress-management consultant in Kalamazoo, Mich., Hathy started the Grump-Out as a way to encourage stress reduction and perhaps even world peace. Sources say that men and women tend to deal with stress differently. "Men tend to get grumpy and women tend to get sad," says SAM COCHRAN, director of counseling at the University of Iowa. (Coxnews.com is the online arm of Cox Newspapers, which owns such papers as the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and the Austin American-Statesman.)
http://www.coxnews.com/newsservice/stories/2002/0522-GRUMP-OUT-COX.html

COLEMAN CO-CHAIRS INSURANCE STUDY (Los Angeles Times, May 22)
More than 18,000 working-age adults died prematurely in 2000 because they lacked health insurance, according to a report released Tuesday by the Institute of Medicine. While previous studies have shown that the uninsured get less medical care and generally are in poorer health than people with insurance, this is the most comprehensive such report. It is also the first to calculate how many deaths are hastened by the irregular medical care, late-stage diagnoses of life-threatening conditions and nonaggressive treatment common among those without health insurance. "We assume that the uninsured manage to get the care they need, but the evidence refutes that assumption," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa and co-chairwoman of the committee that wrote the report. The report was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. The Institute of Medicine is a private research organization with a mandate from the congressionally funded National Academy of Sciences to provide advice on health-care policy.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000036073may22.story
This story also ran May 21 in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD:
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=400310

COLEMAN COMMENTS ON INSURANCE STUDY (Newsday, May 22)
Health insurance does matter, a new study has found, and at least 18,000 Americans may die each year because they lack it. Even brief periods without it can be bad for your health. The Institute of Medicine report, released yesterday, says that "over relatively short time periods -- one to four years -- uninsured adults or adults who lose insurance temporarily are more likely to have poorer health than those who are insured continuously." The study estimated there were 18,314 premature deaths in 2000 among uninsured in the 25-to-64 age group. "Health insurance is a key that provides access to appropriate health care and thus to better health," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa and co-chairwoman of the panel that wrote the report. Coleman said she was surprised "the magnitude of the effects were as great as they were."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=93519ec05220f0ec5a1cfcd1b0b049e2&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=953b800a0ebdb117678abf9545b3ce71
A REUTERS version of the story ran May 21 on YAHOO! NEWS May 21.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020521/hl_nm/insurance_report_1
An ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the story also ran May 21 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020521/ap_on_he_me/uninsured_1
A version of the story also ran May 21 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A50386-2002May21.html
A version of the story also ran May 21 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2849886.html
A version of the story also ran May 21 on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Uninsured.html

GANTZ COMMENTS ON COCHLEAR IMPLANTS (Detroit Free Press, May 21)
In an article about cochlear implants, research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shows that word recognition with implants in quiet learning environments is as high as 90 percent, up from percentages in the teens a decade ago with earlier models. Implants were introduced in 1982 in adults, and first implanted in children in 1987, says Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, professor of otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, a leader in hearing and speech research, including the impact of cochlear implant technology. It developed one of the world's largest databases on cochlear implants. Currently, about 21,000 Americans, half of them children, have cochlear implants. Gantz considers children ages 1-12 the best candidates for implants. "The younger the better," he says, so they can take advantage of learning speech and communication skills from the beginning of their lives with an implant. Children older than 12, particularly those who grew up with American Sign Language, have a harder time adjusting to implants, Gantz says.
http://www.freep.com/news/childrenfirst/bryana21_20020521.htm

CONROY BOOK REVIEWED (International Herald Tribune, May 20)
"Dogs Bark, but the Caravan Rolls On" is the latest work by FRANK CONROY, director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. A reviewer calls the book "essentially fugitive stuff, bits and pieces Conroy has published over the years, most in the '80s and '90s. They are uniformly well written, amiable, smart and, in this age of literary narcissism, something unusual: almost wholly self-absorbed, yet self-effacing as well."
http://www.iht.com/articles/58202.html

FLATTÉ EXPLAINS 'SPINTRONICS' (SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN, May 20)
MICHAEL E. FLATTÉ
, who works on condensed-matter theory and is associate professor at the University of Iowa, is coauthor of a report on "spintronics." Flatté and his colleagues write: "As rapid progress in the miniaturization of semiconductor electronic devices leads toward chip features smaller than 100 nanometers in size, device engineers and physicists are inevitably faced with the looming presence of quantum mechanics -- that counterintuitive and sometimes mysterious realm of physics wherein wavelike properties dominate the behavior of electrons. Pragmatists in the semiconductor device world are busy conjuring up ingenious ways to avoid the quantum world by redesigning the semiconductor chip within the context of 'classical' electronics. … Yet some of us believe that we are being offered an unprecedented opportunity to define a radically new class of device that would exploit the idiosyncrasies of the quantum world to provide unique advantages over existing information technologies. One such idiosyncrasy is a quantum property of the electron known as spin, which is closely related to magnetism. Devices that rely on an electron's spin to perform their functions form the foundation of spintronics (short for spin-based electronics), also known as magnetoelectronics."
http://www.sciam.com/2002/0602issue/0602awschalom.html

BAYNTON COMMENTS ON SIGN LANGUAGE (Grand Rapids Press, May 19)
Foreign language classrooms across the country are growing increasingly silent. Instead of tackling French, German or other more commonly taught languages, students are learning to speak with their hands through American Sign Language courses. While many schools are offering ASL as a foreign language, the idea is not universally accepted. At issue for educators and lawmakers is whether ASL has the components of a bona fide language -- a set of unique linguistic components, a culture, a body of literature, all components of other languages. "I think one of the reasons that people will be skeptical is because they're so used to thinking of languages as being spoken," said DOUGLAS BAYNTON, an ASL professor at University of Iowa. "The idea that you can have a language on your hands is just very foreign." The Grand Rapids Press is based in Michigan. The same Associated Press article also ran May 13 in the MIAMI HERALD, the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE in California, the COLUMBUS DISPATCH in Ohio, the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE and the RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH in Virginia.

UI PRESS PUBLISHES SPORTS POEMS (Los Angeles Times, May 19)
Michael S. Harper's poem "Makin' Jump Shots," from "Motion: American Sports Poems," edited by Noah Blaustein (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS: 250 pp., $15.95 paper), is reprinted on the paper's website.
http://www.latimes.com/features/printedition/books/la-000035445may19.story

UI GRAD NAMED PLAYWRIGHT FELLOW (Minneapolis Star Tribune, May 19)
Writer Rosanna Staffa and Allison Moore, who holds a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, are the Twin Cities winners of the Jerome Fellowship through the Playwrights' Center. The fellowship comes with $9,000 and a 12-month play-development residency. The two will develop "The Weaver," a play about Augusta Ada, Lady Lovelace, the only legitimate child of Lord Byron.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/2837383.html

MORRELL TAUGHT LITERATURE AT UI (Omaha World-Herald, May 19)
He was born in a poor home in Canada. He wrote "First Blood" in his 20s and became world famous as the creator of "Rambo." He followed up with 17 novels receiving critical and popular acclaim. David Morrell looks like the embodiment of an aspiring writer's dream. How did he do it? What should one do to become a best-selling novelist? Morrell, a Ph.D. and former professor of literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, passes along some honest tips for starry-eyed literary aspirants in his "Lessons From a Lifetime of Writing: A Novelist Looks at His Craft."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=395662

UI GRAD RECALLS DECISION TO STAY IN IOWA (Omaha World-Herald, May 18)
In 1969 Nancy "Rusty" Barcelo was a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but she wanted to return home. "I told my mother I was cold," recalled Barcelo, a native of Merced, Calif., who already had a bachelor's degree in social work. "I wanted to come home." Barcelo's mother, Virginia, told her daughter it was not the colder climate she could not adjust to, but the fact that Barcelo was not around people like herself. "Rusty, where there is one Mexican, there is probably another," Barcelo recalls her mother. "She was telling me to find my community and get my strength from that." Her mother's words, Barcelo said, brought her a sense of place she needed to claim and own. Barcelo stayed at Iowa, earning a master's degree in recreation education. Barcelo repeated her mother's wisdom Friday night as the keynote speaker for the 10th anniversary of Latina Unidas, a network of Omaha-area women from various countries that promotes cultural understanding and offers professional and personal development opportunities.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=397300

ALTHEN RETIRING FROM UI (Omaha World-Herald, May 18)
The head of the University of Iowa Office of International Students and Scholars is leaving after 30 years in the program. GARY ALTHEN said foreign students are increasingly anxious about their status in the United States. The frustration it has generated is part of the reason for his retirement. "We have to deal with immigration advising more. I have less and less time to talk with people from other countries, and it's become an increasingly frustrating situation," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=397864

BONIOR EARNED UI FOOTBALL SCHOLARSHIP (Detroit Free Press, May 18)
In a profile of Michigan Rep. David Bonior, it's noted that he went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA hoping to earn a football scholarship; by his second year, he was on full scholarship. Bonior and first wife Sybil Vera started dating in their senior year and they were engaged a few months later. Later in the profile, it's noted that his second wife, Judy Briggs, was a former University of Iowa acquaintance.
http://www.freep.com/news/politics/bon18_20020518.htm

REGENTS OK PLANS FOR OLD CAP RECONSTRUCTION (USA Today, May 17)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa approved first-phase plans for the $6 million reconstruction of the Old Capitol dome, parts of which were destroyed or damaged by fire last fall. The building served as Iowa's first capitol and recently as the signature building for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Restoration following the 1840s design begins this summer.

COLEMAN: 'DIFFICULT YEAR' FINANCIALLY (Omaha World Herald, May 17)
Grim-faced Iowa university presidents spelled out the harsh realities of three rounds of legislative spending cuts Thursday as the Board of Regents, State of Iowa approved revised budgets for the current fiscal year. Faculty cuts, bigger classes, higher tuition, athletic program cuts and postponing campus upgrades and maintenance were among money-crunch casualties cited by presidents at the University of Iowa, Iowa State and the University of Northern Iowa. "As we've said over and over again, this has been an extraordinarily difficult year," University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN told the board.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=396081

COLEMAN, PARROTT COMMENT ON OLD CAP (Omaha World Herald, May 17)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa approved plans Thursday for the first phase of rebuilding and restoring the Old Capitol, parts of which were destroyed or badly damaged by fire last fall. The regents unanimously approved restoration of the cupola, gilded dome and bell tower following the original 1840s design. The $4.5 million project will begin this summer. A Nov. 20 fire destroyed the upper portion of the 160-year-old building, which served as the state's first capitol and in recent decades the signature building for the University of Iowa. The overall cost of the project is expected to top $6.1 million, university spokesman STEVE PARROTT said. University President MARY SUE COLEMAN said nearly $113,000 has been raised so far.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=396023

CONROY COMMENTS ON CAPOTE WINNER (Washington Post, May 16)
An Irish writer has won the 2001 Truman Capote Award for his book surveying Irish literature in both Gaelic, Ireland's native language, and English. Declan Kiberd, head of the English department at University College Dublin, won the award for his literary criticism "Irish Classics." "I was struck by the language and the ambition of the work in both languages," FRANK CONROY, director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, which administers the award for the Truman Capote estate, said Wednesday. The annual Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism in Memory of Newton Arvin has a cash prize of $50,000. "I told him (Kiberd) he will be able to keep his family and friends in Guinness unto eternity," Conroy said of the award money. Winners are selected by an international panel of prominent critics and writers.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A25053-2002May16.html
A version of the story also ran May 15 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/15/national1330EDT0646.DTL

UI STUDENTS TO SEE 19 PERCENT TUITION HIKE (Seattle Times, May 16)
Steep tuition increases at the University of Washington are causing concern, but officials at the state's flagship school say it's still a good deal. Tomorrow, the UW Board of Regents is expected to approve a 16 percent increase for undergraduates, while some graduate programs will jump as much as 50 percent. Rising tuition has become a nationwide issue for state legislatures, students and grassroots organizations. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, undergraduates face a 19 percent tuition increase in the fall, despite much student protest.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=tuition16m&date=20020516&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22

CONROY COMMENTS ON CAPOTE WINNER (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 16)
An Irish writer has won the 2001 Truman Capote Award for his book surveying Irish literature in both Gaelic, Ireland's native language, and English. Declan Kiberd, head of the English department at University College Dublin, won the award for his literary criticism “Irish Classics.” “I was struck by the language and the ambition of the work in both languages,” FRANK CONROY, director of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, which administers the award for the Truman Capote estate, said Wednesday. The annual Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism in Memory of Newton Arvin has a cash prize of $50,000. “I told him (Kiberd) he will be able to keep his family and friends in Guinness unto eternity," Conroy said of the award money. Winners are selected by an international panel of prominent critics and writers.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/675/2839133.html
This Associated Press article also appeared May 16 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Kiberd-Capote-Award.html
This Associated Press article also appeared May 16 on the Web site of the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN:
http://www.austin360.com/aas/life/ap/ap_story.html/Entertainment/AP.V1644.AP-Kiberd-Capote-A1.html
This Associated Press article also appeared May 16 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/entertainment/custom/wire/sns-ap-kiberd-capote-award0516may16.story
This Associated Press article also appeared May 16 on YAHOO NEWS:
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020516/ap_on_en_ot/kiberd_capote_award_1

FORMER UI FACULTY SPEAKS IN TULSA (Tulsa World, May 15)
Dr. Gerard Clancy, dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine-Tulsa, was a speaker at the Tulsa Press Club. Clancy discussed health care for the uninsured in Oklahoma and recent developments at the medical school. He previously was on the faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and has 13 years of clinical psychiatric experience.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=11b072ffa6b44ac8f6a020fdbb8ab86e&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLStV-lSlAl&_md5=776c37bd6f074fb030d19fd8ab013dc9

ESTES TO TEACH AT WARTBURG (Omaha World-Herald, May 15)
To many he's a superstar. To students at Wartburg College in Waverly, he will be known as professor. Opera star Simon Estes has joined the faculty at Wartburg College as distinguished professor and artist-in-residence. Estes will teach master classes, offer programs for high school music teachers and students, lecture in classes in various disciplines and offer voice coaching. He will also give concerts and perform with the Wartburg College Choir. Estes will spend six to eight weeks each academic year at Wartburg. Estes, born in Centerville, studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Juilliard School of Music in New York City. He made his professional operatic debut in 1965 in Berlin. A year later, he received the bronze medal at the Tchaikovsky Competition in Moscow.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=393812

DOEBBELING COMMENTS ON GULF WAR ILLNESS (Yahoo News, May 13)
Veterans who served in the Middle East during the Gulf War have had more health problems after their return than veterans who served at the same time but were stationed elsewhere. No one can say for sure, though, whether this disparity is due to what they did during the war, and where they did it. Those are the findings of a new study in which Iowa veterans were polled about their health five years after their return from the war. Since the war ended in the summer of 1991, numerous researchers have focused on the question of whether the so-called Gulf War syndrome is reality. Those who served in the Gulf had more health problems than those who weren't shipped out to the Middle East, the survey found. "But the effect [on health] is relatively small," says DR. BRADLEY DOEBBELING, a professor of internal medicine and epidemiology at the University of Iowa and the senior author of the study, published in the current issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology. The HealthScout News story appeared in Yahoo News at
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020514/hl_hsn/vets_who_served_in_persian_gulf_are_sicker

BAYNTON COMMENTS ON SIGN LANGUAGE (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 13)
Foreign language classrooms across the country are growing increasingly silent. Instead of tackling French, German or other more commonly taught languages, students are learning to speak with their hands through American Sign Language courses. While many schools are offering ASL as a foreign language, the idea is not universally accepted. At issue for educators and lawmakers is whether ASL has the components of a bona fide language -- a set of unique linguistic components, a culture, a body of literature, all components of other languages. "I think one of the reasons that people will be skeptical is because they're so used to thinking of languages as being spoken," said DOUGLAS BAYNTON, an ASL professor at University of Iowa. "The idea that you can have a language on your hands is just very foreign."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=0ffe393184e06e71398cb6bf75fd3841&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=1a4dd1fb38b3e3e5585dba552124f3af
A version of the story also ran May 12 on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-American-Sign.html
A version of the story also ran May 12 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7343-2002May12.html
A version of the story also ran May 12 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-american-sign0512may12.story
A version of the story also ran May 12 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2829862.html
A version of the story also ran May 12 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/12/national1301EDT0470.DTL
A version of the story also ran May 12 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020512/ap_on_re_us/american_sign_1

GRAY COMMENTS ON GULF WAR ILLNESS (Knoxville News-Sentinel, May 12)
Most scientists who have studied the chronic health problems of Gulf War veterans say there is no environmental toxin or infectious agent to blame. A decade of research overwhelmingly points to another cause -- stress. The VA did announce in December that Gulf War veterans are twice as likely to suffer from Lou Gehrig's disease as their peers, but many experts question the finding because no scientific paper has been published to back it up. Even if it is borne out, says University of Iowa epidemiologist Dr. GREGORY GRAY, the Lou Gehrig's disease finding does not topple stress as the most likely cause of Gulf War illness because it applies to only a few dozen people. There could always be a small subset of veterans with a single well-defined disease that was caused by an infectious or toxic exposure during the Gulf War.

BALDUS STUDY ON DEATH PENALTY CITED (Washington Post, May 12)
Geographic disparity in capital punishment has emerged as a major concern in New Jersey, Nebraska and Illinois. Now a University of Maryland criminologist is asking similar questions about murder prosecutions in Maryland; his study is expected to be complete in September. The University of Maryland study will shed light on whether blacks and whites are treated equally by Maryland prosecutors. A previous, more limited Maryland study by University of Iowa law professor DAVID C. BALDUS found prosecutors more likely to charge killers of whites with capital crimes.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5949-2002May11.html

BUDGET CUTS TAKING A TOLL (Omaha World Herald, May 12)
There were larger classes and fewer of them at the University of Iowa this year, and officials say it won't get any better next year. The university lost $37.9 million in state funding and cut 80 faculty positions. "This has been a devastating year for the university," Provost JON WHITMORE said. Whitmore said he has seen ups and downs while working at public universities for more than 20 years, "but this is the worst I've seen in a single year."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=392792

RAPE TRIAL BEGINS (Omaha World Herald, May 12)
A one-time "Star Search" comedian convicted of raping two women in Nebraska went on trial Monday for the rape of a St. Ambrose University student. Vinson Champ, 40, could face life in prison if he is convicted of first-degree kidnapping, second-degree sexual assault and first-degree robbery, said Scott County Attorney Bill Davis. Champ is already serving prison sentences for attacks in Nebraska; he also could face another life sentence if he is convicted of kidnapping a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student whom he allegedly assaulted in 1996. Champ is expected to go on trial in Johnson County District Court on that charge in September.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=392648

PLAGIARISM CRACKDOWN URGED (Omaha World Herald, May 12)
The University of Iowa should more strenuously warn students of the seriousness -- and penalties -- of plagiarism, especially as the Internet offers greater opportunities for the problem, some school officials say. "I think we probably don't do a good enough job as faculty in instructing students in where the lines are," said JOHN KELLER, dean of the graduate college. Time constraints keep instructors from discussing the topic, and that's a problem, said J. JACKSON BARNETTE, associate dean for education and student affairs in the College of Public Health. "Often faculty have so many other things to do, I'm not sure they do more than putting it on a syllabus and mentioning it once at the beginning of the course," Barnette said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=392593

GATES PICKED FOR TEXAS A&M POST (Washington Times, May 12)
Texas A&M University regents passed over Texas' senior U.S. senator, Phil Gramm, yesterday and picked a former Central Intelligence Agency director as the university's president-to-be. Robert Gates, 58, who led the CIA from 1991 to 1993, was the only finalist for the job. Under Texas law, the university now has to wait 21 days before officially offering Mr. Gates the job. JON WHITMORE, provost of the University of Iowa, had been a candidate for the position.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20020512-23404757.htm

'GRANDMA DOC' REMEMBERED (Tampa Tribune, May 12)
Betsy Crisp never tires of stories about her grandmother -- "Grandma Doc" to family and close friends. Grandma Doc, formally known as Elizabeth Smith, was one of three women to graduate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1901 with a medical degree. She made house calls in and around Oelwein, Iowa with a horse and buggy. Tucked inside her black bag was a pearl-handled revolver, just in case she ran into trouble. "I don't think she ever had to use it," Crisp laughs. Mother's Day -- or any holiday that brings folks together -- is the perfect time for sharing and documenting family stories. Crisp, a county extension agent specializing in family and consumer science, is an advocate of preserving family history with stories and anecdotes.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=2494669ad8ec2019a56b806e8ee079f4&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=00202e6824e54406e3e68f4688e2c865

BLUMBERG BOOK REVIEWED (New Scientist, May 11)
In a review of MARK BLUMBERG's book, "Body Heat," the reviewer says: "Funeral directors could be the unexpected beneficiaries of global warming. If average temperatures increase by just 1 (deg.) C, there will be an estimated 24,000 more murders each year in the U.S. as Americans become hotter under the collar. But temperature change is a life-and-death issue for every inhabitant of a small planet teetering on a knife edge between the scorching heat of the inner Solar System and the frigid depths of space. The need to maintain body temperature within a narrow range is the biggest single influence on physiology and behaviour, as Mark Blumberg explains in this little gem of a book, 'Body Heat.' A professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, Blumberg describes the exquisite mechanisms developed by different species to generate, conserve or lose body heat."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f794f579a64e1d3e34a90f5f5ac6f7ce&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=b1ecd08bd4e1cbd49e07a677d4d6d8e2

LATINA SCHOLAR WITH UI TIE TO SPEAK (Omaha World Herald, May 11)
A talk by a nationally known Latina scholar, cultural entertainment and an award ceremony will be highlights of a Friday event marking the 10th anniversary of Latinas Unidas. Latinas Unidas is a network of Omaha-area women from various countries that promotes cultural understanding and also offers professional and personal development opportunities to members. The keynote speaker for the anniversary celebration, to be held at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, is Nancy "Rusty" Barcelo, vice president for minority affairs at the University of Washington. Barcelo, whose academic focus is on diversity, formerly held several administrative positions during a 20-year span at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=390570

GRAY COMMENTS ON GULF WAR ILLNESS (Washington Post, May 11)
Most scientists who have studied the chronic health problems of Gulf War veterans say there is no environmental toxin or infectious agent to blame. A decade of research overwhelmingly points to another cause -- stress. The VA did announce in December that Gulf War veterans are twice as likely to suffer from Lou Gehrig's disease as their peers, but many experts question the finding because no scientific paper has been published to back it up. Even if it is borne out, says University of Iowa epidemiologist Dr. GREGORY GRAY, the Lou Gehrig's disease finding does not topple stress as the most likely cause of Gulf War illness because it applies to only a few dozen people. There could always be a small subset of veterans with a single well-defined disease that was caused by an infectious or toxic exposure during the Gulf War.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A5423-2002May11.html
A version of the story also ran May 11 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/11/national1215EDT0498.DTL
A version of the story also ran May 11 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-sick-vets-science-war0511may11.story
A version of the story also ran May 11 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2829016.html
A version of the story also ran May 11 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020511/ap_on_re_us/sick_vets_science_war_1

SALE COMMENTS ON SHAREHOLDER LAWSUITS (Washington Post, May 10)
Shareholders filed more than 475 lawsuits against companies, according to the Securities Class Action Clearinghouse at Stanford. But University of Iowa law professor HILLARY SALE, who writes frequently about securities fraud, said given the huge surge in publicly traded companies since 1995, and the stock market bubble, the number of cases filed should be far higher.

NICKELSBURG QUOTED ON NEW BOOK (Chronicle of Higher Education, May 10)
A story about a new translation of the New Testament by Willis Barnstone, a poet and distinguished professor of comparative literature at Indiana University at Bloomington, quotes GEORGE W.E. NICKELSBURG, emeritus professor of religion at the University of Iowa. "It's a salutary turn of events," says Nickelsburg, a leading authority of first- and second-century Judaism, "when someone comes up with a translation of the New Testament that very explicitly -- not in the footnotes, but in the warp and weft of the translation itself -- emphasizes the historical context." The Hebrew and Aramaic names, for example, "just keep hitting you, page after page," he says, conveying the sense that events "didn't happen in Cedar Rapids." That is useful, says Nickelsburg: "There are a lot of people around to whom it hasn't occurred that Jesus was a Jew."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i35/35a02001.htm

BALDUS STUDY ON DEATH PENALTY CITED (Washington Post, May 10)
The future of the death penalty in Maryland now rests on the shoulders of Ray Paternoster, a University of Maryland criminologist who is trying to figure out how and why certain people are sentenced to die. For more than a year, Paternoster and seven doctoral students have been poring over police reports, autopsy results, trial transcripts and other documents from more than 6,000 murders committed since the death penalty was reinstated in Maryland in 1978. DAVID BALDUS, a law professor at the University of Iowa, conducted a more limited version of the same study last year. Baldus predicted that Paternoster would find that "black killers in the main were not treated different than nonblacks. However, killers of whites had a higher chance of getting a death sentence." The reason, Baldus said, is that prosecutors were more likely to charge killers of whites with capital crimes.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A63162-2002May9.html
A version of the story also ran May 9 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/custom/guns/bal-study09.story

UI DOME REPLACEMENT COSTS MAY RISE (Omaha World-Herald, May 10)
The overall cost of restoration of the Old Capitol is likely to be higher than the $6.1 million estimate of damage from the Nov. 20 fire that destroyed the cupola and dome, University of Iowa officials reported to the Board of Regents, State of Iowa. Replacing the cupola, dome and roof of the Old Capitol will cost $4.5 million, Wednesday's report said. A special fund at the University of Iowa Foundation for post-fire restoration has $113,000, said SUSAN SHULLAW, vice president for communications at the foundation. She said that in addition to the money in that fund, other funds for Old Capitol's ongoing preservation have been around for years. If insurance does not cover the amount needed, "I expect they could be used," Shullaw said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=389751

UI TO STUDY QUALITY OF WELL DRINKING WATER (USA Today, May 9)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers are launching a statewide study of drinking water quality in towns that use wells. Researchers will analyze samples for bacteria, nitrates and other inorganic compounds as well as metals, herbicides and insecticides. The results may be used to determine the general vulnerability of private wells and identify trouble spots.

GROUP DROPS UI-CITY EFFORT ON KEG BUYS (Omaha World-Herald, May 9)
Proposals that would have required city permits to buy a keg of beer or host a large party have been killed by a task force appointed to come up with stricter local ordinances. A public hearing on the ideas drew 200 people in April. The Neighborhood Housing Relations Task Force reviewed the public comment Wednesday and decided to remove four recommendations from consideration: 1) Coordinating with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to withhold student grades or diplomas until city fines are paid; 2) Encouraging the police department to reconsider a decision to use "boots" to immobilize vehicles whose owners have multiple city parking violations; 3) Adopting a new city ordinance requiring people who have parties of more than 30 people to apply for free permits, with permit information distributed to police, landlords and housing inspectors; and 4) Adopting a city ordinance or permit process for alcohol kegs.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=389780

WEYER: UI TO STUDY DRINKING WATER (Omaha World-Herald, May 9)
University of Iowa researchers are launching a statewide study of drinking water quality in Iowa communities using wells for public drinking water. Researchers will sample 134 private wells in 16 incorporated Iowa communities that have been identified as having a number of possible nearby sources of contamination. Water samples also will be collected from 120 private wells randomly chosen from approximately 60 incorporated communities around the state. "Data on drinking water quality in Iowa communities that only use private wells is limited," said PETER WEYER, associate director of the University of Iowa Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=388522

HERR COMMENTS ON PAIN (New York Times, May 9)
Getting old doesn't mean having to live with pain, the American Geriatrics Society says in new guidelines with easy-to-read pamphlets to help older Americans explain their pain to doctors and know if dementia-stricken loved ones are suffering. "There are these myths ... that as you get old, you have to expect you'll have pain and learn to live with it. That isn't true," said KEELA HERR, a University of Iowa nursing professor who led development of the patient materials. But with today's range of treatments, pain should be controlled at least to a level that doesn't harm quality of life, Herr stressed. "Be more assertive" in demanding care, and seek a referral to a pain specialist if the regular doctor doesn't help enough, she advised.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/health/AP-Elderly-Pain.html
This Associated Press article also appeared in the May 9 BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/politics/wire/sns-ap-elderly-pain0508may08.story
This Associated Press article also appeared in the May 9 SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/08/national1736EDT0785.DTL
This Associated Press article also appeared May 9 in YAHOO NEWS: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020509/ap_on_he_me/elderly_pain_2
This Associated Press article also appeared in the May 9 MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2823894.html

GRANT: FOOTBALL EXPENSE FORCES OTHER CUTS (Washington Post, May 9)
Nearly thirty years ago, Congress passed legislation prohibiting institutions that receive federal funds from discriminating based on gender. The legislation -- known simply in athletic circles as Title IX -- has had a profound impact at universities, particularly in their athletic departments. Not all of the consequences were foreseen. As the NCAA begins a seminar about the 30th anniversary of Title IX today in Arlington, perhaps the key issue surrounding the legislation is how various schools are trying to gain compliance. Perhaps the most difficult thing for many schools is finding a way to balance the resources devoted to football programs and still allocate scholarship dollars near the same ratio as the gender makeup of the student body. CHRISTINE GRANT, athletic director emeritus at the University of Iowa and an authority on Title IX implications, is among a group of administrators who say most difficult budget decisions are the results of most schools' refusal to put constraints on their football and men's basketball teams. Between rising coaching salaries and facility costs in those sports, Grant said, athletic departments see their checkbooks crippled and often are forced to make cuts elsewhere.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A56845-2002May8.html

ANDREASEN TO SPEAK AT UNL GRADUATION (Omaha World Herald, May 7)
NANCY C. ANDREASEN, who holds the Andrew H. Woods chair of psychiatry at the University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City, will give the address at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln graduation Saturday. The ceremony will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the Bob Devaney Sports Center.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=386169

CHICAGO ARTISTS ATTENDED UI (Chicago Tribune, May 6)
A story about Chicago-area artist Ellen Layon says that she met her husband of 52 years, the painter and printmaker Roland Ginzel, while the pair attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In 1949 the couple went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to earn their master's degrees. At graduation Lanyon was awarded a Fulbright scholarship, which allowed her to study egg tempera painting at the Courtauld Institute in London for a year.
http://metromix.com/top/1,1419,M-Metromix-Home-X!ArticleDetail-7647,00.html

UI STUDY: SOME CHILDREN PRONE TO MISHAPS (Los Angeles Times, May 6)
A story exploring whether some people really are prone to accidents says that psychologists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA concluded in a 1999 study that, among children temperament seemed to be a big factor in risk taking. The researchers, who published their findings in the Journal of Developmental Psychology, were trying to determine why some kids continually overestimate their physical abilities and end up having accidents. "Children who are active and think quickly, the ones that seek out new sensations, seem to have more accidents in their history," the researchers wrote, observing that this described kids who were more extroverted. Another factor in some children who had more accidents was "low inhibitory control"--the ones who got hurt didn't pause to consider possible dangers associated with their actions. Studying this in children, they concluded, may help explain patterns that endure into adulthood.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000032038may06.story

WEINSTOCK: CITIES CAN BE TOO SANITARY (Los Angeles Times, May 6)
A number of other scientists think that dirt exposure among people, and worm infestations in particular, aren't half as bad as they're made out to be. Yes, worms are gross, and some are certainly harmful (causing bilharzia, elephantiasis, anemia and more). But others are fairly benign. And worms, say the scientists, have a positive, nurturing side. Inflammatory bowel disease, for example, is a rarity in less-developed countries and was unheard of in this country until the early 1930s, says Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK, director of the center for digestive diseases at the University of Iowa. "Whenever you see industrialization and improved lifestyle, you see a rise," he says.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000032040may06.story

LEVY: GREEN TEA THYROID RISK MINIMAL (First For Women, May 6)
A Q&A health column responds to the statement, "Green tea is all the rage now, but I read that it contains fluoride, which can lead to thyroid disease." STEVEN LEVY, Ph.D., a University of Iowa professor who's studied the effects of fluoridation for more than 10 years, says that you'd have to drink several gallons of tea every day for years before you'd have even a slim chance of experiencing any negative effects.

BLANCK COMMENTS ON ADA CASE (National Law Journal, May 6)
Disabled workers seeking "reasonable accommodations" from their employers will face a higher hurdle in showing the reasonableness of their request in litigation under the latest interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act by the U.S. Supreme Court. In US Airways v. Barnett, No. 00-1250, the justices, for the first time, examined the meaning of "reasonable accommodation" under the provisions of the ADA governing private employers. The Barnett case asked the high court whether employers must make a requested accommodation even if it conflicts with an employer-established seniority system. In answering generally no, the justices articulated a rule that will have implications beyond workplace seniority systems, say employment litigators and scholars. US Airways had argued that when a requested accommodation violates a disability-neutral workplace rule, such as a seniority system, it gives the disabled employee treatment that other workers could not receive -- or a preference. Because ADA seeks only "equal" treatment of the disabled, said the company, it doesn't require an employer to grant preferential treatment. Although "linguistically logical," US Airways' argument "fails to recognize what the Act specifies, namely, that preferences will sometimes prove necessary to achieve the Act's basic equal opportunity goal," wrote Justice Stephen G. Breyer. "By definition any special 'accommodation' requires the employer to treat an employee with a disability differently, i.e., preferentially. And the fact that the difference in treatment violates an employer's disability-neutral rule cannot by itself place the accommodation beyond the Act's potential reach." Disability law scholar PETER BLANCK, director of the Law Health Policy and Disability Center of the University of Iowa, says, "That's the first time I can recall a clear articulation that the act is designed to remedy historical prejudice faced by persons with disabilities."
http://www.law.com/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?pagename=law/View&c=Article&cid=ZZZP307KS0D&live=true&cst=1&pc=0&pa=0&s=News&ExpIgnore=true&showsummary=0
UI 4-YEAR GRADUATE CONTRACT MENTIONED (Kansas City Star, May 5)
From the University of Wisconsin to Baylor University, schools are getting tired of dilly-dallying students who take five and even six years to graduate. Instead of wishing the problem away, they're going on the offensive, granting tuition discounts, running television commercials and even sending out e-mail alerts to get kids into their caps and gowns. The latest tactic at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: Asking new freshmen to sign a "contract" promising to get out in four years. While the contracts at the University of Iowa have boosted four-year graduation rates 16 percent since 1995, only about half of the students who sign them actually manage to finish on time. (The school says there's no penalty for breaking the contract.) Back at freshman orientation in 1998, JENNY FERGUSON, 22, signed a four-year contract with the University of Iowa. But the Hawkeye went ahead and switched majors her junior year anyway -- a move that meant she would have to breach the contract. "Our advisers told us to just sign it because if you didn't follow it, it didn't matter," says Ferguson.

GRADUATE IS ON ANDERSEN DEFENSE TEAM (Washington Post, May 5)
A list of the teams of prosecutors and defense attorneys who will represent the government and Arthur Andersen LLP in the trial that began Monday, May 6 with jury selection in U.S. District Court in Houston includes among the defense attorneys Andy Ramzel of Rusty Hardin & Associates. The story says Ramzel graduated in 1992 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. The firm focuses on civil litigation, specifically commercial, securities, insurance, employment, civil rights and voting rights. It has handled numerous appeals before the Texas appellate courts and the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A35916-2002May5.html

GRADUATE IS ON ANDERSEN DEFENSE TEAM (Yahoo News, May 5)
A list of the teams of prosecutors and defense attorneys who will represent the government and Arthur Andersen LLP in the trial scheduled to start May 6 with jury selection in U.S. District Court in Houston includes among the defense attorneys Andy Ramzel of Rusty Hardin & Associates. The story says Ramzel graduated in 1992 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. The firm focuses on civil litigation, specifically commercial, securities, insurance, employment, civil rights and voting rights. It has handled numerous appeals before the Texas appellate courts and the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020505/ap_on_bi_ge/andersen_trial_3

GRADUATE IS ON ANDERSEN DEFENSE TEAM (San Francisco Chronicle, May 5)
A list of the teams of prosecutors and defense attorneys who will represent the government and Arthur Andersen LLP in the trial scheduled to start today (Monday, May 6) with jury selection in U.S. District Court in Houston includes among the defense attorneys Andy Ramzel of Rusty Hardin & Associates. The story says Ramzel graduated in 1992 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. The firm focuses on civil litigation, specifically commercial, securities, insurance, employment, civil rights and voting rights. It has handled numerous appeals before the Texas appellate courts and the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/05/05/financial1443EDT0004.DTL

UI TO ALERT PARENTS IF STUDENTS ARRESTED (Omaha World-Herald, May 5)
The University of Iowa plans to start telling parents when underage students get into trouble. Beginning in the fall, university officials say they will send letters to parents of students who are arrested on alcohol-related charges. PHILLIP JONES, university vice president for student services, said the expanded notification policy is a response to calls from concerned parents who read about incidents such as the recent flaming-bar stunt, which injured at least nine students, some of whom were minors. Two bar patrons were burned severely when a bar manager lit a high-proof alcohol poured onto the bar on fire, police said. Nick Herbold, Student Government president, said he thinks the policy will not change student drinking patterns. "If you treat students as adults, they are more likely to act as adults," Herbold said. "If you start calling parents and treating them like children, it's not going to be productive."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=384724

PATEL COMMENTS ON MISSISSIPPI CENTER (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, May 3)
The University of Iowa opened doors Friday to a research center where biologists and engineers can come to better understand fish habitat, shifting river beds and banks and other mysteries of the nation' s most fabled river. Situated near a state fish hatchery on the Mississippi River' s west bank, the Lucille A. Carver River Research and Education Facility will give scientists from around the world a base for studying all aspects of the river and its ecosystem, from St. Paul, Minn., to St. Louis, officials said. "This facility will attract international attention, " said V.C. PATEL, director of the University of Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research. "We have a facility in which people can collaborate with us to look at everything about this river ... and take what we learn from here to other river systems." The 7, 000-square-foot building was made possible from a $1.2 million gift to the university from the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust of Muscatine. The station is the dream of Tatsuaki Nakato, the center' s associate director, who in 1995 floated along both banks of the river from St. Paul to Cairo, Ill., studying bank erosion. " I realized at that time that as researchers we needed to be in the field to make observations and better understand the relationship between human activity and nature, and in this case the river," Nakato said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/2719321.html

UI JOINS HEPATITIS VIRUS RESEARCH EFFORT (Dow Jones Newswires, May 2)
Genelabs Technologies Inc. (GNLB) and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION will examine whether hepatitis G slows progression of the HIV virus. Financial terms weren't disclosed. In a press release Wednesday, the biotechnology company said the decision to collaborate stems from research done at the University of Iowa and published in The New England Journal of Medicine that indicates that those infected with both HIV and hepatitis G live longer. Genelabs, whose scientists discovered hepatitis G, said it has licensed the virus's patent portfolio to the foundation, but that research generated as a result will be freely available to other academic institutions

UI GRADUATE'S STORIES PUBLISHED (Houston Chronicle, May 2)
A recently published anthology, "Red Boots and Attitude: The Spirit of Texas Women Writers," contains two nonfiction stories written by Farnoosh Moshiri-Rossi, professor of English at Montgomery College. The anthology showcases the fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry of both established and emerging Texas women writers. Moshiri-Rossi taught at the University of Kabul in Afghanistan for a time and she is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, with a master's degree in drama.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a1bfedab792e65beb734616397d0788d&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=82cccf3b9348e2e5f7ea13a4aac5af22

VIRGINIA COUNCILWOMAN ATTENDED UI (Washington Post, May 2)
A guide for Virginia voters provides information about members of the Fairfax City Council, including Joan W. Cross, whom the article says has a bachelor's degree in journalism and public relations from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A14437-2002May1.html

HOVENKAMP HIRED BY HOSPITAL SUPPLIERS (Dallas Morning News, May 1)
Several small manufacturers of hospital supplies, which charge that group purchasing organizations such as Novation and Premier Inc. are colluding with rivals to siphon off business, have hired through their industry association antitrust expert HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor who has advised states in their antitrust lawsuit against Microsoft Corp., to prepare a study on their business.

BARTENDER CHARGED IN FIRE STUNT (Virginian-Pilot, May 1)
A bartender at a downtown Iowa City club has been charged with a misdemeanor for setting fire to high-proof grain alcohol that burned nine UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students standing nearby, authorities said Tuesday. The Johnson County Attorney's Office said Troy David Kline, 26, of Coralville, Iowa, was charged with reckless use of fire, a serious misdemeanor, for his role in the April 19 bar stunt at Et Cetera. Authorities said they also charged the popular student club, licensed as Iowa City Etcetera LLC, with using an open flame device in a drinking establishment. The newspaper is based in Norfolk, Va.

CHARGES FILED IN FIRE THAT BURNED STUDENT (Washington Post, May 1)
Bartender Troy David Kline, 26, of Coralville, is accused of recklessness for setting fire to a high-proof grain alcohol at a downtown club, burning nine UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students standing nearby. Kline was charged with misdemeanor reckless use of fire for his role in the April 19 bar stunt.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A11964-2002Apr30.html
A version of this story also appeared in the May 1 BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/bal-te.nation01may01.story

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON 'MAY DAY' (NPR's Marketplace, May 1)
University of Iowa leisure studies professor BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT was interviewed for a segment on the history of May Day, also known as International Labor Day, on National Public Radio's show Marketplace with reporter Shira Boss. Hunnicutt says that despite efforts that began in 1886 to reduce the number of hours in a work day, people today are working longer and harder. He said a commonly accepted idea is that if people devote themselves more to their jobs all of their other problems will go away. The program can be heard on the web at
http://www.marketplace.org/

BARTENDER CHARGED IN FIRE STUNT (Omaha World-Herald, May 1)
A bartender at a downtown club here has been charged with a misdemeanor for setting fire to high-proof grain alcohol that burned nine UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students standing nearby, authorities said Tuesday. The Johnson County Attorney's Office said Troy David Kline, 26, of Coralville, Iowa, was charged with reckless use of fire, a serious misdemeanor, for his role in the April 19 bar stunt at Et Cetera. Authorities said they also charged the popular student club, licensed as Iowa City Etcetera LLC, with using an open flame device in a drinking establishment, a simple misdemeanor. Investigators accuse Kline of pouring alcohol into the bar well then setting it on fire. As the fire began to fizzle, Kline poured more liquor on the fire, causing a flash fire that burned students on the other side of the stainless steel bar, authorities said. The student who suffered the most serious injuries, Deana Busche, 20, of Schaumburg, Ill., is reported in fair condition in an Illinois hospital. Two other students burned in the stunt have filed lawsuits against the bar.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=380979
A version of the story also ran May 1 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/bal-te.nation01may01.story
A version of the story also ran April 30 on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Fire-Stunt.html
A version of the story also ran April 30 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A10819-2002Apr30.html
A version of the story also ran April 30 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/2615867.html
A version of the story also ran April 30 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/30/national1903EDT0827.DTL
A version of the story also ran April 30 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020430/ap_on_re_us/fire_stunt_4

UI COLLABORATES ON RESEARCH (Drug Discovery & Development, May 2002)
Genelabs Technologies has announced that it has entered into a collaboration with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION to study the impact of the hepatitis G virus on HIV infection.

BERRY BALANCES PARENTING, WORK (Ebony, May 2002)
VENISE BERRY, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Iowa, is now happily juggling the joys of motherhood with the demands of teaching and writing. With help from friends and family, the 45-year-old single mother is deftly managing her parenting and professional obligations. "Organization is the key," says Berry. "Since Averi was born, I've become a great multitasker. I've learned that you have to be able to do a lot of things at the same time." Berry says it has taken her, on average, about two years to produce each of her three novels. Her latest, "Colored Sugar Water," is a meditation on spirituality.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f1ccc27131695dd6d89e0ec3676295b6&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStk-lSlzV&_md5=542195d4d91d6e42561ffadc4ff2a1da

WARREN: THUMB-SUCKING POSES RISKS TO TEETH (Parents, May 2002)
Most experts agree that sucking on a thumb or a pacifier is a perfectly harmless way for babies to soothe themselves. But a new study from the University of Iowa College of Dentistry suggests that it’s best not to let the habit go on too long. Kids who sucked on a thumb, a finger, or a pacifier until they were 2 or 3 were twice as likely to develop an improper bite than children who gave up the habit in their first year, said study author JOHN WARREN, D.D.S.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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