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UI in the News

March, 2002

See UI in the New Archive Index

ESTES DISCOVERED SINGING AT IOWA (Baltimore Sun, March 31)
A feature on singer Simon Estes -- who in 1978 became the first black man in a major role at the Bayreuth Festival, the sacred shrine to Wagner in Germany -- says his voice teacher, Charles Kellis, first detected Estes' potential at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Estes sang in a choir. Estes, a self-confessed "professional student for seven years," had tried out medicine, theology and sociology before Kellis persuaded him to focus on music.
http://www.sunspot.net/features/arts/bal-as.estes31mar31.story

UI STUDENT FACES WEAPONS CHARGE (Omaha World Herald, March 31)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student has been arrested after police found gunpowder-filled air cartridges with dynamite fuses attached in his dorm room. Scott Christopher Mendralla, 19, is charged with unauthorized possession of offensive weapons. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=353522

VAN ALLEN SUBJECT OF BIOGRAPHY (Omaha World Herald, March 31)
Abigail Foerstner, a free-lance journalist and author in Chicago, is writing the first popular biography being written about UI physicist JAMES VAN ALLEN, the story of the man who determined that space is radioactive. She said the University of Iowa Press expects to have the book out by 2004, in time for the scientist's 90th birthday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=351693

BLOOM'S BOOK POSTVILLE REVIEWED (World, March 30)
A review of STEPHEN G. BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" says that when the former San Jose Mercury News reporter decided to accept a job teaching journalism at the University of Iowa, he was prepared for a change in lifestyle -- but soon found himself dealing with more than regional differences. As he sensed for the first time that his Jewishness matters to his neighbors, it began to matter to him. Meanwhile, he discovered that Hasidic Jews from Brooklyn have moved to a small town nearby, transplanting their habits and lifestyle to a staid, Lutheran farming community. His description of the situation, and his reactions to the unfolding story, are the basis of his book. World is based in Asheville, N.C.

DYER WILL SPEAK ON NANCY DREW CRUISE (Toledo Blade, March 30)
Mildred Benson, author of many of the original Nancy Drew books, writes in a column that plans are underway for a Nancy Drew Caribbean cruise, a seven-day trip on the Holland America line that will depart from Fort Lauderdale, Fla., June 30. Benson, who said she is not involved with the trip, writes in her column that two full days of the cruise out of Fort Lauderdale will be spent at sea, during which time several Nancy Drew educational seminars will be conducted under the auspices of CAROLYN DYER, professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, and by Barbara Lounsberry, English professor at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls.
http://www.toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20020330&Category=COLUMNIST01&ArtNo=103300098&Ref=AR

WHITMORE FINALIST FOR UNH POST (The Union Leader, March 29)
The search for a replacement for University of New Hampshire President Joan Leitzel, who is retiring from the job this year, has whittled a selection pool of over 85 applicants down to four prospects, including JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa. The Union Leader is based in Manchester N.H.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7831c0bff01692e01b8df5d1db5ccc20&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLStS-lSlzV&_md5=70fc1350a7cc52a7d268653700daa01a

UI PRESS PUBLISHES ANTHOLOGY (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 29)
An anthology "Like Thunder: Poets Respond to Violence in America," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is excerpted in the Chronicle. "When we were young, we worried about the Red Menace or being blown to smithereens by atomic weapons. Nowadays, what American children worry about is being in the wrong place at the wrong time when a drug deal goes bad. Or that some kid with an Uzi in his locker has a rotten day. Or that some irate government employees decide that it's this city block they'll blast with a truck bomb just to make a point. With that type of fear looming larger than the back-of-the-mind worries of Mother Russia or Fidel Castro or Middle Eastern terrorists, now more than ever we need an antidote, a cure, a way to navigate through these ever-present concerns. What we offer here is poetry, which, as Michael Klein recently wrote, 'is the best truth in a time when there isn't very much truth.'" The book was edited by Virgil Suárez, professor of creative writing at Florida State University, and Ryan Van Cleave, assistant professor of English at the University of Wisconsin at Green Bay.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i29/29b00601.htm

TRUST GIVES UI $63 MILLION (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 29)
The largest foundation in Iowa has pledged $63-million to the University of Iowa College of Medicine, the largest gift ever to the university, to support biomedical research. The Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust will distribute this gift in cash payments over a period of up to 15 years. The university's president, MARY SUE COLEMAN, will ask the Board of Regents to change the name of the medical school to the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The Carver family and the trust, which has assets totaling $300-million, have now given the university a total of $106-million. ... Carver's name already appears on the institution's Carver-Hawkeye Arena and the Carver Pavilion at the University Hospitals. The Roy J. Carver Molecular Science Research Center is under construction.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i29/29a03002.htm

UI TESTS FORMER AMMO PLANT WORKERS (Omaha World-Herald, March 29)
A story about the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant says many former employees suffered ailments as a result of their contact with beryllium, a metallic dust blamed for chronic beryllium disease, a lung disease. This week a former nuclear-weapons inspector at the plant, Jess Mills of Morning Sun, became the first former plant worker to receive a $150,000 check from the U.S. Labor Department, which also will pay his ongoing medical bills. Last summer, Congress authorized payments to former federal workers with health problems caused by exposure to beryllium, radioactive materials or heavy metals used in nuclear weapons production. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH and the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health are screening applications from more than 400 former plant workers. About 4,000 people worked on nuclear weapons assembly at the plant between 1947 and 1974. Many have since died, but researchers say there are many more who are reluctant to sign up for the program
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=352098

QUALLS IS IN DOCUMENTARY ON SCHOOL TESTING (FRONTLINE, March 28)
AUDREY QUALLS
, an associate professor in the University of Iowa College of Education's Iowa Testing Programs department, was featured in a documentary "Testing Our Schools," that aired on PBS's FRONTLINE. The program examined how the quest for higher scores on mandated school tests is changing teaching and learning in America. Qualls, a co-author of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills and a specialist in large-scale assessment, said among other things that President Bush's push for yet more testing in schools disturbs her. "The resources aren't there. To someone committed to testing, it's a terrifying idea," Qualls said. Information about the broadcast can be found at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/frontline/shows/schools/

MORRELL BOOK REVIEWED (Yahoo! News, March 28)
David Morrell, a Ph.D. and former professor of literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, passes along some honest tips for starry-eyed literary aspirants in his "Lessons From a Lifetime of Writing: A Novelist Looks at His Craft." "This is no ordinary how-to manual. With remarkable candor, the author reveals exactly how his mind works when he puts a novel together. By doing so, he delves into something that has always intrigued scientists: From where do we get artistic creativity?" the reviewer says. "Any psychological trauma, never adjusted to, can be the impetus for someone to want to be a story teller," Morrell writes. His own traumas, he confesses, were growing up without "the affectionate attention of a male authority figure" because his father died in World War II, and being put in an orphanage for a while by a financially strapped mother.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020329/ap_wo_en_ge/arts_book_review_lessons_5

ALUMNUS BEMOANS DRINKING CRACKDOWN (Wall Street Journal, March 27)
In a column written by Michael Judge, an assistant features editor at the Journal, Judge bemoans what he calls "a new temperance movement sweeping across America." He writes: "Local governments, most notably in college towns, are banning happy hours, two-for-ones, dollar pitchers and a host of other insidious drink specials at an alarming rate -- never mind the fact that overall drinking among Americans, including college students, is declining. Iowa City, Iowa, for example, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, my alma mater, enacted an ordinance in August making it illegal to sell more than two servings of alcohol to one person at a time; alas, two-for-one and all-you-can-drink specials were also banned."
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1017193287872781000.djm,00.html

PLAN CUTS $8.8 MILLION FROM UI BUDGET (Omaha World-Herald, March 27)
Republican legislators in Iowa unveiled a budget plan Tuesday that would set Iowa education spending next year at $37.5million less than this year. All three major public colleges, the state's network of community colleges and the Department of Education would receive less money next year than they got this year. GOP leaders said the measure would be approved later this week. They said a weak state economy has left lawmakers with little choice but to cut deeply into state spending. Under the proposed cuts the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA would get $284.7 million next year, $8.8 million less than this year and $14.7 million less than Gov. Tom Vilsack sought.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=350024

UI BRAIN RESEARCH CITED (Boston Globe, March 26)
Adrian Raine, a clinical neuroscientist at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, has compiled some compelling visual evidence for the link between brain damage and violence. Among other things, Raine has performed PET scans on 41 murderers and 41 normal people of similar age. In each group, 39 of the 41 people were male. (PET scans, which measure glucose uptake by brain cells, show which brain regions are most active.) The murderers, Raine said, had lower glucose metabolism in the prefrontal cortex, a sign that this region was not functioning as it should to inhibit aggressive impulses. The results support previous work by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showing that healthy people who suffer damage to the prefrontal cortex can become impulsive and antisocial.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/085/science/Brain_scans_draw_a_dark_image_of_the_violent_mind+.shtml

BLACK TREATED LIFELONG KLEPTOMANIAC (Newsweek, Feb. 25)
A story exploring the motivation of shoplifting, prompted by the recent arrest of actress Winona Ryder, cites the case of Gretchen Grimm who at the age of 6 began one of the longest criminal careers in history. The only daughter in a family with seven older sons, Grimm felt overlooked and began stealing, she believes, to win her mother's attention and affection. It ended last year when Grimm, at the age of 83, finally kicked the habit with the help of psychotherapy and the anti-anxiety drug Paxil. Over the intervening years, while she raised five children and worked as a nurse at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she stole, by her own account, "clothes, jewelry, toilet paper, towels, pencils, pieces of stone -- everything." She started getting caught more often in her 80s and would call her psychiatrist, Dr. DONALD BLACK. "She usually gets off because she's old," Black says.

OLD CAP REPAIRS ON AGENDA (Omaha World Herald, March 25)
Meetings to discuss repair and renovation of the Old Capitol building in Iowa City have been set for early next month as officials prepare to begin work on the fire-damaged historic building. GEORGE HOLLINS, University of Iowa director of design and construction services, expects the final report on architectural plans for replacing the dome to be ready around April 10. OPN Architects Inc., based in Cedar Rapids, and Einhorn Yafee Prescott Architecture & Engineering P.C. of Boston have been researching the project since being hired in January.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=348299

MORRELL BOOK REVIEWED (Associated Press, March 25)
David Morrell, a Ph.D. and former professor of literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, passes along some honest tips for starry-eyed literary aspirants in his "Lessons From a Lifetime of Writing: A Novelist Looks at His Craft." "This is no ordinary how-to manual. With remarkable candor, the author reveals exactly how his mind works when he puts a novel together. By doing so, he delves into something that has always intrigued scientists: From where do we get artistic creativity?" the reviewer says. "Any psychological trauma, never adjusted to, can be the impetus for someone to want to be a story teller," Morrell writes. His own traumas, he confesses, were growing up without "the affectionate attention of a male authority figure" because his father died in World War II, and being put in an orphanage for a while by a financially strapped mother.
http://web.lexisnexis.com/universe/document?_m=75ead670a5b0ce65031bb1497583c7b6&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStklSlAl&_md5=e7c9f89964838a0cb78b9a7df8f66533
The review also appeared in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
http://www.sfgate.com/cgibin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/03/25/entertainment1556EST0905.DTL

UI'S GEKELMAN TO USE PLASMA DEVICE (Los Angeles Times, March 25)
Inside Walter Gekelman's warehouse-sized laboratory in Westwood Village, Calif., enough electricity to power a thousand homes pours into a row of 68 magnet rings, each one weighing half a ton. A steady pulse of brilliant red light flashes from inside the cylindrical machine -- as tall as a bus and twice as long. With each pulse, a thimble's worth of neon gas seeps into the near-vacuum inside the machine and directly into the path of a 500,000-watt electron beam. As temperatures shoot to a quarter-million degrees, a curious form of matter known as plasma is created. It lasts only a few thousandths of a second. Any longer and the 80-ton Large Plasma Device would melt. Researchers like Gekelman study the fundamental properties of how waves of energy flow across and through plasma. Among the behaviors the Large Plasma Device is designed to study is the ability of plasma to, in effect, store a memory of energetic disturbances that pass through it. The sheer size of the Large Plasma Device makes it "the only machine in the world" that enables researchers to make detailed studies of Alfven waves, Gekelman's main research interest. He has company. The University of Iowa's CRAIG KLETZING, who studies the generation of northern lights, is scheduled to visit the device in April.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000021540mar25.story

MORITA CO-RESEARCHER ON TUBERCULOSIS STUDY (Science Daily, March 25)
CRAIG T. MORITA, associate professor Internal Medicine at the UI, is listed as a co-researcher of a study has found that a group of white blood cells demonstrates previously unrecognized "memory" characteristics that enable them to launch a sustained immune response against tuberculosis bacteria. This finding, described in a study in the March 22 issue of the journal Science, offers an important new piece of information on how the immune system combats infection, as scientists around the world continue to work on developing a more effective tuberculosis vaccine. The discovery was made by a scientific team headed by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2002/03/020325080541.htm

ALUMNA HEADS BIOMEDICAL OFFICE (Pittsburgh Business Times, March 25)
The University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences has created a new academic career development office to help recruit and retain biomedical scientists. Joan Lakoski will lead the new unit as assistant vice chancellor for academic career development. Lakoski, who received a Ph.D. in pharmacology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will join Pitt's faculty in July.
http://pittsburgh.bizjournals.com/pittsburgh/stories/2002/03/25/daily3.html

MCLEOD: MUSIC STILL IMPORTANT TO PEOPLE (Miami Herald, March 24)
A story about the decline in CD sales says that the continuing success of such Internet-music sites as Moebius, which attract millions of users, shows the problem is not lack of appetite for music. "Napster showed how important music is to people," says KEMBREW MCLEOD, assistant professor of communications studies at the University of Iowa and director of the documentary "Money for Nothing: Behind the Business of Pop Music." "What's going on with the music industry is the direct result of the industry's greed."

BLAISE, UI WORKSHOP CITED IN STORY (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 24)
A feature on author Bharati Mukherjee makes several references to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Mukherjee, whose latest novel is Desirable Daughters, began to study writing at the UI in 1961. The story says she met her future husband, writer CLARK BLAISE -- a Harvard protégé of the novelist Bernard Malamud -- on his first night in Iowa. It took him months to ask her on a date, having heard rumors that she was a princess with bodyguards who would break the knees of any untoward suitor. Blaise talks about Mukherjee's writing with more than spousal approval, having run the international writing program at the University of Iowa from 1990 to 1998.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/2115675.html

UI WILL HAVE 19 PERCENT TUITION HIKE (Chicago Tribune, March 24)
State budget cuts this year are prompting galloping tuition increases at many of the Midwest's biggest public universities, sharpening concerns over growing student debt and access to higher education for low- and middle-income students. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA already approved a 19 percent tuition increase for next year and still faces $38 million in cuts for this fiscal year alone.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0203240280mar24.story

WHITMORE FINALIST FOR TEXAS A&M TOP POST (Washington Post, March 24)
A committee searching for a new president for the Texas A&M University System's flagship campus announced a short list of three candidates last Tuesday, all distinguished academics. But the list also was notable for a name it did not include: that of Sen. Phil Gramm (R-Tex.). Gramm, 59, plans to retire from politics when his third term in the Senate ends next January and has long described the presidency of A&M's campus in College Station as one of his dream jobs, according to spokesman Larry Neal. The school's short list of candidates includes former CIA director Robert Gates, head of the Forum for International Policy in Washington; Richard Herman, a vice chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and JON WHITMORE, provost of the University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A8422-2002Mar23.html

KURTH QUOTED ON JUPITER STUDIES (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, March 24)
A story about how the recent rendezvous of two spacecraft will allow scientists to study Jupiter's violent, radiation-filled magnetic field quotes WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who worked on a number of the new studies. "The only way to measure these [charged particles and radio signals] is to take your radio receiver to the planet," Kurth said.

WHITMORE CANDIDATE FOR A&M PRESIDENCY (Houston Chronicle, March 23)
U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm may still have a chance of being named the 22nd president of Texas A&M University. Two unnamed candidates are still being considered for the post, along with three candidates who were named by a search committee, A&M System Regents Chairman Erle Nye said Friday. The candidates are Robert Gates, a former director of the CIA who currently heads a Washington, D.C., think tank; Richard Herman, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b7dc2b1d4509bdf673c9ba2ebf671743&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=3964ecdb22ddd9244d98f5a81ff1fa2c

FORMER UI FACULTY HONORED (The Tulsa World, March 23)
Dr. Gerard P. Clancy, dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine in Tulsa, will receive the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill's Excellence in Community Psychiatry Award. The award recognizes Clancy's work in introducing the Program of Assertive Community Treatment. Clancy came to OU in August and has 13 years of clinical psychiatry experience. He joined the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE faculty in 1995. http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=9ef0bda65766f109ea0d2bcfaa446d6c&_docnum=6&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlAl&_md5=d001c2b9e08a7f7371171aa145490f71

POET ATTENDED UI WRITING SEMINAR (Asahi Shimbun, Japan, March 22)
This story examines the work of poet Fuyuko Tomita Molenkamp who began writing tanka, 31-syllable poems, in 1983 -- three days after her 40th birthday. Her 40th birthday was a turning point. Why 40? Because of something a visiting poet had said at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA creative writing seminar she'd attended years before. "Anyone," said poet Ryuichi Tamura, "can write poetry when they're young. If you're still writing poetry at 40, then it's the real thing." http://www.asahi.com/english/culture/K2002032200393.html

UI STUDENT COMMENTS ON DOG ATTACK (Boston Herald, March 22)
Dog lovers around Boston yesterday agreed with a California jury's decision that a couple should be held criminally responsible for the murderous acts of their vicious dogs. "I think it's fair. They were irresponsible, especially with dogs who had the potential to do that kind of damage," MARTY SKUBAL, a visiting student from the University of Iowa, said yesterday as he played fetch on Boston Common with "Lulu" the bulldog. "Animals can be used as weapons if they're trained a certain way," he said. Marjorie Knoller, 46, of San Francisco and her husband, Robert Noel, 60, were convicted of second-degree murder and involuntary manslaughter respectively for the savage killing of Diane Whipple, a petite 33-year-old college lacrosse coach.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b7dc2b1d4509bdf673c9ba2ebf671743&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=f07a4211192fbe4510cd2d06baf2cdfe

UI STUDY CITES AIR POLLUTION (Omaha World Herald, March 22)
Iowa lawmakers on a committee seeking to resolve the controversy over factory hog farms have released an outline detailing plans for controlling farm pollution. The proposal doesn't include setting standards for air quality, said Erick Davidson, a spokesman for the Des Moines-based activist group, Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement. He criticized the panel, saying it failed to recognize that a joint study by Iowa State University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers indicates that studies show the air surrounding farms is polluted and a health risk.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=346263

UI MAY HIKE TUITION 19 PERCENT (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 22)

Over the past five years, tuition at public colleges has risen at an annual rate of slightly more than 4 percent. But for 2002-3, many public colleges are projecting percentage increases in the double digits. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, officials have proposed a 19-percent increase. A graphic accompanying the story says the proposed tuition increase for in-state UI students would raise tuition from $3,522 to $4,191.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i28/28a02601.htm

LEWIS-BECK FORECASTS FRENCH ELECTION (Liberation, March 21)
In an article about election forecasting, MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a UI political science professor, describes "the Iowa model" for predicting election winners and why it has been so successful at forecasting French national elections. The model currently predicts a razor thin margin of victory for Lionel Jospin in the 2002 French Presidential election, but even that is within the model's margin of error so statistically the election is too close to call.
http://www.liberation.fr/quotidien/debats/020321-110006156REBO.html

IRVING IS FRIEND OF UI'S GABLE (Albany Times Union, March 21)
Fishing, boxing and baseball continue to attract enough writers to staff several college English departments. But with Ken Kesey no longer with us, the list of major living American authors with a deep understanding of wrestling begins and ends with John Irving. The author of "The World According to Garp," "The Cider House Rules" and, most recently, "The Fourth Hand" began wrestling at 14. Irving wrestled throughout his academic career at Philips Exeter Academy (in the 133-pound weight class) and the University of Pittsburgh (130 pounds). As a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's writers' program, Irving became friends with the legendary coach Dan Gable, who led the school's program from 1977 to 1997. In this article, Irving offers tips for wrestling novices watching this weekend's NCAA wrestling tournament.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=16a9eed42ba7c5c8ce1e0b258a9dcb31&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=710bb8d0ed0830da8726e62037c61e61
This article also appeared March 22 in ENTERTAINMENT NEWS DAILY
http://199.97.97.16/contWriter/endnews2/./2002/03/22/enter/9114-0019-pat_nytimes.html

PROGRAM TO BOOST RURAL DENTISTS (Omaha World Herald, March 21)
A program designed to bring dentists to rural Iowa will assist dentists with school-loan debt if they agree to practice in rural communities. The program will start this spring, said Carl Kulczyk of the Iowa Department of Public Health's Bureau of Rural Health and Primary Care. The project is a joint effort between Delta Dental and the Iowa Department of Public Health, the State Public Health Dental Director and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Dentistry.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=345174.

HAVENER DONATION NOTED (Dallas Business Journal, March 21)
Fort Worth real estate investor Gary W. Havener has pledged $5 million to the University of Missouri-Rolla, the university's largest private donation to expand UMR's university center. In addition to this donation to the University Center project, Havener and his wife, Judy, have endowed scholarships in the UMR mathematics and statistics department and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Judy Havener's alma mater.
http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/stories/2002/03/18/daily34.html

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE STUDIES DEATH RATES (Palm Beach Post, March 21)
Legislation has been proposed in Florida that may weaken the state's certificate-of-need program, which has helped control health costs in hospitals, nursing homes and hospices by ensuring that any services added are needed. The Florida Hospital Association opposes weakening the certificate-of-need laws. In January, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE study commissioned by the hospital trade group concluded that death rates for open-heart surgery and angioplasty patients are 21 percent higher in states that don't regulate such services, compared to states like Florida that restrict the services.

WHITMORE IS FINALIST AT A&M (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 20)
Retiring U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm apparently will not become the 22nd president of Texas A&M University. Although the Texas Republican had been rumored since last year to be a leading candidate for the post, he was not named as one of three finalists Tuesday by a search committee. According to news accounts, Gramm was one of 125 candidates interviewed by the committee. The finalists are Robert Gates, a former director of the CIA who currently heads a Washington, D.C., think tank; Richard Herman, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa.

WHITMORE IS FINALIST FOR A&M PRESIDENCY (Houston Chronicle, March 20)
Retiring U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm apparently will not become the 22nd president of Texas A&M University. Although the Texas Republican had been rumored since last year to be a leading candidate for the post, he was not named as one of three finalists Tuesday by a search committee. According to news accounts, Gramm was one of 125 candidates interviewed by the committee. The finalists are Robert Gates, a former director of the CIA who currently heads a Washington, D.C., think tank; Richard Herman, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; and JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ae8f1fc9b1e3df9cf8430f573607d346&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=668505604b1c63b62b1419d54a37d865

WHITMORE NOT GRAMM IS FINALIST (San Antonio Express-News, March 20)
U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm, the former Texas A&M economics professor who left College Station 24 years ago for Capitol Hill, is out of the running to be the university's next president. An A&M search advisory committee announced Tuesday that three candidates, including a former CIA director, had made the short list and would be invited to the campus for interviews. They are: Robert Gates, CIA director under President George Bush. Richard Herman, the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign since 1998. JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa since 1996. "These are stellar candidates," said Dr. John L. Junkins, distinguished professor of aerospace engineering at Texas A&M and chairman of the search committee. "They bring vast experiences and share common attributes."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=385dba91b7e91146eaf403784b0f4bf0&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=a4ac730c9f130817ca7902b60908008c

STUDY: RURAL GAYS WITH HIV LACK SUPPORT (Reuters Health, March 20)
HIV-positive gay men living in rural areas are more likely to suffer from depression as a result of a lack of social support than those who live in metropolitan areas, researchers report. "The reason why gay men with HIV in non-metropolitan areas have a higher risk of depression is because of social constraints -- they're unable to get the support a person would want," lead author PHILIP M. ULLRICH, a doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, told Reuters Health. "If a person can talk with others about the stressors of HIV, they'll adjust better," he noted. "It allows people to re-evaluate themselves and their world and gain control over their emotions." Previous research has suggested that gay people with HIV may face more social stigma and negative attitudes in rural areas, Ullrich said. The researchers were interested in whether this could lead to higher amounts of HIV-related depression.
http://www.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=search&StoryID=723742

WHITMORE IS FINALIST AT TEXAS A&M (Dallas Morning News, March 20)
A story about the three finalists for the presidency of Texas A&M University provides some background information on finalist JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa. Whitmore has been provost at the UI since 1996. He took that job after serving as dean of the college of fine arts at the University of Texas at Austin for six years. He has a bachelor's and master's degree in speech and theater from Washington State University and a doctorate in theater history from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER STUDIES (Boston Globe, March 19)
Twenty times larger than the sun, tens of thousands of times larger than Earth, the largest object in the solar system is a violent, radiation-filled magnetic bubble that surrounds Jupiter, according to new data resulting from the timely rendezvous of two spacecraft around the giant planet. Jupiter's magnetic field arises from electric currents generated by the planet's metallic interior. But the vagaries of Jupiter's magnetosphere have remained a mystery. Many of the signals it generates are trapped; those that do escape can't penetrate Earth's protective atmosphere. "The only way to measure these (charged particles and radio signals) is to take your radio receiver to the planet," said WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who worked on a number of the new studies. In January 2001, scientists were able to tag-team Jupiter with two spacecraft: the soon to be retired veteran Galileo and a newcomer called Cassini-Huygens. Cassini, speeding toward a 2004 date with Saturn, passed within 6 million miles of Jupiter in order to use the planet's gravitational field as a slingshot. In addition to the two spacecraft, scientists were also able to employ the Hubble and Chandra space telescopes and an array of radio telescopes on Earth. A version of the story also ran March 14 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

WHITMORE FINALIST FOR A&M TOP POST (KEYE-TV, Austin, Texas, March 19)
Texas A&M announced Tuesday three candidates for school president have been invited for on-campus interviews. They are Robert Gates, Richard Herman and JON WHITMORE. A&M officials say the three were chosen from a list of about 125 individuals in a nationwide search to find a replacement for retiring president Ray Bowen. Whitmore has been provost at the University of Iowa since 1996. He will visit March 27-30.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/keye/20020319/lo/three_invited_for_on-campus_interviews_at_a_m_1.html

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER STUDIES (Boston Globe, March 19)
Twenty times larger than the sun, tens of thousands of times larger than Earth, the largest object in the solar system is a violent, radiation-filled magnetic bubble that surrounds Jupiter, according to new data resulting from the timely rendezvous of two spacecraft around the giant planet. Jupiter's magnetic field arises from electric currents generated by the planet's metallic interior. But the vagaries of Jupiter's magnetosphere have remained a mystery. Many of the signals it generates are trapped; those that do escape can't penetrate Earth's protective atmosphere. "The only way to measure these (charged particles and radio signals) is to take your radio receiver to the planet," said WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who worked on a number of the new studies. In January 2001, scientists were able to tag-team Jupiter with two spacecraft: the soon to be retired veteran Galileo and a newcomer called Cassini-Huygens. Cassini, speeding toward a 2004 date with Saturn, passed within 6 million miles of Jupiter in order to use the planet's gravitational field as a slingshot. In addition to the two spacecraft, scientists were also able to employ the Hubble and Chandra space telescopes and an array of radio telescopes on Earth.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/078/science/Violent_bubble_buffets_Jupiter+.shtml

UIHC GETS BIGGEST SLICE OF MEDICAID (USA Today, March 18)
UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS IN IOWA CITY gets the biggest slice of Iowa's annual Medicaid spending. State records show the institution got almost $75 million for health services last year. The Glenwood State Resource Center and Woodward State Resource Center, both homes for the mentally retarded, were second and third with $43.7 million and $33.5 million, respectively.

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON WEEKEND WORK (Omaha World Herald, March 18)
Is the industrial age invention of the weekend going the way of the rotary dial telephone? Only 80 or so years after most American workers became entitled to two days off after working Monday through Friday, this last frontier of free time is being increasingly colonized by work. Until the 20th century, American workers commonly had only one day off a week -- the choice of day often depending on their religion. It wasn't until a big push from organized labor in the 1920's that workers generally became entitled to two days off, noted BENJAMIN K. HUNNICUTT, a professor of health, leisure and sport studies at the University of Iowa. "They saw the five-day week as the next step," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=46&u_sid=342236

HUNNICUTT TRACKS HISTORY OF WEEKEND (News & Observer, March 17)
A story about the growing number of employees who are forgoing weekends to work more hours quotes BENJAMIN K. HUNNICUTT, a professor of health, leisure and sport studies at the University of Iowa. Until the 20th century, American workers commonly had only one day off a week, the choice of day often depending on their religion. It wasn't until a big push from organized labor in the 1920s that workers generally became entitled to two days off. "They saw the five-day week as the next step," Hunnicutt said. The News & Observer is based in Raleigh, N.C.

BERRY'S 'SUGAR WATER' REVIEWED (Philadelphia Tribune, March 17)
A feature on author VENISE BERRY, whose most recent novel is "Colored Sugar Water," says Berry is an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Iowa.

BROCKMEIER BOOK PRAISED (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 17)
In a review of his collection of short stories titled "Things That Fall from the Sky," Kevin Brockmeier is called "another prodigy of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA writing program." He has won The Chicago Tribune's Nelson Algren Award, the Italo Calvino Short Fiction Award, Glimmer Train's New Writers Award and an O. Henry story award for four of these short fictions. "Although he will inevitably be compared to T.C. Boyle, Steven Millhauser and George Saunders, his work is sweeter than theirs. There's no smirking satire here, no intellectual puzzles, no metafictional mysteries. Instead, Brockmeier explores an adult nostalgia for the fantasies of childhood, whether from the Bible or the Brothers Grimm," says reviewer Charles E. May.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7212ca8e88a59d5479eb8e2dd58f824e&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=f86cbfb9184dfa0bc7a4069a42a903b9

THOMPSON LED MILWAUKEE BALLET (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, March 17)
In a story about a succession of artistic directors at the Milwaukee Ballet, UI ballet professor BASIL THOMPSON is included in the list of directors, noting him as the company's veteran ballet master and occasional interim leader.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=7212ca8e88a59d5479eb8e2dd58f824e&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=355ee930750ad665bbf399a16d56db4f

EX-UI PRESIDENT RAWLINGS TO TEACH (San Francisco Chronicle, March 16)
Cornell University President HUNTER R. RAWLINGS III will step down as leader of the Ivy League school in June 2003 to return to the classroom. Rawlings, 57, who has been president since 1995, told the Cornell board of trustees of his intention to retire Friday. He said he will become a full-time professor in the university's Department of Classics. "The heart of (the educational) enterprise is found in the classroom, the library and the laboratory, and I look forward with great enthusiasm to returning to the fundamental activities that first attracted me to the worlds of teaching and scholarship," said Rawlings, who is the former president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/03/16/national1337EST0526.DTL
A version of the story also ran March 16 on the website of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-cornell-rawlings0316mar16.story
A version of the story also ran March 16 on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/16/education/16COLL.html
A version of the story also ran March 16 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2104266.html
A version of the story also ran March 16 on the website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A37840-2002Mar16.html
A version of the story also ran March 16 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020316/ap_on_re_us/cornell_rawlings_1

ALTHEN DEFENDS LOBBYING BY UNIVERSITIES (Washington Post, March 16)
Two years ago, the Immigration and Naturalization Service was moving forward on an ambitious plan to beef up its checks of foreign nationals seeking permission to study in the United States, an effort designed to thwart terrorists from taking advantage of the loosely controlled student visa system. Then, the program ran into a roadblock: a fierce lobbying campaign by colleges and universities that considered foreign students a major revenue source. The schools complained that it was a privacy violation to conduct in-depth checks of applicants whose backgrounds raised red flags of possible terrorist involvement. College administrators defend their lobbying efforts. "You're talking about the way things were being viewed in 1997 or 1998, before September 11th, 2001," said GARY ALTHEN, the University of Iowa's director of international students and past president of NAFSA: Association of International Educators. "At the time, it was reported that one of the people involved in the earlier [World Trade Center] bombing had at one time in his past been here in student status. That was the example -- the one example -- that came up over and over."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A35473-2002Mar15.html

WSUI'S ENGLANDER PRAISED FOR HOSTING (Poets & Writers, March 15)
A columnist writes about the readings at Prairie Lights Books near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA,. One that drew his attention occurred on March 7, 2002, when about 75 to 80 people gathered to hear Forrest Gander read from his new volume of poems, Torn Awake. Audience members included ROBERT HASS and BRENDA HILLMAN (both of whom are visiting professors at the Writer's Workshop during the spring semester), and CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, who provided the introduction. He writes: "The true impresario of the evening, as is usually the case when an Iowa City reading is broadcast on the radio, was JULIE ENGLANDER, who works for the local NPR station. Throughout the year, Englander hosts an enormous number of these readings, provides continuity (especially during the question and answer sessions), and brings to bear substantial research into the evening's reader."
http://www.pw.org/mag/pc_iowacity.htm

STUDY EXAMINES REFEREE'S CALLS (United Press International, March 15)
NCAA Division I referees may make their calls based on the presence of the television spotlight, says a new study by anthropologist Kendall Thu. The study is to be published in the spring edition of Human Organization. A spokesman for the National Association of Sports officials said he would find it difficult to give the study any credence. "Referees tend to keep nationally televised games close by calling a significantly higher number of fouls against teams that are ahead in the score," said Thu, a professor at Northern Illinois University. Thu analyzed ref calls in games televised by the national networks. He found 58 percent of the fouls were called against the leading team, excluding calls made in the last two minutes of each half and in tie-game situations. Thu, a basketball fan got the idea for the study a decade ago while he was a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=15032002-022805-3125r

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER KING ATTENDED UI (Wall Street Journal, March 15)
A story about the fall sitcom lineup planned by the major networks includes a bio about the story's author, Tom King, that says King is a Cedar Rapids native and graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. King's Hollywood Journal column takes readers onto the studio back-lot to discover how the strange decisions made there affect the movies that play at your local multiplex. King joined the Journal in New York in 1986 and worked as a staff reporter covering advertising; he moved to Los Angeles in 1991 to write about entertainment. King's book, "The Operator: David Geffen Builds, Buys, and Sells the New Hollywood," was a New York Times bestseller upon its publication by Random House in March 2000. Now a senior special writer, King also appears every Monday on CNBC's "Power Lunch." King lives in Los Angeles with his partner Ken Miller, an Emmy Award-winning casting director.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1016150266959665640.djm,00.html

DUNKHASE HEADS SCIENCE COURSE (NSTA Reports!, March 15)
EarthSearch 2002, a summer field class for K-12 teachers, is offered by the Science Education Center at the University of Iowa. Based in Crested Butte, Colo., the class offers teachers of all science backgrounds a chance to learn basic interdisciplinary earth science concepts and their applications while exploring the area. The program is headed by JOHN A. DUNKHASE in the UI Science Education Center. NSTA Reports is a bimonthly publication based in Arlington, Va.

BOWLSBY COMMENTS ON RULES (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 15)
An association of athletics directors at some of the nation's largest and most prominent colleges issued a statement last week expressing frustration with the National Collegiate Athletic Association and the way it governs itself. ROBERT A. BOWLSBY, chairman of the athletics directors' association and athletics director at the University of Iowa, said the current system shuts out people who aren't directly involved, depriving them of a voice on important matters and often excluding administrators with expertise in certain areas. "It seems to our organization that the best people aren't necessarily at the table when discussions are taking place," said Bowlsby, who served as the Management Council's first chairman in 1997 and 1998. "In the second, third, and fourth generations of appointments to the Management Council and the cabinets, perhaps more attention is being given to ethnicity and gender diversity than to expertise."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i27/27a04201.htm

UI PADS STADIUM SEATS, BOOSTS REVENUE (Athletic Management, March 15)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was looking for a way to increase fan comfort while generating additional revenue. With the Cushioned Chair Back program from GTM Sports Marketing, they generated more than $240,000 in new revenue. The seats are customized with school colors and logo.

BERRY'S 'COLORED SUGAR WATER' PRAISED (Milwaukee Times, March 14-20)
"Colored Sugar Water," the latest novel by VENISE BERRY, an assistant professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Iowa, is reviewed. "Filled with all the humor, passion and pathos of modern relationships, "Colored Sugar Water" tells the story of two women who, together, search for happiness and spiritual fulfillment," the reviewer writes. "It also further establishes Venise Berry as one of the freshest, wittiest and wisest writers on today's fiction scene."

COURT RULES ON COLLEGE COSTS (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 14)
The Iowa Court of Appeals on Wednesday outlined the college costs that divorced parents must agree to cover for their children. In its decision, the court attempted to clarify the definition of "necessary" college expenses. While a divorced parent's financial responsibility is generally limited under Iowa state law to the costs of tuition, room, board, and books, the court expanded the list to also include "mandatory fee assessments for such things as laboratory, student health, and computer use." The decision stems from a proceeding in the divorce of a Dubuque, Iowa, couple who disagreed over the amount each should pay for their son's education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Under the court's decision, each parent is responsible for roughly a third of the college costs, while the student is responsible for the remaining third.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/03/2002031402n.htm

UI RECEIVES TWO GRANTS (Omaha World-Herald, March 14)

The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has received two grants from the Department of Health and Human Services totaling nearly $600,000, according to Sen. Charles Grassley's office. The National Institute of Nursing Research will provide a $466,030 grant for predicting children's responses to distraction from pain. A second grant of $110,250, from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, will be used for studying the neurobiology of joint manipulation induced analgesia.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=339085

AWARDS GO TO WORKSHOP GRADUATES (Boston Globe, March 13)

Justin Cronin, author of the short story collection "Mary and O'Neil" (Dial Press), has won the 2002 Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award for first fiction, it was announced yesterday. Also announced yesterday was the winner of this year's L. L. Winship/ PEN New England Award, Elizabeth McCracken, for her novel "Niagara Falls All Over Again" (Dial Press). The award honors the best book in the previous year by a New England author or about the region. Cronin, 39, is a graduate of Harvard University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. He is associate professor of English at La Salle University in Philadelphia, where he lives. McCracken, 35, lives in Somerville. She holds degrees from Brown and Drexel universities, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose Writers' Workshop she attended.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/072/living/Cronin_McCracken_win_PEN_awards+.shtml
This story also appeared March 14 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/03/14/DD191132.DTL

NATIONAL MATH BOWL AT UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 12)
In a story about the Minnesota State High School Math League Tournament on Monday, it's noted that the top 10 finishers will go to the national math competition in June at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/2001593.html

IOWA CITY SITE HAS TOXIC SOIL (Omaha World Herald, March 12)
A project to replace a bridge in Iowa City has rekindled debate about how much contamination remains on a 1.6-acre toxic waste site. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says the soil beneath the former coal gasification plant site is laced with lead, arsenic, cyanide and other hazardous materials. City officials want to know where the contamination is before they begin replacing the Burlington Street bridge over Ralston Creek. Before 1939, the former Iowa City Light and Power Co. used the site to produce gas from coal, a process that generated tons of toxic coal tar. The site was maintained by Iowa-Illinois Light and Power until 1971. A three-story, 54-unit apartment building was built there in 1983 and is now home to about 150 tenants, most of whom are UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=336912

ANDREASEN DESCRIBES SCHIZOPHRENIA (Newsweek, March 11)
A story about Andrea Yates case, in which a mother was accused and on Tuesday convicted of murdering her five children by drowning them in the bathtub, says that the disease that came to be termed schizophrenia was first described by German psychiatrist Emil Kraepelin in the 1890s, but it remains one of the most tragic and mysterious of mental illnesses. Whether it brings the voices of heaven or of hell, it causes what must surely be the worst affliction a sentient, conscious being can suffer: the inability to tell what is real from what is imaginary. ... If Yates's is the public face of schizophrenia -- bedeviled by voices, gripped by evil forces -- then John Nash's is the hidden one. As shown in the Academy Award-nominated picture "A Beautiful Mind," the disease, at least in its early stages, can inspire Olympian leaps of creativity and insight. "That’s the wonderful paradox of schizophrenia," says Dr. NANCY ANDREASEN, professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "People see things others don't, most of which aren't there. But because they perceive the world in a different way, they sometimes also notice things -- real things -- that normal people don't."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/718433.asp

UI SIMULATOR MENTIONED IN ARTICLE (Chicago Tribune, March 11)
Motorola Labs recently built an automobile simulator to further safety research and has held an industry seminar intended to devise an agenda of what's needed to assure that new auto-centric technology enhances safety rather than jeopardizes it. The lab includes a car placed amid audio and video equipment that immerse the driver in the sounds, sights and feel of actually driving. Video cameras and sensors tied to five computers collect a wealth of information on the driver as he drives and does other things like talk on the phone or use a navigation tool. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a far more elaborate simulator than Motorola's, and so does Ford Motor Co., but those are intended to aid people who are designing and building vehicles, said Mike Gardner, director of Motorola's intelligent systems lab.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0203110013mar11.story

NOWAK STUDIES DENTAL SCHOOL TREATMENT (Reuters Health, March 11)
U.S. children who rely on the nation's teaching institutions for dental care are facing increasingly long -- and often painful -- waiting times for treatment, according to researchers. "These kids are being sent to academic health centers for dental care, and when they get there they find out that they have to wait," said Dr. ARTHUR J. NOWAK of the University of Iowa. Nowak and his colleagues surveyed 26 pediatric dental program directors -- almost half of all such directors in the country -- who worked in dental schools or training clinics in hospitals across the US. They were asked to assess the adequacy of their staff and facilities, and describe the demographics of their patients over the previous 5 years. In the current edition of Pediatric Dentistry, Nowak's team reports that children with dental pain had to wait an average of 28 days before receiving general anesthesia for operating room treatment, a time frame that rose to nearly 3 months in some instances.
http://www.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=search&StoryID=686490

WOMEN PLAYWRIGHTS' WORK CITED (Pittsburgh Post Gazette, March 11)
Rebecca Gilman, who attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is named within a list of several noted female writers whose works are challenging long-held ideas of what constitutes a "woman's play." Gilman has seen enormous success with a range of topics and themes in her plays. "I think that you should never feel an obligation to write about any particular thing," Gilman says. "If people expect only a certain type of play from you, I think that's really restrictive. We all live in the same world, and we all see that same world, and we write about whatever we want to write about."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f3b9606e277693afff89119160416254&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=42249032b19591461c1f18159da284c0

UI SIMULATOR CITED IN STORY ON MOTOROLA (Chicago Tribune, March 11)
A story about Motorola's recently built automobile simulator, which will be used to test the risks of driving while using cell phones and other devices, says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a far more elaborate simulator, but it is intended to aid people who are designing and building vehicles. Motorola's simulator and those being built by other companies that supply electronic products intended for use in autos are sufficient for their purposes.

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON WEEKEND WORK (New York Times, March 10)
Is the industrial age invention of the weekend going the way of the rotary dial telephone? Only 80 or so years after most American workers became entitled to two days off after working Monday through Friday, this last frontier of free time is being increasingly colonized by work. Until the 20th century, American workers commonly had only one day off a week -- the choice of day often depending on their religion. It wasn't until a big push from organized labor in the 1920's that workers generally became entitled to two days off, noted BENJAMIN K. HUNNICUTT, a professor of health, leisure and sport studies at the University of Iowa. "They saw the five-day week as the next step," he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/10/business/yourmoney/10WEEK.html

NATIONAL GUARD SERVED AT HYGIENIC LAB (Omaha World Herald, March 9)
Six months after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the Iowa National Guard continues to protect military bases statewide, fill security shifts at airports and maintain helicopters that have seen action overseas. As the Guard's role in the war on terrorism and homeland security has evolved, the number of troops called up immediately after the attack has declined by a third. In Iowa, more than 900 troops were called upon last fall to aid in the nation's military response and to bolster security at airports, the Statehouse and other government buildings, and at other potential terrorist targets, such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB. That total is just a fraction of the more than 9,500 members of the Iowa National Guard.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=334790

YANKOWITZ ADVISES ON VIDEOTAPING BIRTHS (ABCNews.com, March 8)
Many hospitals across the country are instituting policies not allowing videotaping of births, highlighting an emotional struggle between patients' wishes and doctors' efforts to protect themselves from costly litigation. Many hospitals, of course, still allow patients to tape births. In the end, communication is the key to finding a solution that suits both doctor and patient, says DR. JEROME YANKOWITZ, director of the division of maternal-fetal medicine at the University of Iowa. Research shows malpractice lawsuits are less likely when doctors and patients have a good relationship and talk through issues, he said. Yankowitz advises doctors offer consent forms to their patients who want to videotape. With their signatures, patients acknowledge they may be asked to turn off their cameras and get permission of nurses and other staff before taping them at work. "I don't think of it as protecting physicians," he said. "The patient and physician are assisted with the tools to sit down and talk to each other. The biggest thing is to prevent ill will."
http://more.abcnews.go.com/sections/us/dailynews/videotapedbirths001003.html

SLAYTON: FIRST DENTAL VISIT SHOULD BE SOONER (Reuters Health, March 8)
Most parents don't bring their child to the dentist before age 3, despite pediatrician and dentist guidelines urging early dental visits, study findings suggest. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children have their first dental visit during their first year of life, while the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that first visit be at age 3. "We are missing the opportunity to identify those children who are at high risk for dental cavities prior to them developing serious dental problems," lead study author Dr. REBECCA L. SLAYTON, an assistant professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Iowa, told Reuters Health. "We are also missing an opportunity to educate parents about how dental disease can be prevented in their young children."
http://www.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=search&StoryID=680599

THREE EX-STUDENTS' FATES IN JUDGE'S HANDS (Associated Press, March 8)
A judge will decide if three former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students accused of making pipe bombs in their dormitory room were building offensive weapons. District Judge William Thomas heard arguments Thursday in Johnson County District Court. Attorneys say the decision, which will determine whether the trio face felony or misdemeanor charges, will shape expected plea negotiations. Andrew Ritchie, 19, Adam Fisher, 19, and Nathan Krotz, 20, were charged with felony possession of an offensive weapon after three explosives were found last March in Fisher's Burge Residence Hall room. The devices, made from PVC pipe, black powder and fuses, were decorated with fish drawings. The men told authorities they planned to detonate the explosives in an area pond while fishing. The university indefinitely suspended the students.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=cf0a2fdf4b9c48cc1bf067be612a38ce&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=0fcb0c9d76007a75702057973de39665

SLAYTON: FIRST DENTAL VISIT SHOULD BE SOONER (Yahoo! News, March 8)
Most parents don't bring their child to the dentist before age 3, despite pediatrician and dentist guidelines urging early dental visits, study findings suggest. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that children have their first dental visit during their first year of life, while the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that first visit be at age 3. "We are missing the opportunity to identify those children who are at high risk for dental cavities prior to them developing serious dental problems," lead study author Dr. REBECCA L. SLAYTON, an assistant professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Iowa, told Reuters Health. "We are also missing an opportunity to educate parents about how dental disease can be prevented in their young children."
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020308/hl_nm/children_dentist_1

LEWIS-BECK COMMENTS ON FRENCH CANDIDATE (Liberation, March 7)
University of Iowa political science professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK is quoted in a story about how the American media has largely ignored one of the three candidates for president in France, Jean-Pierre Chevènement. "Chevènement comes from the left of the Socialist Party but preaches an authoritative policy," says Lewis-Beck, a specialist in electoral forecasts. "It is very complicated to understand from the American point of view." Liberation is a French online news magazine.
http://www.liberation.fr/quotidien/semaine/020307-020015111PRES.html

CHICAGO GRAPHIC WORKSHOP OWNERS ATTENDED UI (Metromix, March 7)
A feature on painter Ellen Lanyon, who is working on a mural in Chicago depicting pivotal events in the history of the Chicago River, says that after meeting her husband of 52 years, the painter and printmaker Roland Ginzel, Lanyon and Ginzel attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to earn their master's degrees. At graduation Lanyon was awarded a Fulbright scholarship, which allowed her to study egg tempera painting at the Courtauld Institute in London for a year. When she and Ginzel returned to Chicago, they moved into a storefront near Milwaukee and Chicago and started a printmaking studio that came to be known as the Chicago Graphic Workshop. Metromix is an online entertainment guide produced by the Chicago Tribune.
http://metromix.com/top/1,1419,M-Metromix-Home-X!ArticleDetail-7647,00.html

UI RECEIVES LARGEST GIFT EVER (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 7)
The largest foundation in Iowa has pledged $63-million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, the largest gift ever to the university, to support biomedical research. The Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust will distribute this gift in cash payments over a period of up to 15 years. The university's president, MARY SUE COLEMAN, will ask the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, to change the name of the medical school to the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. The Carver family and trust have now given the university a total of $106-million.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/03/2002030706n.htm

UI ALUMNUS IS ARTISTIC DIRECTOR (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 7)

"Art," Yasmina Reza's literate and intriguing drama -- which won the 1998 Tony Award for best play -- symbolizes in many ways the Park Square mission of artistic director Richard Cook. "It's very smart, and we have a really smart audience," he said, distilling a philosophy that has made his organization one of the success stories of the Twin Cities theater community. Attending solicitously to audience and artist alike, Cook and managing director Steven Lockwood have piloted Park Square into a respected niche in the cultural ecosystem. All this is heady stuff for an Iowa farm boy who grew up singing to himself while he drove a tractor up and down rows of soybeans and corn. Cook graduated from Morningside College in Sioux City and received a master's degree in directing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was there that he met Lockwood, with whom he'll celebrate 30 years of partnership this summer.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/1405/1906955.html

UI GRADUATES SHARE LOVE OF FOOD (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, March 6)

From their kitchen overlooking a woodsy lot in a subdivision in Richfield, Linda and Tony Alonghi endeavor to share their enthusiasm for fine food and wine through Saturday morning cooking lessons under the name Ma Cuisine. Linda teaches while Tony takes care of their two children. Then Tony serves food and pours the wine for a leisurely lunch enjoyed by the students in their Provencal dining room. The Alonghis, who met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, returned home 18 months ago from an extended residency in Europe, where they say they truly learned to love food.
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CAMPBELL GETS GRANT TO TREAT MD (Associated Press, March 6)
A University of Iowa researcher has received a $2.2 million grant to develop a new method for delivering gene therapy to victims of muscular dystrophy, university officials say. Molecular biologist KEVIN CAMPBELL will team up with Barry Byrne, a gene therapy expert at the University of Florida, on the project. The grant was provided by the Muscular Dystrophy Association. The goal is for Campbell and Byrne to develop a new vehicle that can be used to deliver gene therapy in trials for victims of limb-girdle MD, a genetic disease that causes muscles in the shoulders, hips, upper arms and legs to waste away. The MDA began gene therapy trials in 1999, but suspended tests after a death in an unrelated gene therapy trial at the University of Pennsylvania. "We are very excited to receive the grant and take the first steps toward this new trial," Campbell said.
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COLEMAN OUTLINES BUDGET PLANS (Associated Press, March 6)
The University of Iowa will use resignations or retirements, not furloughs or layoffs, to help cut nearly $5 million from this year's budget. President MARY SUE COLEMAN said Tuesday the university will make the maximum use of attrition. "We will not implement the furlough plan proposed in the Legislature," she wrote in a note to faculty and staff. "We will keep as many of our people working as possible and will not use layoffs unless absolutely necessary." The university already has cut 165 jobs with attrition, she said. The cuts are needed to help the state close a $121 million revenue shortfall this fiscal year. The kinds of savings attrition will yield will depend on the department, said STEVE PARROTT, director of university relations. Academic units have not been, and will not be, spared entirely, Provost JON WHITMORE told the University of Iowa Faculty Senate on Tuesday.
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UI CITED IN DEBATE ON CLONING BAN (Associated Press, March 6)
Iowa Sen. John Redwine's push to ban human cloning was approved in the Senate on Tuesday, although some lawmakers say they oppose it because it prohibits cloning for the purpose of treating illnesses. Redwine, R-Sioux City and a physician, called the bill one of the most important acts the Legislature and governor could approve this year. It passed on a 32-16 vote, with several Democrats opposing it. "The part about therapeutic cloning or destructive research is much more questionable," said Sen. Johnie Hammond, D-Ames. "And by banning that research, I think we would have a chilling effect on our research and research institutions, such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." Hammond said a ban on all types of cloning may create an obstacle for finding new and more successful treatments for people who suffer from diseases such as Alzheimer's. But Redwine, who is running for a seat in the 5th Congressional District, disagreed with Hammond, whose amendment that would allow therapeutic cloning failed. "Maybe more important is what it does not do," Redwine said of the bill. "It does not affect any research currently being done at the University of Iowa. It does not affect current procedures at in-vitro fertilization clinics in this state. ... It does not prohibit research on stem cells obtained from outside the state of Iowa."
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UI ALUMNA WAS FIRST BLACK ON STATE SUPREME COURT (Jet, March 4)
The magazine's "This Week in Black History" column notes that on March 3, 1988, Juanita Kidd Stout, educator, lawyer and judge, became the first Black woman to serve on a state supreme court when she was sworn in as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania. A native of Wewoka, OK, she earned a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and her J.D. and L.L.M. degrees from Indiana University in 1948 and 1954 respectively.
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HUBBARD, FIRST BLACK UI PROFESSOR, DIES (Jet, March 4)

The magazine's obituaries include PHILIP G. HUBBARD, 80, a former University of Iowa vice president and the university's first Black professor, who died at the University Hospitals in Iowa City.
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STUDY: PRESIDENTIAL PERSONALITIES VARY (Washington Times, March 4)

Character, charisma and a power tie: Surely this is the stuff of an American president. Hollywood has a few more embellishments, however. White House hopefuls have less than three weeks to submit their applications to "Candidate 2012," a new HBO reality TV show intent on finding "one curious and compelling young American" to go through the rigors of the campaign trail. Several hundred applications already have arrived, said Los Angeles-based director R.J. Cutler. Mr. Cutler and his staff have boiled down presidential qualifications to 60 questions plumbing aspirants' political souls and debating their styles and tastes in movies, best friends, heroes and spouses, among other things. They are not alone in assigning a touchy-feely quotient to the office. Public polls from the likes of CNN and Newsweek often include questions about a candidate's emotional appeal. A group of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA psychologists, in the meantime, surveyed 100 presidential historians to discover that presidents come in eight types, including dominators, introverts, good guys, innocents, actors, philosophers and extroverts.
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UI FORUM FOCUSES ON SOFT DRINKS IN SCHOOLS (ADA News, March 4)
A state senate bill introduced last month in Iowa calls for a study on the sale of carbonated beverages in schools during the 2001-2002 school year. The University of Iowa dental school was scheduled to hold a public forum on March 8, "Soft Drinks in Iowa Public Schools: Emerging Epidemics and Possible Solutions." The forum was designed to give health care professionals and the public the opportunity to learn more about the issue, says Dr. JONATHAN SHENKIN, pediatric dentistry resident at the UI dental school, public health dentist and moderator. Also scheduled to appear at the forum, according to the article, were Dr. MICHAEL KANELLIS, professor and chair of the UI department of pediatric dentistry; RONALD LAUER, M.D., UI professor of pediatrics and cardiology; and LINDA SNETSELAAR, Ph.D., UI associate professor of epidemiology in nutrition.

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER STUDIES (Los Angeles Times, March 4)

Twenty times larger than the sun, tens of thousands of times larger than Earth, the largest object in the solar system is a violent, radiation-filled magnetic bubble that surrounds Jupiter, according to new data resulting from the timely rendezvous of two spacecraft around the giant planet. Jupiter's magnetic field arises from electric currents generated by the planet's metallic interior. But the vagaries of Jupiter's magnetosphere have remained a mystery. Many of the signals it generates are trapped; those that do escape can't penetrate Earth's protective atmosphere. "The only way to measure these [charged particles and radio signals] is to take your radio receiver to the planet," said WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who worked on a number of the new studies. In January 2001, scientists were able to tag-team Jupiter with two spacecraft: the soon to be retired veteran Galileo and a newcomer called Cassini-Huygens. Cassini, speeding toward a 2004 date with Saturn, passed within 6 million miles of Jupiter in order to use the planet's gravitational field as a slingshot. In addition to the two spacecraft, scientists were also able to employ the Hubble and Chandra space telescopes and an array of radio telescopes on Earth. The synchronized view gave scientists so much information they published a flood of results.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000016151mar04.story

PONSETI METHOD TREATS CLUBFOOT (Los Angeles Times, March 4)
Clubfoot may be correctable without surgery in up to 90 percent of affected infants, potentially sparing them the pain, complications and expense of traditional treatment. A drive to keep babies out of the operating room pushed some foot specialists to revisit a nonsurgical technique developed at the University of Iowa by Dr. IGNACIO PONSETI more than 50 years ago. The Ponseti method, which involves gentle manipulation of the leg followed by casting with thin plaster, can correct the problem as well as surgery in 90 percent of affected babies, said Dr. Robert W. Mendicino, president of the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons, the professional organization of podiatric surgeons. Avoiding foot surgery in infancy also potentially spares the child repeated corrective procedures later on, Mendicino said in an interview. http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000016126mar04.story

THORNE: BEDS CAN CARRY ENDOTOXINS (Grand Rapids Press, March 3)
A recent study found that more than 90 percent of the bedding in the average American household has detectable levels of dust mites. In 23 percent of the homes, the dust mite levels are high enough to trigger asthmatic reactions among susceptible children and adults. In a companion part of the study, PETER THORNE, a professor of toxicology at the University of Iowa, says that every bed in the study had evidence of endotoxins. Endotoxins are components of the cell wall of bacteria.

BASKETBALL GAME-FIXER PROFILED (New York Times, March 3)
In a review of "The Wizard Of Odds: How Jack Molinas Almost Destroyed the Game of Basketball" by Charley Rosen, the reviewer says Molinas was probably the greatest fixer of basketball games in history, the Mephistopheles of college sports. Between 1957 and 1961, he had no fewer than 27 collegiate programs in the bag, including St. John's and the University of Alabama, and managed to rig the outcomes of at least 43 games, leading to the arrests of 37 players and the shaming of several others. "The most notable casualty was Connie Hawkins, an inner-city Wunderkind who should have been the Julius Erving of his day but instead was sent home from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and spent his prime years banned from the National Basketball Association," the reviewer said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/03/03/books/review/03KONIGST.html

DOERSHUK COMMENTS ON BURIAL GROUNDS (Omaha World Herald, March 3)
Larry Gross, an assistant professor in the Indian studies program and the religious studies department at Iowa State University, has nominated Ames resident Maria Pearson for a Nobel Peace Prize for her work in protecting Native American burial grounds and resulting Iowa laws about notification of the Office of the State Archaeologist before disturbing remains. "Iowa is a model for the country," said JOHN DOERSHUK, who directs the general contracts program for the Office of the State Archaeologist at the University of Iowa. "It's only in the last 10 years that the rest of the country has been catching up."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=328770

FORMER HY-VEE CEO WAS UI ALUMNUS (Omaha World Herald, March 2)
Dwight Vredenburg, who helped to turn Hy-Vee Food Stores Inc. into Iowa's largest employer and a major Midwest grocery chain serving seven states, died Thursday at Lucas County Health Center from complications of a stroke. He was 88. He graduated in 1935 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=328279

POET STERN TAUGHT AT WORKSHOP (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 2)
Poet Gerald Stern became Dr. Gerald Stern when his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh, awarded him an honorary degree Thursday at its honors convocation. Chancellor Mark Nordenberg called the 76-year-old Stern a "distinguished man of letters," citing his various achievements, including the 1998 National Book Award for Poetry and numerous prizes from the poetry community. Now a resident of New Jersey, Stern grew up in Brookline and graduated from Pitt in 1948. His teaching posts included one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, where he taught from 1982-1995.
http://www.post-gazette.com/books/20020302booknotes0302fnp4.asp

DEPROSSE COMMENTS ON EX-RESIDENT (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 1)
A judge suspended criminal proceedings in the case of a Minnesota obstetrician accused of killing her 13-year-old son after the woman blurted out in court Friday that she wanted to represent herself and plead guilty to charges she stabbed the boy to death. Donna Anderson, 48, made the statements at the beginning of a hearing in the courtroom of San Mateo County Superior Court Judge Stephen Hall. The judge did not accept entry of Anderson' s pleas and instead ordered another hearing to appoint two doctors to examine the woman to assess her mental status. Anderson went to medical school at George Washington University and attended three residency programs, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, where she was dismissed because of problems with decision-making and developing treatment plans for patients, said Dr. CHARLES DEPROSSE, a retired professor of obstetrics and gynecology there. "I don' t think anybody had any personal issues with her," he said. "She was a perfectly normal-appearing individual."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/1901523.html

GRONBECK CITES SEPT. 11 SOUVENIRS (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 1)
Souvenirs and collectibles related to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks are everywhere: flags and baseball caps, coffee mugs and T-shirts, cufflinks and clocks. For hard-core collectors, there are subway signs for the World Trade Center station and an invitation to the trade center's 1973 dedication. For some -- particularly friends and families of the victims -- the sale of these mementos is crass and ghoulish. For others, the items are a source of comfort. BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of political communication at the University of Iowa, said the desire to collect started immediately. "There were special editions of newspapers that afternoon. Within a week, there were American flags everywhere, in storefront windows. The torrent of memorabilia was almost instantaneous."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/1707965.html

OLD CAPITOL CONTRACTOR FINED (Omaha World Herald, March 1)
The Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Administration has issued more citations to an asbestos-removal company accused of accidentally starting the Old Capitol fire. Enviro Safe Air Inc. faces a penalty of more than $65,000 from the OSHA citations. OSHA said Wednesday that the South Dakota company failed to take all the necessary fire prevention steps and required safety measures for workers removing lead-based paint and asbestos from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA building.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=327257

CHICAGO TV ANCHOR RETIRING (Chicago Tribune, March 1)
Veteran WLS-TV news anchor John Drury is retiring after 40 years on Chicago TV. In a review of his career, it's noted that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While a student at the UI, and for years afterward, Drury was an amateur magician. "I bought a lot of illusions, including a zig-zag lady. You could take the center of her torso and push it to one side. But I got rid of all that," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0203010119mar01.story

UI HIRES ISLAM PROFESSOR (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 1)
Many universities found themselves with no one qualified to teach Arabic, Islamic studies, or Middle Eastern history following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Student demand, as well as pressure from local leaders and government officials, sent institutions scrambling to hire professors to teach classes in disciplines once near the bottom of the academic pecking order. Now, those same courses are considered essential, although it's not clear whether student interest will be short-lived. The University of Iowa has a half-time visiting professor of Islamic studies who hasn't even earned his Ph.D. But the institution will upgrade his post to full time next year, and the School of Religion is hoping to convert it to the tenure track after that. The visiting professor, REZA ASLAN, has been doing double duty, teaching at Iowa and acting as the state's leading academic authority on modern Islam. "I've been forced to go up and down the state speaking to groups to make up for the fact that there simply is no other professor who is able to do this," says Mr. Aslan. For many state institutions, though, the pressure to start new programs and add faculty posts has run headlong into another phenomenon blamed on September 11: the recession. States have already trimmed university budgets, and some institutions have even announced they will cut faculty jobs. The University of Iowa has decided to spend $20,000 to elevate Aslan’s post to full time next year. But LINDA MAXSON, dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, does not hold out hope for much more. "We had a $30-million-plus budget cut for this year," she says. "We are facing the possibility of another cut before May. We've been very, very careful in granting permission to search for new positions."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i25/25a01001.htm

UI GRADUATE NAMED COACH (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 1)
Former National Basketball Association star Kevin Gamble has been named the first men's basketball coach. University of Illinois at Springfield. Gamble, 36, is a graduate of Springfield Lanphier High School and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and played for the Boston Celtics, Miami Heat and Sacramento Kings during his 11-year NBA career. He was drafted in the third round by the Portland Trail Blazers in the 1987 draft.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=46a2070f18b18a8cf4a52e8328655502&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLStS-lSlzV&_md5=0ce92ee0ca935bf43555b697e4c4f14a

BROCHU PRAISES T-REX STUDY (Detroit Free Press, March 1)
Tyrannosaurus rex, the fearsome carnivore depicted as fast on its feet in the "Jurassic Park" movies, may have been a bit of a slowpoke. A study suggests that at six tons and 40 feet in length, the two-legged T. rex was so big its leg muscles could not have let it sprint. The conclusion may have a bearing on the long-running debate over whether T. rex was a predator that chased down its prey or a scavenger that fed on carcasses. The findings were published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. CHRIS BROCHU, a paleontologist at the University of Iowa, praised the paper as "the firmest statement yet made on how fast a large bipedal dinosaur could have moved -- its running ability or lack thereof." Versions of the story also ran Feb. 28 in the COLUMBUS DISPATCH in Ohio, the FRESNO BEE in California, the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, the STAR-LEDGER in Newark, N.J., the NEWS & OBSERVER in Raleigh, N.C., the ARIZONA DAILY REPUBLIC, in Phoenix and the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER in Santa Ana, Calif.

UI CUTS FACES $13.5 MILLION SHORTFALL (University Business, March 2002)
A story on the budget cuts being faced by universities says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA faces a $13.5 million state funding shortfall and has eliminated 107 staff and faculty positions.

BAUM FEATURED IN PHOTO OF 'BOOK DROP' (American Libraries, March 2002)
A photo of a new book-arts vending machine in the University of Iowa library's lobby runs along with a caption that says the Center for the Book unveiled the machine in December. Book Drop, as it was named by assistant conservator KRISTEN BAUM (shown in the photo with the fully stocked machine), sells handmade books as well as bookbinding kits. Prices range from $5 to $15, and the income from sales benefits the UI book-studies program.

HUNNICUTT: WORKWEEK STABILIZED AFTER WAR (UP Magazine, March 2002)
A story exploring why people are working harder than ever says the trend is a far cry from the vision of the future portrayed in the early years of the century. Back then everyone from Julian Huxley to John Maynard Keynes predicted a 10-hour working week by 2000. And social planners were scribbling worried tomes about what people would do with all this new-found free time. "What I've found is that after 100 years of increasingly shorter workweeks, it came to an end after World War II and stabilized at 40 hours a week," says BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of history at the University of Iowa. UP Magazine is published in Glasgow, Scotland.
http://www.up-mag.com/themag/themag/feature1.htm

HUNNICUTT: WORK IS NEW RELIGION (La Monde, March 2002)
A story about the growing number of hours Americans are working in order to purchase all the goods marketed to them so aggressively quotes BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian of work and leisure at the University of Iowa, as saying that "work has become a new ideology, a new religion." A version of the article also appeared online Feb. 24 in the Brazilian publication CORREIO BRAZILIENSE

NURSING CREATES CLASSIFICATION TOOL (Nursing Management, March 2002)
A story about the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system, which is a research- and practice-based approach to defining nurses' work, is the product of research by the Iowa Interventions Project at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF NURSING. The NIC systematically organizes nearly 500 nursing interventions by patterns of association. For example, nutrition support interventions include eating disorders management, feeding, nutritional monitoring and swallowing therapy, among others. Nursing Management is a magazine based in Spring House, Pa.

BLOOM: CONFEDERATE SPIRIT ALIVE IN BRAZIL (DoubleTake, Spring 2002)
STEPHEN G. BLOOM, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, writes a lengthy feature article about Americana, a Brazilian town populated by the descendents of Confederate soldiers and their families who settled there after the Civil War. "Even though the war had been over for 115 years," when Bloom first went there, he had heard that "the town was still a stronghold of Dixie spirit. Unbelievably, these Brazilian descendants of rebel soldiers spoke English of the American South circa 1865, they sipped mint juleps on their bougainvillea-covered verandas, and they still had rotogravure photographs of Jefferson Davis on the walls of their parlors.



 

 

 

 

 

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