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UI in the News

February, 2002

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BROCHU: T-REX LIKELY TOO BIG TO RUN (Washington Post, Feb. 28)
The legend of Tyrannosaurus rex rampaging along like a prehistoric SUV appears to be incorrect. New research suggests that T. rex just didn't have the legs. Instead, says Stanford biomechanist John R. Hutchinson, this great carnivore was a relatively slow-moving, 10-mile-per-hour walker, which, if it could run, just might have managed a 25-mph lumber, but "that's pushing it." The research is published in the Feb. 28 issue of Nature. The University of Iowa's CHRISTOPHER A. BROCHU, a leading authority on T. rex, praised the new research for bringing "far more rigor and precision than has ever been possible to a long-standing debate. This paper doesn't firmly establish T. rex as a nonrunner, but it really lends strong support to the idea," Brochu said. "T. rex is about as big as a biped can get. To move and balance, it has a tail and a center of gravity at the hip. The whole thing is operating like a giant seesaw."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A13869-2002Feb27.html
A version of this article also appeared Feb. 28 on the SEATTLE TIMES WEB site:
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=trex28&date=20020228&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

PONSETI METHOD CITED (Yahoo! News, Feb. 28)
Nine in ten infants with clubfoot can have the deformity corrected successfully without surgery, according to research presented today by pediatric foot and ankle experts at the American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons annual meeting. Clubfoot is a deformity of unknown causes that occurs in otherwise healthy infants. It is the most common congenital disorder of the lower extremity, affects 1 in 750 infants, and occurs more frequently in boys. Clubfoot deformity causes the foot to turn inward and point downward. Shortened tendons and ligaments on the inside of the lower leg restrict outward movement and cause the foot to turn inward. Tight Achilles tendons cause the foot to point downward. "It has not been widely published that non-surgical treatments can achieve permanent correction in the first year of life," said ACFAS President Robert W. Mendicino, DPM. However, Mendicino reported that a unique external manipulation and casting technique, known as the PONSETI method, is gaining acceptance by podiatric foot and ankle surgeons as an alternative to clubfoot surgery. First described at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1950, long-term success with this treatment had not been replicated at other institutions until recently.
http://biz.yahoo.com/prnews/020227/cgw020_1.html

PEEK-ASA COMMENTS ON WORKPLACE HOMICIDE (HealthScout News, Feb. 28)
According to a study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, eliminating solo night work is one of the few measures that appears to reduce the risk that workers will be murdered on the job. Another is having well-lighted work areas. On the other hand, installing video cameras to record crimes, storing cash in safes, and even having security guards don't appear to protect employees from deadly violence. CORINNE PEEK-ASA, a violence prevention expert at the University of Iowa, says the latest study contains few surprises. However, it does underscore the need for a comprehensive program to deter attacks. "There really is no such thing as a quick fix," Peek-Asa says. "There's a cumulative effect, and what that indicates to me is that a comprehensive program is more effective than buying a piece of equipment or doing one thing."
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020301/hl_hsn/night_shift_is_dangerous_work

CHEVRON ADA CASE BEFORE THE HIGH COURT (National Law Journal, Feb. 27)
The U.S. Supreme Court in recent Americans with Disabilities Act rulings has not been particularly deferential to the EEOC -- to employers' advantage, notes PETER BLANCK, professor and director of the University of Iowa's Law, Health Policy & Disability Center. "This court, led by justices like [Antonin] Scalia, has been very literal in its reading of the statues," said Blanck, who wrote an amicus brief for the National Council on Disability, which is supporting worker Mario Echazabal in Chevron USA v. Echazabal, argued before the high court last month. "In Echazabal, the statute said what it means and we'll see how principled the court will be," Blanck said.

PIRO: DONATIONS REFLECT FAN LOYALTY (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Feb. 27)
University of Minnesota officials say they need to come up with some creative ways to generate private donations to support the spiraling cost of big-time athletics. The article also discusses athletic endowments and scholarships, noting the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has endowed scholarships for 35 players on its football team and wants to endow the other 50 scholarships, and a $250,000 gift endows the quarterback position on the football team. If the player is an Iowan, income from that donation is enough to pay his in-state tuition Tying a name to a position on the football team seems to have special resonance for some donors, said ANDY PIRO, who works with endowments as a development director in Iowa's athletics programs. "People give for a variety of reasons, some for altruistic reasons, others for the benefits they receive, and lots of people for reasons in between," Piro said. "This is a way for loyal fans to be involved forever. And that's a powerful concept."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/503/1703347.html

BLANK OPINES ON ADA LEGISLATION (Hartford Courant, Feb. 27)
PETER BLANCK
, professor of the University of Iowa College of Law, commenting about the Bush Administration's support of the Americans with Disabilities Act, said it's too early to draw any conclusions about the Administration's approach to the 1990 legislation. Still, he noted the president has spoken favorably about the act and inherits his father's support for the legislation. Some claim the Act is under attack in light of a series of recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions seen by some as being pro-business. The high court on Wednesday heard Chevron v. Echazabal, an ADA case where the issue before the court was whether a worker has the right to a job that the employer believes could be injurious or fatal to him.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/health/hc-disable0226.artfeb26.story?coll=hc%2Dh

KURTH COMMENTS ON MAGNETOSPHERE (City News of Los Angeles, Feb. 27)

Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena are studying the inner workings of the whirling bubble of charged particles surrounding Jupiter, it was announced today. Though invisible, the bubble, or magnetosphere, is more than 100 times wider than the big planet and ranks as the solar system's largest object with distinct boundaries, according to Scott Bolton, a JPL physicist and co-author of three of seven reports on the phenomenon. Some14 months ago the Cassini spacecraft passed by Jupiter on its way Saturn. At one point, researchers were able to glean simultaneous data from the Galileo spacecraft when it was within the magnetosphere and Cassini, which was just outside of it. "The combined observations ... help show us the relative importance of the influence of the solar wind and the factors affecting the magnetosphere from within -- primarily the energy from Jupiter's rotation and the supply of material from volcanoes on the moon Io," said WILLIAM KURTH, a physicist at the University of Iowa, who authored a report on the findings that appears in the Feb. 28 issue of Nature.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=88f0a9883a3b4e4a6cb19d9de685add3&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlAl&_md5=ac014fed45db386ed88b17c7c75612aa

BROCHU PRAISES T-REX STUDY (New York Times, Feb. 27)
Tyrannosaurus rex, the fearsome carnivore depicted as fast on its feet in the "Jurassic Park" movies, may have been a bit of a slowpoke. A study suggests that at six tons and 40 feet in length, the two-legged T. rex was so big its leg muscles could not have let it sprint. The conclusion may have a bearing on the long-running debate over whether T. rex was a predator that chased down its prey or a scavenger that fed on carcasses. The findings were published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. CHRIS BROCHU, a paleontologist at the University of Iowa, praised the paper as "the firmest statement yet made on how fast a large bipedal dinosaur could have moved -- its running ability or lack thereof."
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/science/AP-T-Rexs-Stride.html
A version of this ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared Feb. 27 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES WEB site:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-t-rexs-stride0227feb27.story
A version of this Associated Press story also appeared Feb. 27 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE WEB site:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/02/27/national0132EST0424.DTL
A version of this Associated Press story also appeared Feb. 27 on YAHOO NEWS: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020227/ap_on_sc/t_rex_s_stride_1
A version of this story also appeared Feb. 27 on the BBC NEWS WEB site:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_1844000/1844886.stm

BLANCK COMMENTS ON DISABILITY CASE (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 27)
The U.S. Supreme Court is taking up the case of Mario Echazabal, a Chevron refinery worker who is diagnosed with a liver condition, but has filed suit to continue working in the refinery even though managers have decided that, for his own good, he must find work elsewhere. The case confronts the difficult question of whether U.S. disability law requires employers to hire disabled workers even when the job they want may harm or even kill them. The suit claims that the company excluded him from a job he is capable of performing based on insufficient medical data and their own fears and stereotypes about his condition. Lawyers for Chevron say the company acted on the best medical and scientific information it had at the time. PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy, and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law, says such information is rarely more than an educated guess. http://csmonitor.com/2002/0227/p02s01-usju.htm

PEEK-ASA NOTES WORKPLACE HOMICIDE STUDY (Associated Press, Feb. 26)
Locked doors and employees working in groups at night do more to reduce the chance of a workplace homicide than gadgets like video cameras and bulletproof glass, according to a study by researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The study found that the equipment that proved most effective was bright lighting. "In a nutshell, I think what we're seeing is that crime prevention is also good for business," said CORINNE PEEK-ASA, who studies workplace violence at the University of Iowa's Injury Prevention Research Center. "The good news in what they found was effective is that a comprehensive program (to fight crime) may not be that expensive." http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020226/ap_on_re_us/workplace_homicides_1
This article also appeared Feb. 26 on the Web sites of the NEW YORK TIMES:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Workplace-Homicides.html,
the LOS ANGELES TIMES:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-workplace-homicides0226feb26.story
the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/02/26/national1554EST0696.DTL
and the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-workplace-homicides0226feb26.story.

RESEARCHERS WIN GRANT (Pacific Business News, Honolulu, Hawaii, Feb. 26)
The University of Hawaii and the University of Iowa will work together to look for a treatment or cure for cystic fibrosis after winning a joint $2 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation. Researchers with the two universities will study an ocean species that does something cystic fibrosis victims cannot do: live normal life spans with a persistent infection. The bobtail squid has a symbiotic relationship with luminous bacteria that somehow keeps the squid's immune system from becoming alarmed. The Kewalo Marine Laboratory at UH Manoa's Pacific Biomedical Research Center will work with the UI College of Medicine. "There are many parallels," said PETER GREENBERG, a molecular pathogenesist at Iowa. "The principles of engagement, as far as we can tell, seem to be the same.

UI DENTAL SCHOOL STUDIES PACIFIER USE (Florida Times-Union, Feb. 26)
Researchers with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY and Tokyo Dental College followed nearly 400 Iowa children, making models of their teeth at age 4 to 5. In December, they published the results in the Journal of the American Dental Association. The prevalence of crossbite was 5.8 percent among children who stopped sucking on objects by age 1. It was 13 percent among children who stopped by age 2 or 3. And it was 20 percent among children who continued after they turned 4. The Times-Union is based in Jacksonville.

WARREN WARNS OF THUMB SUCKING DANGERS (Post and Courier, Feb. 25)
Children who use a pacifier or suck their thumbs at age 4 or beyond run a greater risk of developing an overbite and of altering the way their jaws fit together, says a recent study in The Journal of the American Dental Association. "The results of the study suggest some potential harm in continuing habits beyond 24 months of age, with greater risk of developing occlusal problems with ... habits persisting to 48 months of age and beyond," writes Dr. JOHN WARREN, assistant professor of preventive and community dentistry at the University of Iowa and the lead author. The Post and Courier is based in Charleston, S.C. A version of the story also ran Feb. 25 in the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.

VALUE OF DONATIONS DOWN AT UI (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 25)
The value of gifts to foundations that support the University of Iowa and Iowa State University slipped last year. University of Iowa officials said the number of donors reached a record, however. The $64.8 million in outright gifts to the University of Iowa was less than 1 percent behind 2000, a record year for outright gifts, according to MICHAEL NEW, foundation president. More than 56,000 contributors made nearly 100,000 gifts during the year.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=323491

TOBACMAN: RESEARCH WAS INCONCLUSIVE (Business World, Feb. 25)
The American researcher who earlier said that Philippine carrageenin is carcinogenic admitted that her research on the seaweed was not at all conclusive, the Seaweed Industry Association of the Philippines (SIAP) said. SIAP president Peter Borja said this came after the Department of Agriculture (DA) officials met recently with Dr. JOANNE TOBACMAN, a professor from the University of Iowa who did the research using carrageenin from Cebu and Tacloban. Carrageenin, which is a by-product of seaweed, is a thickening agent used in making paint, air fresheners and photographic film, pet food, beer, toothpaste and lipstick. According to Ms. Tobacman's research, which was released late last year, there is "a cause-and-effect relationship between carrageenin and mammary carcinoma or breast cancer." In meeting with DA officials, however, Dr. Tobacman said that her research was not conclusive. (Business World is a magazine in the Philippines.)
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a62c6c760e7b8b649c18bce320878961&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=2484b5b9558d0d02718f8c83b0364cb7

HOOVER: TEST MANIA IS SCARY (Washington Post, Feb. 24)
An article in the paper’s Sunday Magazine looks back at a year-long scandal in suburban Washington, D.C. in which standardized test security was compromised. The article notes that the strongest and most persuasive critics of high-stakes testing are the people who make the tests, the psychometricians involved in the imprecise science of measuring mental function and educational attainment. They know the limits of their products and, all across the educational and political landscape, see them being exceeded. "What's happening at the moment scares the dickens out of me," H.D. HOOVER, the principal author of the venerable Iowa Tests of Basic Skills, says from his office at the University of Iowa. "Tests like ours offer valuable information about a student. They offer some information about a school, but only a limited picture of what's important to know about that school. They were never intended to be used as a hammer on teachers and school administrators." Hoover has been putting together the Iowa tests for 35 years. He is a statistics professor and president of the National Council on Measurement in Education, the professional organization of psychometricians. He may be more blunt than many in his field, but he's hardly out of the mainstream. "When I see miracle changes in scores on reading comprehension or problem solving, that means either it is not a good test -- and it can be taught by rote drilling -- or someone is cheating. You are not supposed to say that, but it's a fact."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A41920-2002Feb20.html

THRILLER WRITERS ARE ON BOOK TOUR (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 24)
Riding together in a Chevy truck, writers Chuck Logan and John Camp are on a tour of Midwestern bookshops promoting their thrillers. Omaha and Lincoln were early stops, which were to be followed by Denver, Des Moines and Iowa City. Camp, who publishes a novel about every year under the name John Sandford, is up to his 14th "Prey" book. The most recent to be published by Putnam, "Chosen Prey," came out last year. Camp, a native of Cedar Rapids, earned an undergraduate degree in American studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and later returned to Iowa for a master's in journalism. He also attended classes at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=320655

HENDRIX COMMENTS ON STEM CELL BILL (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 23)
University of Iowa researchers say they support a ban on human cloning, but are fighting a Republican state lawmaker's bill that would place restrictions on stem-cell research that go beyond existing federal restrictions. MARY HENDRIX, deputy director of the University of Iowa Cancer Center, said researchers believe that a section of a Senate bill that bans all destructive research on human embryos could bring about some unintended consequences. She said the bill could handicap the university, future research on therapeutic cloning and potential biotechnology investment in the state. "We don't yet know the future promise of this type of research," Hendrix said. "To inhibit our ability to do this research at a very early stage does not seem wise."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=322065

LOCKWOOD IS NEW UI REGISTRAR (Capitol Times, Madison Wis., Feb. 23)
Associate Registrar Larry Lockwood, a 22-year veteran of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Registrar's Office, will leave in mid-May to become registrar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. As an associate registrar since 1996, Lockwood has been involved in many important developments in the office, including the implementation of touch-tone registration and the ISIS student records system. Before officially becoming a member of the Registrar's Office, he worked closely with the office for five years as a government counselor for students returning from the Vietnam War.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=26293eee2d0ed55a83936fd0780dbeec&_docnum=11&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=94ed3d4a797419f834e9d4c38819cda4

GRONBECK AMAZED BY SEPT. 11 COLLECTING (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 23)
Souvenirs and collectibles related to the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks are everywhere: flags and baseball caps, coffee mugs and T-shirts, cufflinks and clocks. On Thursday, New York City officials demanded that eBay pull all items from its Web site that are related to the World Trade Center attack, saying the memorabilia were exploiting a tragedy. The company said it's unlikely to do so, but would review its standards. BRUCE GRONBECK, a professor of political communication at the University of Iowa, said it is "utterly amazing what is now available. The impact of 9-11 has erupted in clothing styles, we see it on cereal boxes ... We cannot escape it." Gronbeck said the desire to collect started immediately. "There were special editions of newspapers that afternoon. Within a week, there were American flags everywhere, in storefront windows. The torrent of memorabilia was almost instantaneous."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-collectibles0223feb23.story
This article also appeared Feb. 23 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-collectibles0223feb23.story
This article also appeared Feb. 23 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/02/22/national0140EST0419.DTL
This article also appeared Feb. 23 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE :
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/1644985.html
This article also appeared Feb. 23 at YAHOONEWS.COM
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020223/ap_on_re_us/attacks_collectibles_1
This article also appeared Feb. 23 on the Web site of NEWSDAY:
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-collectibles0223feb23.story
This article also appeared Feb. 23 on the Web site of the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL:
http://www.jsonline.com/news/attack/ap/feb02/ap-attacks-collect022402.asp

UI PLAYWRIGHT FINDS VOICE (San Diego Union Tribune, Feb. 23)
Shortly after Rebecca Gilman finished graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the 37-year-old playwright says she had "a critic say that one of my plays was good but it was essentially a 'woman's play.' Which meant, 'Why should anybody bother to go see it?' Like a chick film or something." Today, Gilman and other female playwrights aren't hearing that criticism much anymore. Decades after playwrights such as Maria Irene Fornes, Tina Howe and Beth Henley made their mark at the height of the women's movement era with plays dealing with feminist and relationship issues, the theater world is abuzz over the emergence of new women's voices -- except now nobody is calling them that. Writers such as Gilman, Kia Corthron, Heather McDonald, Naomi Wallace, Claudia Shear and Melanie Marnich are just a few in a long list of female writers whose works are challenging long-held ideas of what constitutes a "woman's play."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/uniontrib/sat/currents/news_1c23drama.html

REGENTS: SPARE COLLEGES FROM BUDGET CUTS (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 22)
The Board of Regents, State of Iowa is urging lawmakers to look elsewhere when trying to offset the state's budget shortfall, saying more cuts to university budgets would hurt higher education. "Additional cuts in state university budgets would result in severe reductions in services to citizens and denial of access to education," according to a statement unanimously approved by the board during a conference call Wednesday. Greg Nichols, executive director for the regents, called a Republican furlough plan impractical for employees and administrators at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=321115

FRESHMAN SHARES THOUGHTS ON COLLEGE (Daily Herald, Chicago, Feb. 22)
Shelley May is completing her freshman year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after graduating from Neuqua Valley High School in 2001. The article contains excerpts from her evaluation of life at a large college: "First of all, marching band is awesome and I'd recommend it to anyone as a way to meet people who are energetic and fun. I've seen how freedom at college has brought out the best in some and the worst in others. Your work ethic and sense of responsibility will play a big part in your success, especially at a large university." May is a music education/percussion major at the UI.
http://www.dailyherald.com/search/main_story.asp?intID=37309258

THUMBSUCKING AFFECTS TEETH (Chattanooga Times/Free Press, Feb. 21)
New research shows thumbsucking or pacifier use after age 2 may increase the risk of conditions such as buck teeth which can cause children to need braces, according to the American Dental Association. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY found changes in bite among children who were still sucking a finger or pacifier after age 4. But even before that, potential problems could be spotted, according to the study.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=b20844e71a7fe717b5a2a6286dc010d1&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlzV&_md5=8b031d8409177c6d0c4e4eebd55db6d9

ACHEPOHL TALKS ON WEAVING (Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Wash., Feb. 21)
KEITH ACHEPOHL, Elizabeth M. Stanley Professor in the Arts at the University of Iowa, recently lectured at Gonzaga University's Jundt Art Museum as part of its exhibition "Family Holdings: Turkish Nomadic Flatweaves." "We can look at these objects," says Achepohl, "and imagine them hanging from their tents, lining the walls, covering the floors, and providing a magical richness of design and color." Achepohl, also an internationally known artist, has traveled extensively over the last 40 years to find new ideas for his art. In the mid-'70s he began collecting the fiber art of the nomadic weavers of Turkey.
http://www.spokesmanreview.com/news-story.asp?date=022102&ID=s1105037

LEICHT COMMENTS ON CLERGY FIRING RATE (USA Today, Feb. 21)
The Rev. Charles Chandler felt so blindsided when he was forced out of his church eight years ago that he established the Ministering to Ministers Foundation, which provides emergency funds, housing and legal, psychological and career assistance for clergy of any denomination who have suffered a similar fate. In 2001, his organization helped approximately 500 ousted or beleaguered ministers. That's up from 400 the year before and 100 when he started. KEVIN LEICHT, professor of sociology at the University of Iowa and author of Professional Work, says, "Clergy firings are very high compared with the national labor force, where 1.2% of all employees are involuntarily terminated. The rate is even higher than coaches in the NFL, a notoriously unstable profession."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/comment/2002/02/21/ncguest1.htm

UI STUDENT TOUTS BOTTLE BILL (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 20)
Student environmental activists chanted and waved signs on the steps of the Iowa Statehouse Tuesday, demanding that lawmakers toughen regulation of factory farms and expand the state's bottle deposit law. Both must win committee approval by Friday, a deadline self-imposed by the Legislature, to remain alive this year. The student group, calling itself Iowa Students Toward Environmental Protection, urged lawmakers to move quickly. "The bottle bill just makes sense," said Grant Raupp, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It is wildly popular and effective and clearly needs to be expanded."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=318884

OSTEDGAARD COMMENTS ON GENE THERAPY (HealthScout, Feb. 20)
A shortened version of the gene implicated in cystic fibrosis (CF) could, with further refinements, lead to gene therapy to correct the human form of this ultimately fatal lung disease. The "mini-gene" appears to function just like the full gene in laboratory cultures and in the mouse version of the disease, say researchers at the University of Iowa. Their work appears in yesterday's issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. According to lead investigator LYNDA S. OSTEDGAARD, an associate research scientist in internal medicine, one of the most promising delivery systems in CF is the adeno-associated virus (AAV), a small, harmless virus. It has already been used in a clinical trial of gene therapy in people with CF.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020220/hl_hsn/_mini_gene__may_help_cystic_fibrosis_patients

ADOLPHS: BRAIN IMAGING AIDS STUDY (HealthScout, Feb. 19)
Judging who is worthy of your faith is a crucial ability, influencing everything from financial investments to who will look after your family. To make those decisions, we draw on a variety of sources, not the least of which is visual information, including emotional cues on a person's face. Now, new research points to the areas of the brain that receive and decipher that particular information, giving us our "gut instinct" about who is worthy of our trust, and who isn't. The study, which appears in the March issue of Nature Neuroscience, focused on two brain regions. RALPH ADOLPHS, the author of a commentary accompanying the study and an assistant professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, says brain imaging helps to make distinctions about the brain regions involved in judging trustworthiness. "It adds more detail to the picture of how the brain links what we see in the world – our perception, in this case, of other peoples' faces – to the kinds of judgments that we make about them," says Adolphs. "It's a complex issue," he notes, because the brain uses a variety of regions and strategies to perform this task.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020220/hl_hsn/brain_trust

BIRTH DEFECTS REGISTRY CREDITED (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 19)
The Iowa Birth Defects Registry, based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is credited with making Iowa one of eight states to receive an "A" in a national birth-defects report card. Paul Romitti, director of the 19-year-old program, said Wednesday that state laws allow his staff to seek information on possible problems with infants. In many other states, health officials have to rely on doctors to report the problems. The report by the Trust for America's Health said Iowa is one of a handful of states actively tracking and trying to explain defects.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=321158

COCHRAN: DEMAND FOR SERVICES IS UP (US News & World Report, Feb. 18)
New statistics show that many freshmen arrive on campus depressed and anxious and feel worse as the year progresses. At the same time, colleges must also negotiate the legal and emotional pitfalls of caring for their charges, not children but not yet fully adults. The number of freshmen reporting less than average emotional health has been steadily rising since 1985, according to the newest data from an annual nationwide survey by the University of California-Los Angeles. The ballooning caseloads mean there isn't the time or the staff to offer long-term therapy to any but the most troubled. Instead, colleges focus on getting students over immediate crises. "We let students know from the beginning that we offer primarily short-term counseling," says SAM COCHRAN, the director of counseling services at the University of Iowa.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/020218/education/18education.htm

ANDREASEN HEADS NEUROSCIENCE INSTITUTE (Albuquerque Journal, Feb. 18)
Twenty years ago, Dr. NANCY ANDREASEN jumped at the opportunity to study images of brains actively working, hoping those pictures would unearth clues about mental illness. But many of her colleagues laughed at her. "They didn't think I would see anything," she said. Back then, the conventional thinking was that mental illnesses were psychological, but that the person's brain worked as normally as anyone else's. How things have changed. Today, mental illnesses are understood as a disease of the brain, where biology causes malfunctions that can be seen in changing patterns on brightly colored images. Andreasen is heading a collaboration of scientists that hopes to use those images to understand exactly what goes wrong and maybe even how to fix it. She recently took over as head of the MIND (Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery) Institute based at the University of New Mexico. Andreasen continues some work at the University of Iowa, where she has been professor of psychiatry, so scientists there also are contributing to the group. "Yesterday we had a meeting that was just plain inspiring," she said during an interview earlier this month.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=99b2c66fafd80ff1d86883edeb363787&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=30a24e17e4fffe575426a126a729840c

UI PLAYWRIGHT FINDS VOICE (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Feb. 18)
Shortly after Rebecca Gilman finished graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the 37-year-old playwright says she had "a critic say that one of my plays was good but it was essentially a 'woman's play.' Which meant, 'Why should anybody bother to go see it?' Like a chick film or something." Today, Gilman and other female playwrights aren't hearing that criticism much anymore. Decades after playwrights such as Maria Irene Fornes, Tina Howe and Beth Henley made their mark at the height of the women's movement era with plays dealing with feminist and relationship issues, the theater world is abuzz over the emergence of new women's voices -- except now nobody is calling them that. Writers such as Gilman, Kia Corthron, Heather McDonald, Naomi Wallace, Claudia Shear and Melanie Marnich are just a few in a long list of female writers whose works are challenging long-held ideas of what constitutes a "woman's play."
http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/arts/feb02/20538.asp

COMMUNITY COLLEGES HELP IN JOB TRAINING (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 19)
Many small businesses lack the resources for in-house job training, but this article suggests that they can turn to community colleges as a source of motivated workers and training. St. Luke's Hospital in Cedar Rapids uses high-school students with hopes of hiring them after graduation and sending them to Kirkwood Community College or one of three local four-year schools for nursing training. Tai Benson, 21, interned at St. Luke's in high school, switched to full-time work after graduation, and got her two-year nursing degree at Kirkwood while working. With a nurse shortage, she works about 50 hours a week and makes $16 an hour. "I'm taking a breather," Ms. Benson says. But in the fall of 2003, she plans to begin a one-year program at the nearby UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that will bring her a four-year nursing degree. http://online.wsj.com/article/0,4286,SB1014078174130069480,00.html?collection=wsjie/30day&vql-string=(

VILSACK: HANDS OFF COLLEGE BUDGETS (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 19)
After a wave of budget cuts, Iowa's higher education system is operating with less money than it had two years ago and additional cuts would devastate the colleges, Gov. Tom Vilsack said Monday. Iowa lawmakers are now wrestling with how to handle an expected $120 million shortfall in state revenues. Vilsack's proposal is to use the state's cash reserve funds. An across-the-board budget cut of 2.6 percent is another option. If state leaders enact the across-the-board cut, Iowa's three public universities might be forced to cut $17 million from their budgets before the end of the spring semester. That would be on top of an already slim budget year that reduced the combined budgets at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa by $69 million.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=317983

CALLAGHAN COMMENTS ON HIP SURGERY INCISION (Buffalo News, Feb. 19)
A story about efforts to find methods of hip replacement surgery that are less drastic and invasive -- including suggestions that a smaller incision can accomplish the task --quotes Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN, professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Iowa and president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Callaghan says there is no proof yet that the smaller incision is better for the patient. The procedure is being done by a small number of doctors nationwide, and more study is needed to document a true advantage. "We think it's a good idea that people are working on a lot of innovative approaches, but it's too early to report any large benefits from this," said Callaghan. The Buffalo News is based in New York. A version of the story also ran Feb. 17 in THE STATE of Columbia, S.C.

THUMBSUCKING AFFECTS TEETH (The Record, Feb. 18)
New research shows thumbsucking or pacifier use after age 2 may increase the risk of conditions such as buck teeth which can cause children to need braces, according to the American Dental Association. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY found changes in bite among children who were still sucking a finger or pacifier after age 4. But even before that, potential problems could be spotted, according to the study. The Record is based in Hackensack, N.J.

GLASS STUDY CITED (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 18)
As early as 1989, JENNIFER GLASS, head of the sociology department at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, had "fears that if employers introduced flexible hours and allowed people to work from home, it would be used against women. You know, the old Mommy Track. But the hope was that family-friendly policies would keep women in the work force and therefore their wages would grow." Both have come true. "First, these policies keep women working longer: Women re-enter the work force sooner after having babies and they change jobs less frequently," Glass said. "But the downside is that if you use these policies, some managers feel you're not as invested in your career nor as productive as those who don't. As a result, you pay a financial penalty." Glass is principal researcher of a new study, "Blessing or Curse? Family Responsive Policies and Mothers' Wage Growth Over Time." A version of the story also ran Feb. 17 in the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.

GREEK HOUSES AT UI HAVE HIGHER ARREST RATES (Associated Press, Feb. 18)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students from fraternities and sororities get arrested more frequently than other students on the university's campus. University of Iowa fraternities had an overall arrest rate of 15 percent during the 2000-01 academic year. That compares with an overall arrest rate for undergraduate men at the university of just over 10 percent. The arrest rate is the percentage of arrests per members in the organization. The rate was 6.6 percent for all undergraduates in 2000-01. Most of the arrests were for alcohol-related crimes, university officials said. The 1,319 sorority members in 2000-01 had an arrest rate of 5.7 percent, a full 1.7 percentage points higher than the rate for the general female undergraduate population. "It's consistent with the national pattern of sororities and fraternities having a higher binge drinking rate," said PHILLIP JONES, university vice president of student services and dean of students.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=56da53bcfc40bb8f4f7bc103b14b5735&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=d2277189895de6ba2995d162f86ced54

GLASS STUDY CITED (Seattle Times, Feb. 17)
As early as 1989, JENNIFER GLASS, head of the sociology department at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, had "fears that if employers introduced flexible hours and allowed people to work from home, it would be used against women. You know, the old Mommy Track. But the hope was that family-friendly policies would keep women in the work force and therefore their wages would grow." Both have come true. "First, these policies keep women working longer: Women re-enter the work force sooner after having babies and they change jobs less frequently," Glass said. "But the downside is that if you use these policies, some managers feel you're not as invested in your career nor as productive as those who don't. As a result, you pay a financial penalty." Glass is principal researcher of a new study, "Blessing or Curse? Family Responsive Policies and Mothers' Wage Growth Over Time."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=kleiman17&date=20020217

EMMONS CRITIQUES DUFRESNE NOVEL (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 17)
A review of author John DuFresne's third novel, "Deep in the Shade of Paradise," was written by JOSH EMMONS, who an editor's note says at the end teaches at the University of Iowa. Emmons says the book, "a latticework of love stories with so many characters that D.W. Griffith would blanch, is ostensibly about a Southern wedding, but it is really an unsettled, unfocused, treatment of the bride's and groom's family members as the event draws near. The impulse behind 'Deep in the Shade of Paradise' is admirable but is the reason for the book's failure."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/02/17/RV229346.DTL

'FLU DETECTIVE' HAS UI TIES (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 17)
A few weeks before his 73rd birthday, Johan Hultin left his Nob Hill home to go hunting in a remote and frozen Alaskan graveyard for the deadliest killer in human history. The Indiana Jones of the scientific set, Hultin was hell-bent on uncovering the secrets behind one of the world's most baffling natural disasters, a flu virus that felled tens of millions of people in the waning days of World War I, then promptly vanished. ... Implausibly, Hultin succeeded. He found, buried in the subarctic permafrost, a corpse containing remnants of the elusive 1918 virus. The tissue Hultin retrieved from that corpse is now helping federal researchers unlock the microscopic secrets behind the pandemic. ... Born in Sweden, he immigrated to the United States in 1949, and earned a master's degree in microbiology at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In 1950, curiosity led him into what was then an arcane study of anthrax, clostridium botulinum, and other poisonous agents. With the blessing of officials at the University of Iowa, Hultin set up a one-man diagnostic lab -- during his spare time -- to study freeze-dried samples of anthrax and other bacteria, testing them on mice and guinea pigs. "I was worried that anthrax and other organisms could be used against us," Hultin says. "I wanted to be able to diagnose it in the lab."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/02/17/CM40502.DTL

UI CENTER TO STOP PAYING DONORS FOR PLATELETS (Associated Press, Feb. 16)
Donors will no longer be paid for their blood platelets at the DeGowin Blood Center beginning April 1. The University of Iowa Hospital-based center has been paying its 950 active donors $30 for a donation. The center has sent letters to those people notifying them of the change. The decision to stop payments for donations has been discussed for several years, said MITCH OVERTON, donor recruitment coordinator at the center. "The FDA strongly frowns upon paying people for their blood," he said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=4dcaefa95db9869ee9f99ed479e3b315&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlAl&_md5=d67eda5fef22828e5661fbf7ac2756c6

MAN CHARGED IN THEFTS FROM HOSPITALS (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 16)
A Wisconsin man has been charged with the theft of more than $50,000 worth of high-tech medical equipment from Iowa hospitals and is suspected in thefts totaling nearly $134,000. Michael Patrick Fitzpatrick, 48, of Port Washington, Wis., was charged with first-and second-degree theft. Fitzpatrick is linked to thefts to several hospitals, including UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. UI PUBLIC SAFETY was involved in the investigation. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=315730

EMERSON PUTS ON DISPUTED BARD PLAY (Boston Globe, Feb. 15)
Emerson Stage at Emerson College will present "Thomas of Woodstock," a play that some scholars believe was written by Shakespeare, Feb. 27 to March 3 at the Emerson Majestic Theatre. Shakespeare & Company artistic associate Michael Hammond was approached by Emerson College to direct an Elizabethan play for the school's theater program. He picked "Thomas" because he'd performed in it as an undergraduate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1973. "I always thought I'd have a go at it someday."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=532fb321d1ca8ac1e2689b4372614877&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLSzV-lSlAl&_md5=29855260dea9a2bcf3c4ee560eafd565

DE KLERK SPEAKS AT UI (Associated Press, Feb. 15)
Former South African President and 1993 Nobel Peace Prize winner F.W. de Klerk has noticed far more accommodation to people who speak Spanish since his first visit to the United States in 1976. "I think it's the right thing to do," he said prior to his public lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Thursday night. He pointed out that South Africa is managing to address issues that come with having 11 official languages. "It's quite a tall order," he said. "Things are going basically well in South Africa." He acknowledged during a news conference at the university that he is unfamiliar with the current push in the Iowa Legislature to make English the state's official language. But he said he likes the nation's overall move to acknowledge native Spanish speakers.
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JOGERST: AGING POPULATION AT RISK (Associated Press, Feb. 15)
Separate lawsuits blame a door at an eastside Des Moines super market for the deaths of two men. Sons of Anton Kouri allege in a lawsuit filed this week that the door at the Dahl's Foods on Hubbell Ave. caused the broken hip that led to the death of their 92-year-old father. Meanwhile, relatives of 86-year-old Frank Piziali sued the supermarket last month, charging that the door had knocked Piziali to the ground and repeatedly hit him in January 2001. He died two weeks later. Dr. GERALD JOGERST, director of geriatrics programs for the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, last month said Piziali's death "brings to light a very important problem. That's that our society hasn't adapted well to a slower, aging population yet." Jogerst said medical researchers have estimated that about 40 percent of U.S. octogenarians have some difficulty walking quickly and would therefore have problems with such devices as escalators and revolving doors.
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COLEMAN: BUDGET OUTLOOK 'NOT GOOD' (Associated Press, Feb. 15)
Iowa's three state universities are facing loss of more teachers if budgets are cut again, officials from the schools said. "We've tried to protect the academic core...but, frankly, the outlook is not good," UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESIDENT MARY SUE COLEMAN said. Universities have tried to avoid eliminating teaching positions, but layoffs are a possibility for the next academic year. Dozens of faculty and staff positions have gone unfilled this year. Students may notice more classes are full or canceled when they enroll for the fall semester in the coming weeks, Coleman said. "For the first time since I've been here, students are beginning to talk to me about this," Coleman said. "Students are beginning to feel the pinch of the cuts we made in October." FRED ANTCZAK, an associate dean in Iowa's liberal arts and sciences college, said some students may feel the impact of having 300 of 4,500 courses eliminated when they begin fall enrollment. "Everyone is going to be teaching bigger sections and, in some cases, expanding courses that used to be smaller into lecture courses," Antczak said. "In that way, we'll try to make more out of the teaching resources that we do have." Iowa was told in October to make a midyear cut of $13.5 million.
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NEW COMMENTS ON LAWSUIT (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 15)
A farmer is suing the University of Iowa Foundation, charging that its plan to sell a tract of land violates the wishes of the man who bequeathed the property. The suit was filed in a local court in December by Larry D. Holtkamp, who has farmed the disputed land since 1975. Holtkamp had leased the land from Donald I. Hackbarth, who died in 1997, having bequeathed to the foundation his properties in Arizona, Colorado, and Iowa. A provision of his will states that the Iowa tract -- about 400 acres of farmland parceled into four lots -- "shall not be sold sooner than 10 years after my death." Hackbarth wanted proceeds from the eventual sale of the land to benefit the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Holtkamp, a friend of Hackbarth's, said the moratorium was put in the will to ensure that he would be able to continue farming the land until he retired. "We've seen the lawsuit," said MICHAEL J. NEW, president of the University of Iowa Foundation. "We disagree with its claims, and we plan to defend ourselves." The suit is reminiscent of a controversy that roiled the Iowa State University Foundation last year, when it came under fire for disposing of a donated family farm even though the donor had stipulated that the real estate and its buildings be retained in perpetuity.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i23/23a03602.htm

PFALLER: ANTIBIOTICS LOSING GROUND (Internal Medicine News, Feb. 15)
Once again, bacteria grew a little smarter last year and inched forward in the antibiotic arms race, according to presentations at the annual Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy held in Chicago and sponsored by the American Society for Microbiology. The No. 1 bloodstream pathogen during 2000, Staphylococcus aureus, was resistant to oxacillin in 34 percent of isolates, up from 22 percent resistance prevalence in 1997, reported Dr. MICHAEL A. PFALLER, a professor of pathology and epidemiology at the University of Iowa.

COOLEY RANKING PUTS UI LAW SCHOOL AT 15TH (The National Jurist, Feb. 15)
A story about the differences between the law school rankings in U.S. News & World Report and those by the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Lansing, Mich., shows that while U.S. News ranked the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW in a tie for 20th best law school in 2002, Cooley's book "Judging the Law Schools" ranks the UI 15th -- just two spots down from Cooley's ranking of Yale (13th). The story says that Cooley uses only objective data, avoiding surveys of legal professionals about school reputation that fuel 40 percent of U.S. News rankings, according to Cooley's dean, Don LeDuc, who published his guide with Thomas Brennan, president of the school. Cooley used data compiled by the American Bar Association, considering as many factors as could fit on one page. "We've tried to make it that no single factor outweighs all the others, like in U.S. News, where reputation weights so heavily compared to everything else," LeDuc says.

PASCARELLA CHALLENGES RANKINGS METHODOLOGY (Currents, Feb. 15)
Rankings of college campuses by magazines -- most notably U.S. News & World Report -- have come under fire by some people who charge that the components on which the rankings are based are not the most useful or accurate gauges of quality. The categories related to advancement -- financial resources, alumni giving and even academic reputation -- take the most heat. "Advancement is ancillary to the major question," says ERNEST PASCARELLA, the Mary Louise Peterson Chair in Higher Education at the University of Iowa. "It's important for other kinds of ratings -- 'America's Most Advantaged Colleges,' say -- but it doesn't play a direct role in educational excellence. Advancement is a good enough end in itself -- to contribute to the health and welfare of an institution -- but to assume that it has a direct causal effect on the quality of student education is a stretch."

CONSULTANT TEACHES AT UI (Puget Sound Business Journal, Feb. 14)
Consultant SCOTT CLARK says in a column that aside from creating and selling several technology-driven businesses, in his spare time he writes books, gives workshops and teaches as an adjunct professor of entrepreneurship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "A scant 18 months ago, many of my students were still eager to create dot-com companies, having read about the millions raised in venture capital overnight and the soaring value of dot-com stocks," Clark writes. One such person was Lyle Bowlin, from the University of Northern Iowa, who according to the Wall Street Journal raised $90,000 for a book-selling business operated out of his home (www.positively-you.com) competing with Amazon.com and barnesandnoble.com." But success came too fast, overwhelming the business and its ability to keep up with orders.

SUSPENDED FRATERNITY SITE DOWN (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 14)
A fraternity that University of Iowa officials suspended in January took down its Web site on Tuesday after the university received a complaint that the site's content was demeaning to women. The complaint, filed by an Iowa man named Dennis Hill, also reported that the Web site named chapter members as "Slut of the year," "Pedophile of the year," and "Most likely to commit a felony," according to the Associated Press. Hill filed the complaint on Monday with the university's Office of Affirmative Action. The university isn't going to investigate the matter further because the fraternity, Phi Delta Theta, is no longer recognized by the institution, said THOMAS R. BAKER, assistant dean of students for the university. The chapter was suspended for violating university policies on hazing and alcohol, he said. "Almost as soon as I received the complaint, the chapter -- I don't know who exactly -- but the chapter de-linked from the university Web site," Baker said.
http://chronicle.com/free/2002/02/2002021402t.htm

DENNIS, DAWSON FIND STD-PROSTATE CANCER LINK (Yahoo! News, Feb. 14)
A history of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) is associated with the development of prostate cancer, suggesting that such infections may play a role in causing the disease, according to a review of older studies. Drs. LESLIE K. DENNIS and DEBORAH V. DAWSON, from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, analyzed 36 studies that evaluated the link between sexual activity and prostate cancer. Men with a history of any STD, gonorrhea or syphilis were 1.4, 1.4, and 2.3 times more likely, respectively, to develop prostate cancer than men without these histories, according to the report in the January issue of Epidemiology. The amount of sexual activity was also tied to prostate cancer development, the report indicates.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020214/hl_nm/std_1

GLASS: WOMEN'S CHILD CARE CHOICES RARELY MET (Yahoo! News, Feb. 14)
Although most women returning to work after giving birth would prefer that Dad or another relative provide care of the baby, fewer than one quarter of new mothers end up with the type of child care they prefer, according to new study findings. Dr. Lisa A. Riley, of Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, and Dr. JENNIFER L. GLASS, of the University of Iowa in Iowa City, interviewed 247 pregnant women to find out what kind of child care they would prefer once they had a baby and returned to work. Eighty-four percent of the women wanted their husband, partner or some other relative to take care of their baby at home. A little more than half of the mothers-to-be said that they would want the baby's father to provide child care when they had to be at work.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020214/hl_nm/childcare_1

WELLER COMMENTS ON THE 'GREENSPAN PUT' (National Post, Feb. 14)
After three months of good advances in North American markets, investors seem ready to pack the bear in a box and bury it. Good idea? Absolutely not, says PAUL WELLER, a professor at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. He suggests in a recent paper, written with two colleagues, that a significant bubble still underpins the entire Standard & Poor's 500 -- a bubble, says Prof. Weller, most improbably, the result of Alan Greenspan's stellar job performance. According to Mr. Weller, investors were so impressed by the Fed's ability to prevent a market break in 1987 and its agility in negotiating the credit crunch of 1998 that an irrational perception has developed among investors that the Fed can successfully negotiate any form of market turbulence. As a result, investors have discounted the risk in the stock market, a phenomenon Mr. Weller calls the "Greenspan put."
http://www.nationalpost.com/financialpost/story.html?f=/stories/20020214/52304.html

UI PLAYWRIGHT FINDS VOICE (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Feb. 14)
Shortly after Rebecca Gilman finished graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the 37-year-old playwright says she had "a critic say that one of my plays was good but it was essentially a 'woman's play.' Which meant, 'Why should anybody bother to go see it?' Like a chick film or something." Today, Gilman and other female playwrights aren't hearing that criticism much anymore. Decades after playwrights such as Maria Irene Fornes, Tina Howe and Beth Henley made their mark at the height of the women's movement era with plays dealing with feminist and relationship issues, the theater world is abuzz over the emergence of new women's voices -- except now nobody is calling them that. Writers such as Gilman, Kia Corthron, Heather McDonald, Naomi Wallace, Claudia Shear and Melanie Marnich are just a few in a long list of female writers whose works are challenging long-held ideas of what constitutes a "woman's play."
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QUILL AND SCROLL GIVES AWARD (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Feb. 13)
Quill and Scroll, an organization sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION, awarded the Greenfield High School student newspaper an international second place award.
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GLASS: POLICIES USED AGAINST WOMEN (Indianapolis Star, Feb. 13)
As early as 1989, JENNIFER GLASS, chair of the sociology department at the University of Iowa, had "fears that if employers introduced flexible hours and allowed people to work from home, it would be used against women. You know, the old 'mommy track.' But the hope was that family-friendly policies would keep women in the work force and therefore their wages would grow." Both scenarios have come true, Glass says.

WEILER LAUDS NEW OLYMPIC ASTHMA RULES (Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 12)
When the 2002 Winter Olympics begin Friday, we will be hearing about many medical marvels: There's the snowboarder with a liver transplant, the Alpine racer who shattered his leg in a motorcycle crash and an aerial skier who broke her back during a performance but finished anyway. Yet doctors say the Games will also put a spotlight on a far more common, and familiar, health condition -- asthma. "Asthma could become one of the big stories of these Games," said Dr. JOHN WEILER, an allergist at the University of Iowa who has studied Olympic athletes. That's because, for the first time, Olympic officials will require athletes taking asthma medication to prove their diagnosis with lab results and other documentation -- or risk disqualification. The new rules, said Weiler, should yield "much more solid numbers on these athletes," and how they've handled the disease. ... "I truly hope that the Olympic committee position doesn't put people off taking medication if they need it," Weiler said. "I see a lot of athletes who think they have to stop taking the drugs because they've heard they're banned. But this is only an Olympic thing. It's got nothing to do with NCAA or high school athletes."

ALUMNUS MULLS MERGING FIRM (Business Journal of Kansas City, Feb. 12)
Two Kansas City law firms, Morrison and Hecker LLP, and Stinson Mag and Fizzell PC, are considering a merger that would make a new firm the second-biggest in the city. Brian Gardner, managing partner of Morrison and Hecker, grew up in Cambridge, Iowa. He got an undergraduate degree from Iowa State University, then attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://kansascity.bizjournals.com/kansascity/stories/2002/02/11/focus1.html

CONSTUCTION COMPANY HAD PAST VIOLATIONS (Associated Press, Feb. 12)
As part of an investigation of a worker's death Feb. 8 at Cornell College construction site, Iowa Occupational Safety and Health Administration officials said the worker's employer, McComas-Lacina Construction of Iowa City, has received four citations in the past year for rules violations at work sites on the Cornell and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campuses, said OSHA administrator Mary Bryant. The company was cited for failing to record work on the University of Iowa campus as confined-space work, for failing to instruct workers on precautions for working in confined spaces, and for failing to determine employees' lead exposure on the job.
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ISU INCREASES ENGLISH STANDARDS (Associated Press, Feb. 12)
Faculty and student councils at Iowa State University have increased the English language standards for foreign students enrolling into graduate school. Students with a score of 500 or more on a standard English test that covers grammar and vocabulary have been admitted to Iowa State. Next fall, the minimum acceptable score will be 530. The new acceptable score is higher than the 500-score requirements at the University of Northern Iowa, but below the 550 required by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, admissions officials said.
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UI ALUMNUS ON APPEALS COURT (Associated Press, Feb. 11)
The Senate on Monday approved the nomination of Michael Melloy to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The 11-member appeals court is based in St. Louis. The vacancy was created when Judge George Fagg of Des Moines, Iowa, took senior judge status. Melloy, 53, a Republican, is a native of Dubuque who has served on the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Iowa in Cedar Rapids since 1992. He previously served six years as a U.S. bankruptcy judge. He received a bachelor's degree from Loras College in 1970 and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW in 1974 before entering private practice in Dubuque.
The story also appeared Feb. 11 in the following publications:
Yahoo News: http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020212/ap_to_po/senate_judges_1
New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Senate-Judges.html
Los Angeles Times: http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/wire/sns-ap-senate-judges0212feb11.story
San Francisco Chronicle: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/02/11/national1909EST0715.DTL
Baltimore Sun: http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/politics/wire/sns-ap-senate-judges0212feb11.story

FORMER 'MISS UI' RETIRES AS COURT CLERK (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 11)
Judy Napier retired Feb. 1 as clerk of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the District of Nebraska, working as one of the state's top court officials there since 1980. In this feature story, it's noted that Napier was named Miss UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1958. After graduating with a nursing degree, she was married and had five children. After the marriage ended, Napier moved to Omaha, where she enrolled at Creighton University's law school in 1977.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=310754

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON WITNESS LIST (New York Times, Feb. 11)
To make its case against severe sanctions, Microsoft, shifting its previous strategy, has named both Bill Gates, its cofounder and chairman, and Steven A. Ballmer, the chief executive, as witnesses in a trial on remedies in the antitrust case it lost. The opposing sides in the remedies trial Microsoft and nine states exchanged witness lists late Friday night. In their list, the states named 16 witnesses, some of whom appeared in the antitrust trial, including James Barksdale, the former chief executive of Netscape Communications, and Steven McGeady, a former Intel executive. But others are new, including an executive from Palm, a maker of handheld devices; an executive from a set-top box software maker, and an executive of a distributor of Linux, the computer operating system that is an emerging competitor to Microsoft's Windows. "The states' witness list has to be forward-looking because remedies in an antitrust case are about protecting competition in the future," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa's College of Law.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/10/business/10SOFT.html
The article also ran Feb. 10 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nyt/20020210/tc_nyt/microsoft_s_top_officials_may_testify_to_help_fight_sanctions
IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS CITED (New York Times, Feb. 10)
Business students from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology participating in a mock stock exchange at a vacation lodge here last month received instant feedback. The idea was inspired by the successes of several Internet-based trading exchanges that have been called "decision markets" by Robin Hanson, an economics professor at George Mason University. The most renowned one, THE IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, has often outperformed pollsters in predicting election results. The market, operated by the HENRY B. TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, permits investors to buy and sell shares in a candidate, based either on how much of the vote they expect the candidate to receive or simply on whether the candidate will win or lose. Participants can invest up to $500 under a special clearance from the Securities and Exchange Commission that protects the market from being charged with illegal sponsorship of gambling.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/10/business/yourmoney/10TRAD.html

UI, ISU RESEARCHERS ISSUE AIR QUALITY REPORT (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 9)
Iowa researchers are recommending that state environmental officials regulate livestock odor from concentrated feedlots to minimize health risks to neighboring residents. In a report submitted Friday to Gov. Tom Vilsack and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources, a research team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University recommends that the state adopt ambient air-quality standards to protect residents who live near large livestock confinements.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=309473

RENOWNED PROFESSOR TAUGHT AT UI (New York Times, Feb. 9)
A feature on Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, a professor in the humanities at Columbia University, says she is a celebrity in academia (her résumé of publications, lectures and awards has now reached 41 pages). She was one of the first translators of Jacques Derrida into English and one of the most famous practitioners of postcolonial studies, devoted to the culture of people of the former colonies. In 1964 Ms. Spivak married a fellow student, Talbot Spivak. They divorced in 1977. Then, while teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she began a 10-year relationship which she calls "a second marriage," although it was not legally binding with one of her students, who was nine years younger. "People wanted to see if he got an easy Ph.D.," she said. "I was incredibly hard on him." (Today many colleges prohibit professors from dating students.) She has been separated for 10 years from her second husband, Basudev Chatterji, a history professor at Delhi University. She has no children.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/09/arts/09SPIV.html
The article also ran Feb. 10 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nyt/20020209/en_nyt/creating_a_stir_wherever_she_goes

JONES, BAKER COMMENT ON PHI DELTA THETA (Associated Press, Feb. 8)
The University of Iowa has revoked recognition of the school's chapter of Phi Delta Theta fraternity following the investigation of hazing. "Charges against Phi Delta Theta were substantiated by our investigation," said Vice President for Student Services PHILLIP JONES. Jones handed down the sanction last month. Former fraternity member Omar Vejar alleged last fall he was forced to consume mass amounts of hard liquor in a short amount of time, among other activities he considered hazing. ... The school determined "there was a basis" for the charges of hazing and subsequently the sanction, said assistant dean of student services THOMAS BAKER, who headed the university's investigation. Vejar called the sanction "appropriate," saying the investigation has forced the IFC and university administration to become more sensitive to future complaints.
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JONES COMMENTS ON PUNCH CARDS (New York Times, Feb. 7)
As unlikely as it sounds in today's digital era, some punch-card-based information systems are clinging to life. Some employers still use them as time cards to generate payroll information. Another government application for punch cards, voting machines, drew national attention in late 2000 during the dispute over counting ballots with "dangling" or "pregnant" chads in the presidential election. These Votomatic-style punch-card machines are still widely used, said DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and chairman of that state's Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. Mr. Jones said that the cities of Los Angeles and Chicago were especially committed to retaining the punch-card system. The dangling-chad problem is unique to punch-card ballots, he said, because they are prescored so that they can be punched by a person with a stylus. That makes it possible for a chad to stick to the card if the hole is not punched cleanly. Punch cards for other applications are not prescored and are punched by keypunch machines, which do not leave dangling chads.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/07/technology/circuits/07CARD.html

DRUM STORE OWNER IS UI ALUM (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 7)
A feature about James Streich, who owns an independent music store in suburban Chicago that focuses on drums and percussion-related merchandise, notes that he has a degree in music performance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/mchenry/chi-0202070308feb07.story

D'ALESSANDRO: PARENTS OVERTREAT FEVER (Reuters Health, Feb. 6)
A survey comparing attitudes of doctors, nurses and parents towards treating fevers in children reveals that parents tend to treat high temperatures much more aggressively than health professionals do. A low fever can actually benefit a sick child, and the researchers attributed parental tendencies to "fever phobia" -- a fear that fever is harmful -- which they say originated after the introduction of anti-fever drugs like Tylenol. Dr. DONNA D'ALESSANDRO from the department of pediatrics at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, who reviewed the paper for Reuters Health, said these results are consistent with what she sees in her practice. "It seems to me there is a general feeling that many, many parents are worried about fevers," she said. A fever can actually help sick children, she explained. "The body, basically, is trying to do the right thing," she said. "Bugs like to live at body temperature. So if you raise the temperature, you kill them off." And contrary to what parents may believe, she pointed out, the body can function very efficiently at temperatures as high as 100.5 degrees. D'Alessandro added that some parents may overtreat fever because they mistake it for a problem, and not just a symptom.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020206/hl_nm/fever_1

WORKSHOP ATTENDEE PENS BOOK ABOUT FATHER (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 6)
For many years, William Duffy Sr. promised his family that he would write the harrowing tale of his survival after the World War II Air Force captain's B-29 was shot down over Malaysia on Jan. 11, 1945. But he died a decade ago. So one of Duffy's 11 children, William Jr., decided to write "Destiny Ours." "My wife, Jan, was very encouraging and she supported both of us while I took writing workshop classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," the younger Duffy said. "Then in July of 1997, I spent six weeks in Malaysia retracing my father's footsteps."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/nation/chi-0202060086feb06.story

CALLAGHAN COMMENTS ON HIP SURGERY INCISION (Orlando Sentinel, Feb. 6)
A story about efforts to find methods of hip replacement surgery that are less drastic and invasive -- including suggestions that a smaller incision can accomplish the task -- quotes Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN, professor of orthopedic surgery at the University of Iowa and president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Callaghan says there is no proof yet that the smaller incision is better for the patient. The procedure is being done by a small number of doctors nationwide, and more study is needed to document a true advantage. "We think it's a good idea that people are working on a lot of innovative approaches, but it's too early to report any large benefits from this," said Callaghan.

BLANCK QUOTED ON ADA ISSUES (Miami Daily Business Review, Feb. 5)
After losing a string of disability cases in the U.S. Supreme Court in the past three years, disability activists are wondering whether it's time to turn to Congress for help. ... If Congress doesn't respond, disability activists and plaintiffs' lawyers will turn increasingly to state legislatures and state laws, one attorney predicts. And that would be ironic because disability discrimination is a federal problem and the ADA, like other civil rights laws, was designed to end a hodgepodge of state protections, says PETER BLANCK, director of the Law Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa College of Law. "Perhaps we have reached the high-water mark now, where members of the disability community say, 'This ain't what we intended and we'd better go back and fix it or live with it,'" says Blanck.

EARLY KIDNEY TESTING URGED (Washington Post, Feb. 5)
Alarmed by the steep rise in the number of Americans with kidney failure -- now estimated at 340,000, up from 183,000 a decade ago -- the nonprofit National Kidney Foundation this week released new guidelines calling for earlier screening for the disease. Experts say it's important for patients to be vigilant and not assume testing isn't necessary simply because their doctor hasn't recommended it. Family physicians are overwhelmed by messages from other medical specialists and disease groups, said CYNDA JOHNSON, chairwoman of the Department of Family Medicine at University of Iowa, who served on the Kidney Foundation work group. "From the family physician's point of view, we've got so many words coming out at us, we can't see straight," she said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A22920-2002Feb4.html

TEACHING MENTOR HELPS UI GRAD (Associated Press, Feb. 4)
First-year West High School language arts teacher Lindsey Aikin says she finds her job very stressful, and her mentor helps her relax. "I don't think anyone outside the profession realizes how stressed out you are," said Aikin, 27, who teaches honors English and beginning journalism. "You are going very solo in that classroom," said Aikin, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "When you student-teach, you run everything by the regular teacher. Suddenly you don't get that anymore." Aikin was paired with Carolyn Van Zante, chairwoman of the West High language arts program, through a mentoring program that started this year at the school.
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UIHC BOND BILL INTRODUCED (Associated Press, Feb. 4)
In a list of bills introduced Feb. 4 in the Iowa Legislature, HF2195 is noted, which would allow UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials to issue bonds for renovation of University Hospitals and Clinics.
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VAN BRIESEN TRANSCRIPTS NOTED (Associated Press, Feb. 4)
The president of Iowa Central Community College and three other officials from the school in Fort Dodge pleaded innocent Monday to charges that they falsified student records. They are accused of falsifying transcripts so that three students would be eligible for athletics, including football player B.J. Van Briesen. Van Briesen, an offensive lineman, joined the Iowa Central team after being declared academically ineligible at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
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WEILER LAUDS NEW OLYMPIC ASTHMA RULES (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 4)
When the 2002 Winter Olympics begin Friday, we will be hearing about many medical marvels: There's the snowboarder with a liver transplant, the Alpine racer who shattered his leg in a motorcycle crash and an aerial skier who broke her back during a performance but finished anyway. Yet doctors say the Games will also put a spotlight on a far more common, and familiar, health condition -- asthma. "Asthma could become one of the big stories of these Games," said Dr. JOHN WEILER, an allergist at the University of Iowa who has studied Olympic athletes. That's because, for the first time, Olympic officials will require athletes taking asthma medication to prove their diagnosis with lab results and other documentation -- or risk disqualification. The new rules, said Weiler, should yield "much more solid numbers on these athletes," and how they've handled the disease. ... "I truly hope that the Olympic committee position doesn't put people off taking medication if they need it," Weiler said. "I see a lot of athletes who think they have to stop taking the drugs because they've heard they're banned. But this is only an Olympic thing. It's got nothing to do with NCAA or high school athletes."
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000008701feb04.story

AMMUNITION PLANT STUDY TO BEGIN (Associated Press, Feb. 3)
Public health researchers from the UI soon will begin assessing the health conditions of former and current workers at the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant in Middletown. Project managers said the survey will mark a dramatic expansion of the university's current ammunition plant worker survey, which has focused only on former nuclear weapons workers. Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, director of the study, said his team will meet with Army representatives on Feb. 20 to design procedures for the health study. Workers at the Middletown plant have charged that, over the decades, many of them were exposed to hazardous materials that caused lifelong illnesses and deaths. The UI team, working under Department of Energy grants, has been locating and interviewing hundreds of former workers or their survivors. They hope to determine whether certain illnesses may have been caused by exposure to radiation and other hazardous materials while they were assembling and testing components of nuclear weapons for the Atomic Energy Commission.
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LEVINE WRITES ABOUT SUPER BOWL COMMERCIAL (New York Times, Feb. 3)
MARK LEVINE
, who teaches poetry at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop and whose latest book of poems is "Enola Gay," is the author of an article on the director of a 30-second commercial that aired during Sunday's Super Bowl game. The director, Bryan Buckley, created a commercial promoting Oxygen Media, owners of a cable channel aimed at female viewers, that involved a lavish tongue-in-cheek reconstruction of three generations of beauty pageants.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/02/03/magazine/03BUCKLEY.html

LITERACY PROGRAM CREATED BY FORMER UI PROF (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 3)
A story about a program called Breakthrough to Literacy, which aims to teach young children the skills they will need to read at grade level in the first and second grades, says Breakthrough is a for-profit subsidiary of the McGraw-Hill Cos. Inc. The program includes computer software and materials to train teachers and work with children at different ability levels in small groups. Group activities range from identifying letters of the alphabet to reading short stories. The program was created and is operated by the husband-and-wife team of Carolyn Brown and Gerald Zimmermann, both speech experts. Zimmermann says it helps children develop the foundation for reading by making it easier for them to learn how to break words into distinct sounds, as well as learn vocabulary, alphabet and word recognition skills. "This isn't a quick fix," says Zimmermann, a former speech scientist at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It's a partnership schools enter with us, and we work with them over a period of time to get better and better."
http://www.sunspot.net/news/readingby9/bal-rd.literacy03feb03.story

STUDY: WOMEN PAY PRICE FOR FLEX TIME (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 3)
Flex-time. Job sharing. Telecommuting. Only a few years ago, many employers adopted a whole menu of these family-friendly perks as incentives to woo and retain scarce workers. But as the economy weakened, employees who opted to use those benefits discovered a harsh truth -- there was a price to be paid. According to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research, professional women who make use of flex- or part-time schedules and telecommuting receive lower raises than their peers, despite little difference in productivity.
This article originally appeared in SmartMoney magazine.
This article also ran Feb. 3 in the AUSTIN AMERICAN STATESMAN, NEWS & OBSERVER of Raleigh, N.C., ORLANDO SENTINEL, and the RICHMOND TIMES-DISPATCH.

UI PRESS BOOK NOTED (Boston Herald, Feb. 3)
A short item features the book "Motion: American Sports Poems," edited by Noah Blaustein and published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

UI STUDY: WOMEN PAY PRICE FOR FLEX TIME (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 3)
Flex-time. Job sharing. Telecommuting. Only a few years ago, many employers adopted a whole menu of these family-friendly perks as incentives to woo and retain scarce workers. But as the economy weakened, employees who opted to use those benefits discovered a harsh truth -- there was a price to be paid. According to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA research, professional women who make use of flex- or part-time schedules and telecommuting receive lower raises than their peers, despite little difference in productivity.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1012660140917704840.djm,00.html

UI STUDENT QUESTIONS TRUE VALUE OF 'A' GRADE (Washington Post, Feb. 2)
Troubled that so many Harvard undergraduates earn A's and graduate with honors, the university's administrators are wrestling with how to rein in grade inflation. They aren't the first to struggle with the problem. The upward swing in grades dates to the 1960s and, some think, the Vietnam War. In the past decade, schools have been trying to fix their grading systems. Joe Plambeck, a 22-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, wonders how employers and graduate schools can gauge candidates if everyone is rated top-notch. "It would be nice if getting an A meant that you really knew that material rather than you knew the material as well as half of the class," Plambeck says.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A13748-2002Feb2.html
A version of the story also ran Feb. 2 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/1403912.html
A version of the story also ran Feb. 2 on the website of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-grade-inflation0202feb02.story
A version of the story also ran Feb. 2 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/02/02/national1500EST0560.DTL
A version of the story also ran Feb. 2 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020202/ap_on_re_us/grade_inflation_1
A version of this story also ran Feb. 3 in the POST AND COURIER of Charleston, S.C.

UI DRUG ARRESTS RISE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 1)
Drug arrests at the nation's colleges increased 10.2 percent in 2000, a rise that some college officials attribute to a more casual attitude among students toward drugs, particularly marijuana. Of the 11,276 drug arrests on campuses, 89 percent, or 10,004, occurred at public and private, nonprofit four-year institutions. Five public institutions, each enrolling more than 28,000 students, made more than 125 drug arrests: Penn State (175), Michigan State (156), Indiana University at Bloomington (147), the University of California at Berkeley (137), and the http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i21/21a03201.htm (127).
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i21/21a03201.htm

BLOOM TALKS ABOUT POSTVILLE BOOK (Chicago Sun Times, Feb. 1)
A story about University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM's book Postville says Bloom was drawn to the story of the conflict between longtime Postville residents and the Hasidic Jews who moved into the area while he was making his own adjustment to leaving cosmopolitan San Francisco for Jell-O-mold Iowa City.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/steinberg/cst-nws-stein01.html

UI ALUMNUS IS CEO OF SUPERVALU (Twin Cities Business Monthly, Feb. 2002)
Jeff Noddle, CEO of food retailer and distributor Supervalu, Inc., is profiled in this story about the changing nature of these industries. He is overseeing a number of retail and wholesale strategies designed to meet tough competition from Wal-Mart and Costco. Noddle earned a bachelor of arts degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, joining Supervalu in 1976 and moving his way up the management chain at the company.

UI STUDIES DRIVER DISTRACTION (Network Magazine, February 2002)
While there's plenty of proof that cell phone use while driving causes accidents, there's no evidence that hands-free kits actually make it any safer. A 2001 study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Cognitive Systems Laboratory found that navigating a voice portal can be even more distracting than holding a phone conversation, thanks to the need to remember computer commands and repeat phrases that the machine didn't understand.

UI STUDY SHOWS VITAMIN E BENEFITS (Alive, February 2002)
There is substantial evidence that homocysteine (a sulphur-containing amino acid) promotes atherosclerosis and hypertension through increased oxidative stress and by causing a dysfunction of the lining of the arteries (endothelial dysfunction) that results in reduced arterial blood flow. Earlier research has shown that vitamin C can reverse endothelial dysfunction. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA now report that vitamin E has a similar beneficial effect. This research was reported in the American Journal of Cardiology, August 2001.

OWEN COMMENTS ON UIHC PURCHASE (Medical Imaging, February 2002)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HOSPITALS AND CLINICS, which perform more than 216,000 imaging procedures a year, recently purchased Eastman Kodak Co.'s DirectView PACS, including EMC Corp. RAID storage. The imaging volume increases brought about expanded storage needs, some of which resulted from the system's four multi-slice CT scanners. "We watched the performance of the original archive and could not keep up with the load demands we were putting on it," DAVE OWEN, technical director of radiology engineering for the system says. "It wasn't a matter of the pipes not being big enough. It was just the archiving protocol; the structure of the old archive just couldn't keep up." Medical Imaging is based in Providence, RI.

HINGTGEN QUOTED ON TELERADIOLOGY (Medical Imaging, February 2002)
In the early days of teleradiology, physicians and administrators at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics quickly recognized the developing technology's potential to help rural hospitals struggling to provide timely, accurate radiology services to their patients. Jumping into the teleradiology business early on, they also quickly recognized the challenges. "There are an awful lot of communities here in the state of Iowa that are having trouble providing radiology service, because radiologists are either retiring or getting better job offers, and [communities] can't recruit anybody to replace them," says MARK HINGTGEN, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinic's radiology administrator. Medical Imaging is based in Providence, RI.

GANTZ, CANTY WRITE ON BELL'S PALSY (Cortlandt Forum, February 2002)
Drs. BRUCE J. GANTZ, professor and head of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, and PAUL CANTY, an Otology/Neurotology/Skull Base Fellow in the same department, are the coauthors of a question-and-answer column on the management of Bell's palsy. Cortlandt Forum is a magazine based in Hawthorne, N.Y.

ENGELHARDT COMMENTS ON GENE THERAPY (AARC Times, February 2002)
Laboratory-based experiments conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA may one day lead to a new gene therapy technique to correct the most common cystic fibrosis genetic defect in human cells. The system, known as SMaRT (spliceosome-mediated RNS trans-splicing) works by correcting genetic defects at the RNA level rather than at the DNA level and may be useful in circumventing some of the problems associated with traditional gene therapy. "Traditional gene therapies for CF have primarily used a machine-gun approach, attempting to express as much of the corrected gene product in as many cells as possible. However, more is not necessarily better; and in CF there are potential disadvantages to over-expressing the corrected protein in the wrong place," said JOHN ENGELHARDT, Ph.D., lead author of a study of the new therapy

 

 

 

 

 

 

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