The University of Iowa
University News Services
Archives Services Contact Us A-Z Search

UI in the News

December, 2002

See UI in the New Archive Index

ANDREASEN STUDY ON WRITERS CITED (New York Times, Dec. 31
A story abut hyperthymia -- the clinical name for a perpetually joyous temperament -- says that hyperthymic and bipolar people may share a tendency to be highly creative, given the strong association between bipolar disorder and creativity. For example, a 1987 study of creative writers at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP by Dr. NANCY ANDREASEN showed that writers had bipolar illness at a rate four times as high as control group members who were not writers.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/31/health/psychology/31BEHA.html?ex=1042347600&en=4a09ec5696dc8621&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

OSU, FORMER HERKY REACH SETTLEMENT (AKRON BEACON JOURNAL, DEC. 31)
Ohio State University has agreed to pay $25,000 to a former HERKY THE HAWK mascot for injuries she suffered when she was struck by an Ohio State band member. Angela Anderson, formerly of Council Bluffs and now of the District of Columbia, was performing as the Herky the Hawk mascot at Ohio State when she was struck from behind in October 1999 by a 3-foot foam banana wielded by a member of the Buckeye band sitting on the shoulders of another band member.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/local/4845015.htm

Art Museum Bought Freyer Teeth (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Dec. 29)
A feature on University of Iowa art graduate John Freyer's decision to sell all of his possessions on eBay says the UI MUSEUM OF ART purchased "two slightly used front teeth" for $27. A version of the story also ran Dec. 29 in the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE in Little Rock, Ark.

Hawkeye Band In Bowl Parade (Palm Beach Post, Dec. 29)
A story about the performers at the Orange Bowl parade in downtown Miami says a dozen out-of-state bands, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S MARCHING HAWKEYES, would follow dance troupes, drill teams and youth groups.

WORKSHOP ALUMNUS, MEMOIR AUTHOR DIES (Los Angeles Times, December 29)
Lucy Grealy, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP whose 1994 memoir, "Autobiography of a Face," was a fearless account of growing up with a disfigurement caused by cancer, died Dec. 18 in New York City. She was 39.
http://www.latimes.com/news/printedition/california/la-me-grealy29dec29.story
A version of this story also appeared in the BOSTON GLOBE on December 30
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/364/obituaries/Lucy_Grealy_39+.shtml
A version of this story also ran in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS on December 30
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/mercurynews/news/local/4839119.htm

PROFESSOR QUOTED IN INTERRACIAL RELATIONSHIP STORY (Seattle Times, December 29)
While the number of people involved in interracial relationships is increasing, those involved in such relationships still spend more time defending and justifying their relationships than do same-race couples, says KRISTINE FITCH, associate professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=winterracial29&date=20021229&query=%22university+of+iowa%22
A version of this story also appeared in the THE OLYMPIAN of Olympia, WA, on December 30
http://www.theolympian.com/home/news/20021230/living/37748.shtml

UI ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT WILL PAY MORE (Omaha World Herald, December 28)
Figuring in a 17.6 percent tuition increase next year, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA athletic department will pay nearly $3.9 million to cover the costs of full-tuition scholarships for 215 athletes.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=606701

MIAMI BRACES FOR IOWA INVASION (Miami Herald, December 28)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA plays in the Orange Bowl for the first time against Southern Cal, and thousands of Hawkeye fans will nervously descend on South Florida next week, creating a clash of cultures that will test the manners of all involved.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/4830219.htm

HAWKEYES ARRIVE IN MIAMI (Miami Herald, Dec. 27)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Southern California arrived in South Florida on Thursday, six days before they take the field at Pro Player Stadium in the 69th annual FedEx Orange Bowl. While many of the Hawkeyes and Trojans might have preferred to play in the Rose Bowl, Iowa linebacker Fred Barr isn't complaining. The former South Plantation High graduate is ecstatic to be home. ''The Rose Bowl would have been cool, but this is better,'' Barr said. ``When I found out we had a chance to come to the Orange Bowl, I was rooting for every team that could make that happen.''
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/4820462.htm

POSITIVE ATTITUDE CAN BE HEALTHY (HealthScout News, Dec. 27)
A study by researchers at the University of Sussex in England found that taking part in protests and demonstrations is beneficial to your mental and physical health. The protesters interviewed for the study said they experienced a deep sense of happiness and even euphoria because of their participation in protests. Some psychologists believe that positive experiences and emotions help promote mental and physical health. The story provides a link to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE (http://www.uihealthcare.com/topics/stressandcope/stre5136.html) with information about the health benefits of having a positive attitude.
http://www.healthscout.com/template.asp?page=newsdetail&ap=1&id=510980

COUNCILMAN'S DEGREE QUESTIONED (Honolulu Advertiser, Dec. 27)
In a story about the problems of the Honolulu City Council, it's noted that Council member Steve Holmes fell under scrutiny over his educational credentials after UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials said they had no record of the two degrees he claims to have earned there.
http://the.honoluluadvertiser.com/article/2002/Dec/27/ln/ln01a.html

MILLER COMMENTS ON GRAHAM PRESIDENTIAL BID (St. Petersburg Times, Dec. 27)
As Sen. Bob Graham spends the holidays at home in Miami Lakes pondering whether to run for president, political consultants say the Florida Democrat has time to organize a campaign. But they say Graham needs to move quickly if he is serious about entering the race for 2004. Graham's high-profile role as co-chairman of the joint congressional inquiry into the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and the failure of the government's intelligence operations will help him in both states, analysts said. But they said he has to offer more. "Just a message having to do with the war on terrorism isn't going to do it," said ARTHUR MILLER, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa. "It's got to be tied with a strong economic message. Something that's a little more insightful than simply talking about taxes." The St. Petersburg Times is based in St. Petersburg, Fla.
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/12/27/Worldandnation/Clock_ticks_for_Graha.shtml

FREEDMAN STUNNED BY COACH'S PAY (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 27)
A former University of Iowa president says intercollegiate athletics is undermining the educational mission of colleges and universities. "Athletics has distorted the mission of universities, and it's hard to see how intercollegiate athletics, in any respect, is important," JAMES O. FREEDMAN said. Freedman, 67 and retired, was the university's president from 1982 to 1987. He said he was stunned by the news that Iowa Football Coach KIRK FERENTZ could receive $1 million in performance and incentive bonuses, beyond a regular salary of $910,000.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=605776

UI RESEARCH GRANTS MAY DOUBLE (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 27)
A possible spike in funding from the National Science Foundation could expand the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's research abilities. School officials said the federal funding could double over the next five years. The university was awarded $10.6 million for the past fiscal year that ended June 30. The money accounted for 3.1 percent of the school's research dollars. The increase depends on whether a congressional measure passed in November moves forward, officials said. It would double the National Science Foundation's spending.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=605775

TEACHING ASSISTANT CHARGED WITH ABUSE (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 27)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate teaching assistant has been charged with third-degree sex abuse involving a female student. Frederick Richard Williams, 27, of Iowa City also was charged with false imprisonment and indecent exposure. He made his initial appearance Monday in Johnson County District Court and was released on his own recognizance with travel restricted to Iowa. Williams has been suspended from his duties as a biology teaching assistant pending the outcome of the case, said JACK LILIEN, chairman of the biological sciences department. Williams has been with the department for more than one semester, Lilien said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=605598

TIPTON TWINS PROFILED (Omaha World Herald, Dec.27)
Twins Marjorie and Mildred Carstensen of Tipton, Iowa, share an apartment across from the Cedar County Courthouse, and have spent only one of their 92 years apart. It was 1929, the year that Mildred Carstensen taught in a country school in Mitchell County. Her sister remained in Cedar County. Today, they read the newspaper and go to the senior center every day. Then they read their mail and write letters in reply - they delight in hearing from former students - and do crossword puzzles. They also attended college together, earning bachelor's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1961.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=605502

CISNEROS ATTENDED WRITERS' WORKSHOP (Ottawa Citizen, Dec. 26)
After more than 20 years of writing, Sandra Cisneros is enjoying fame after being 'discovered' by mainstream publishers. This fall, she toured the United States for the first time since 1994 to promote Caramelo, her first full-length work in a decade. And she is a major reason why the publishing industry now cares so much about the Hispanic market. Cisneros majored in English at Chicago's Loyola University, where she later served as a counselor for minority students. She then studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, from which she graduated in 1978.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=22ce5fa9cd18906acb6075bc1463a3c2&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=50883706980ca63cf7dd7aeb9a892449

GRANT COMMENTS ON TITLE IX (Knoxvillle News Sentinel, Dec. 25)
Proponents of women's athletics argued last week that changes under consideration to the 30-year-old law requiring gender equity in collegiate sports would set back women's sports. A Title IX commission formed by Education Secretary Rod Paige discussed several possible changes when it met in Philadelphia earlier this month. One would require a 50-50 proportion of male and female athletes, with some leeway allowed depending on each school's circumstances. The commission will meet Jan. 8 to vote on ways to make it easier for universities to comply with the law. The Title IX proponents worry it will give back too much. "Such proposals would permanently deny women equal access to play sport," CHRISTINE GRANT, former women's athletics director at the University of Iowa, told a conference call sponsored by the National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education. http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/other_sports/article/0,1406,KNS_304_1631505,00.html

ALUMNA PROMOTED AT HOSPITAL (Newton Tab. Dec. 24)
Paulette Di Angi has joined Newton-Wellesley Hospital in Massachusetts as operations manager of medical safety and quality. Di Angi was previously executive director of Cape Psych Center at Cape Cod Hospital and chief executive officer/president of Cape Cod Human Services Di Angi received her doctorate in Healthcare/Nursing Administration Case Western Reserve University, a master's in Psychiatric Nursing from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and a bachelor of science degree in Nursing from Villa Maria College in Pennsylvania. The Newton Tab is a newspaper covering Newton, Mass., near Boston. http://www.townonline.com/newton/news/local_regional/new_busnenotes12232002.htm

HOLIDAY DEPRESSION EXAMINED (Redlands Daily Facts, Dec. 23)
Christmas, with its festive lights and cheerful presents, plans for family get-togethers and visions of sugar plums, does not necessarily mean a cheerful time of year for everyone. According to psychiatrists, 'tis the time of year when feelings of anxiety and stress arise, and the disease known as depression affects more people than other times of the year. "It's the time of year when social expectations are high and people are supposed to feel a connection to family and friends," according to University of Redlands professor of psychology, Fred Rabinowitz, who has published books on depression, including "Men and Depression," co-written with Sam Cochran, director of the Counseling Center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and "Deepening Psychotherapy with Men." The Daily Facts newspaper is based in Redlands, Calif.
http://www.redlandsdailyfacts.com/Stories/0,1413,209%257E22484%257E1069711,00.html

UI GRAD, NOW FINANCIAL ADVISOR, PROFILED (Indianapolis Star, Dec. 23)
A Q&A profile of Shirley Mueller, senior wealth adviser at STAR Wealth Management, says Mueller is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and its medical school. Mueller is currently completing studies for a Certified Financial Planner designation.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/010534-8981-031.html

BOWLSBY PROPOSES CHANGE TO TITLE IX (Statesman Journal, Dec. 23)
The Commission on Athletic Opportunity has received relatively little attention, though it does its work in public and its proposals could reverberate at virtually every educational institution in the country. The 15-member commission held a meeting in Philadelphia two weeks ago at which members offered broad outlines of the kinds of changes they would like to see, especially in how the underlying regulations of Title IX apply to college sports. What emerged was a clear consensus to recommend new rules for enforcement of Title IX at its next meeting Jan. 8. University of Iowa athletics director BOB BOWLSBY proposed that participation rates in a given region's high schools be used as a barometer for colleges. If 42 percent of the high school athletes are female, he suggested that colleges in that region be required to have 45 percent of their athletes be women -- 3 percent better than the feeder system. Others counter that the proposal would freeze discrimination in place. The Journal is based in Salem, Ore.

DAMASIO COMMENTS ON EMPATHY (Denver Post, Dec. 22
Looking out from the pulpit of her Denver synagogue, Rabbi Sandra Cohen could no longer feel the delight of the newlyweds sitting in the second row, nor the grief of the widower behind them whose wife's funeral she had missed. The 35-year-old leader of Temple Micah had been on disability leave since suffering a stroke in January. Cohen, who had made a living connecting very personally with her 160 congregants, noticed that evening she could no longer read their faces nor care for them like she once did. Something inside her had gone numb. The rabbi had lost her empathy. 'It's like a painter losing the ability to perceive color or a musician who no longer appreciates pitch. A rabbi losing her empathy - that gets to the heart of her work and her faith,' added ANTONIO DAMASIO, chief of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, who specializes in the inner workings of emotions.
http://www.denverpost.com/Stories/0,1413,36%257E53%257E1066906,00.html?search=filter

"SUN RINGS" IN CRITIC'S TOP TEN (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 22)
Music critic Mark Swed listed notable music events of 2002, ten musical happenings that went inspiringly right in 2002. Topping the list was "Sun Rings," "Terry Riley's empyrean masterpiece for the Kronos Quartet, chorus, electronic sounds from outer space, and lavish visual projections provided one wild ride at its UNIVERSITY OF IOWA premiere, along with music of supreme beauty and spiritual impact. A response to the Sept. 11 attacks and a comprehensive call for peace, this cosmic, 95-minute string quartet is a whole new chapter in the age-old quest for a music of the spheres."
http://www.calendarlive.com/music/classical/cl-ca-swed22dec22.story

UI ALUMNUS NAMED COMPANY VP (South Bend Tribune, Dec. 22)
Keith D. Dennis has been named vice president of business services/chief financial officer of Family & Children's Center Inc. Most recently Dennis served as vice president for finance and administration at Saint Mary's College, where he managed financial activities, operation and maintenance of physical plant, human resources, student financial aid, auxiliary enterprises and investments. A certified public accountant, Dennis received a bachelor's degree in 1972 and his master's degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1975. The Tribune is based in South Bend, Ind.
http://www.southbendtribune.com/stories/2002/12/22/business.20021222-sbt-MICH-B2-SOUTH_BEND___Fifth_T.sto

UI GRAD GETS PH.D. (Plainview Daily Herald, Dec. 22)
Cindy McClenagan, assistant professor of English at Wayland Baptist University, earned her doctorate in English during December ceremonies at Texas Tech. McClenagan´s specialization is in 20th century American literature, and her dissertation was titled "A Postmodern End for the Violent Victorian Female." McClenagan holds a bachelor's degree from Luther College in Iowa and a master of arts in library science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She also earned a master of arts in English from Texas Tech in 1998. The Herald is based in Texas.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6471946&BRD=517&PAG=461&dept_id=473182&rfi=6

CARLSON STUDENT ATTENDED UI (Miami Herald, Dec. 22)
The Carlson School of Management's student-run Consulting Enterprise competes with professional consulting firms and, since the program's inception last summer, has generated $100,000 in revenue. So far, the students have finished several projects for five public and private companies, including Northwest Cargo and Guidant Corp. Student Ana Ponguta has learned that sometimes projects aren't as straightforward as they appear. On a recent project she was supposed to analyze data for a Fortune 500 company but the data were a mess, so first she had to clean it up. Ponguta wants to work in marketing, and through an internship, she is one of the few students offered a job before graduating in May. She will be a marketing manager for Ecolab. Colombian-born Ponguta is an example of the kind of student Carlson wants to attract -- an international student who wants to stay and work in Minnesota. She went back to Colombia after attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on a scholarship but wanted to return to the Midwest.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/business/4796217.htm
A version of the story also ran Dec. 22 on the website of the KANSAS CITY STAR.
http://www.kansas.com/mld/kansas/business/4796217.htm

PAULSON HEADS STUDY (Rochester Democrat and Herald, Dec. 21)
Doctors at the University of Rochester Medical Center are leading a national study to determine the very first symptoms of Huntington's disease. Because DNA tests can determine whether a person has the fatal disease, the study also will provide a window into the stress factors and privacy issues for those facing diseases predicted by genetic tests. A second Huntington's study will include 625 people at 20 sites in North America, including Rochester. The participants will be people who know they will develop Huntington's, though they don't have signs of illness. The National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke is providing $6.8 million for the study, which is headed by JANE PAULSON, a neuropsychologist at the University of Iowa. The Democrat and Herald is based in New York.
http://www.rochesterdandc.com/news/1221story4_news.shtml

DEFENSE RESTS IN NELSON MURDER TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 21)
The defense in Phyllis Nelson's first-degree murder trial rested Friday morning after less than an hour of testimony, including a medical expert who said the stab wound that killed her husband could have been accidental. Nelson, 56, of Iowa City is on trial in the Dec. 12, 2001, death of her husband, Richard, 54, former executive dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=601123

BROKAW BOOK REVIEWED (Los Angles Times, Dec. 20)
In a review of Tom Brokaw's new book " A Long Way From Home, Growing Up in the American Heartland," it's noted that Brokaw went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for a year. But left and later graduated from the University of South Dakota. "When I turned eighteen," he writes, "I began a steady descent into a pattern of self-deception, deceit and irresponsibility."
http://www.calendarlive.com/printedition/calendar/cl-et-book20dec20.story

"ALL MY LIFE FOR SALE" REVIEWED (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 20)
John Freyer's memoir/ conceptual-art project "All My Life for Sale," is reviewed in this piece. Freyer is a 29-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student. Moving his stuff from New York to Iowa in August 2000, he was overcome by a feeling that everyone has probably experienced: He was nauseated by the amount, and kind, of his stuff. There was too much there. He decided to sell all his stuff -- from the lone, mysterious can of Vienna sausages in the kitchen cabinet to his T-shirts. He threw a price tag party, in which his friends dug out his stuff and put tags on them. Then he offered these things on EBay.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/12/22/RV120103.DTL

ILLINOIS PROVOST VIES FOR UI PRESIDENCY (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 20)
Richard H. Herman, 61, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois, was named Thursday as a finalist for the president's job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Herman has been the chief academic and budget officer at Illinois since 1998. He oversees an annual budget of $1.1 billion and a faculty of nearly 2,000 at 12 colleges, two schools and two institutes. The University of Iowa is looking for a successor to Mary Sue Coleman, who left last summer to become the president at the University of Michigan.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=600012

GREEN: UI OFFICERS USED STUN GUNS (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 20)
The stun guns carried by security officers at the three state-run universities, unused for more than six months, have been used to subdue two men at the University of Iowa in the last five weeks, officials said. "We don't encourage our officers to use them," said CHUCK GREEN, assistant vice president for university police. "But these times they got used because it got to the point where the officers were going to have to fight." Officer Shawn Sharp used a Taser to stun Corey Mothershead, a University of Northern Iowa junior, Nov. 10 in the parking lot of a residence hall. Reports allege that Mothershead tried to set fire to a gas can, resisted arrest and threatened Sharp verbally. The report said a breath test indicated Mothershead had a blood alcohol level of 0.17 percent. The second incident occurred Dec. 8 when officer Bob Blockhus stunned Darnell Teague, of East Moline, Ill., after he allegedly tried to evade arrest by running away. Teague's blood alcohol level was measured at 0.118 percent by a breath analyzer.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=600005

FORMER STUDENT RECALLS UI DAYS (Times-Herald, Dec. 20)
A columnist writes about her memories of attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She writes: "I got good grades, but skipped classes when I felt like it. Teachers didn't take attendance, so why bother? I paid more attention to filling requirements than taking classes that interested me, and I was quite intolerant of the judgmental career-students who rolled their eyes because I wasn't as perky and dedicated as they were." The Times-Herald is based in Port Huron, Mich.
http://www.thetimesherald.com/news/stories/20021220/localnews/614827.html

GRANT: NO IX COMMISSION NEEDED (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 20)
A women's advocacy group leveled criticism yesterday at the Commission on Opportunity in Athletics, which could weaken the federal anti-discrimination law that has been hailed as a boon to female athletes. The National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education organized a teleconference, during which invited panelists blasted the group formed by Secretary of Education Rod Paige. The coalition charged that the commission is advancing the political agenda of the White House, that it has not fully researched the effects of Title IX and that it has ignored major funding questions, such as football scholarship levels and the escalation of coaching salaries. "We did not need a commission on Title IX," said CHRISTINE GRANT, the women's athletic director at the University of Iowa. "We need a commission on cost containment. We have a financial disaster waiting for us down the road because of the [athletic] arms race and salaries that are out of control."
http://www.sunspot.net/sports/college/bal-sp.titleix20dec20,0,2530804.story?coll=bal-college-sports
A version of this story also ran Dec. 20 on the website of the CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/12/2002122003n.htm

GRANT: NO EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN SPORTS (Rocky Mountain News, Dec. 20)
Even before the President's commission on Title IX has written its report, women's groups say they see what's coming and they don't like it. The commission was created in June and charged with examining the 30-year-old civil rights law that bans sex discrimination in all areas of education, including school sports. After listening to expert testimony and public comments in four cities across the country, the 15-member commission met in Philadelphia two weeks ago to discuss their findings. At a news conference Thursday morning, many proponents of girls and women's sports expressed outrage and said the proposals were nothing more than plans to gut the law. CHRISTINE GRANT, the women's athletic director at the University of Iowa, added that the law never has been enforced particularly well anyway. "Thirty years after the passage of Title IX, girls nationwide have only 42 percent of the participation opportunities at the high school level and only 42 percent at the collegiate level," Grant said. "Forty-two percent is not equal opportunity." The Rocky Mountain News is based in Denver, Colo.
http://www.rockymountainnews.com/drmn/sports/article/0,1299,DRMN_2_1621972,00.html

GRANT COMMENTS ON TITLE IX CHANGES (The Olympian, Dec. 20)
Women's sports advocates warned Thursday that a commission reporting next month to U.S. Secretary of Education Rod Paige could weaken the effect of Title IX. Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972 bans gender discrimination in schools that receive federal funds. Women's sports advocates who spoke Thursday -- as part of the National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education -- believe the commission membership is stacked against them. They maintain there is no reason to change anything about Title IX. "People who want to understand this law can do so by sitting down and reading it," said CHRISTINE GRANT, women's athletic director at the University of Iowa. The Olympian is based in Olympia, Wash.
http://www.theolympian.com/home/news/20021220/prosports/31542.shtml
Versions of the story also ran Dec. 20 on the website of the CINCINNATI ENQUIRER.
http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/12/20/spt_wwwsptztitleix20.html
The ALBANY, N.Y., TIMES UNION.
http://www.timesunion.com/AspStories/story.asp?storyID=85041&category=SPORTS&BCCode=&newsdate=12/20/2002
The INDIANAPOLIS STAR.
http://www.indystar.com/print/articles/1/009928-1641-036.html

GRANT OPPOSES CHANGES TO TITLE IX (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Dec. 20)
Proponents of women's athletics argued Thursday that changes under consideration to the 30-year-old law requiring gender equity in collegiate sports would set back women's sports. A Title IX commission formed by Education Secretary Rod Paige discussed several possible changes when it met in Philadelphia earlier this month. One would require a 50-50 proportion of male and female athletes, with some leeway allowed depending on each school's circumstances. The commission will meet Jan. 8 to vote on ways to make it easier for universities to comply with the law. The Title IX proponents worry it will give back too much. "Such proposals would permanently deny women equal access to play sport," CHRISTINE GRANT, former women's athletic director at the University of Iowa, told a conference call sponsored by the National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/503/3544755.html
Versions of the story also ran Dec. 20 on the website of the BISMARCK, N.D., TRIBUNE, the TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNALin Kansas
http://www.cjonline.com/stories/122002/spo_briefs.shtml
The AKRON, Ohio, BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/sports/4777690.htm
The DURHAM, N.C., HERALD-SUN.
http://www.herald-sun.com/sports/18-301103.html
The SEATTLE TIMES.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/APWires/sports/D7O171UG0.html
NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA(NEPA) NEWS.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6451736&BRD=2212&PAG=461&dept_id=465816&rfi=6
FOX SPORTS.
http://foxsports.lycos.com/content/view?contentId=816828
And Dec. 19 on the website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-Title-IX.html

GRANT: TITLE IX NEVER MEANT TO HELP MEN (Cybercast News Service, Dec. 20)
A coalition of women's groups charged Thursday that the Bush administration was carrying out a discreet campaign to undermine Title IX, a federal law that forbids sexual discrimination in education. Over the course of the next few weeks, the women's groups are hoping to focus attention on the Commission on Athletic Opportunity, a board set up by the U.S. Department of Education to review Title IX. Since the 15-member commission was formed in June, four meetings have been held and several proposals for enforcing Title IX have been discussed. One of the primary concerns for the women's groups is the commission's focus. The board was charged with evaluating, among other things, if Title IX was "working to promote opportunities for male and female athletes." "Title IX was never meant to assist men in athletics," said CHRISTINE GRANT, University of Iowa women's athletic director and liaison to the National Association of College Women Athletic Administrators. "It was intended to help women who have been the underrepresented gender in sports throughout the entire 20th century."
http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewCulture.asp?Page=%5CCulture%5Carchive%5C200212%5CCUL20021220a.html
A version of the article also ran Dec. 20 on the website CROSSWALK.COM, a for-profit, Christian-based news and information web site.
http://www.crosswalk.com/news/1177367.html

DONHAM: DUST RISK IN SWINE BUILDINGS (The Sampson Independent, Dec. 20)
A story about the threat cold weather poses to swine operations says dust also poses a problem. Nearly every swine building in North Carolina has this problem to some degree. Dr. KELLEY DONHAM, Institute of Agricultural Medicine and Environmental Health, University of Iowa, states that dust is perhaps the most hazardous contaminant in the air in swine confinement buildings. This dust arises from feed, dried manure, epidermal hair from the animals and microbes that grow in the buildings. The Sampson Independent is based in Sampson County, N.C.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1117&dept_id=132328&newsid=6449011&PAG=461&rfi=9

WATSON, NADS FEATURED IN TV STORY (CNN, Dec. 20)
CNN's Daybreak show featured the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S NATIONAL DRIVING SIMULATOR. A transcript of the segment has reporter Julie Vallese saying, "It was 10 years in the making and a few bumps along the way, but a partnership between the federal government, private industry and the University of Iowa have paved the road to here. Behind me, the most advanced vehicle simulator in the world. Go inside and it's the ultimate in virtual reality. There's a full sized vehicle, today a Chevy Malibu, completely surrounded by digital pictures. Researchers are able to see inside the vehicle and observe testing, which is all too real." Interviewed for the story was GINGER WATSON, chief application scientist for NADS. "Our data shows that up to 75 percent of crashes are human error or something that the driver did contributed to the crash. This is a way to get at the cause of three quarters of crashes," Watson said.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8ce9556cd021dd7ae078bf093e8a2df2&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=76b32e74890693c001327b5d3e99d15d

UI GRAD NAMED HEAD OF CITY LIBRARY (Wadena Pioneer Journal, Dec. 20)
A profile on Linda McIntosh, who was recently named librarian of the Wadena City Library in Minnesota, says McIntosh is originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and earned her bachelor of art degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in American history and education.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=6456259&BRD=2175&PAG=461&dept_id=457555&rfi=6

GRANT OPPOSES CHANGES TO TITLE IX (Miami Herald, Dec. 19)
Proponents of women's athletics argued Thursday that changes under consideration to the 30-year-old law requiring gender equity in collegiate sports would set back women's sports. A Title IX commission formed by Education Secretary Rod Paige discussed several possible changes when it met in Philadelphia earlier this month. One would require a 50-50 proportion of male and female athletes, with some leeway allowed depending on each school's circumstances. The commission will meet Jan. 8 to vote on ways to make it easier for universities to comply with the law. The Title IX proponents worry it will give back too much. "Such proposals would permanently deny women equal access to play sport," CHRISTINE GRANT, former women's athletic director at the University of Iowa, told a conference call sponsored by the National Coalition of Women and Girls in Education.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/sports/4777690.htm
Versions of the story also ran Dec. 19 on the websites of the TIMES-PICAYUNE in New Orleans and the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/353/sports/Title_IX_proponents_say_possib%3A.shtml
The SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2002/12/19/sports1957EST0830.DTL
The DAILY TIMES in Florence, Ala.
http://www.timesdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021219&Category=APS&ArtNo=212191130&Ref=AR
MYRTLE BEACH, S.C., SUN.
http://www.myrtlebeachonline.com/mld/myrtlebeachonline/sports/4777690.htm
MACON, Ga., TELEGRAPH.
http://www.macon.com/mld/macon/sports/4777690.htm
WALNUT CREEK, Calif., JOURNAL.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/bayarea/sports/4777690.htm
MONTEREY COUNTY, Calif., HERALD.
http://www.montereyherald.com/mld/montereyherald/sports/4777690.htm
THE STATE in Columbia, S.C.
http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/sports/4777690.htm
DULUTH, Minn., NEWS TRIBUNE.
http://www.duluthsuperior.com/mld/duluthsuperior/sports/4777690.htm
SAN LUIS OBISPO TRIBUNE in California.
http://www.sanluisobispo.com/mld/sanluisobispo/sports/4777690.htm
SARASOTA HERALD TRIBUNE in Florida.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021219&Category=APS&ArtNo=212191130&Ref=AR
COLUMBUS, Ga., LEDGER-ENQUIRER.
http://www.ledger-enquirer.com/mld/ledgerenquirer/sports/4777690.htm

UNC ADMINISTRATOR VIES FOR UI PRESIDENCY (Chapel Hill Herald, Dec. 19)
Gretchen Bataille, a top administrator in the UNC system, is one of six finalists for the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Bataille has been the university system's senior vice president for academic affairs since she arrived in Chapel Hill in March 2000. She came to UNC from an administrative post at Washington State University. Reached at an Iowa airport Wednesday on her way back from a campus interview there, Bataille said the job intrigues her. A native of Indiana, Bataille has worked at a number of universities across the nation, but spent more time in Iowa than in any other state. She taught English at Iowa State from 1967 to 1988. The Herald is based in Chapel Hill, N.C.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=8ce9556cd021dd7ae078bf093e8a2df2&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=67586c8d5a219a50ef5fc1116eb8d704

BERMAN, GARCIA NET NEH AWARDS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 19)
The National Endowment for the Humanities announced on Tuesday $14.5-million in grants to support scholarly research, college curriculum-development programs, and museum and library humanities programs. Two research fellowships were awarded to University of Iowa people. CONSTANCE BERMAN, whose area of study is "Women's Work and European Economic Expansion, 1050-1250;" and JOHN GARCIA, whose area of study is "Song and Rite in Early Greece: Mnemosyne and Divine."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/12/2002121904n.htm

FERENTZ GIVES $100,000 TO UI (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 19)
Iowa Football Coach KIRK FERENTZ and his wife have agreed to donate $100,000 to the university to support the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, officials said Wednesday. The gift, made through the University of Iowa Foundation, will establish the Kirk and Mary Ferentz Excellence and Innovation Fund. The money will enable the college to recognize and stimulate the development of new education programming. "Mary and I have always been impressed by the (university's) tradition of distinctive, top quality education," Ferentz said in a statement. The fourth-year coach is enjoying his most successful season on the field. No. 3 Iowa finished 11-1, won a share of the Big Ten title and an invitation to the Orange Bowl.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=598807

SKORTON FINALIST FOR UI PRESIDENT (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 19)
The University of Iowa's vice president for research and external relations is a finalist for the university's top job. DAVID J. SKORTON will interview for the post Thursday. The university is looking for a successor to Mary Sue Coleman, who left last summer to become the president at the University of Michigan. Skorton, 53, has been a faculty member at Iowa since 1980. He was appointed vice president for research in 1992 and was named vice president of external relations in March after serving in that position on an interim basis since July 2000. Skorton is one of six finalists to interview on campus for the president's job.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=598776

UI GRADUATE HAS ART EXHIBITION (Doylestown Patriot, Dec. 19)
" Randall Exon: A Quiet Light" features more than 35 works by the painter, whose landscapes, interiors and still-lifes have been described as "moody," "passionate" and "evocative." The exhibition is sponsored by Dr. Joseph A. Murphy and Dr. Martha J. Murphy and Rathdan Design Company, and runs through April 27. It is part of an ongoing series that highlights contemporary masters of landscape painting from the Philadelphia region. Born in South Dakota and raised in Kansas and Oregon, Exon received his bachelor of fine arts from Washburn University in 1978 and later attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, graduating with a master of fine arts degree in 1982. The Patriot is based in Pennsylvania.
http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1685&dept_id=45367&newsid=6449754&PAG=461&rfi=9

UNC VICE PRESIDENT INTERVIEWS AT UI (Durham Herald Sun, Dec. 19)
Gretchen Bataille, a top administrator in the UNC system, is one of six candidates for the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She has been the university system's senior vice president for academic affairs since she arrived in Chapel Hill in March 2000. Reached at an Iowa airport Wednesday on her way back from a campus interview there, Bataille said the job intrigues her. A native of Indiana, Bataille has worked at a number of universities across the nation, but spent more time in Iowa than in any other state. She taught English at Iowa State from 1967 to 1988. "When this presidency came available the search committee contacted me. It wasn't something I was seeking," Bataille said. "I very much like what I'm doing at the University of North Carolina. But this was too attractive to ignore."
http://www.herald-sun.com/orange/10-300666.html

EX-DIRECTOR PENS BIOGRAPHY (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 19)
William Saroyan could write a play in a day and a short story in two hours. Months before his death in 1981, at 73, he claimed to have 50 published books, 50 unpublished manuscripts and 50 years' worth of journal entries to his credit. So it is astounding to find no first-hand evidence of the Saroyan voice in John Leggett's paraphrase-filled new biography, "A Daring Young Man." This is not to say that Mr. Leggett, longtime director of the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa and a former book editor, has not done his homework. Though his notes are sketchy and his bibliography mystifyingly brief (listing only three books not written by members of the Saroyan family), he has obvious feeling for his subject. He grasps the larger, self-destructive misanthropy in Saroyan's life, as well as much of the minutiae (at the level of family quarrels, real estate transactions and gambling debts). But his book is hurt from the outset by an apparent lack of permission to use Mr. Saroyan's own words, and a lack of candor about that shortcoming. (This article originally appeared Dec. 5 in the NEW YORK TIMES.)
http://www.iht.com/articles/80708.html

UI ALUMNUS INVESTIGATED (Charlotte Sun Herald, Dec. 19)
A story about Lance Poulsen, the wealthy founder of National Century Financial Enterprises of Dublin, Ohio notes that he grew up in Chicago in the 1950s. He earned marketing degrees from Roosevelt University in Chicago and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Up to $2.5 billion in National Century money is currently unaccounted for, and an additional $400 million is missing from reserve funds used to back National Century bonds, according to a USA Today article published Wednesday.
http://www.sun-herald.com/NewsArchive2/121902/tp10ch3.htm?date=121902&story=tp10ch3.htm

PENN STATE PROVOST INTERVIEWS AT UI (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Dec. 19)
A Penn State University official is a finalist for the president's job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Rodney A. Erickson, executive vice president and provost of Penn State, is the fourth of six finalists scheduled to meet with faculty, staff, students and community leaders at the Iowa campus. He has been at Penn State since 1977.
http://www.post-gazette.com/localnews/20021219paburbs9.asp

UI PATIENT'S NEIGHBORS HOLD FUNDRAISER (The Standard, Dec. 18)
A local couple is hosting a fundraiser to help the family of a St. Catharines teenager who has a non-malignant brain tumor cover the cost of U.S. medical treatment. Andy Gindroz, a Grade 12 student at West Park Secondary School, has been at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City with his parents, Sherry and Alain, for more than a week to allow specialists to identify the best method of treating his tumor. The newspaper is based in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a280231ce250f61f2fe1c3f27f26e296&_docnum=11&wchp=dGLbVlz-lSlAl&_md5=775449bd031f9ba4eb148289fcd9861c

UI GRAD LAUDED FOR WORK WITH IRS (West County Times, Dec. 18)
Anyone who helps out thousands of taxpayers on a regular basis deserves a medal, or at least an award. Orinda's Ann Collins got one. Collins was recognized recently as the Federal Employee of the Year in the administrative/technical category. Collins, who retired from her job in the Oakland IRS office last month, is credited "directly or indirectly for almost every correct and complete response given to the millions of taxpayers who call the Internal Revenue Service each year for technical assistance," says Ken Hempel, Collins' manager and the man who nominated her. As a graduate of Berea College in Kentucky and with a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, her expertise was in the area of speech and oral interpretation. The West County Times is based in California.
http://www.bayarea.com/mld/cctimes/living/4764929.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp

UI MOVE ON DRINK SPECIALS CITED (Green Bay News Chronicle, Dec. 18)
The De Pere License Committee voted down proposed bar restrictions Tuesday night that would have banned all-you-can-drink specials in bars. Two of three committee members voted to deny the restrictions that would have made unlimited drink specials, the sale of beer through vending machines and selling to intoxicated individuals illegal in the city. State law already prohibits serving to intoxicated individuals. De Pere Police Capt. John Koser said at the meeting that the specials encourage people to become drunk and that the problem is not limited to St. Norbert College students. Koser said he is worried about patrons who drink too much and drive home. Dick Rankin, St. Norbert College's vice president, said low drink prices cause individuals to become too intoxicated. He cited the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as a school that has curbed drink specials and has seen a decrease in alcohol-related problems. The News Chronicle is based in Wisconsin.
http://www.gogreenbay.com/page.html?article=117528

UI ALUMNUS UNDER INVESTIGATION (USA Today, Dec. 18)
Before his downfall last month, Lance Poulsen, former CEO of National Century Financial Enterprises, was flying high. He ran a lucrative health care finance firm. He hosted charity fundraisers at his waterside villa in Port Charlotte, Fla. He hobnobbed with Republican politicians, including Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, and he sailed often to the Bahamas on his $2 million yacht, The Enterprise. But in recent weeks, the mystery has deepened around Poulsen, 59. His financing of small hospitals, nursing homes and doctors' groups nationwide appears to have been a vast, fraudulent scheme, according to court filings and attorneys representing clients and investors. The son of Danish immigrants, Poulsen grew up in Chicago in the 1950s, then earned business and marketing degrees at Roosevelt University in Chicago and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/health/2002-12-17-poulsen_x.htm

BOWLSBY PROPOSES CHANGE TO TITLE IX (USA Today, Dec. 18)
The Commission on Athletic Opportunity has received relatively little attention, though it does its work in public and its proposals could reverberate at virtually every educational institution in the country. The 15-member commission held a meeting in Philadelphia two weeks ago at which members offered broad outlines of the kinds of changes they would like to see, especially in how the underlying regulations of Title IX apply to college sports. What emerged was a clear consensus to recommend new rules for enforcement of Title IX at its next meeting Jan. 8. University of Iowa athletics director BOB BOWLSBY proposed that participation rates in a given region's high schools be used as a barometer for colleges. If 42 percent of the high school athletes are female, he suggested that colleges in that region be required to have 45 percent of their athletes be women -- 3 percent better than the feeder system. Others counter that the proposal would freeze discrimination in place.
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/2002-12-17-1a-title-ix-cover_x.htm

FRIENDS TESTIFY IN NELSON MURDER TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 18)
Two longtime family friends described Dr. Richard Nelson as a deeply religious man who spiraled into a deep depression in the final years of his life. The description of the former executive dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE echoes the testimony given by defense witnesses Monday in the murder trial of Nelson's wife, who is accused of stabbing her husband to death on Dec. 12, 2001. Phyllis Nelson, 55, is accused of first-degree murder for stabbing her husband once in the chest during an argument about his extramarital affair.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=597536

PENN STATE V.P. VIES FOR UI POST (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 18)
A Penn State official is a finalist for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president's job. Rodney A. Erickson, executive vice president and provost of Penn State, will visit Iowa on Wednesday to interview for the job, university officials said Tuesday. Erickson is the fourth of six finalists scheduled to meet with faculty, staff, students and community leaders. The university is seeking a successor to Mary Sue Coleman, who left last August to become president at the University of Michigan. Erickson has been at Penn State since 1977, serving as a geography and business administration professor, as well as dean of the graduate college. He was named vice president and provost in 1999. The third finalist for president, Gretchen M. Bataille, was interviewed Tuesday. She is the senior vice president for academic affairs at the University of North Carolina.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=597531
A version of the story also ran Dec. 17 on the website of NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA NEWS.
http://www.rocketnews.com/rocket/jsp/NewsSearch.jsp?search_string=%22UNIVERsity+of+Iowa%22&age=

PIERCE CASE DIVIDES UI COMMUNITY (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 18)
Kelly Fangman and Tim Roling have been friends for almost all their lives. Lately, though, they find themselves arguing fiercely over the subject that has consumed many on the University of Iowa campus: Pierre Pierce and date rape. Pierce, of west suburban Westmont, is a star basketball player at the school who last month pleaded guilty to assault causing injury after a female athlete at the school told police Pierce raped her. He was originally charged with felony sexual assault, but as part of a plea agreement entered a guilty plea to the misdemeanor charge. He was sentenced to a year of probation, 200 hours of community service and ordered to undergo counseling. The incident has riveted and riven the campus. Some students furiously contend that Pierce, 19, a former prep basketball star at Westmont High School, was treated more leniently by the school because he is an athlete. Pierce remains on full athletic scholarship and on the team, although he will not be allowed to compete this year. There have been protests, petition drives and calls for firing basketball coach STEVE ALFORD, who after Pierce was arrested said he believed that the player was innocent. And the case has opened heated discussions among students about the rules of sexual engagement; about the lines between sexual freedom and responsibility; and about whether date rape is an act of predatory violence or an alcohol-fueled misunderstanding.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0212180012dec18,1,5750868.story

PARROTT: NO CENSORSHIP INTENDED (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 18)
University of Iowa students and a faculty member said they were ordered to remove coverage of a murder trial from a news broadcast -- a charge that a university official has denied. Staff at UITV ordered coverage of the Phyllis Nelson murder trial removed from the student-produced broadcast. Staff also asked to review the script before it would be aired, said journalism professor STACEY CONE. Nelson, 55, is charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing death of her husband Richard Nelson, a former executive dean of Iowa's College of Medicine. The trial, which has gained national media attention, began its second week Monday. Cone said PETE TROTTER, a senior staff member in Information Technology Services, told her "we may have a university relations problem." Trotter denies ordering the Nelson trial to be omitted, and he said he thought the issue was a misunderstanding. STEVE PARROTT, director of university relations, agreed. "Basically, I think this was a misunderstanding and I think we should probably apologize to the students that we weren't more clear to them about what we were trying to accomplish," he said. "We weren't trying to censor anything they were doing, and it had nothing to do with the fact they were covering the Nelson trial," Parrott said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=597534

CENTER FOR BOOK PRINTING 'SNICKET' STORY (Boston Globe, Dec. 17)
Lemony Snicket is one of the country's top-selling children's book authors, as his series of macabre children's books, "A Series of Unfortunate Events," has turned Snicket (a.k.a. Daniel Handler) into one of publishing's most prized commodities. So which publisher will produce his next book? Monotreme Press, a small press operated out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CENTER FOR THE BOOK in Iowa City. The publication is being overseen by Chelsey Johnson, a former graduate student who graduated from the university's WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 2002. Only 65 copies of the 18-page illustrated story are being published. The story, "The Baby in the Manger," was actually written two years ago for the Washington Post, which commissioned Handler to write a Christmas story for publication. When the editors received the manuscript, however, they were in for a shock -- the story is a spoof of the Nativity, with Joseph as a costume designer, Mary as an herb specialist, and the baby Jesus kidnapped by the owners of the hotel where he was born. The Post's editors labeled the story too dark and "anti-family" for their newspaper and sent it back to Handler.
http://boston.com/dailynews/351/ascribe/_University_of_Iowa_Center_for%3A.shtml

SQUIRE DOESN'T SEE A DEMOCRATIC FRONT RUNNER (Kansas City Star, Dec. 17)
In Missouri on Monday, Democrats were in a twitter. Al Gore's announcement Sunday that he was bowing out of the 2004 presidential race appeared to widen the opening for one of Missouri's own -- veteran Rep. Richard Gephardt. With Gore out, the potential Democratic field is now reduced to six: two candidates who already have taken the first steps to run, Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts and Vermont Gov. Howard Dean, and four others who are actively exploring a run: Gephardt; South Dakota's Sen. Tom Daschle, the Senate Democratic leader; Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina; and Connecticut's Sen. Joseph Lieberman, who was Gore's running mate in 2000. "I don't think there is a real front-runner," said University of Iowa political scientist PEVERILL SQUIRE.
http://www.kansascity.com/mld/kansascitystar/4753769.htm

CITY COLLEGE PRESIDENT FINALIST FOR UI POST (New York Times, Dec. 17)
The City College of New York, which experienced a rough period with uneven leadership in the 1990's, could find itself in the market for a new president again. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said yesterday that Gregory H. Williams, City College's president for 16 months, was one of six finalists for the Iowa presidency. Williams said in a statement that he was honored that Iowa, where he worked for 16 years, was considering him. Williams was a law professor, associate law dean and vice president at Iowa, and then law dean at Ohio State.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/12/education/12CUNY.html?ex=1040792400&en=1ac454cedaee951a&ei=5062&partner=GOOGLE

UNC OFFICIAL FINALIST FOR UI PRESIDENCY (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 17)
A University of North Carolina official is a finalist for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president's job. Gretchen M. Bataille, senior vice president for academic affairs, will visit Iowa today to interview for the job, university officials said Monday. Bataille, 58, is the third of six finalists scheduled to meet with faculty, staff, students and community leaders. The university is seeking a successor to Mary Sue Coleman, who left in August to become president at the University of Michigan.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=596443

DAUGHTERS TESTIFY IN DEAN MURDER TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 17)
The daughters of a former University of Iowa medical school dean testified Monday that the last two years of their father's life were marked by fits of rage, depression and periods of deep withdrawal from his family and marriage. Emily Hansen and Elyse Nelson-Winger said it was a stark contrast to the father, Dr. RICHARD NELSON, they grew up with. Nelson died of a stab wound to the heart. Phyllis Nelson, 55, is charged with first-degree murder, accused of stabbing her husband with a paring knife as the two argued over his affair with a former secretary. The trial began its second week Monday.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=596409

SQUIRE: GORE DECISION CAUSES SHUFFLE (San Diego Union Tribune, Dec. 17)
As Connecticut Senator Joseph Lieberman and other potential candidates scrambled to adjust to Al Gore's decision to renounce a presidential campaign, party activists and independent analysts said that the competition for the nomination is now wide open with no obvious front-runner. That appears to be the situation in at least two of the first three states that will begin the process of choosing a nominee early in 2004 -- Iowa and South Carolina. PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa and an expert on the caucuses, said that Gore's decision guarantees an unscripted free-for-all in the state, adding, "This shuffles it up so that a lot of people gravitate to the other candidates, and no one of them really pops to the surface yet."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/politics/20021216-1539-n25615.html

BUSS COMMENTS ON ERA MOVE IN ILLINOIS (Daily Journal, Dec. 16)
Back in the late '70s and early '80s, Springfield, Ill. was a national battleground over the Equal Rights Amendment. Lawmakers repeatedly voted down the measure, which would have afforded women equal protection under the U.S. Constitution. The amendment was approved by Congress but fell at least three states short of ratification before its 1982 deadline and died. Some backers of the ERA believe the measure can be resurrected by a future Congress by simply extending the deadline for ratification retroactively and getting three more state legislatures to ratify the measure. Rep. Lou Lang, D-Skokie, says he will reintroduce the ERA during the spring legislative session. Most of the states that have not ratified the ERA are in the deep South. Non-southern states such as Illinois are considered places where an amendment might be more likely to pass. "I honestly can't believe anyone is wasting their time on this," said WILLIAM BUSS, a constitutional law professor at the University of Iowa. "If they want to pass the ERA, the best thing they can do is start from scratch again." (The Daily Journal is based in Kankakee, Ill.)
http://www.daily-journal.com/content/?id=18300
The same political column appeared Dec. 16 in the OTTAWA (ILL.) DAILY TIMES:
http://www.ottawadailytimes.com/news/story.php?storyid=8597

SQUIRE: ISSUES HAVE CHANGED (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 16)
The Democratic Party and those vying to lead it back into the White House have all probably gained as a result of Al Gore's decision to step aside in 2004, most analysts agree. His withdrawal, they said, will banish the ghosts of the last disputed election and offer Democrats a chance to focus on the future, which comes as a huge relief to many in the party. Some Gore partisans felt he deserved a rematch, given the cliff-hanging outcome in 2000. But to others, he increasingly seemed like a candidate whose time had passed, especially in the aftermath of Sept. 11. "Things have just changed so dramatically that the nature of the debate has to be different from the last election," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa and a front-row observer of the event that will formally launch the 2004 contest, the Iowa caucuses. "National security will be more prominent than it was. We're now running deficits, rather than surpluses. Our Medicare and Social Security problems will be of even larger concern than they have been, just because the retirement of the baby boomers will be four years closer," Squire continued. "We need to talk about all these things in a different way, and it would have been hard for Gore to do that."
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/la-na-dems16dec16.story

MILLER COMMENTS ON GEPHARDT BID (Jefferson City News Tribune, Dec. 16)
Following former Vice-president Al Gore's announcement that he will not seek the Democratic nomination for president in 2004, ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the biggest boon to Missouri Democrat Richard Gephardt would be in Iowa, where Gephardt won the caucuses in his 1988 presidential bid and where he still enjoys wide popularity. But, he noted, plenty of Democrats may still be scared off by the most formidable candidate so far in the race: George W. Bush. "A number of (other) candidates might run if Bush was not so popular and if there were clearer signals that the public was upset with aspects of the Bush administration," he said. "The problem (for Democrats) is that as long as the focus continues to be on terrorism and Iraq and being tough in the international arena, it really does focus on a set of topics that Democrats are disadvantaged on." (The News Tribune is based in Jefferson City, Mo.)
http://www.newstribune.com/stories/121602/sta_1216020051.asp

SQUIRE DISCUSSES GORE DECISION NOT TO RUN IN 2004 (Fox News, Dec. 16)
PEVERILL SQUIRE
, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, appeared Monday afternoon on Fox's "The Big Story With John Gibson" to discuss former Vice President Al Gore's decision not to run again for president in 2004. Squire and other guests were slated to discuss why Gore decided against another White House run and about the contenders that are waiting in the wings ready to take his place.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=314aead1737ab0511edbedde42b91126&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlAl&_md5=48081b508b363b345a8714bc455118d5

FORMER UI DOCTOR MOVES TO INDIANA (News Dispatch, Dec. 16)
Pediatric pulmonologist Dr. Barbara Stewaret joined The Medical Group at the beginning of December, bringing three of her patients with her from Amarillo, Tx. Indiana has only five other pediatric pulmonologists. While there are such specialists in Chicago, the closest in Indiana is in Indianapolis. The families were willing to pull up stakes because their children are so critically ill and because they trust Stewaret. One family has a child with cystic fibrosis and another has two children with a condition that causes bleeding in their lungs. Stewaret attended medical school and completed her pediatrics residency at the University of Texas, spent three years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, working on her fellowship in pediatric allergy and pulmonology. The News Dispatch is based in Michigan City, Ind.
http://www.michigancityin.com/insidenews.asp?ID=18219

SQUIRE: ISSUES HAVE CHANGED (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 16)
The Democratic Party and those vying to lead it back into the White House have all probably gained as a result of Al Gore's decision to step aside in 2004, most analysts agree. His withdrawal, they said, will banish the ghosts of the last disputed election and offer Democrats a chance to focus on the future, which comes as a huge relief to many in the party. Some Gore partisans felt he deserved a rematch, given the cliff-hanging outcome in 2000. But to others, he increasingly seemed like a candidate whose time had passed, especially in the aftermath of Sept. 11. "Things have just changed so dramatically that the nature of the debate has to be different from the last election," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist at the University of Iowa and a front-row observer of the event that will formally launch the 2004 contest, the Iowa caucuses. "National security will be more prominent than it was. We're now running deficits, rather than surpluses. Our Medicare and Social Security problems will be of even larger concern than they have been, just because the retirement of the baby boomers will be four years closer," Squire continued. "We need to talk about all these things in a different way, and it would have been hard for Gore to do that."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-dems16dec16.story?null
This story also appeared Dec. 16 in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/la-na-dems16dec16,1,1551139.story

MILLER COMMENTS ON GEPHARDT BID (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 16)
ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor at the University of Iowa, said the decision by Al Gore not to seek the Democratic nomination for President in 2004 "will have a large impact on spending and raising of funds." Gore likely would have sopped up much of the big money and top fund-raisers, he said. Now, he said, "This will free up those opportunities for other candidates to jump in and do much better than they would have been able to do if he had been in the field." Miller and others said the biggest boon to Missouri Democrat Richard Gephardt would be in Iowa, where Gephardt won the caucuses in his 1988 presidential bid and where he still enjoys wide popularity. But, he noted, plenty of Democrats may still be scared off by the most formidable candidate so far in the race: George W. Bush. "A number of (other) candidates might run if Bush was not so popular and if there were clearer signals that the public was upset with aspects of the Bush administration," he said. "The problem (for Democrats) is that as long as the focus continues to be on terrorism and Iraq and being tough in the international arena, it really does focus on a set of topics that Democrats are disadvantaged on."
http://www.newstribune.com/

SCHOEN SHARES EUGENICS RECORDS (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Dec. 15)
North Carolina had one of the nation's most aggressive and longest running eugenics programs, sterilizing 7,600 people, the third most of any state, according to a newspaper report. Until recently, few details were known about how the Eugenics Board of North Carolina operated or the nature of cases it handled. The Winston-Salem Journal obtained and examined thousands of these documents. JOHANNA SCHOEN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa, gave the Journal access to a set of 7,000 records that she copied more than 10 years ago. Since that time, the N.C. State Archives have declined other requests, and the records are officially closed to the public. "I think the problem is that there are cases where sterilization was the solution - but sterilization authorized by the Eugenics Board is never the solution," Schoen said. "The very premise that the state had the right to do this was flawed." The Times Dispatch is based in Richmond, Va. This article originally appeared in the Winston-Salem (N.C.) Journal.
http://www.timesdispatch.com/frontpage/MGB7OQEBQ9D.html

FORSYTHE IS FINALIST FOR KENTUCKY DEAN POSITION (Lexington Herald Leader, Dec. 13)
ROBERT FORSYTHE
, a professor at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, is one of three finalists to become dean of the Gatton College of Business and Economics at the University of Kentucky.
http://www.kentucky.com/mld/heraldleader/news/local/4729667.htm

BOYD MENTIONED IN STORY ON GINKGO CONTROVERSY (Centre Daily Times, Pa., Dec. 13)
The University of Iowa's esteemed leader seemed too polite to mention that the reporter in his office smelled like vomit. But the odor distracted me during the interview with the university's interim president, WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD. "Where did that putrid odor come from? Did I step in something while interviewing students in the raucous sports bars along the pedestrian mall?:" No, I had stepped into a campus controversy: Every autumn, a female ginkgo tree drops its ripe, smelly seeds onto the sidewalk, almost at the university president's doorstep. That tree and four other ginkgoes are at the center of a dispute pitting a student senator from the Chicago suburbs who wants to chop down the trees against environmentalists who rushed to hug the ginkgoes -- if not eat their berries. Bryan Stacy, a senior from Bloomingdale, Ill., spearheaded the anti-ginkgo drive last month.
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/4732314.htm

JONES COMMENTS ON VOTING FIASCO (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 13)
During Florida's ballot crisis in 2000, two prominent research universities offered to help repair the nation's voting process so that Americans would not have to go through another fiasco requiring the intervention of the U.S. Supreme Court. In the two years since the Florida debacle, political scientists at the two universities -- the California Institute of Technology and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology -- have gathered and analyzed millions of election records as part of the Caltech-MIT/Voting Technology Project. Some members of the Caltech-MIT team applaud the Help America Vote Act of 2002 for requiring that a new Election Assistance Commission set up a program for college students to serve as poll workers. However, money may be the most significant aspect of the Help America Vote Act, which President Bush signed on October 29, says DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa. The new law authorizes spending $3.86-billion on election administration during the next four years. That comes to about $4,000 per precinct, says Jones, who is chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. Jones adds later in the story that fewer than a dozen companies are manufacturing voting systems. "But it's enough so that innovation is ticking along," he says. "Right now, it's a very competitive market."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v49/i16/16a03802.htm

UI CITED IN RESIGNATION STORY (New Mass Media Valley Advocate, Dec. 12)
A story that questions the departure of two top administrators from the University of Massachusetts, including Theodore Weidner, associate vice chancellor for facilities and campus services, says that Weidner apparently was already looking for another job when he quit. It says that a Nov. 25 press release from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA listed Weidner as a candidate for a similar job at that school. Weidner declined to talk to the Advocate, and it remains unclear what prompted him to leave UMass. The Advocate is an alternative publication based in Easthampton, Mass.
http://www.newmassmedia.com/nac.phtml?code=wma&db=nac_fea&ref=23125

UI COURTS CUNY PRESIDENT (New York Times, Dec. 12)
The City College of New York, which experienced a rough period with uneven leadership in the 1990's, could find itself in the market for a new president again. THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said yesterday that Gregory H. Williams, City College's president for 16 months, was one of six finalists for the Iowa presidency. Dr. Williams said in a statement that he was honored that Iowa, where he worked for 16 years, was considering him. Dr. Williams was a law professor, associate law dean and vice president at Iowa, and then law dean at Ohio State.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/12/education/12CUNY.html

WINOKUR COMMENTS ON SMALLPOX VACCINE (New York Times, Dec. 11)
Healthy college students injected with the smallpox vaccine in clinical trials have developed aches, pains and fevers that laid them up for days. The symptoms have been temporary, but they underscore the dangers of the vaccination strategy under consideration by the Bush administration, experts say. KAREN COWDERY, 24, a University of Iowa cardiology administrator, missed a day of work but said she'd go through it again. She said she was nauseated. Dr. PATRICIA WINOKUR of the University of Iowa estimated that a quarter of the 218 people vaccinated there missed a day of work or school. A few missed two or three days. "They mostly feel fatigued," she said. "It's what we expected. We were well-prepared."
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/4720961.htm
A version of this story appeared Dec. 11 and 12 on the following Web sites
FOX NEWS
http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,72814,00.html
ABC NEWS
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/Living/ap20021211_1724.html
NEW YORK TIMES
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Smallpox-Vaccine.html
CENTRE DAILY TIMES (PA.)
http://www.centredaily.com/mld/centredaily/news/4723259.htm
FORT WAYNE NEWS SENTINEL
http://www.fortwayne.com/mld/newssentinel/4716709.htm
THE OLYMPIAN (WASH.)
http://www.theolympian.com/home/news/20021212/frontpage/26109.shtml
SALT LAKE TRIBUNE
http://www.sltrib.com/2002/Dec/12122002/thursday/10359.asp
BILLINGS (MONT.) GAZETTE
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2002/12/12/build/health/40-smallpox.inc
NEWSDAY
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/wire/sns-ap-smallpox-vaccine1211dec11,0,6034128.story?coll=sns-ap-health-headlines
TIMES DAILY (ALA.)
http://www.timesdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021211&Category=APA&ArtNo=212111024&Ref=AR
TUSCALOOSA NEWS
http://www.tuscaloosanews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021211&Category=APA&ArtNo=212111024&Ref=AR
YAHOO NEWS
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=541&ncid=751&e=10&u=/ap/20021211/ap_on_he_me/smallpox_vaccine
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/12/11/national1729EST0765.DTL
SWIFT COUNTY MONITOR (MINN.)
http://www.swiftcountymonitor.com/swiftcountymonitor/myarticles.asp?P=594963&S=208&PubID=10298&EC=0
MSN
http://news.ninemsn.com.au/Health/story_43695.asp
BRADENTON (FLA.) HERALD
http://www.bradenton.com/mld/bradenton/news/nation/4716709.htm

PROSECUTORS REST CASE IN MURDER TRIAL (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 11)
Prosecutors rested their case Tuesday in the trial of Phyllis Nelson, charged with first-degree murder in the stabbing death of her husband, a prominent University of Iowa administrator. Linn County Attorney Harold Denton wrapped up his portion of the trial with testimony from Mary Jo Young, who said she carried on a three-year, off-and-on affair with Dr. RICHARD NELSON, the husband of Phyllis Nelson and former executive dean of the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Phyllis Nelson, 55, is accused of stabbing her husband during an early morning argument Dec. 12, 2001, at his Cedar Rapids apartment, just minutes after Young slipped out of the building after spending the night with Richard Nelson.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=590203

WHITMORE NO LONGER FSU FINALIST (Miami Herald, Dec. 11)
Florida State University moved a step closer Tuesday to finding out who will replace Talbot "Sandy" D'Alemberte as its president when a search committee narrowed the list of finalists to three. The short list includes former Florida House Speaker T.K. Wetherell, former Ohio State and University of Wyoming President Edward Jennings, and Susan Prager, a law professor at UCLA. The search committee eliminated Robert V. Smith, provost and vice chancellor at the University of Arkansas, and University of Iowa provost JON WHITMORE.
http://www.miami.com/mld/miami/news/local/4710492.htm
Versions of the story also ran Dec. 11 on the website of THE LEDGER in Lakeland, Fla.
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=LL&Date=20021211&Category=NEWS&ArtNo=212110380&Ref=AR&Profile=1004
The TALLAHASSEE, Fla., DEMOCRAT.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/4711907.htm
The NAPLES, Fla., NEWS.
http://www.naplesnews.com/02/12/florida/d866950a.htm
The Akron, Ohio, BEACON JOURNAL.
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/local/4710492.htm
The SARASOTA, Fla., HERALD-TRIBUNE
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021210&Category=APN&ArtNo=212101072&Ref=AR

OPERA THAT PREMIERED AT UI RETURNS TO STAGE (Plain Dealer, Dec. 11)
The world is a bleak, unforgiving place in Edwin London's one-act opera, "Santa Claus." Or is it? At the end of this compelling and touching work, a bit of joy seems to creep back into the lives of a mother and child with close ties to Santa Claus. And the protagonist may even find some fulfillment on Earth. Ambiguity is an essential element in the e.e. cummings morality play that London turned into an opera. For the first time since its premiere in 1960 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, London's "Santa Claus" received a performance Monday at Cleveland State University's Drinko Recital Hall by the Cleveland Chamber Symphony and a fine cast. The Plain Dealer is based in Cleveland, Ohio.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1039602694180400.xml

AIDS SURVIVOR JOINS ROCK STAR, ACTRESS AT UI (Catholic News, Dec. 10)
An Irish rock star and Hollywood actress attracted the crowd. But it was the heartbreaking tale of an African woman that moved them. Ugandan nurse Agnes Nyamayarwo's account of the impact of AIDS on her family and friends was the centerpiece of an educational forum that attracted about 1,600 people to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Memorial Union. Nyamayarwo told the crowd at a Dec. 2 event in Iowa City how she was compelled to speak out about the disease that killed her husband and youngest child, and this year will claim an estimated 6,500 African people each day. Bono, lead singer of the Irish rock group U2, and American actress Ashley Judd toured the Midwest Dec. 1-8 with the group DATA, which stands for Debt, AIDS, Trade Africa.
http://www.catholicnews.com/data/briefs/cns/20021210.htm

TEENS HURT IN FIRE TREATED AT UI (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 10)
A propane explosion started a fire that severely burned two teen-agers Saturday in eastern Iowa, firefighters said. Wyatt Krug and Luke Youngblut, both 14 and of Dysart, were cleaning a rental house when the fire broke out, said Al Bredehoeft, Dysart assistant fire chief. The fire started when a propane leak somehow ignited, Bredehoeft said. The teens were taken to a hospital in Waterloo and later were transferred to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS in Iowa City.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=589124

UI SELLS MANY BOWL PACKAGES (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 10)
When Nebraska made it to the Rose Bowl last year, the phone lines at the UNL alumni association lit up like the eyes of a Husker running back with a giant crease. One year later, the place is quiet, and Marti Paquette has until 5 o'clock today to decide whether to cancel a charter for the Independence Bowl. "Obviously, I'm very disappointed," said Paquette, the association's travel coordinator. "I just thought through thick and thin, the fans would be there." Talk about thick and thin. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on Monday, they were flooded with 20,000 ticket requests for the Orange Bowl. Back at Nebraska, 510 tickets were sold Monday, the first day after the announcement the Huskers were going to a lower-tier bowl in Shreveport, La., to play Mississippi on Dec. 27.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=589310

GURNETT RESEARCH IS MUSIC TO EARS (Canadian Broadcast Corp., Dec. 10)
The music was indeed heavenly as NASA's first venture into the world of musical composition was unveiled during a concert at the University of Iowa. Dr. DON GURNETT, a physicist at the University of Iowa, has been collecting plasma waves recorded in space by the Voyager probe. He converted more than 40 years' worth of waves into sounds, much as a receiver turns radio waves into sound. Two years ago, NASA and the University's Hancher Auditorium co-contracted composer Terry Riley to create music inspired by the sounds. An hour-long piece called "Sun Rings" is the end result. It was debuted over the weekend by the Kronos Quartet, with the backing of a 60-member choir.
http://www.cbc.ca/artsCanada/stories/nasa101202

NELSON TRIAL UNDERWAY (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 10)
A police officer testified that Phyllis Nelson wanted only to hurt her husband the morning he died from a single stab wound to the chest during an argument about his extramarital affair. "She only meant to hurt and not to kill him," Officer Corey Peiffer said Monday during the first day of Phyllis Nelson's trial in Linn County District Court. Peiffer said Nelson repeatedly said that she never intended to kill her husband as he and Nelson sat in a squad car outside Dr. Richard Nelson's Cedar Rapids apartment. Phyllis Nelson, 55, is accused of first-degree murder for allegedly stabbing her husband of 33 years in the chest with a paring knife on Dec. 12, 2001. In opening statements, defense attorney William Kutmus described the stabbing as an accident, saying Phyllis Nelson initially grabbed the knife in self-defense. Kutmus said Richard Nelson, the former executive dean of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, and his wife were in the process of dissolving their marriage.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=589126

PARKINSON'S DISEASE DISCUSSED (WebMD.com, Dec. 9)
A growing body of scientific research is confirming what common sense implies -- Parkinson's patients can be dangerous behind the wheel. Yet aside from a doctor's suggestion, there is nothing to prevent most licensed patients with this degenerative disease to drive. Ellie Martin, a spokeswoman for the federal National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, says her agency has "no opinion" on whether Parkinsonians should have driving restrictions. "Any and all laws pertaining to who can drive and who can't are decided by the individual state," she tells WebMD. "However, we have new advanced driving simulators, under the management of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, that test drivers with various medical conditions to determine how these illnesses and medications impact their ability to drive. One of the potential uses is for those with Parkinson's disease. But as far as I know, no studies are scheduled." The university confirmed no Parkinson's studies are under way or planned. http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1833.51534?z=1728_00000_1000_ln_02

STUDENT WANTS GINKGO TREE REMOVED (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 9)
Every autumn, a female ginkgo tree drops its ripe, smelly seeds onto the sidewalk, almost at the University of Iowa president's doorstep. A ginkgo tree and four other ginkgoes are at the center of a dispute pitting a student senator from the Chicago suburbs who wants to chop down the trees against environmentalists who rushed to hug the ginkgoes -- if not eat their berries. Bryan Stacy, a senior from Bloomingdale, Ill., spearheaded the anti-ginkgo drive last month. Stacy said he wanted to show his fellow collegians the effect that student government could have on their lives. DIANA HORTON, an associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Iowa, said people should be more tolerant and appreciative. "It's disturbing to see such ignorance on a university campus," she said. "We should be preserving [the female ginkgoes] as a symbol of the enlightenment that should be the essence of the university." Defenders of the ginkgo also noted that smell is in the nose of the beholder. Horton conceded the seeds have a "carrion-like" odor, but she said she had seen Asians collecting them on campus. In the end, the student government and a campus planning committee rejected Stacy's proposal.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0212090206dec09.story

POMERANTZ: PRESIDENT SALARY TOO LOW (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 9)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president's salary is "severely limiting the pool of people that will apply for the job," the former president of the Board of Regents said. The salary of $281,875 puts Iowa next to last among public schools in the Big Ten Conference, according to the Chronicle of Higher Education Almanac. Iowa State University's president makes the same amount. The U of I is looking for a leader after Mary Sue Coleman left in August to become president of the University of Michigan. The Board of Regents is expected to name a president late this month or early in January. But without a pay increase, Iowa's presidential search isn't likely to attract sitting university presidents - the most experienced candidates, said Marvin Pomerantz, a Des Moines businessman and co-chairman of the university's fund-raising campaign. "No one leading a major research institute with a higher salary is going to take a pay cut to come to Iowa," he said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=588458

AUTHOR ATTENDED UI WRITERS WORKSHOP (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 9)
After writing two novels set in the Old West at the start of his career, Ron Hansen has not stepped into the same river twice. His 1999 work, "Hitler's Niece," was about the relationship between Adolf Hitler and Geli Raubal, his half sister's daughter. Now the Omaha-born writer has returned home fictionally by writing a light-on-its-feet comedy, "Isn't It Romantic?" It is set in Seldom, Neb., population 395. The novel, due out in January from HarperCollins, is a mix of Shakespearean comedy and French farce. In 1995 Hansen received a master's degree in spirituality at Santa Clara. He also has a master of fine arts degree from the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There he studied under novelist John Irving, among others.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=584960

READER QUESTIONS BOYD COMMENTS (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 9)
In a letter to the editor, writer John Dietzen of Valparaiso, Ind., says that "the Tribune printed a story on Pierre Pierce, a University of Iowa basketball player accused of felony sexual assault ("Favoritism charges linger in Iowa star's assault case," Page 1, Nov. 29). The comments by the university's interim president, WILLARD BOYD, are somewhat incredible. His quote was: 'There is concern in the community that the athletes are treated separately. I don't know if that's so or not, but I want that concern put to rest.' Yes, they are treated separately. The only standard a star athlete is held to is his or her scoring average, yards per carry or passing efficiency."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/letters/chi-0212090098dec09.story?null

SCHOEN GIVES PAPER STERILIZATION RECORDS (Charlotte Observer, Dec. 9)
North Carolina had one of the nation's most aggressive and longest running eugenics programs, sterilizing 7,600 people, the third most of any state, according to a newspaper report. Until recently, few details were known about how the Eugenics Board of North Carolina operated or the nature of cases it handled. The Winston-Salem Journal obtained and examined thousands of these documents. JOHANNA SCHOEN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa, gave the Journal access to a set of 7,000 records that she copied more than 10 years ago. Since that time, the N.C. State Archives have declined other requests, and the records are officially closed to the public. "I think the problem is that there are cases where sterilization was the solution - but sterilization authorized by the Eugenics Board is never the solution," Schoen said. "The very premise that the state had the right to do this was flawed."
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/4697841.htm
Versions of the story also ran Dec. 9 on the website of the PRESS-ENTERPRISE in California and in the RALEIGH NEWS & OBSERVER in North Carolina.
http://newsobserver.com/nc24hour/ncnews/story/2009809p-1945158c.html
The SARASOTA, Fla., HERALD-TRIBUNE.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021209&Category=APN&ArtNo=212090522&Ref=AR
The DURHAM HERALD-SUN in North Carolina.
http://www.heraldsun.com/state/6-296949.html

WHITMORE INTERVIEWS AT FSU (Tallahassee Democrat, Dec. 8)
Florida State University is poised to break into the ranks of the nation's most prestigious research universities, said presidential candidate JON WHITMORE. He's interested in leading the school there as its president. "If that weren't its ambition, I'd be less interested," said Whitmore, provost at the University of Iowa. Whitmore's resume includes administrative work at two AAU schools besides Iowa. He led the College of Fine Arts at the University of Texas at Austin during the 1990s and served as a dean at the State University of New York at Buffalo in the 1980s when the school joined the AAU. During Whitmore's watch as Iowa provost, honors programs have been expanded and improved, and freshman retention programs have been implemented. Iowa has an annual budget of about $1.6 billion and strong health sciences programs, including a medical school. Whitmore also has experience with fund raising. He was the president's lead planner for the $850 million capital campaign announced by Iowa in June.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/4691425.htm

FORMER UI EMPLOYEE VIES FOR FSU JOB (Tallahassee Democrat, Dec. 8)
In the past quarter-century, Edward Jennings has served as president of two major American universities, one of them twice, and earned the admiration of faculty and students as a professor of finance. Now he's looking for more. Jennings, 65, is one of five top candidates to succeed Sandy D'Alemberte as president of Florida State University. He is coming from a recent stint as interim president at Ohio State University. Jennings, a Minnesota native, got his Ph.D. in finance from the University of Michigan and held various faculty and administrative positions at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/4691418.htm

FORMER UI FACULTY MEMBER FSU CANDIDATE (Tallahassee Democrat, Dec. 8)
Bob Smith has spent the past 34 years performing a wide range of roles on college campuses across the country. From an assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences in Iowa to his current job, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Arkansas, Smith has pursued an increasing level of academic service. So when he saw an opening for the presidency at Florida State University, he couldn't resist. Smith, 60, joins four other top contenders to succeed FSU President Sandy D'Alemberte. The native Long Islander got his degree in pharmaceutical chemistry, teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Texas.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/4691419.htm

'SANTA CLAUS' OPERA PREMIERED AT IOWA (Plain Dealer, Dec. 8)
More than four decades ago, Edwin London, founder and music director of the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, wrote a one-act opera titled "Santa Claus." London's work is no ode to the jolly old fellow who stays up late on Christmas Eve, whatever the Weather Channel predicts. The opera explores the struggle between good and evil, even employing the character of Death to pose heavy questions to an unusually dispirited Santa. For the libretto, London turned to the great American poet e.e. cummings, who termed his "Santa Claus" a morality play. For the first time since its premiere at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1960, London's opera will be revived, in performances Dec. 9 and 11 at Cleveland State University's Drinko Recital Hall. Featured will be the Cleveland Chamber Symphony, conductor Steven Smith and a cast including tenor John Duykers, baritone Philip Larson and sopranos Marilyn Coles and Eileen Moore.
http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/entertainment/1039257149290230.xml

UI PRESS BOOK NOTED (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 8)
"A Bountiful Harvest: The Midwestern Farm Photographs of Pete Wettach, 1925-1965" by Leslie A. Loveless and published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is briefly reviewed. Wettach's photos captured the poignancy of farm life around Iowa during the Depression and postwar years. A supervisor with the Farm Security Administration, Wettach took tens of thousands of pictures on the side, and the ones collected here provide an intimate glimpse into the anguish and the charm of the rural Midwest.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/booksmags/chi-0212080003dec08.story

ROSE BOWL TOURISM NOTED (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 7)
In this article that appeared before the announcement about the Hawkeyes playing in the Orange Bowl, it was noted that Rose Bowl is a big tourism draw. Big Ten schools are highly valued by tournament officials who love the tens of thousands of fans who fill the Rose Bowl and by people in the tourism industry, which counts on the spending of Midwesterners who escape winter for a week of visiting Southern California tourist attractions. Much of the state of Iowa also is disappointed at the turn of events. CHRIS BAVOLACK, vice president of the University of Iowa's alumni association, said the Rose Bowl was more appealing than the Orange Bowl to Iowa fans. The alumni association has sold nearly all of its 3,000 available Rose Bowl packages, including nearly 1,000 deluxe deals for $2,199. "The Rose Bowl is a Big Ten tradition, it's where the Big Ten fans want to be," he said. "Right now we're in the process of contacting our Rose Bowl tour participants so they can tell us if they're interested in going to a game other than the Rose Bowl."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-rose7dec07.story

MAN CLAIMS REWARD IN RAPE CASE (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 7)
A former Pasadena, Calif., college student who thwarted a convicted campus rapist's attack and provided police with information that led to an arrest is claiming a $50,000 reward established by an Iowa victim's family. Jim Park, 52, now a Seventh-day Adventist minister in El Monte, Calif., reported convicted rapist Vinson Champ's license plate number to campus police after he came to the aid of a screaming woman at Pasadena City College in May 1997. Champ, 41, formerly of Los Angeles, has been convicted of attacks in Iowa and Nebraska. He was sentenced to life in prison last month in Johnson County District Court for the 1996 kidnapping and sexual assault of a University of Iowa student. The reward fund was set up by the Chicago family of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student who was raped by Champ in 1996 in Iowa City, said Jerry Brandt, a Chicago private detective who managed the reward.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=586925

WHITMORE EYES FSU POST (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 7)
University of Iowa Provost JON WHITMORE is a candidate for the presidency of a major university for the fourth time in the past two years. Whitmore is one of five candidates for president of Florida State University, according to the St. Petersburg Times. In the last two years, Whitmore, 57, has been a presidential finalist at the University of Kentucky, the University of New Hampshire and Texas A&M University.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=586572

JAZZ SINGER ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Dec. 6)
A feature on jazz singer/pianist Patricia Barber, whose first collection of original material is titled "Verse," says her father, a Chicago jazz saxophonist, taught her how to play piano at 5. He died when she was 9, and the family moved to Iowa. She got serious about music in high school and, while earning a degree in psychology at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, decided to become a jazz musician, to her mother's consternation.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/3470076.html

GURNETT CAPTURES SOUNDS OF SPACE (The Guardian, Dec. 6)
The music of the spheres turns out to be a mixture of whistles, chirrups, howls, static and something that sounds like chattering voices. Oh, and a string quartet and a choir. The string quartet and the choir were not DON GURNETT's idea. The mind of an astrophysicist tends to favour the hard evidence. But it was Gurnett who built the devices that captured the whistles and chirrups as Nasa's Voyager probes hurtled past Saturn, Uranus and Neptune on their 25-year journey into deep space, and he was there to share a standing ovation when they formed part of Sun Rings, an hour-long piece written by Terry Riley for the Kronos Quartet and a 60-voice choir, given its world premiere at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HANCHER AUDITORIUM recently. Gurnett has spent the past 40 of his 60 years in his university laboratory in Iowa City, designing equipment to retrieve signals from space. The Guardian is based in the U.K.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/fridayreview/story/0,12102,854231,00.html

SCRAPBOOK AUTHOR ATTENDED UI (Arizona Republic, Dec. 6)
In a column written by John Sayler of Santa Fe, N.M., Sayler writes: "I once gripped Aurelia's scrapbooks in one hand while with the other struggled with a trash bag. Now those scrapbooks are a special exhibit at Nohwike Bagowa, the White Mountain Apache Cultural Museum in Fort Apache, and will remain a central attraction through next year. These treasures of children's art were buried in Aurelia Tossini's patio bin in Santa Fe for 60 years, then remained for several more years on a closet shelf in Lyons, Kan. Now they have returned to Arizona, where Aurelia launched her teaching career at the White Mountain Apache Reservation, following graduation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1930."
http://www.arizonarepublic.com/opinions/articles/1206sayler06.html

TERM PAPERS STOLEN FROM UI OFFICE (USA Today, Dec. 6)
Someone stole about 90 term papers from a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA office. Andrew Bargen, a teaching assistant for an associate professor of political science, said the papers were taken from his office sometime after Nov. 21, the day they were due. He has re-assigned the papers. Campus police are investigating.

SUN RINGS PREMIERS IN UK (The Guardian, Dec. 6)
Sun Rings, the performance by the Kronos Quartet using sounds from space with tools developed by University of Iowa physicist DON GURNETT, will premiere in the United Kingdom in London on March 22.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/arts/fridayreview/story/0,12102,854231,00.html

LIKE UI, UW FACES TUITION HIKE (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Dec. 6)
With the prospect of state budget cuts dead ahead, University of Wisconsin officials Thursday raised the specter of tuition increases, stricter enrollment limits and stripped-down programs. Leaders of several UW institutions told the Board of Regents that $44 million in cuts this year have their campuses strapped for cash and warned that further reductions would cut the quality of higher education. Wisconsin would be the seventh of the eight public universities in the Big 10 to hike tuition and fees as a result of state budget problems, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/state/dec02/101251.asp

FOUNDATION LEADER GOT $55,000 RAISE (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 6)
The University of Iowa Foundation gave its president a $55,000 raise last fiscal year, according to the foundation's tax filing with the Internal Revenue Service. The raise in the fiscal year ended last June 30 left Foundation President MICHAEL NEW earning $225,000, the 32-page tax document said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=584186

90 TERM PAPERS STOLEN AT UI (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 6)
Someone stole about 90 term papers from a teaching assistant's office at the University of Iowa. The papers were taken from Andrew Bargen's office in Schaeffer Hall sometime after Nov. 21, the day the papers were due, Bargen said. "Professors here for 30 years haven't seen anything like this," said Bargen, a teaching assistant for CARY COVINGTON, associate professor of political science. Bargen reassigned the papers and gave students 10 days to rewrite them.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=585446

BARKAN WRITES ON KENYA (Boston Globe, Dec. 5)
JOEL BARKAN, a UI professor of political science, writes an op-ed about Kenya's President Daniel arap Moi's visit to Washington today to meet with President Bush. Moi will leave office Jan. 3 after ruling Kenya for 24 years. "Moi's visit presents the Bush administration with an opportunity to advance democratic and economic reform in Africa," Barkan writes. "Bush can press the case for fair elections and a smooth handover of power. They might also dangle the prospect of a presidential visit to Nairobi when Bush visits Africa in mid-January. By going out as a "statesman," the aging president may be fondly remembered despite the misery Kenyans have suffered during his rule."
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/339/oped/Kenya_s_new_opportunity+.shtml

WHITMORE A FINALIST AT FSU (St. Petersburg Times, Dec. 5)
UI Provost JON WHITMORE is one of five finalists for president at Florida State University. The article says Whitmore and one of the other candidates are being considered for presidential posts at universities outside the state but FSU will complete its search first. Officials declined to name the schools.
http://www.sptimes.com/2002/12/05/State/Search_for_FSU_chief_.shtml
Similar stories appeared Dec. 5 on the following Web sites:
TALLAHASSEE DEMOCRAT
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/local/4668423.htm
ORLANDO SENTINEL
http://www.naplesnews.com/02/12/florida/d865849a.htm
SOUTH FLORIDA SUN-SENTINEL
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/local/florida/sfl-ffsu05dec05,0,2535393.story?coll=sfla-news-florida
NAPLES (FLA.) DAILY NEWS
http://www.naplesnews.com/02/12/florida/d865849a.htm
LAKELAND (FLA.) LEDGER
http://www.theledger.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=LL&Date=20021205&Category=NEWS&ArtNo=212050340&Ref=AR&Profile=1004
WJXT-TV

http://www.news4jax.com/sh/news/florida/stories/news-florida-182104220021205-071222.html
WPLG-TV
http://www.click10.com/sh/news/florida/stories/news-florida-182104220021205-071222.html
STAMFORD ADVOCATE
http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/news/local/state/hc-04185354.apds.m0962.bc-ct--flordec04,0,3107689.story?coll=hc-headlines-local-wire
AKRON BEACON JOURNAL
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/local/4665806.htm
MIAMI HERALD
http://www.miami.com/mld/miami/news/local/4665806.htm
SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021204&Category=APN&ArtNo=212041020&Ref=AR
FLORIDA TIMES-UNION
http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/120502/met_11144545.shtml
GAINESVILLE SUN
http://www.gainesvillesun.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Site=GS&Date=20021205&Category=NEWS01&ArtNo=212050350&Ref=AR

UI FARM STUDY CITED (Dayton Daily News, Dec. 5)
From Oklahoma's red clay riverbanks to North Carolina's piedmont to Pennsylvania's Amish country, Americans are weighing the benefits of modern livestock farming against the costs to the environment and rural way of life. Megafarms are in 46 states, providing jobs to rural impoverished communities and an efficient source of cheap food to the supermarkets and fast-food restaurants that keep America fed. But the farms also are forcing states -- and, in a growing number of cases, small communities -- to overhaul megafarm regulations to better protect the air, water and fast-disappearing rural tradition of generations of farm families living off the land. Such efforts have been controversial in places. In February, Iowa State University and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA faculty drafted a report recommending that standards be developed on odor, hydrogen sulfide and ammonia emissions from Iowa's large livestock farms.
http://www.activedayton.com/ddn/project/farm/1205states.html

FORMER WORKSHOP DIRECTOR PENS BIOGRAPHY (New York Times, Dec. 5)
William Saroyan could write a play in a day and a short story in two hours. Months before his death in 1981, at 73, he claimed to have 50 published books, 50 unpublished manuscripts and 50 years' worth of journal entries to his credit. So it is astounding to find no first-hand evidence of the Saroyan voice in John Leggett's paraphrase-filled new biography, "A Daring Young Man." This is not to say that Mr. Leggett, longtime director of the WRITERS' WORKSHOP AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a former book editor, has not done his homework. Though his notes are sketchy and his bibliography mystifyingly brief (listing only three books not written by members of the Saroyan family), he has obvious feeling for his subject. He grasps the larger, self-destructive misanthropy in Saroyan's life, as well as much of the minutiae (at the level of family quarrels, real estate transactions and gambling debts). But his book is hurt from the outset by an apparent lack of permission to use Mr. Saroyan's own words, and a lack of candor about that shortcoming.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/12/05/books/05MASL.html

CISNEROS ATTENDED UI WORKSHOP (GoMemphis.com, Dec. 5)
An article about author Sandra Cisneros notes that she graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP in 1978.
http://www.gomemphis.com/mca/books/article/0,1426,MCA_484_1587779,00.html

MENCZER PRAISES 'MOTIFS' STUDY (Technology Research News, Dec. 4)
There are many types of networks in the world -- computer webs like the Internet, connections among components in electronics, relationships among friends and acquaintances, transportation grids, food relationships among animals, connections among neurons, and interactions among genes. Scientists from the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel and Spring Harbor Laboratory have shown that it is possible to categorize networks by looking at certain recurring circuits, or motifs, within the networks. The researchers work is interesting because "it tries to make connections between the different types of complex networks beyond the power-law results that we have seen thus far," said FILIPPO MENCZER, an assistant professor of management services at the University of Iowa. "It goes beyond global link analysis such as the studies which unveiled the scale-free/power degree distribution of many complex networks including the Web, and starts focusing on more local structures," he said.
http://www.trnmag.com/Stories/2002/112702/Motifs_distinguish_networks_112702.html

BONO BUS TOUR STOPS AT UI (Chicago Sun-times, Dec. 3)
An article on rock star-cum-humanitarian Bono and his bus tour through the Midwest raising awareness about AIDS and debt in Africa noted the program at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which included a children's choir from Ghana signing the U2 hit, "Still Haven't Found What I'm Looking For."

BONO SPEAKS AT UI (Sarasota Herald Tribune, Dec. 3)
Irish rock star Bono said he came to the fertile farm state of Iowa to grow a new product -- public momentum to help thwart the spread of AIDS in Africa. "This is the best soil in the world. We're told you can grow anything here," the lead singer of the band U2 told more than 2,000 students on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus Monday. "We've come here to grow a movement." The stop in Iowa City was the second in a seven-day, seven-city tour of the Midwest for an organization called Debt, Aid, Trade for Africa. Bono encouraged the audience to get involved in the fight to halt the devastating effects AIDS is having in Africa, a continent that claims 75 percent of the world's 42 million AIDS cases. The Herald Tribune is based in Sarasota, Fla.
http://www.heraldtribune.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?Date=20021202&Category=APE&ArtNo=212021076&Ref=AR

UI PAIN RESEARCH NOTED (BBC, Dec. 3)
People suffering chronic pain from bad backs may not get relief from conventional painkillers, but new drugs are being developed to help them. Normal analgesics stop the brain from receiving pain signals, but have little or no effect on many types of long-lasting pain. The latest research centers on a compound called A-317491. This appears to block chemical receptors on nerves which are believed to play a vital role in the way the brain perceives pain. If these receptors are blocked, then the intensity of pain experienced should be less. Not only this, but this kind of receptor is generally found only on this kind of sensory nerve cell. This means that higher doses can be given, with greater effect, but without the drug interfering with some other important cell function by blocking receptors on other types of cell. All this adds up to fewer side effects for the patient, even at higher doses. The researchers, based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, tested their compound on rats. They found, that when injected, it reduced certain types of chronic pain linked to inflammation and nerve damage. This is similar to the long-lasting, debilitating pain suffered by people with serious back problems.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/2536687.stm

SHEFFIELD REACTS TO SAVING DNA (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 3)
A drop of a dead person's blood could help future generations live longer, a West Des Moines businessman says. The blood, drawn by a funeral director, can be saved and analyzed later for genetic flaws that could cause disease in the person's descendants, Steven Whitehead said. Whitehead is president of DNA Connections, which has marketed the idea nationally for about a year. About 70 funeral homes have signed up to offer the tests, which cost $295 apiece. The samples are sent to a Missouri lab, where they are evaluated and stored. DR. VAL SHEFFIELD, a professor at the University of Iowa, blanched at the image of a funeral director suggesting genetic testing right after a family loses a loved one. "To me," he said, "that seems like a terrible time." Sheffield specializes in genetic diseases, and he often encourages people to be tested if there is reason to think illnesses run in their families. He is skeptical that DNA from dead people would be needed to help determine genetic risks in their descendants. That type of information usually can be gleaned from tests on living family members, he said. http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=581833

BLACK COMMENTS ON COMPULSIVE SHOPPING (Tallahassee Democrat, Dec. 3)
What distinguishes a conscious spender from a compulsive shopper? The answer lies in the degree to which the shopping affects his or her life, said DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa's Carver College of Medicine and a leading expert in compulsive shopping and shoplifting. "If it's affecting your social life, your relationships, your marriage and your financial health, you had better take a look at it," said Black. Compulsive shoppers routinely hide credit card bills from family members, take out secret loans and stash merchandise to hide their habit. In fact, much of the merchandise compulsive shoppers cart home sits unused and even unopened, hidden in closets and under beds. They often don't even bother to take off the price tags, said Black. Black treated one woman who would routinely see a blouse or slacks she liked on her daily shopping trips and end up buying one in every color. The Democrat is based in Tallahassee, Fla.
http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/living/people/family/4650489.htm

COVINGTON COMMENTS ON PRESIDENTIAL BIDS (Hartford Courant, Dec. 3)
Announcing one is officially a candidate for president, rather than hinting strongly as John Kerry has done, has drawbacks. One is that a candidate clearly running is subject to scrutiny from reporters all over the country; prior to that, they generally go under the microscopes of only hometown media and a few national outlets. But once they're in, every newspaper and television station covering the race feels some obligation to dig into the record. "Getting in suddenly paints a target on your back," said CARY COVINGTON, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa. That's felled candidates before. In 1995, California Gov. Pete Wilson lasted only 32 days after his announcement as the media documented how hard a time he had raising money, controlling a warring staff and shedding a stiff personal approach.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/nationworld/hc-announce1203.artdec03,0,7142544.story?coll=hc-headlines-nationworld

BONO, JUDD SPEAK ON AIDS AT UI (Daily Peloton, Dec. 3)
U2's front man Bono and actress Ashley Judd told students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on World AIDS Day that if people don't take urgent action to combat the crisis, we will "be remembered for when an entire continent bursts into flames while we sat around with watering cans." The Daily Peloton is an online magazine about bicycling.
http://www.dailypeloton.com/displayarticle.asp?pk=2461

BONO SPEAKS AT UI (Yahoo! News, Dec. 2)
Irish rock star Bono said he came to the fertile farm state of Iowa to grow a new product -- public momentum to help thwart the spread of AIDS in Africa. "This is the best soil in the world. We're told you can grow anything here," the lead singer of the band U2 told more than 2,000 students on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus Monday. "We've come here to grow a movement." The stop in Iowa City was the second in a seven-day, seven-city tour of the Midwest for an organization called Debt, Aid, Trade for Africa. Bono encouraged the audience to get involved in the fight to halt the devastating effects AIDS is having in Africa, a continent that claims 75 percent of the world's 42 million AIDS cases.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20021203/ap_en_mu/bono_aids_tour_1

TITZE TO TAKE PART IN VOCAL-CORD STUDY (Washington Post, Dec. 2)
INGO R. TITZE
, the director of the National Center for Voice and Speech at the University of Iowa, gained attention in the mid-1990s for appearing onstage and singing a duet with "Pavarobotti" -- a computer he had programmed to accompany him in an operatic aria. Today, Titze is investigating a less highbrow challenge, but one that will have a greater impact on Americans who use their voice on the job. With funding from the National Institutes of Health, Titze and his fellow investigators will soon be hooking up vocal-cord monitors to almost 100 volunteer teachers in Denver. The hope is to gain a better understanding of the basic mechanics of speaking, so that people who talk for a living can better avoid raspiness and pain.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61492-2002Dec1.html

DYKEN: 'CAT NAP' MAY REFRESH SLEEPYHEADS (Cincinnati Enquirer, Dec. 2)
If you're yawning nonstop during that mid-afternoon slump while trying to concentrate on your work, you're not alone. The go-go mentality that has created a 24-7 world where the average workday is no longer confined to 8 hours has also created a nation of zombies. The average person gets less than the recommended 8 to 9 hours of shut-eye each night, sometimes much less, experts say. Napping, once thought to be a luxury of the wealthy or slothful, is catching on in the corporate world. "A lot of workers do a lot better with a 15-minute nap," said MARK DYKEN, a neurologist and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at the University of Iowa. Catnaps of 15 to 30 minutes can do a lot to refresh someone who is ready to nod off, Dyken said. While it won't replace a night's rest, a brief snooze can help people focus better on their work, he said.
http://enquirer.com/editions/2002/12/02/biz_naps02.html

UI TESTING INTERNET CHEATING DETECTION TOOL (WTVD-TV, Dec. 2)
Education experts say that as more youngsters who grew up on the Internet head into high school and college classes, plagiarism is on the rise. A study by Duke University's Center for Academic Integrity shows the number of college students who said they took material from the Internet without attributing sources jumped to 41 percent in 2001-to-2002. That's up from 10 percent in 1999-to-2000. To combat plagiarism, eight faculty members at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are conducting a pilot test of an Internet-based detection tool. The University of Iowa also is planning to hold a forum on plagiarism in January. The speaker will be Chris Anson, a North Carolina State University professor who heads a plagiarism task force for a national association of college writing programs. WTVD-TV covers Raleigh, Durham and Fayetteville, N.C.
http://abclocal.go.com/wtvd/news/120202_NW_plagarism.html
A version of the story also ran Dec. 2 on the website of WQAD-TV in Moline, Ill.
http://www.wqad.com/Global/story.asp?S=1033025

BONO TO SPEAK AT UI (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 2)
Bono, singer for the rock band U2, will discuss the growing AIDS crisis in Africa at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City today. His visit is part of a nationwide tour to promote awareness of the AIDS epidemic in Africa and developing countries. Bono made a similar appearance Sunday at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Earlier this year, Bono toured Africa with U.S. Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill to raise awareness of the problems faced by the world's poorest continent.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=580967

DIAZ-DUQUE TESTS PLAGIARISM DETECTION TOOL (News & Observer, Dec. 2)
Teacher OZZIE DIAZ-DUQUE is serious about plagiarism. Diaz-Duque, a University of Iowa lecturer in Spanish and Portuguese, used to do Internet searches on his students papers if he questioned the authenticity of their work. Now, he's one of eight faculty members conducting a pilot test of turnitin.com, an Internet-based tool used to detect plagiarism. "Within an hour or so, I can access a report that uses a color code in rating each paper," he said. "If it's red, there's a problem, and the paper will come back to me with the suspect content printed in red, along with the Web site address for where that same content was found elsewhere." Chris Anson, a North Carolina State University professor who heads a plagiarism task force for a national association of college writing programs, will speak at a plagiarism conference the University of Iowa is planning to hold in January. The News & Observer is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://newsobserver.com/nc24hour/ncnews/story/1986367p-1932807c.html
A version of the story also ran Dec. 2 on the website of the CHARLOTTE, N.C., OBSERVER.
http://www.charlotte.com/mld/observer/news/local/4643940.htm
A version of the story also ran Dec. 2 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=580968

UI BUSINESS GRADUATE FACES FRAUD CHARGES (Plain Dealer, Dec. 1)
A story about businessman Lance Poulsen, owner of the $3.5 billion medical financing firm National Century, says the company is now in bankruptcy, Poulsen has resigned and cannot be found, and FBI agents have seized records and computer hard drives and servers from the company's opulent, 62,000-square-foot compound on the grounds of the Muirfield Village Golf Club in Dublin. Financial institutions that underwrote billions of dollars in National Century bonds and the bond trustees are accusing the company of perpetrating a "massive fraud" that already has bankrupted hospitals and health-care organizations from California to Massachusetts. Born in Chicago in 1943, Poulsen received a bachelor's degree from Roosevelt University, a private college in Chicago, and graduated in 1968 with a master's degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Plain Dealer is based in Cleveland, Ohio.
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/news/1038738708264280.xml

FREYER TAKES BOOK SIGNING ON ROAD (Saratogian, Dec. 1)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
graduate John Freyer, who sold all his possessions on EBay and then went to visit the items in their new homes, wrote about the experience in his book "All My Life For Sale." According to the publisher, the book is "part autobiography, part travelogue, and part cultural commentary, (which) offers a meditation on what the objects we surround ourselves with actually mean to us, and what happens when we set them free." In addition to garnering national media interest in his project, Freyer got a call from producer David Heyman during his book signing in Los Angeles. Heyman, best known for producing the "Harry Potter" films, optioned the rights to "All My Life For Sale." The story also says Freyer recently became engaged to SASHA WATERS, a film faculty member at the University of Iowa. The Saratogian is based in New York.
http://www.saratogian.com/site/news.cfm?BRD=1169&dept_id=17776&newsid=6239632&PAG=461&rfi=9

FISH BIOLOGIST ATTENDED UI (Daily Press, Dec. 1)
Jan McDowell received a nice fillet of fish, carefully packed in dry ice, from California recently. It definitely was not destined for a spritz of lemon and a hot grill. McDowell, a molecular biologist at the Virginia Institute of Marine Science, used her sleuthing skills to help the California Department of Fish and Game determine that the fish couldn't be sold there legally. For conservation purposes, only black marlin -- not other types, such as white, blue or striped marlin -- can be imported into California. McDowell knew that the fish was a blue marlin by analyzing its DNA, its genetic fingerprint. Having a slab of fish to work with was nice, but she can analyze DNA from a sample smaller than the head of a pin. McDowell was always interested in science and genetics, and she earned a bachelor's degree in biology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1988. The Daily Press is based in Hampton Roads, Va.
http://www.dailypress.com/news/local/dp-02092sy0dec01,0,1023031.story?coll=dp-news-local-final

UI TUITION HIKE CITED IN EDITORIAL (Orange County Register, Dec. 1)
An editorial on California's budget crisis says that as in California, other states last fiscal year tried gimmicks to close budget gaps: borrowing, fund shifts and some tax increases, The New York Times notes. Fewer of those options will be available this fiscal year, although some states will try to enact large tax increases to wash away red ink. Here are other states' approaches: Iowa increased tuition and fees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "this year by 18.5 percent, the biggest increase in more than two decades, after an increase of 9.9 percent in the prior year," The New York Times said. The Register is based in California.
http://www2.ocregister.com/ocrweb/ocr/article.do?id=13882&section=COMMENTARY&year=2002&month=12&day=1

UI OMBUDSMAN IS BUSY AFTER 9/11 (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 1)
The Old Capitol fire, state funding cuts and tuition hikes are keeping the University of Iowa's Ombudsperson's office busier than ever. "No two days are alike," said MAILE SAGEN, the university's ombudsperson. "Student complaints are up, suicide attempts are up, and we're in a climate now that is a real concern." The office, organized in 1986, handled 83 complaints in its first year of operation. That total grew to nearly 400 during the last academic year, with faculty and staff filing more than half the complaints and students making 175 complaints, according to the office's records. Sagen said the rise corresponds with the 9/11 terrorist attacks and education issues, such as a double-digit tuition hike and state budget cuts that led to a hiring freeze and teacher cuts. Sagen and two colleagues investigate the concerns and worries of students, faculty and staff. With little discretion to make immediate change in campus policy, Sagen said her staff focuses on conflict resolution and management.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=580283

WEINSTOCK USES WORMS TO COUNTER IBD (Readers Digest, December 2002)
University of Iowa gastroenterologist JOEL WEINSTOCK infected patients who had irritable bowel disease with harmless worms and symptoms vanished in seven of eight patients. Someday, probiotics -- the helpful bacteria -- may take their place beside antibiotics.

RESEARCH PARK WELCOMES NCS PEARSON (Area Development, Dec. 2002)
NCS Pearson recently opened a 37,000-square-foot facility at the Corridor Technology Center in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Oakdale Campus research park. NCS Pearson, a global information services company, employs approximately 1,200 people in the Iowa City- Cedar Rapids area. The new facility will be used to help the company serve its newest contract with the U.S. Transportation Services administration, helping the government screen and qualify 30,000 airport screeners and law-enforcement officers.

IEM IS COMPARED TO OTHER FUTURES MARKETS (Futures, Dec. 2002)
In an article about commercial internet based futures exchanges, the well-known Iowa Electronic Markets run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are noted. The IEM, which provides markets for outcomes of political elections, does so in the context of educating the university's student body. A profit-seeking venture called Tradesports, which offers forward contracts on the outcome of sporting events and political events, charges four cents for each matched order.

UI GRADUATION PLAN CITED (Jewish World Review, December 2002)
At many schools, it's difficult to get all the requirements for a specific course of study out of the way in four years. Colleges and universities are offering incentives and cutting through red tape for students having trouble fulfilling graduation requirements. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a program that guarantees incoming freshmen access to required courses and attention from advisers if they sign a pledge to graduate in four years. The program started seven years ago when officials realized the four-year graduation rate was only 33 percent. Now, 48 percent of those who sign the pledge graduate on time compared to 28 percent among those who do not sign the pledge.
http://www.jewishworldreview.com/1202/grow_up.asp

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The University of Iowa All rights reserved copyright 2006