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UI in the News

August, 2002

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UI'S BARDACH REMEMBERED AS INNOVATOR (New York Times, Aug. 31)
Dr. JANUSZ BARDACH, a plastic surgeon who improved techniques for treating cleft lip and cleft palate and who wrote an acclaimed account of his life in Soviet labor camps in the early 1940's, died on Aug. 16 in Iowa City, at his home. He was 83. Dr. Bardach, a native of Ukraine who trained in Moscow after World War II, practiced plastic surgery in Poland and headed an early program in plastic surgery there. He came to the United States in 1972 and the next year became chairman of the division of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. He also held other posts, administrative and teaching, at the university's Medical College before retiring in 1991. Dr. Bardach developed what colleagues came to call the Bardach palatoplasty, a surgical procedure for patients with congenital clefts of the palate, a condition in which the palate is separated into halves. The new procedure minimized scarring, entailed one operation instead of the two that had previously been required and improved the patient's speaking ability. Janusz Bardach was born in Odessa on July 28, 1919, and moved with his family to Poland in 1920. Poland was partitioned by Germany and the Soviet Union in 1939, and the next year he was drafted into the Soviet Army. But after an accident in which a tank he was driving flipped onto its side, he was sentenced to 10 years at hard labor. He wound up in a gulag in a frigid area of the Soviet Far East and served roughly half the sentence. Dr. Bardach's gulag experiences are recounted in "Man Is Wolf to Man: Surviving the Gulag," (University of California Press, 1998) which he wrote with Kathleen Gleeson. A review in The New York Times Book Review said, "Bardach's meditations on slavery tap into the well of pain and insight that feeds songs of freedom everywhere."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/08/31/national/31BARD.html

INCOMING LAW STUDENT TO SCALE EVEREST (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 31)
Chuck Huss is going back to the top of the world. Huss, 54, an emergency room doctor at Mercy Iowa City, has tried twice before to reach the summit of Mount Everest. He was forced to descend in 1998 after coming within 1,500 feet. Two years ago, a brief illness foiled his bid. But the Iowa City mountaineer won't be the only Iowan trying to make history. This time he will be joined by three other Iowans to make up something of an all-state team of climbers. "A group of Iowans taking on Mount Everest is going to attract a lot of attention," said team leader Charlie Whittmack, a 25-year-old from Des Moines who plans to begin law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA next fall. "We want to bring Iowa to the national stage."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=489822

UI CUTS LONG-DISTANCE CHARGES (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Aug. 30)
A growing number of college students nationwide are shunning long distance plans offered through their schools in favor of flat-rate cell phone plans with unlimited nationwide calls and pre-paid phone cards. For students, it can be a bargain. But it's also become a nagging worry for colleges, which are losing hundreds of thousands of dollars in commissions. Also, going above those allotted minutes can mean big surcharges and not all plans necessarily mean a substantial savings, some students say. But the heavily advertised notion of cheap long distance calling is a powerful lure. The University of Maryland is considering cutting its long distance prices to lure users back. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has already done so. In June, it announced a 50 percent cut to 5 cents a minute, saying its long distance provider made the move in response to heightened competition.
http://www.post-gazette.com/localnews/20020830cellphones0830p4.asp

UI TO NOTIFY PARENTS OF STUDENTS' DRINKING (USA Today, Aug. 30)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA says it will notify the parents of underage students charged with possession of alcohol. The school has decided to track charges filed by local police involving students and alcohol. Parents will receive mailed notices, officials said.

UI FACED CHALLENGES IN 2002 (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 30)
Iowa's three public universities faced another year of bad budget news in 2002, as the rate of state-revenue growth plummeted to its lowest level in 50 years. With state contributions to institutions falling, universities placed more emphasis on raising private funds. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA struck pay dirt in March 2002, receiving its largest gift ever when the Roy J. Carver Charitable Trust pledged $63-million to the College of Medicine to support biomedical research. But the question of how universities used money from donors continued to raise controversies in 2002. In December 2001, a farmer sued the University of Iowa Foundation, charging that its plan to sell a tract of land violated the wishes of Donald I. Hackbarth, who died in 1997 and had bequeathed the property. Larry D. Holtkamp, who had farmed the disputed land since 1975, had leased the land from Mr. Hackbarth, whose will said that he did not want the 400-acre tract sold sooner than 10 years after his death. He wanted the proceeds of the eventual sale of the land to benefit the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. And in personnel matters, the University of Iowa lost its president to another Big Ten institution. In May 2002, the University of Michigan announced that it had chosen Mary Sue Coleman to oversee its three campuses.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/almanac/2002/states/ia.htm

COLEMAN MOVES TO MICHIGAN (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 30)
The University of Michigan system lost a president but made history in replacing him. After seeking the presidency of Harvard University the year before and then saying he would stay at Michigan, Lee C. Bollinger announced in October 2001 that he would become president of Columbia University. In May 2002, he was replaced by Mary Sue Coleman, president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who became the first female president of Michigan.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/almanac/2002/states/mi.htm

DAMASIO USES CARDS IN STUDY (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 30)
Research by a growing number of psychologists and neuroscientists is showing the importance of the unconscious -- "mental processes that are inaccessible to consciousness but that influence judgments, feelings or behavior," as he puts it. But this isn't Freud's unconscious, that maelstrom of primitive emotions and repressed memories. Instead, the unconscious being excavated by scientists processes data, sets goals, judges people, detects danger, formulates stereotypes and infers causes, all outside our conscious awareness. In one study, researchers led by the noted neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa had volunteers draw from four decks of cards. Each card was marked with an amount "won" or "lost." Two decks had big wins and losses and, if played consistently, yielded a net loss; the other two had smaller wins and losses and, over time, returned a net gain. Almost all the volunteers learned to avoid the risky, losing decks, though as in the game of X's, none could articulate why the losing decks gave them a bad feeling. But if the conscious part of their brain was confused their body was not: choosing from the losing decks increased skin conductance, which measures minute levels of sweat and correlates with stress. Volunteers with damage to the brain areas called the ventromedial prefrontal regions, however, never experienced a rise in skin conductance and never learned to avoid the bad decks.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1030644674233767915.djm,00.html
The same article also ran Aug. 30 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/08/30/financial0919EDT0060.DTL

UI WILL CONSIDER LONGER HOLIDAY BREAK (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 30)
A group of University of Iowa students wants a longer Thanksgiving holiday this year. The student government asked university administrators Wednesday for two more days of vacation. The request was in a letter to Provost JON WHITMORE. The school calendar traditionally gives students Wednesday through Friday of Thanksgiving week, which is a five-day holiday including the weekend after Thanksgiving. The students say they want to add Monday and Tuesday before Thanksgiving to equal the weeklong holiday that Iowa State University students get. "I think those days are such a waste," Student Government President NICK HERBOLD said. Whitmore said the calendar cannot be changed this year, but he said the university will look seriously at the students' request for future years.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=488697

UI TO TRACK STUDENT ALCOHOL CHARGES (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 30)
Students younger than 21 at the University of Iowa can no longer keep alcohol-related arrests from their parents. University officials will begin tracking charges involving alcohol filed by Iowa City police next week and mailing letters to parents. "We think it's important to notify parents that it is not in our power to stop young people from going to bars and consuming alcohol and getting citations for it," said PHILLIP JONES, vice president for student services. "We are essentially asking parents to take the responsibility to notify their young person."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=488442

RADIO STATIONS HOST 'FIELD TO FAMILY' (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 29)
A list of regional cooking events urges readers to drive down to Iowa City Sept. 4 through 7 for "From Field to Family: A Culinary Celebration," presented by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's public radio stations. The event will feature local chefs Deborah Madison and Lynne Rossetto Kasper as well as cooking classes, book readings, a culinary walk, farm tours and more.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/438/3176870.html

LINDER COMMENTS ON JIM BEAM CASE (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 29)
Jim Beam's policy limiting the number of bathroom breaks for production workers at a Kentucky distillery has landed the venerable bourbon maker on the hot seat. Employees complained to the Kentucky Labor Cabinet, which cited the distillery in November for violating a federal rule that employers should give workers "timely access" to facilities. Deerfield-based Jim Beam appealed the citation and defended its policy in a hearing Wednesday in Kentucky. The proceeding is expected to continue Thursday. One labor lawyer says Jim Beam's policy runs afoul of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's standard, which says employers "may not impose unreasonable restrictions on employee use of the facilities." "You have to go when you need to go, not when employers want to let you go," said MARC LINDER, a professor at the University of Iowa law school who has studied the issue.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/showcase/sns-othernews-toiletbreaks.story
The same story also ran Aug. 29 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/sns-othernews-toiletbreaks.story

GRANT SPEAKS ON TITLE IX (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 28)
Title IX is the best thing that ever happened to some athletes, and the worst thing that ever happened to others. A federal commission charged with examining the law heard from both types during its inaugural meeting here Tuesday, as well as an array of coaches, parents, and advocates of all viewpoints on the issue. Among the speakers was CHRISTINE B. GRANT, the retired women's athletics director at the University of Iowa. She pointed out the tremendous gains women have made thanks to Title IX, yet noted that men still command the vast majority of scholarships, participation opportunities, and operating expenses at most colleges. Steve Erber, athletics director at Pennsylvania's Muhlenberg College, argued that at his college, where women make up 58 percent of the student body, having a disproportionately male athletics program helps recruit male students to the campus.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/08/2002082801n.htm

LUTGENDORF QUOTED ON CANCER STUDY (Yahoo! News, Aug. 28)
People who have more support from friends and neighbors may produce less of a growth factor that can foster cancer spread, according to a study of ovarian cancer patients. While there is strong evidence that stress, social support and other behavioral factors can affect a person's immune system, there has been no research on whether such factors can affect a person's production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). VEGF helps new blood vessels to form around tumors, which allows tumors to grow and spread more easily. And higher levels of VEGF have been linked to worse survival among ovarian cancer patients. To investigate whether there might be a link between VEGF levels, social support and depression, Dr. SUSAN K. LUTGENDORF of the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues studied 24 women with ovarian cancer and 5 women with non-cancerous pelvic masses. The cancer patients had not yet had surgery for the condition.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020828/hl_nm/cancer_friends_dc_1

UI LAB CONFIRMS HUMAN WEST NILE CASE (CBSNews.com, Aug. 28)
A roundup of news about the West Nile Virus says that Iowa reported its first human case of the West Nile virus. State health officials say a blood sample from a Lee County man has tested positive for the mosquito-borne virus at the state lab at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/07/26/health/main516475.shtml

LINDER CRITICIZES BATHROOM POLICY (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 28)
Jim Beam, a unit of Fortune Brands Inc., Lincolnshire, Ill., says too many workers on its bottling line were taking too many bathroom breaks, potentially causing quality and safety problems. "Human beings have a longstanding practice of excessive breaks," says Jack Allen, human-resources director. He says company officials believe its policy, which he says gives workers bathroom access about every two hours, "is both fair and reasonable." Jim Beam will defend its policy, which was cited by Kentucky state regulators for violating a federal rule, in a hearing scheduled for Wednesday. The company says that 29 of its employees have been granted medical exemptions that allow them to go to the bathroom more frequently, but that isn't good enough, says MARC LINDER, a professor at the University of Iowa law school who has studied the issue. "People's bladders don't operate on clock time," says Linder, who believes Jim Beam's policy violates OSHA's rule. Linder suspects other employers operate similar systems.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1030483251804972515.djm,00.html

VILSACK RESPONDS TO GROSS COMMENTS (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 28)
Gov. Tom Vilsack, responding to accusations that he was to blame for two years of double-digit tuition increases at the state's public universities, said the GOP-controlled Legislature is the real culprit. Vilsack, a Democrat, made his comments one day after his Republican gubernatorial opponent, Doug Gross, said Vilsack's mishandling of state finances led to an unprecedented rise in tuition for students attending Iowa's three public campuses. Last year, the State Board of Regents approved a 19 percent increase in tuition to offset deep cuts in state funding in a budget approved by the Legislature and signed by Vilsack. "Unfortunately, over the course of the last couple of years, the Republican Legislature has inadequately funded our public university system," Vilsack said during a campaign stop Tuesday at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "So if Mr. Gross has criticisms about tuition increases, he needs to address them to colleagues in his own party."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=486535

WRITING ABOUT TRAUMA MAY HELP IN HEALING (Yahoo! News, Aug. 28)
Your own words have the power to heal you. If you've had a traumatic experience, writing your thoughts about it in a journal may help you work through that event, says a study in the August issue of the Annals of Behavioral Medicine. However, writing only about your emotions won't have the same benefits, and may actually make things worse. "Engagement of both thoughts and emotions while journaling about a stressful or traumatic experience can raise awareness of the benefits of the event," say study authors PHILIP M. ULLRICH and SUSAN K. LUTGENDORF of the University of Iowa. "In contrast, focusing solely on the emotional aspects of traumas may not produce a greater understanding of traumatic events," they say.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/hsn/20020828/hl_hsn/doing_the_write_thing

BUCKWALTER WEIGHS IN ON KNEE STUDY (Seattle Times, Aug. 28)
Knee arthroscopy is the most commonly performed orthopedic surgery in the nation. More than 650,000 knee arthroscopies are performed each year to relieve pain from osteoarthritis, a condition in which cartilage between the bones of the knee breaks down. But a recent study in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) has prompted discussions about the value of certain types of knee arthroscopy in relieving osteoarthritic pain. Since the study's publication last month, many patients with knee ailments have been asking doctors about the research and options. In an editorial published July 11 in NEJM, Dr. David Felson of Boston University and Dr. JOSEPH BUCKWALTER of the University of Iowa wrote that lavage and debridement are "probably not efficacious as treatments for most persons with osteoarthritis of the knee."But people whose knees have loose debris or flaps of cartilage that cause locking, catching and giving way of the joint may benefit from having these unstable pieces removed to improve movement of the joints, they wrote. The article was reprinted from the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=kneesurgery28&date=20020828&query=%22UNIVERSITY+OF+IOWA%22

GROSS CITES UI STUDY IN BLASTING HIKES (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 27)
Using the opening day of classes at the state's universities as a backdrop, Iowa Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Gross attacked Gov. Tom Vilsack for soaring college tuition. "This year's increases at Iowa State, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa hit a lot of students and families very, very hard," said Gross. "Tuition increases need to be more predictable and affordable." He pointed to one study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showing that the typical student is carrying $21,000 in student loans by graduation, more than at some private colleges.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=485521

UI GRADS WRITE EX-BOYFRIEND COOKBOOK (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 27)
Why would anyone put together a collection of recipes left behind by castoff lovers? It's the rare boyfriend, after all, who has the skill to whip up a romantic repast. Unless he's dating Erin Ergenbright or Thisbe Nissen. The two friends recently wrote "The Ex-Boyfriend Cookbook: They Came, They Cooked, They Left ... (But We Ended Up With Some Great Recipes)." A great concept, and it's amazing that two 30-year-old women have amassed enough exes and their recipes to fill a 175-page cookbook. The authors met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. As graduate fellows, they lived together four years ago, where one day before a party, Ergenbright said, "I should make Davis Haggerty's spicy barbecue sauce!" and the book idea was born.
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-lv-cookbook27aug27.story

TERRORISM FEARS CANCEL WRESTLING TRIP (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 27)
JOE WILLIAMS and TOM BRANDS had expected to be flying to Germany on Monday, but instead were hanging around the University of Iowa wrestling office getting ready for Thursday's staff meeting. Williams, a Mt. Carmel graduate, and Brands were scheduled to travel with the USA Wrestling national team to the 2002 World Freestyle Wrestling Championships on Sept. 5-7 in Tehran, Iran, but USA Wrestling, the sport's national governing body, pulled the team out of the competition. USA Wrestling said it had "received credible information from an official U.S. government channel" of a possible threat to the safety of the team in Iran. "I feel like I should be on a plane going somewhere," said Brands, an Iowa assistant and world and Olympic champion who would have been an assistant coach for the U.S. team. This is the second time the U.S. team has had plans disrupted by terrorism or the threat of terrorism. The Sept. 11 terrorist attacks caused a postponement of the 2001 World Championships, which had been scheduled for Madison Square Garden. The tournament was eventually moved to Bulgaria. Williams, who is also an assistant coach at Iowa, was one of the favorites for a gold medal at 163 pounds. He was third at the 2001 World Championships.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/chi-0208270039aug27.story

UI EXPERIMENT LEADS TO LAWSUIT (Washington Times, Aug. 26)
Two unwitting participants in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stuttering experiment six decades ago and the families of three other now-dead participants are seeking a combined $10.5 million in damages from the state, the Des Moines Register reports. The experiment conducted at a Davenport children's home used psychological pressure to cause a small group of normal-speaking children to begin stuttering. Some battled speech difficulties for years. In claims filed with the state, the stutterers and their survivors contend the experiment "controlled the direction" of their lives.
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20020826-17080499.htm

UI TO TAKE PART IN PARKINSON'S STUDY (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 26)
University Hospitals will participate in the study of a drug to combat Parkinson's disease and is looking for test participants. The neurology department will study the drug, which is intended to slow or stop the progression of the disease by preventing the death of brain cells, said JENNIFER BROWN, a University of Iowa spokeswoman. Patients who have been diagnosed with Parkinson's for less than five years and aren't taking any medications for it could be eligible to participate. The two-year study requires 12 clinical visits and two trips to the Institute for Neurodegenerative Disorders in New Haven, Conn.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=484689

UI SUED OVER STUTTERING EXPERIMENT (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 26)
Participants in a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA stuttering experiment six decades ago, and the families of now deceased participants, are seeking $10.5 million in damages from the state. The university experiment, conducted at a Davenport children's home, used psychological pressure to make a small group of normal-speaking children begin stuttering. In claims filed with the state, the stutterers and their survivors contend that the experiment "controlled the direction" of their lives. A graduate student conducted the experiment in 1939 in the now-closed Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home. It was designed by the late Wendell Johnson, for whom the university's speech and hearing clinic is named, and was intended to support his theory on the cause of stuttering. Johnson kept the experiment on orphaned and abandoned children quiet in the aftermath of World War II out of fear that it might be compared to Nazi experiments on human subjects. Last summer, the university issued an apology.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=484719

BEHRENDT COMMENTS ON SHORTAGE (AMA News, Aug. 26)
A new study done by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons shows that the number of physicians entering training to become heart surgeons is too low to replace the surgeons who will retire by 2010. The society analyzed data from the National Resident Matching Program, which places medical school graduates. The study found that the number of cardiothoracic surgical training positions has remained steady in the last 10 years, at roughly 140. But applicants for those positions have dropped from 197 in 1995 to 145 in 2002, with U.S. medical school graduates interested in the residencies declining from 156 to 107 during that period. Data showed that 21 of 144 positions available for cardiothoracic surgery have not been filled in residency programs that start in 2003. "It used to be we had several applicants for one position. Now it's one for one," said DOUGLAS BEHRENDT, MD, chair of cardiothoracic surgery at the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine in Iowa City.
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_02/prsb0826.htm

SOLL USES SOUND TO CUT MANURE STENCH (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 25)
Researchers say they've found a way to take some of the sting out of hog manure's stench: Bombard it with a little ultrasound. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, has applied for a patent on ultrasound technology that cuts by 50 percent the buildup of hydrogen sulfide, a key odor-producing ingredient in hog manure. Scientists, hog farmers and pork industry officials say the technology could be an inexpensive, environmentally safe approach to deal with a major complaint against factory hog farms in the nation's top pork-producing state. They say the technology also may be effective in treating waste from dairy and beef cattle and poultry operations.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=483837

GROSS TARGETS FUNDING FOR UI ABORTIONS (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 24)
Republican gubernatorial candidate Doug Gross said shortly after joining the race that he sought no change in the state's abortion laws, but he also told Christian conservatives he supports significant new restrictions. Gross aides said the apparent contradiction is a misunderstanding. Gross told conservatives he favored a measure requiring a parent to consent before a minor obtains an abortion. Even much milder notification measures have been stricken down by the courts as violating a woman's right to choose. Eric Woolson, a Gross spokesman, said Gross was referring to state laws providing funding of abortion procedures at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS when he said he wanted no change in state law.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=483275

BLUMBERG EXPLAINS SCIENCE BEHIND SPICE (Arizona Republic, Aug. 23)
Some diners like spicy foods even when it's hot outside. There might even be a scientific explanation for the cooling effect hot food can trigger, says MARK BLUMBERG, a University of Iowa biopsychologist. The chemical in hot peppers, called capsaicin, sets off receptors in your mouth and skin that recognize pain. What results is a loss of heat from the body and dilation of blood vessels in the skin, or flushing, he said. "You are increasing the flow of blood to the skin, and from there the heat is lost to the environment," Blumberg said. "You get sweating." The sweating effect works only if your body temperature is hotter than your environment's, he said. "If the air temperature is hotter than the human body temperature, there is a good chance you'd make things worse for yourself," Blumberg said. "The only way you can lose heat is if you are hotter than the environment."
http://www.azcentral.com/ent/dining/articles/0823hotfood23.html
A separate article about spicy foods notes that chemically speaking, it's capsaicin in the pepper that affects your nerve endings, turning heat into lingering sensations of pain, flushed skin, cleared sinus passages, watery eyes and even sweating. The Scoville Scale, named after its inventor, Wilbur Scoville, shows the measured amount of capsaicin in different pepper varieties. Habaneros rate highest on the scale at 300,000, while green bell peppers are at the other end, zero. Habaneros are "really hot," and you don't need Mark Blumberg, a University of Iowa biopsychologist, to tell you that. "What happens is you get this incredible flushing and your mouth feels like it's on fire," Blumberg said. He can tell you this sage advice: Drinking water or alcohol won't stop the pain, but drinking milk may help.
http://www.azcentral.com/ent/dining/articles/0823wvhotfoods0823.html

NEW: COLEMAN TO KEEP NEW CAR (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 23)
Former University of Iowa President Mary Sue Coleman took her new 2002 Buick LeSabre with her when she went to Michigan. University of Michigan officials bought the car from the University of Iowa Foundation for $26,000. "It was a good solution, under the circumstances," said MICHAEL NEW, foundation president. "I think Mary Sue liked that car, and she had gotten used to it, and I think she probably encouraged it a bit." Coleman left in July to become the new president at the University of Michigan. New said he did now know how the car would have been used if Michigan had not purchased it. The foundation has a long-standing tradition of purchasing cars for university presidents, paying for them either with unrestricted gifts or endowments, New said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=482118

NAGLE PLEASED WITH OLD CAP LOW BID (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 23)
The first phase of the Old Capitol renovation project will cost $1.2 million less than estimated if the low bid is accepted. "I'm very pleased," said GARY NAGLE, a University of Iowa project manager. "We're always pleased when they're under budget." Tricon Construction Group of Dubuque, Iowa, submitted the lowest bid of $1.47 million. University officials had estimated the project's cost at $2.7 million.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=482279

GILCHRIST: NEW HYGIENIC LAB NEEDED (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 23)
A new Iowa Hygienic Laboratory could cost $26 million if officials choose a plan that adds labs to test suspected biological or chemical agents. The hygienic laboratory is located at the University of Iowa in Oakdale Hall, built in 1917 as a state hospital to isolate tuberculosis patients. The lab's scientists provide air and water quality testing, track diseases, investigate food-borne illness and, in recent months, have performed tests on suspicious substances found in mail. The lab's workload has increased significantly since last fall's anthrax scare increased the attention on bioterrorism. The lab also has seen increased testing demands since West Nile virus began spreading across the state. Earlier this spring, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provided about $1 million to help the laboratory work more closely with other laboratories. About $300,000 of that money was set aside to study the future needs and develop estimated costs of a new lab. "You don't go anywhere seeking money for a building until you have an idea of how much it's going to cost," said MARY GILCHRIST, laboratory director. "That's where we are right now. We have a range of cost estimates." She said the current 85-year-old building, which has about 67,993 square feet, is outdated and not set up for efficient laboratory use.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=482278

DAMICO: BEQUEST TO AID EDUCATION (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 23)
An administrator who spent his career at the University of Iowa has left $1.1 million to the university's College of Education. The bequest from William L. Lillibridge established the Marjorie A. Lillibridge Memorial Fund, named in honor of his late sister. William Lillibridge died in 2001. The money will be used by the college to support student aid, foster collaboration with Iowa's working teachers, keep education students up to date with technology and maintain relationships with alumni and emeritus faculty, said SANDRA BOWMAN DAMICO, the college's dean. Lillibridge was assistant dean in the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine for 26 years until his retirement in 1998.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=482117

HILL TAKES PART IN HEART STUDY (Dallas Morning News, Aug. 23)
The body has brakes that stop dangerous enlargement of the heart under stressful conditions, a new study by Dallas scientists suggests. Failure of those brakes may contribute to the enlarged condition, called cardiac hypertrophy, that can lead to heart failure, said Eric Olson, the molecular biologist at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas who led the study. The discovery of these inborn brakes could lead to drugs for people with genetic mutations that impair heart muscle, cause high blood pressure, or clog arteries -- all stresses that can lead to abnormal heart growth. Among the other researchers who performed the study was the University of Iowa's JOSEPH HILL.
http://www.dallasnews.com/latestnews/stories/082302dnmetheart.1b6ec.html

YE COMMENTS ON FIELDS MEDAL WINNERS (China News, Aug. 22)
YANGBO YE
, a professor of Mathematics at the University of Iowa, was quoted in the English language newspaper about winners of the Fields Medals, the Mathematics equivalent of the Nobel, awarded Aug. 20 at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Beijing.

SOLL USES SOUND TO CUT MANURE STENCH (Poultry Today, Aug. 22)
Researchers say they've found a way to take some of the sting out of hog manure's stench: Bombard it with a little ultrasound. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, has applied for a patent on ultrasound technology that cuts by 50 percent the buildup of hydrogen sulfide, a key odor-producing ingredient in hog manure. Scientists, hog farmers and pork industry officials say the technology could be an inexpensive, environmentally safe approach to deal with a major complaint against factory hog farms in the nation's top pork-producing state. They say the technology also may be effective in treating waste from dairy and beef cattle and poultry operations.
http://www.poultryandeggnews.com/poultrytoday/news/20020822/479800.html
A version of this article also appeared Aug. 22 on the website of the IRISH EXAMINER.
http://breaking.examiner.ie/story.asp?j=53954150&p=5395498x&n=53955063&x=

NIEBYL: MORNING SICKNESS POSES RISK TO FETUS (CBC News, Aug. 22)
Morning sickness among pregnant women can pose dangers to the unborn child, especially when it results in severe nausea and vomiting that depletes the amount of folic acid in the woman's body. A study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology discusses ways of relieving morning sickness using over-the-counter remedies. Dr. JENNIFER NIEBYL of the University of Iowa worked on the study with Dr. T. Murphy Goodwin of the Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California. "Nausea and vomiting during pregnancy significantly impact women's lives in terms of missing work and affecting their personal relationships and responsibilities at home," Niebyl said. This clip came from the online version of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television network.
http://www.cbc.ca/stories/2002/08/22/nausea020822

ALUMNI PEN 'EX-BOYFRIEND COOKBOOK' (Miami Herald, Aug. 22)
A story on the authors of "The Ex-Boyfriend Cookbook: They Came, They Cooked, They Left . . . (But We Ended Up With Some Great Recipes)," Erin Ergenbright and Thisbe Nissen, says the authors met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. As graduate fellows, they lived together four years ago in a farmhouse, where one day before a party, Ergenbright said, "I should make Davis Haggerty's spicy barbecue sauce!" and the book idea was born. (This article originally appeared Aug. 11 in the Washington Post.)
http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/entertainment/3908866.htm

BLOOM WORKED WITH AILING MAGAZINE (Boston Globe, Aug. 21)
DoubleTake magazine, a 1998 winner of the prestigious National Magazine Award for general excellence, breaks nearly all the rules. Its animating force is not a journalist nor media executive, but renowned Harvard professor, psychiatrist, author, and social activist, Robert Coles. In an era of "news you can use," it runs 7,000 words about a colony of descendants of the US Confederacy living in Brazil and publishes the drawings of Cambodian children. At a time when many media outlets are focused on what Wall Street wants, its leadership seems almost blithely ignorant of economic reality. But now, with an economic downturn, contributions lagging, circulation at about 25,000, debts piling up, significant staff turnover, and no clear blueprint for turning things around, this noble and widely acclaimed experiment in journalism as the chronicler of the human condition seems in grave danger. No one wants DoubleTake's brand of journalism -- and the vehicle it provides for talented photographers and writers -- to vanish, not even victims of its financial woes. Even University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who recently threatened to sue DoubleTake in order to collect a $4,000 fee for writing about the confederates in Brazil, said, "They're great people to work for. They're doing the kind of journalism that's not done today."
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/233/living/Financial_woes_threaten_DoubleTake+.shtml

SOLL USES SOUND TO CUT MANURE STENCH (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 21)
Researchers say they've found a way to take some of the sting out of hog manure's stench: Bombard it with a little ultrasound. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, has applied for a patent on ultrasound technology that cuts by 50 percent the buildup of hydrogen sulfide, a key odor-producing ingredient in hog manure. Scientists, hog farmers and pork industry officials say the technology could be an inexpensive, environmentally safe approach to deal with a major complaint against factory hog farms in the nation's top pork-producing state. They say the technology also may be effective in treating waste from dairy and beef cattle and poultry operations.
http://www.sunspot.net/business/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-farm-scene0821aug21.story
A version of this Associated Press article appeared Aug. 22 in the online version of the SEATTLE DAILY JOURNAL OF COMMERCE:
http://www.djc.com/news/ht/11136580.html

MILLER: MORE IOWANS ARE INDEPENDENTS (Nando Times, Aug. 21)
Despite Democratic Gov. Tom Vilsack's surprise victory in 1998, after 30 years of GOP gubernatorial rule, analysts say Democrats vying for Iowa House and Senate seats aren't necessarily on the road to a solid majority. Although Al Gore won here in 2000, he arguably would have lost to Bush had Pat Buchanan not received nearly 6,000 votes. Instead, the fastest-growing electoral group in Iowa has been independents -- who increasingly cast the deciding votes in most races. "There's been a narrowing of the gap between Democrats and Republicans, and a growth in the percentage of people saying that they're independents," says ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "That gives rise to the competitive nature of the overall population."
http://www.nandotimes.com/politics/story/505590p-4029958c.html
The story originally appeared Aug. 21 in the CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR.
http://www.csmonitor.com/search_content/0821/p01s02-uspo.html

ALUMNUS LEAVES SINGAPORE JOB (The Business Times of Singapore, Aug. 21)
Ending weeks of market speculation, the Singapore Exchange (SGX) said last night its chief executive officer Thomas Kloet will step down on Dec 20 -- four months before his contract expires on April 24, 2003. SGX said its board of directors and Kloet "mutually agreed to an early termination of the employment contract and for Mr. Kloet to be granted an early release from his duties at SGX . . . The board will be taking steps to appoint an appropriate successor at an early date. Pending the appointment of a successor, Ang Swee Tian, the president, will be the acting CEO." Kloet, who has a bachelor's degree in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is a certified public accountant, joined the demutualised and integrated SGX as its first CEO on April 24, 2000. He hailed from ABN Amro -- the US investment banking subsidiary of ABN Amro Bank -- where he was senior managing director responsible for the derivatives brokerage business throughout the Asia-Pacific, including Singapore.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=098bafe4826e648c7c42ead31c003ff4&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=73e7fd3be0d42c2dbb67319679d6d04d

UI RESEARCHERS: WRITING ABOUT TRAUMA MAY HELP (UPI Online, Aug. 21)
Writing one's feelings about a traumatic experience, as well as the attempt to process the experience, can help people work through it, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers have found. On the other hand, writing only about the emotions in such cases does not help and might make things worse. "Emotional expression or the passage of time alone does not seem to facilitate positive growth from a traumatic event," researchers said. They studied 122 college students divided into an "emotions-only" group that wrote about their "deepest feelings" about something traumatic, and an "emotions and cognition" group that wrote about feelings and their attempts to understand the trauma. The group writing about their emotions and cognition became more aware of benefits following the traumatic event, such as improved relationships, greater personal strength, spiritual development and a greater appreciation for life. But the group writing only about their feelings progressively recorded more negative emotions, a trend not seen in the other group. The emotions-only students also reported a worsening health, equivalent to a mild cold becoming a severe cold
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=098bafe4826e648c7c42ead31c003ff4&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=abd91d3820d5f0dd4d6380c11f7f604c

SOLL USES SOUND TO CUT MANURE STENCH (Boston Globe, Aug. 21)
Researchers say they've found a way to take some of the sting out of hog manure's stench: Bombard it with a little ultrasound. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, has applied for a patent on ultrasound technology that cuts by 50 percent the buildup of hydrogen sulfide, a key odor-producing ingredient in hog manure. Scientists, hog farmers and pork industry officials say the technology could be an inexpensive, environmentally safe approach to deal with a major complaint against factory hog farms in the nation's top pork-producing state. They say the technology also may be effective in treating waste from dairy and beef cattle and poultry operations.
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/233/economy/FARM_SCENE_Tests_show_ultrasou:.shtml
The same Associated Press article also ran Aug. 21 on the website of ABC NEWS.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/wire/Business/ap20020821_351.html
The same Associated Press article also ran Aug. 21 on ASSOCIATED PRESS ONLINE.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=098bafe4826e648c7c42ead31c003ff4&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLbVzb-lSlzV&_md5=814c24ed411387f95517a37ad959eaf2
The same Associated Press article also ran Aug. 21 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020821/ap_on_bi_ge/farm_scene_4
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 21 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/671/3179071.html
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 21 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/08/20/national0116EDT0433.DTL

BIBAS: INSANITY DEFENSE 'RISKY' (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 21)
The attorney for Luke Helder, accused of planting pipe bombs in mailboxes in five states, will argue that the former college student was unable to discern right from wrong during the alleged crime spree in May. Assistant U.S. Public Defender Jane Kelly said in papers filed in U.S. District Court that she will argue the insanity plea at the trial, scheduled for Nov. 18. Using the insanity defense is a risky choice for the defense, and one that is rarely successful, according to a former federal prosecutor. "It's really only successful in a small amount of cases," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a former Assistant U.S. Attorney in New York and now a University of Iowa Law School professor. "But it certainly adds some uncertainty to the case for jurors, a lot of extra work for the prosecutors. It sort of serves as some kind of wild card for the defense," he said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-mailbombs21aug21.story?null
The same Associated Press story ran Aug. 21 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/08/20/state1402EDT0078.DTL

SOLL USES SOUND TO CUT MANURE STENCH (Lycos News, Aug. 21)
Researchers say they've found a way to take some of the sting out of hog manure's stench: Bombard it with a little ultrasound. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, has applied for a patent on ultrasound technology that cuts by 50 percent the buildup of hydrogen sulfide, a key odor-producing ingredient in hog manure. Scientists, hog farmers and pork industry officials say the technology could be an inexpensive, environmentally safe approach to deal with a major complaint against factory hog farms in the nation's top pork-producing state. They say the technology also may be effective in treating waste from dairy and beef cattle and poultry operations.
http://news.lycos.com/news/story.asp?section=Business&storyId=497149&topic=%22UNIVERSITY+OF+IOWA%22

WEINSTOCK USES WORMS TO TREAT AILMENT (National Examiner, Aug. 20)
Modern doctors have crawled back in time to cure irritable bowel disease with an old-fashioned remedy – worms. Dr. JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa believes that as our society got cleaner, we got sicker. He says today's sanitary conditions have led to a spread of health problems that used to be taken care of naturally by intestinal parasites that fight bacteria. "It's occurred to us that perhaps de-worming was a negative thing to do," says Weinstock.

HARTWIG COMMENTS ON SEVIS TRACKING RULES (Washington Times, Aug. 20)
Universities across the country are scrambling to comply with new federal regulations requiring administrators to set up electronic databases that would track foreign student-visa holders. By law, universities must have the new Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) -- part of a change in Immigration and Naturalization Service rules -- operating by Jan. 30. University officials say there are still lots of questions that remain about the program, including what sort of information the INS will want them to submit by Jan. 30. "We're still waiting," said KAREN HARTWIG, assistant director of admissions at the University of Iowa, which has about 1,800 international students. "And we're afraid that once we do get it, we'll have to rush to write the program, learn how to use it, get any bugs out before that deadline. We certainly hope to be ready. We don't want to lose our ability to enroll international students."
http://www.washtimes.com/national/20020820-7659690.htm

BIBAS: INSANITY DEFENSE 'RISKY' (Reno Gazette-Journal, Aug. 20)
The attorney for Luke Helder, accused of planting pipe bombs in mailboxes in five states, will argue that the former college student was unable to discern right from wrong during the alleged crime spree in May. Assistant U.S. Public Defender Jane Kelly said in papers filed in U.S. District Court that she will argue the insanity plea at the trial, scheduled for Nov. 18. Using the insanity defense is a risky choice for the defense, and one that is rarely successful, according to a former federal prosecutor. "It's really only successful in a small amount of cases," said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a former Assistant U.S. Attorney in New York and now a University of Iowa Law School professor. "But it certainly adds some uncertainty to the case for jurors, a lot of extra work for the prosecutors. It sort of serves as some kind of wild card for the defense," he said.
http://www.rgj.com/news/stories/html/2002/08/20/21981.php?sp1=rgj&sp2=News&sp3=Local+News
A version of this Associated Press article appeared Aug. 20 in the online version of the GRAND ISLAND (Neb.) INDEPENDENT:
http://www.theindependent.com/stories/082002/new_helder20.html

BIBAS COMMENTS ON HELDER CASE (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Aug. 20)
Court records say a 21-year-old former University of Wisconsin-Stout student accused of planting pipe bombs in mailboxes in Iowa and four other states will plead insanity when he goes on trial Nov. 18. Luke Helder's attorney, Assistant U.S. Public Defender Jane Kelly, filed a notice of an insanity defense with Judge Mark Bennett and the U.S. District Court Northern District of Iowa. Kelly's plans mean she must prove Helder had a mental condition that prevented him from knowing right from wrong, said STEPHANOS BIBAS, a University of Iowa law professor and former assistant U.S. attorney. "It's a tighter standard than it once had to be," said Bibas, who is not involved in the Helder case. "The problem is that showing you were acting strange is not enough."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/3176420.html

NEW BLOOD SUGAR TESTS DISCUSSED (Reuters, Aug.19)
Scientists are hard at work looking for ways people with diabetes can measure their blood sugar without the painful and scarring jabs now necessary for blood collection. Several researchers discussed the state of the art Sunday at a symposium at the American Chemical Society's annual meeting. Researchers are investigating a completely non-invasive method: measuring wavelengths of near-infrared light after it passes through the skin. Dr. MARK A. ARNOLD of the University of Iowa in Iowa City reported on his efforts using this method. After about nine years, Arnold said, he and his colleagues are ready to begin clinical tests of a system in which a beam of light is passed through a roughly 2 millimeter pinch of skin at the back of the hand. The experiments are being funded by NASA, the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, and Inverness Medical Technology.
http://www.reuters.com/news_article.jhtml?type=search&StoryID=1346655
The story also appeared in YAHOO NEWS Aug. 19 at http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=571&ncid=751&e=1&u=/nm/20020819/hl_nm/blood_test_dc_1
Arnold's test is also noted in the NANDO TIMES Aug. 18 at http://www.nandotimes.com/healthscience/story/503100p-4009386c.html

UI CITED IN POLITICS BOOK (USAToday.com, Aug. 19)
In an excerpt of "On the Road with Hillary" by Patrick S. Halley, the author tells about the planning for an appearance in Iowa City by candidate Ted Kennedy in 1979. "Kennedy was going to be speaking in an auditorium at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with fixed seating for close to five thousand people. My assignment was to build the crowd. Those seats were bright red, and every one that went unfilled would look like a missing tooth to the press cameras."
http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/excerpts/2002-08-19-hillary-excerpt_x.htm

FORMER UI DEAN STARTS NEW COLLEGE (USA Today, Aug. 19)
Many of the nation's nearly 350 college engineering programs are retooling their curricula. But all too many remain mired in a Cold War sensibility, experts say, where engineers work in relative isolation and their main client is the U.S. Defense Department. Often, students follow a lock-step program, beginning with science and math courses, but barely touch on engineering studies until their third year in school. "I don't think that strikes anyone as the way to go" anymore, says Frank Huband, executive director of the American Society of Engineering Education. But "it's really hard to make dramatic changes to existing programs." That's where Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering thinks it can make a difference. A clean slate -- not to mention a pledge from the Olin Foundation of more than $400 million so far -- offers freedom to think big, says Richard Miller, dean of engineering at the University of Iowa until he was asked to become Olin College president. The first class of freshmen at Olin starts classes next week. “Olin's work "ties in with a number of other things that have been happening in engineering education," says WILFRID NIXON, who teaches civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa. "A lot of stuff will have been done before to some degree, but they're pushing the envelope as far as it will go."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2002-08-19-newcollege_x.htm

CHRISTENSEN LINKS PERSONALITY, HEALTH (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 18)
If you have a serious chronic illness, a pessimistic personality may shorten your life. That's the conclusion of a new study by University of Iowa scientists that contends if you're a take-charge, conscientious person, you're more likely to live longer. In the study of 174 men and women who suffered from chronic kidney disease, the researchers found those who were prone to excessive worry and general anxiety were nearly 40 percent more likely to die over a four-year period than the average patient. Conversely, those who were upbeat, dependable and goal-oriented were almost 40 percent more likely to live longer over a four-year period than the average patient. "We have confirmed what research and clinical work and many other people have speculated, that there is a link between personality style and physical health," said ALAN CHRISTENSEN, a professor of psychology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa. He is the lead author of the study, which appears in the July issue of Health Psychology.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0208180097aug18.story

GANTZ: BARDACH A 'WONDERFUL' DOCTOR (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 18)
Dr. JANUSZ BARDACH, a Polish immigrant who suffered five years in a Siberian prison camp and later became one of the most respected plastic surgeons in the world, died Friday of pancreatic cancer. He was 83. Bardach retired in 1991 after leading the facial and reconstructive surgery program at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, who heads the medical school's otolaryngology department, said Bardach pioneered a surgical technique for repairing cleft lips and palates. It allowed the patients to have many fewer surgeries than they would have needed otherwise. Gantz also was struck by Bardach's manner with children. "He was a wonderful, caring physician," Gantz said. "He was like a grandfather to them, and he treated all the patients that way. The young people could relate to him. They'd jump up in their chair to see him."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=477923

OFFUTT TALKS ABOUT MEMOIR (NPR Weekend Edition, Aug. 17)
Host Steve Inskeep talks with writer CHRIS OFFUTT about returning to the Kentucky hills and his memoir, "No Heroes." Offutt, a graduate of and instructor in the UI Writers' Workshop, tried to move back to the region (where he grew up) with the idea of giving something back to the community. Instead, he found he couldn't go home again.
http://search.npr.org/cf/cmn/cmnpd01fm.cfm?PrgDate=08/17/2002&PrgID=7

POGUE COMMENTS ON TOWN RELOCATION (New York Times, Aug. 16)
For a number of languishing Mississippi towns it is the Great Flood of 1993 and, as important, its aftermath that have drained life away. The floods, which caused $10 billion in damage, were devastating enough. But the effort to reconstruct the towns, paradoxically, has played a role as well. Federal and state governments resettled 20,000 houses away from the river throughout the flood zone, and while it made sense to prevent people from rebuilding on land that was prone to flooding, the decision also exposed a harsh reality: The towns had lost their reason to exist, making attempts to reconstitute them virtually impossible. The chances of economic recovery are slim, said THOMAS F. POGUE, a professor of economics at the University of Iowa. "The government may have been trying to move the towns and have it continue as it was," Mr. Pogue said. "But that's not economically viable. What is being lost is the sense of community and history. That can't be replicated."
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/08/16/national/16GHOS.html

STATE UNIVERSITIES EXHIBIT AT FAIR (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 16)
Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa are among the hundreds of exhibitors in the air-conditioned Varied Industries Building at the Iowa State Fair. Featured guests at the U of I booth included 19-year-old Lindsay Thomas, who was pinned in her wrecked car for five days and lost both of her legs below the knee. She received extensive care at UI Hospitals and Clinics. The UI Hygienics Laboratory also featured information on mosquitoes and the West Nile virus.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=476233

PANEL STARTS UI PRESIDENTIAL SEARCH (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 16)
A committee looking for candidates for UNIVERSITY OF IOWA president starts its work next Monday by deciding the academic, administrative and personal experience the next president should have. Criteria from the 23-member committee of faculty, staff and students are due to the regents in September and will then be given to the executive search firm hired by the regents and used in job advertising. The school is seeking a successor to Mary Sue Coleman, who became the University of Michigan's president Aug. 1. Regents Executive Director Gregory Nichols said he expects the search to last about six months.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=476222

CONSTRUCTION WORKERS PRONE TO WRIST INJURY (ReutersHealth, Aug. 15)
If the results of one study are any indication, nearly 10 percent of U.S. construction workers just starting out in their careers may have carpal tunnel syndrome. No study before this one has looked at the prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome among construction workers, who make up 6.4% of the U.S. workforce. To investigate, Dr. JOHN C. ROSECRANCE of the University of Iowa in Iowa City studied a group of 1,115 apprentice construction workers. The researchers note they expected "little, if any" carpal tunnel syndrome among these "relatively young" workers. Apprentices belonged to one of four occupational groups: electricians, sheet metal workers, operating engineers, and plumber/pipe fitters. Just over 8 percent of the study participants were diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome, Rosecrance and colleagues report in the August issue of the American Journal of Industrial Medicine.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20020815/hl_nm/workers_carpal_dc_1

UI FRESHMAN IS COMPUTER WHIZ (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 15)
Kevin Jenner, 18, a 2002 graduate of Naperville Central High School, recently won first place in the high school section of a national computer skills contest. He competed against winners from 47 states in the Skills USA competition in Kansas City, Mo. After taking two electronic classes as a junior at Naperville Central, Jenner won the state competition and advanced to the national competition. As a senior, he took a semester class in computer networking. The rest of his courses were in preparation for going to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to study biomedical engineering. Jenner said he can pursue a career as a doctor or in a technology and biology field creating prosthetics or synthetic tissue for burn victims. He is leaning toward becoming a doctor, although technology always has been an interest.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/tribwest/chi-0208150203aug15.story

SALE WRITES ON ANALYSTS' OBLIGATIONS (TheStreet.com, Aug. 15)
In a soon-to-be published legal journal article, two corporate law professors argue that the best way to regulate the behavior of Wall Street analysts is to treat them as "quasi agents." In other words, they say, analysts should owe some fiduciary obligation to investors, in much the same way that an agent who sells real estate has an obligation to deal fairly with a customer. The professors aren't saying that analysts should be liable to investors for simply making a bad stock pick every now or then. But an analyst who makes a bad stock call because of some conflict of interest or other "malfeasance" owes some sort of legal obligation to the investors who rely on his or her judgment, their argument goes. Jill Fisch, a securities professor at Fordham University School of Law, and her co-author, HILLARY SALE, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School, say the fiduciary obligation arises because brokerage analysts are not just supposed to be salesmen for their employers and the companies they cover. Analysts also are supposed to be information providers that investors and the overall stock market can depend upon. (TheStreet.com is a financial news Web site.)
http://www.thestreet.com/_tsclsii/markets/matthewgoldstein/10037733.html

UI HEADS MARS PROBE ANTENNA PROJECT (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 14)
Southwest Iowa isn't exactly Mars, but it's close enough. A planetary probe that will look for underground water on the red planet landed earlier this summer at a company in this small town for testing. Isolation and clear skies help Liberty Labs calibrate antennas and equipment to make sure that electronic products operate in the legally mandated frequency range. Monte Riesgaard, vice president and calibration specialist at Liberty Labs in Kimballton, said the University of Iowa contacted the company last year "and asked if we could help determine the gain of the antenna they were sending up on the satellite for the Mars Express." He said the scientists wanted to make sure that the antenna worked the way it was designed. RICHARD HUFF, engineering manager of the Plasma Wave Engineering group in the department of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa, said the MARSIS antennae will conduct several experiments, including a search for water on Mars.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=473985

ROBINSON EXPLORES BRAIN INJURY (Amarillo Globe-News, Aug. 13)
Using PET scans to explore the trail of damage in the brains of patients who have lost their zest for life as a result of stroke or head trauma, Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON believes he has discovered the dark lair where depression resides. The findings by the chief of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, if borne out, could help explain the millions of depressions in people who have suffered brain injury or strokes or who have vascular dementia, Parkinson's disease or other mental disorders. And it could shed light on the physical changes in the brain that may typify all depressions, which affect as many as 1 in 10 Americans each year. Robinson's breakthrough discovery revealed that the left frontal cortex, which puts a positive emotional spin on experiences that make us feel good, is particularly vulnerable to damage. When that feel-good feeling is erased, Robinson said, depression fills the void. (The Globe-News is a daily newspaper in Amarillo, TX.)
http://www.amarillonet.com/stories/081302/fea_studylooks.shtml

JOHNSON QUESTIONS IRAQ INVASION PLAN (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 13)
NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a former FCC commissioner who ran for the U.S. Senate and House from Iowa and currently teaches at the University of Iowa College of Law, is the author of an editorial warning against the dangers of attacking Iraq. Johnson, who served as a U.S. maritime administrator with responsibilities for Vietnam sealift and was a war Shipping Authority director, writes that "Good citizenship demands that every American choose a position on the proposed war on Iraq. In our overcrowded lives, obligations of citizenship tend to slide. This one can't. Some in the Bush administration advocate that we unilaterally attack a nation that has not attacked us, because President Bush would like 'a change in the regime.' Can any country overthrow another nation's regime just to better serve its corporate and other interests? Hitler thought so. Clearly, Bush is no Hitler. But Bush so far has given us the same rationale for our proposed invasion as Hitler provided the Germans for theirs."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=609&u_sid=472796

MCLEOD PREDICTS MUSIC DOWNTURN (BusinessWeek, Aug. 12)
The music industry is in its worst shape since World War II, when it curtailed record production to conserve materials for the war effort. A recent survey by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), the music industry's lobbying group, showed that 23% of consumers bought fewer albums this year because they could get the music on the Web free. Whatever the reasons, the major labels have laid off up to 20 percent of their employees, cut advances offered to artists, and trimmed their roster of performers. Over the next two years, major labels could cut the number of acts they support by another 20 percent, believes KEMBREW MCLEOD, a University of Iowa professor and producer of the film documentary "Money for Nothing: Behind the Business of Pop Music."
http://www.businessweek.com/technology/content/aug2002/tc20020812_0153.htm

UI GRADUATE PROFILED (Washington Post, Aug. 12)
A biography on Doug Taylor says the executive director of the federal practice at Deloitte Consulting of Reston, a strategy and technology consulting firm, has a bachelor's degree in accounting and finance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Taylor is credited with leading Deloitte's global public-sector practice.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A6685-2002Aug11.html

ALUMNI PEN 'EX-BOYFRIEND COOKBOOK' (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 11)
A story on the authors of "The Ex-Boyfriend Cookbook: They Came, They Cooked, They Left . . . (But We Ended Up With Some Great Recipes)," Erin Ergenbright and Thisbe Nissen, says the authors met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. As graduate fellows, they lived together four years ago in a farmhouse, where one day before a party, Ergenbright said, "I should make Davis Haggerty's spicy barbecue sauce!" and the book idea was born.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/3149879.html

UI PRESS TO PUBLISH IRELAN'S BOOK (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 11)
The book "Central Standard" is all about time. It is time measured by a railroad pocket watch carried by author PATRICK IRELAN's father. It is time lived from his parents' marriage in 1932 to the near present. It is about rough time spent on infertile southern Iowa farms in the Depression and better times, including five years in rural Nebraska, where the author's parents worked in railroad depots and yards. Irelan, 59, talked about the book, to be published in October by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, from his apartment in Coralville, Iowa, on the edge of Iowa City. As an editor in the Division of Continuing Education at the University of Iowa, he edits manuscripts for students taking correspondence courses. "Central Standard" is a nonlinear memoir consisting of 24 essays.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=469543

UI TIES TO POETS LANGAN, BELL CITED (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 11)
Two briefs in the paper's online Living section mention poets with ties to the University of Iowa. The first brief reports that Omaha poet Steve Langan will present a reading Sept. 19 from his debut collection, "Freezing," as part of the John H. Ames Reading Series. Langan, who earned a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP in Iowa City, has taught at Creighton University and Metropolitan Community College. He also has received a $20,000 Michener Fellowship, given to only one poet each year. The second brief reports the news that MARVIN BELL, who became Iowa's first poet laureate in March 2000, has been appointed to a second term through March 2004. Bell is Flannery O'Connor professor of letters at the University of Iowa in Iowa City.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=469540

HUNNICUTT: RELAXATION CRITICAL (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Aug. 10)
Avoiding boredom is what drives America's economy and our gigabyte lifestyles, but such stimulation addiction is also what drives millions of us to anxiety disorders, depression, exhaustion, even suicide, experts say. "There's an awful emptiness, because we work so much," says BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor at the University of Iowa and author of "Work Without End" (Temple University Press, $54.50). "The human animal is a meaning-seeking animal, and leisure provides a time to look for meaning and purpose, a spiritual quest. . . . But we need to relax to search for such meaning." Hunnicutt says that if more of us took time to be bored or found ways to do nothing, fewer people would be depressed, stressed, overworried, overscheduled or obese. But few of us know how to chill without popping pills or turning to alcohol or drugs or food, all of which can develop into dangerous habits. Relaxation, though, is critical, he says, because it gives us time to use our imaginations, to get in touch with inner thoughts, to seek some sort of spirituality or inner peace, whether through religious belief, meditation or exercise.
http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/epaper/editions/saturday/faith_values_d34577bee09152201011.html

UI DEFENSIVE BACK SANDERS PLEADS GUILTY (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 9)
University of Iowa defensive back BOB SANDERS pleaded guilty Wednesday to a charge of drunken driving. Johnson County District Associate Court Judge Stephen C. Gerard III granted Sanders' request for a deferred judgment in the case, which means the conviction will be deleted from his record upon completion of all terms of the sentence. The judge ordered Sanders, 21, to complete 25 hours of community service and attend a weekend drunk driving course. Sanders, who will be a junior in the fall, was arrested May 17.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=469605

WHITMORE TO STEP DOWN NEXT YEAR (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 9)
University of Iowa Provost JON WHITMORE said he will resign next year so the university's next president can pick a new administrative team. Whitmore, 57, said he will explore several career options, among them spending a year doing research before returning to the Department of Theatre Arts, where he is a tenured professor. "I believe that a new president should have the clear option of choosing her or his own administrative team, including the provost," Whitmore said in an e-mail to faculty, staff and students Thursday. The university has begun a search for a new president to replace Mary Sue Coleman, who resigned this summer to become president of the University of Michigan.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=469966

SOLL FIGHTS SMELL WITH SOUND (Denver Post, Aug. 8)
A University of Iowa researcher has applied for a patent on a method he says could significantly reduce the odor associated with large hog farms. Biological sciences professor DAVID SOLL's experimental process involves bombarding the manure in waste lagoons -- part of huge hog-confinement facilities -- with high-powered sound waves aimed at changing the muck's composition. Lab tests suggest the process could cut odor by half.

SOLL WORKING TO REDUCE HOG ODOR (Washington Post, Aug. 8)
A University of Iowa researcher has applied for a patent on technology that he says could cut the strength of odor emitted by hog manure in half. Such technology would be a boon to factory hog farms facing local opposition because of their odor. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor, has been bombarding manure with high-powered sound waves to change its composition. Soll says he won't be able to prove for another year and a half that his so-called acoustic odor management approach absolutely works, but lab tests have shown promise. "The difference is pretty impressive," he says. Caviforce Technologies Inc., of Des Moines, and Heartland Pork Enterprises, of Alden, the nation's ninth-largest pork producer, jointly contributed $87,000 toward the research. If federal officials approve the patent, Soll says the university would own it. Caviforce and Heartland Pork would have some first rights to manufacturing and licensing the technology.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A57842-2002Aug8.html
A version of the article also ran Aug. 8 on the website of the GUARDIAN newspaper in the United Kingdom.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uslatest/story/0,1282,-1933560,00.html

OVERDUE BOOK LANDS UI STUDENT IN JAIL (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 8)
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student spent a night in jail after he forgot to return 20 items to the Iowa City Public Library in July. They were three months overdue.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=468682

RIBBLE COMMENTS ON BIKE CHECKOUTS (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 8)
Some University of Iowa employees needing a ride are being told to take a bike. The school has again launched a bicycle-checkout program on a trial basis for employees in the University Services Building. Employees who check out bikes also are issued a helmet, a lock and, if necessary, saddlebags. "We want to see if it's actually benefiting and if it's being used," said MICHELLE RIBBLE, university commuter programs manager. The school's Facilities Services Group, which works in the building, leases 12 cars that employees drive around campus.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=469005

NIXON COMMENTS ON BUDGET CUTS, BAKE SALE (USA Today, Aug. 8)
Public university students nationwide are likely to face larger classes, longer lines and fewer course options when they return to campus in a few weeks. And they'll be paying more for it. In all but a handful of states, tuition is going up at four-year public universities, which educate 40 percent -- the largest share -- of the nation's 15 million college students. Blame it on cuts in state funding, which have forced public institutions in many states to begin the new academic year with less money than they had last year. Forget lofty ideas about enhancing quality; many university leaders say they are just trying to get by as best they can. Most universities have responded as they did in past recessions -- freezing salaries, delaying capital projects, offering early retirement. But some universities are talking about reducing faculty positions and cutting majors. At the University of Iowa, where the legislature has trimmed $56 million in funding over the past two years, "some classes simply won't get taught, and I hope that's the limit of it," says engineering professor WILFRID NIXON, who found faculty discussions so depressing that he coordinated a Budget-Cut Bake Sale to boost morale. The event raised $820, which was added to a scholarship fund for students -- "the people getting squeezed most in all of this," Nixon says. Tuition will go up 19 percent.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/education/2002-08-07-universities_x.htm

COLEMAN: 'I LOVE THIS' (Detroit Free Press, Aug. 8)
Mary Sue Coleman, the first woman president of the University of Michigan, is spending her first week on the job dealing with issues as significant as appointing a new executive team and as simple as finding her way to the grocery store. But Coleman, who exudes a breezy enthusiasm for her new job, is undaunted by the challenges ahead. During an interview in her office Wednesday, Coleman, former president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said she welcomes even the toughest tasks -- guiding the university's defense of its race-conscious admissions policies and untangling the controversy hanging over its athletic program. "I was sitting in my office this morning thinking, 'I love this,'" Coleman exclaimed. "These problems are important and they are interesting. We're about the education of young people and helping Michigan be a better state. We're doing this wonderful research that will change people's lives and make the quality of people's lives so much better. It's important work, and that's why it's so much fun."
http://www.freep.com/news/education/cole8_20020808.htm

SOLL WORKING TO REDUCE HOG ODOR (New York Times.com, Aug. 8)
A University of Iowa researcher has applied for a patent on technology that he says could cut the strength of odor emitted by hog manure in half. Such technology would be a boon to factory hog farms facing local opposition because of their odor. DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor, has been bombarding manure with high-powered sound waves to change its composition. Soll says he won't be able to prove for another year and a half that his so-called acoustic odor management approach absolutely works, but lab tests have shown promise. "The difference is pretty impressive," he says. Caviforce Technologies Inc., of Des Moines, and Heartland Pork Enterprises, of Alden, the nation's ninth-largest pork producer, jointly contributed $87,000 toward the research. If federal officials approve the patent, Soll says the university would own it. Caviforce and Heartland Pork would have some first rights to manufacturing and licensing the technology.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Farm-Scene.html
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 7 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-farm-scene0808aug07.story
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 8 on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE: http://www.boston.com/dailynews/220/economy/FARM_SCENE_California_farmers_:.shtml
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 7 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-farm-scene0808aug07.story
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 8 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/08/08/financial0510EDT0019.DTL
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 8 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/3149218.html
This article, part of an Associated Press farm report, also appeared Aug. 8 on the Web site of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD:
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=469009

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON LEISURE (Aufbau, Aug. 8)
A story on growing debate over how much time Americans are spending at work quotes BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, who says that when 19th century thinkers spoke of progress they thought of it mainly in terms of shorter hours of work for higher wages. "Both components," he says, "were seen as fundamental." Today, however, progress , mainly in the form of new technology, seems to have had the opposite effect. "Since 1969, time has been flowing like a river away from the family, community, synagogues and churches more and more into the work place," Hunnicutt says. Aufbau describes itself as "The Transatlantic Jewish Paper," covering New York to Berlin.

REGENTS DIVERTING FUNDS TO PAY RAISES (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 8)
Money that Iowa's three state universities wanted to use to offset rising insurance costs won't stretch as far as once thought because lawmakers agreed to use it to cover raises for university employees. The decision means employees probably will pay more for insurance premiums. The State Board of Regents has held insurance policies with Principal Financial Group Inc. for several years. When the Des Moines-based company sold stock to the public for the first time in October, the regents netted $105 million. The money was put into investments, with the interest earmarked for employee benefit programs. Those programs included life insurance and disability insurance for employees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Northern Iowa and Iowa State University. But with the recent state budget woes, lawmakers from both parties agreed to dip into the fund to offset financial shortfalls. Lawmakers diverted about $30 million from the fund to cover the cost of salary increases for university employees and fund other programs.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=469010

FORMER HAWKEYE HAS TIES TO GOLF COURSE (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 7)
A story on Whispering Creek, the Sioux City area's first championship-length golf course open to the public, says its pro is Dave Hilgenberg, who was at Lakeshore Country Club in Council Bluffs for many years before leaving for a Tennessee club owned by his first cousin, former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Chicago Bears center Jay Hilgenberg, and other pro football players.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=467737

BLUMBERG COMMENTS ON TEMPERATURE (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 7)
An article about the 100th anniversary of the invention of air conditioning notes that few people can agree on an optimum temperature. "People don't fight about oxygen," says MARK BLUMBERG, a biopsychologist at the University of Iowa. "They don't fight about gravity. Because these things don't vary. But they do fight about temperature. Everybody has their own perfect temperature." According to Blumberg's book "Body Heat: Temperature and Life on Earth" (Harvard University Press), 93 percent of homes in the hotter Southern regions of the United States now have air conditioning. The numbers are significantly lower -- in the 60s -- for the North.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2002/08/07/HO24059.DTL

UI SEARCH MOTIVATED OHIO STATE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 7)
Find a new president for a major research university in four months? Most trustees would say it can't be done. But the search committee at Ohio State University just proved them wrong. In what many observers of the college presidency are calling a remarkably fast search, Ohio State took only four months to find its new leader, Karen A. Holbrook, senior vice president for academic affairs and provost at the University of Georgia. She will become Ohio State's first female president when she takes office October 1. Ohio State had motivation to move so fast. Other presidential search committees, like the ones at the UNIVERSITIES OF IOWA and Minnesota-Twin Cities, had their eye on hiring people for the top job, too. Jan D. Greenwood, a search consultant and vice president at AT Kearney Executive Search, remembers telling the committee that "Karen was on everyone's wish list."
http://chronicle.com/jobs/2002/08/2002080701c.htm

JOHNSON: IT'S HARD TO CHANGE BELIEFS ABOUT HRT (USA Today, Aug. 7)
For years, doctors had eagerly awaited answers about hormone replacement therapy's health benefits from a large government study. Now that the main answers are in, some of those same doctors have been criticizing the study, leaving scientists involved in the research shaking their heads. "People openly just wanted it to come out differently, and they're having a hard time facing it," says one of the researchers, obstetrician/gynecologist SUSAN JOHNSON of the University of Iowa. On July 9, the government-sponsored Women's Health Initiative announced that it was halting its study of estrogen plus progestin three years early because of an increased risk of breast cancer in women taking the hormones. And earlier analyses had found that heart attack risk began rising in the hormone group almost from the beginning of the study. "If this were a new drug that no one had ever heard of . . . and you came up with exactly these same results, it would just be abandoned," says Johnson. "But what we have here, instead, is a drug that's been around for 50 years that people have very deeply ingrained beliefs about."
http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/2002-08-07-hormone-replacement_x.htm

ZEBROWSKI APPEARS IN STUTTERING VIDEO (Sun-Herald, Aug. 6)
Stuttering is a frustrating and embarrassing problem for millions of people, but it can be especially tough on elementary school-age stutterers. Now some help is available for parents, teachers and speech-language pathologists. There is a video at the DeSoto County Library in Arcadia designed specifically to help school-age children who stutter. The video features students from first through sixth grade, some of whom talk about their experiences with stuttering. They talk openly about the teasing they face from classmates and how their stuttering sometimes makes them feel about themselves. Also appearing in the video are speech-language pathologists Barry Guitar, of the University of Vermont, Hugo H. Gregory and June Campbell of Northwestern University, and PATRICIA ZEBROWSKI of the University of Iowa. The 38-minute video, titled "Therapy in Action: The School-age Child Who Stutters," is being distributed free of charge to public libraries nationwide. (The Sun-Herald is part of a chain of weekly newspapers in Florida.)
http://www.sun-herald.com/NewsArchive4/080602/TP2DE2.HTM?date=080602&story=TP2DE2.HTM

MARYLAND ‘ALDERWOMAN’ WAS UI DIRECTOR (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 6)
Alderman Joshua Cohen was about to leave the Annapolis city council chambers last month when his colleague Classie Gillis Hoyle shouted, "Goodbye, Alderwoman Cohen." Halfway out the door, Cohen wheeled around, visibly perplexed. "See how it feels?" Hoyle said. Hoyle, who took office in December, can't stand it when she is called "alderman," the official title of members of the Annapolis city council. Now that women have a majority on the council for the first time in the city's nearly 300-year history, Hoyle is fighting to change her official title to reflect her gender. Hoyle, a former director of affirmative action at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is so sensitive to sexism, ageism and racism, she said, that "I couldn't even force myself to say 'alderman.'"
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/annearundel/bal-ar.alderman06aug06.story

GILCHRIST, WINOKUR COMMENT ON E. COLI (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 6)
A recent study of state park swimming areas has revealed the presence of potentially dangerous E. coli bacteria that can fight off common antibiotics. The Des Moines Sunday Register reported in a copyright story that the so-called superbugs may be spreading in Iowa's recreational lakes. The presence of E. coli often means fecal matter has washed into the lake, possibly bringing disease-causing organisms with it. The murkiness of Iowa's lakes makes them more likely to harbor bacteria longer than most, said Dr. MARY GILCHRIST, a microbiologist and director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory. Waterborne illnesses commonly cause intestinal problems or infections of the skin, eyes or ears. The Register's samples were too few to say a lot about the threat to swimmers, said Dr. PATRICIA WINOKUR of the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, who took part in the analysis of beach water.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=466777

UI GRADUATES PEN 'EX-BOYFRIEND COOKBOOK' (Washington Post, Aug. 5)
A story on the authors of "The Ex-Boyfriend Cookbook: They Came, They Cooked, They Left . . . (But We Ended Up With Some Great Recipes)," Erin Ergenbright and Thisbe Nissen, says the authors met at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP. As graduate fellows, they lived together four years ago in a farmhouse, where one day before a party, Ergenbright said, "I should make Davis Haggerty's spicy barbecue sauce!" and the book idea was born.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A44111-2002Aug4.html

UI OFFICIALS ADDRESS ATHLETE BEHAVIOR (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 5)
For University of Iowa Athletic Director BOB BOWLSBY, there is no single answer to explain the rash of student athletes who, in one way or another, have drawn more attention off the field than on it. Seven Hawkeye football players and two basketball players have been charged either with underage drinking, drunken driving or possession of illegal drugs in the last 11 months. More than half of those arrests have occurred in the last two months, each generating as many headlines as headaches. Before drawing any conclusions, Bowlsby says it's important to consider all the factors involved: percentages, expectations, culture, the level of wrongdoing and maturity. "We have 700 student athletes who are subject to the same temptations as any other student on campus," Bowlsby said in an interview last week. Football Coach KIRK FERENTZ has held meetings with players and vowed to toughen team sanctions for offenders. Basketball Coach STEVE ALFORD has introduced a 9 p.m. player curfew for downtown Iowa City, a haven of bars and restaurants frequented by students. The ratio of legal troubles for student athletes is significantly lower than the general student population, said MARK SCHANTZ, general counsel for the university.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=466174

GILCHRIST, WINOKUR DISCUSS 'SUPERBUGS' (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 5)
A recent study of state park swimming areas has revealed the presence of potentially dangerous E. coli bacteria that can fight off common antibiotics. The Des Moines Sunday Register reported in a copyright story that the so-called superbugs may be spreading in Iowa's recreational lakes. The newspaper's study found antibiotic-resistant E. coli in Pikes Point State Park at West Okoboji Lake, Lake Manawa State Park in Council Bluffs, Lake of Three Fires in Taylor County and Lake Darling near Brighton. The presence of E. coli often means fecal matter has washed into the lake, possibly bringing disease-causing organisms with it. The murkiness of Iowa's lakes makes them more likely to harbor bacteria longer than most, said Dr. MARY GILCHRIST, a microbiologist and director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory. Waterborne illnesses commonly cause intestinal problems or infections of the skin, eyes or ears. Threat to Iowa swimmers is small but serious, said Dr. PATRICIA WINOKUR of the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, who took part in the analysis of beach water. Winokur said the Register's samples were too few to say a lot about the threat to swimmers.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=466206

MOYER COMMENTS ON WATER TREATMENT FEARS (Detroit News, Aug. 4)
Despite concerns about security weaknesses at the nation's water treatment facilities, NELSON MOYER, a recently retired University of Iowa microbiologist, urged calm, saying "there are easier ways to cause 'havoc' than poisoning the water supply." But Moyer and other scientists agree it's possible for knowledgeable terrorists to kill or injure people by poisoning reservoirs.

CHRISTENSEN COMMENTS ON MIND-BODY LINK (Indianapolis Star, Aug. 4)
New data suggests that certain personality types, not just clinical conditions like depression, can affect a person's health. Personality may one day be incorporated into the whole medical assessment, says University of Iowa researcher ALAN CHRISTENSEN, although he acknowledges that psychologists have often had a difficult time convincing their medical brethren. "Many health psychologists would tell you it's been a bit of an uphill battle, but I tend to be one of the optimistic ones," he says. Medical students usually aren't coached in counseling, he says, because they have more important things to learn. When people go into an emergency room with a bleeding artery, they don't want doctors to ask them about feelings. "You want them to stop the bleeding and suture the artery," he says. "There's a reason they're trained to think that way."
http://www.indystar.com/article.php?mindbody04.html

FORMER UI DOCTOR WRITES ON BIAS (Hartford Courant, Aug. 4)
Herbert J. Keating, a former associate professor of medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, compares a patient's ignorance about poison ivy to the ignorance about the Midwest that he finds pervasive among Easterners. Just as his patient clung to the thought that he was immune to poison ivy, despite the extensive rash all over his body, Keating writes that the "ignorance and bias of Easterners about places like Iowa was (and is) so widespread that it seems almost willful, refractory to any contrary information."
http://www.ctnow.com/news/local/northeast/hc-keating0804.artaug04.story

BOYD SAYS HE'S SEEN TOUGH TIMES BEFORE (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 2)
WILLARD "SANDY" BOYD
takes over as interim president at the University of Iowa during a time of national anxiety over the economy and the war on terrorism. During Boyd's first stint as the university's president, the Vietnam War dominated newspaper headlines and the civil rights movement had left deep national scars. "I'm always mindful that others have endured much greater difficulties than we do today," Boyd, 75, said. Boyd, who was university president from 1969 to 1981, is filling in after Mary Sue Coleman left Iowa to become president at the University of Michigan. A nationwide search is under way for a permanent successor. During his first tenure, Boyd became the first president to name women and minorities as university vice presidents. "That helped influence the tone on campus," said Mary Jo Small, who was named assistant vice president for administration by Boyd in 1972.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=464786

UI ALUMNA ENHANCES SPEECH AND VOICE (Chicago Daily Herald, Aug. 2)
Through her business, The Sound Center in Downers Grove, Ill. Michelle Eppley works with clients to help enhance the sound and style of speech and voice. The 30-year-old, who has a background in singing, sees all types of clients whether it's a professional working on a big presentation or someone looking to enhance a foreign or regional accent. Eppley's background in voice started when she started taking singing lessons years ago. She said she was extremely curious about the voice when majoring in music and vocal performance at the University of Illinois. She then took some classes in voice articulation in the speech and hearing department and went on to earn a master's degree in speech pathology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.dailyherald.com/search/main_story.asp?intID=37470177

KRONOS TO PERFORM SOUNDS OF SPACE (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Aug. 1)
For nearly four decades, University of Iowa astrophysicist DONALD GURNETT has analyzed and interpreted the solar system's chirps, whistles and grunts, all captured during dozens of unmanned space flights by sophisticated radio receivers he invented in the early 1960s. Composer Terry Riley will use the cosmic sound in an 85-minute multimedia piece called "Sun Rings." The Kronos Quartet will perform it in America and Europe this fall, including its Oct. 26 premiere in Iowa City, the Associated Press reports. NASA commissioned the piece and contacted Kronos Quartet founder David Harrington two years ago about using Gurnett's sounds.
http://www.jsonline.com/onwisconsin/arts/jul02/62955.asp

KATEN-BAHENSKY LEAVES FOR IOWA (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Aug. 1)
DONNA M. KATEN-BAHENSKY is leaving the Virginia Commonwealth University Health System after four years as chief operating officer and executive vice president of Medical College of Virginia Hospitals. She is moving to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, where she will be the director and chief executive officer, the hospital's top management post. "It's been a tough four years," Katen-Bahensky told VCU Health System board members yesterday, adding later that "the focus has been so much on the financial side. There are lots of other things that need to get done, but you have to deal with the money before anybody can do anything else." In her new job, she will oversee a system that operates an 831-bed hospital with a Level 1 trauma center and a National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer center.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3b648663534ffe25d1a8ae186939742a&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=d5fbae2eb55cc593696c5924b066c70d

KATEN-BAHENSKY'S POSITION FILLED (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Aug. 1)
Two executives from The Hunter Group, a firm specializing in helping cash-strapped hospitals cut costs and streamline operations, will assume key jobs at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System temporarily. The health system hired the firm this year to help improve financial performance. William Kerr, of The Hunter Group, will serve as interim chief executive officer of VCU's Medical College of Virginia Hospitals starting Monday. He is replacing DONNA M. KATEN-BAHENSKY, chief operating officer, who is leaving to take the top job at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. MarieAnn North, also from The Hunter Group, will become interim executive director of MCV Physicians.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3b648663534ffe25d1a8ae186939742a&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLbVlb-lSlzV&_md5=e00cc13d848d5faa37526173c8013430

UI GRANT FUNDS GRASS RESEARCH (Omaha World-Herald, Aug. 1)
Native big blue stem and yellow Indian grass could be a safer and cheaper way to clean up spills from agricultural chemicals. Iowa State University researchers have been experimenting with 12 species of native prairie grasses in hopes of finding ways to improve the state's soil and water. Joel Coats, an entomologist and leader of the three-year project, said the lab tests have been successful and he hopes eventually to try the project on a contaminated site in the state. The research is funded through a $20,000 grant from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=462833

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON LEISURE IN AMERICA (Voice of America, Aug. 1)
It's the middle of the summer in the United States when Americans usually take vacation. The international radio network's "Dateline" program focuses on Leisure in America, taking a look at how we spend our free time. UI professor BEN HUNNICUTT says almost all leisure time in the U.S. is characterized by passivity. "We have very few active leisure skills. Things like doing music for ourselves and even conversations are somewhat a thing of the past. We tend to be consumer oriented in our leisure -- that is to say we expect other people to sing and dance and play games while we just watch." Rather than gaining leisure time as machines make our lives easier, Hunnicutt says we have actually become more chained to work because of them. He thinks Americans need to be taught what to do with free time. "We have very few leisure skills," he says. "I teach in a college of liberal arts, and I always like to think that the liberal arts are the free arts. Things like reading, writing, music, literature, the arts -- those are leisure skills that are necessary to give some substance to free time. Without those skills leisure becomes a sort of vacuum that we really don't know what to do with."

UI PART OF TUITION HIKE TREND (The Oregonian, Aug. 1)
A second bad year for the economy is driving up tuition and fees on many public four-year campuses as state revenues decline while costs keep escalating. "Last year, overall, wasn't pretty. This year is worse," said Travis Reindl, director of state policy analysis at the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. "The situation's pretty much caught up with everybody. The effects of the economic slowdown are being fully felt." The National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, which represents the larger public institutions, posts a running tuition survey of its members on its Web site. Using the Web survey as a guide, The Associated Press asked college officials around the country about in-state tuition and fees this fall. The University of Colorado at Boulder is typical of public schools: it is raising tuition and fees 6 percent for in-state undergraduates, to $3,566 from last year's $3,357. Other cases are more dramatic: Texas A&M University tuition and fees will soar nearly 28 percent for incoming freshman and transfer students; University of Kansas tuition is up nearly 21 percent; and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, saw a 19 percent rise.

GLASS STUDIES WORKING MOTHERS' EARNINGS (Parenting, August 2002)
A recent study has found that taking advantage of family-friendly programs may cost you. The research (funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation's Program on Working Families) tracked the earnings of 300 working mothers over eight years. It revealed that pay increases for those who take advantage of such policies as flexible scheduling, telecommuting, part-time hours, and childcare assistance don't keep up with those of moms who choose not to use these perks. For instance, telecommuting (without cutting back on hours) meant a 36 percent loss in wage growth over a seven-year period. (Other studies indicate that men who use such policies are not penalized.) The reason for the pay discrepancy isn't clear, but JENNIFER GLASS, Ph.D., professor of sociology at the University of Iowa, who conducted the research, says employers may equate using these policies (most of which result in less face time) with a lack of commitment. "But there's no indication that these women are producing less or aren't as dedicated," she says.
http://www.parenting.com/parenting/article/article_general/0,8266,7395,00.html

UI PART OF IOWA GETAWAY (Chicago Life, August 2002)
An article about Midwest Getaways notes that Iowa is a "beautiful and overlooked state… Many great writers have come out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA including John Irving, Jane Smiley, and Paul Engle."

UI STUDY: SOY MAY BUILD LEAN MUSCLE (Let's Live, August 2002)
In a study conducted by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, menopausal women were given 40 gm a day of one of three treatments: soy protein high in isoflavones, soy protein devoid of isoflavones or whey protein. At the end of 24 weeks, changes in the women's body compositions were measured by a low-level radiation scan. Women who consumed isoflavone-rich soy gained lean muscle in their waists, hips and thighs, plus lost fact in their thighs – two favorable changes in body composition. Let's Live is a magazine based in Los Angeles, Calif.

UI RESEARCH CAPABILITIES LAUDED (Business Xpansion Journal, August 2002)
A story about the Iowa New Jobs Training Program quotes Iowa Department of Economic Development C.J. Niles as saying that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA provides cutting-edge research in medicine, pharmaceutical services and bioprocessing. The university is also a world leader in biocatalytic research. The UI's College of Engineering, in partnership with the College of Business Administration, offers the nation's only Technological Entrepreneurship Certificate with an engineering degree. Business Xpansion Journal is a monthly publication based in Lawrence, Kans.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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