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UI in the News

April, 2002

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RADIATION DURING PREGNANCY DISCUSSED (UPI, April 30)
Normally, radiation and pregnancy don't mix. But researchers have worked out a policy to safely use radiation to diagnose patients who may be pregnant. "Surprisingly, a search through the medical literature and an informal survey of some academic radiologists yielded a lack of clear policies or specific instructions on this issue," says MEGHAN BLAKE, a medical student at the University of Iowa Hospitals. "CT and other methods that use radiation are an integral part of how we diagnose acute care patients; it became apparent that a policy was needed." The fetus of pregnant women whose injuries are not in the pelvic or nearby area would not be in the direct X-ray beam and, therefore, not exposed to harm. In these cases, pelvic shielding is used, and the radiation doses are kept as low as possible.
http://upi.com/view.cfm?StoryID=30042002-045943-7159r

FISHER: HIGH COST FOR LURING BUSINESS (Seattle Times, April 29)
Syndicated columnist Neal R. Peirce writes that corporations have lobbied successfully to insert loopholes into state tax formulas. They have pushed their average state income-tax rate down from 6.5 percent in the mid-1980s to 3.8 percent today. On top of that, states have been giving away the store to attract or hold corporations. The average new factory job is costing taxpayers more than $46,000 over a 20-year period, PETER FISHER of the University of Iowa reports in State Tax News. The fiscal benefits virtually never match the costs, he says.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=peirce29&date=20020429&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22

UI RESEARCHERS STUDY PREFRONTAL CORTEX (Los Angeles Times, April 29)
For years, the prevailing assumption was that the roots of violence lie in bad environments and abusive parents, and this view is still scientifically supported -- and politically correct. In the last several years, however, brain scans and other studies of the minds of murderers show that there's often another factor: damage or poor function of the prefrontal cortex, a part of the brain that lies just behind the forehead and eyes. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that healthy people who suffer damage to the prefrontal cortex can become impulsive and antisocial.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000030350apr29.story?null

UI SENDS 300 COMPUTERS TO NIGERIA CLASSES (AP Worldstream, April 29)
More than 300 used computers from Iowa are heading to classrooms in Nigeria. The computers and networking equipment, mostly donated by Iowa City residents, were to be shipped Monday to several Nigerian universities. "Universities in Africa are hard-pressed to find equipment," said CLIFF MISSEN, director of The WiderNet Project, a nonprofit group at the University of Iowa that works to improve communications in developing countries. "We saw that equipment was going to landfills that still had good life in it," he said. Missen organized the computer-donation project after teaching in Nigeria at the University of Jos as a senior Fulbright scholar in 1998. He said 16,000 students had to share 50 computers at Nigerian universities. AP Worldstream is international news distributed by the Associated Press throughout Africa and England.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=d2d3a9119fd24868d0991cff8aa11ce6&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSlS-lSlzV&_md5=450f36ad7f627cae5c038bc3d518560d
A version of the story also ran April 29 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020429/ap_wo_en_ge/us_nigeria_computers_2

RIVERBANK ART FAIR IS PROMOTED (Chicago Tribune, April 28)
A column spotlighting upcoming Midwest events mentions the Riverbank Art Fair, Iowa City, May 4-5. This outdoor event sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Fine Arts Council features Midwestern artists exhibiting and selling their original work, including clay, drawing, painting, metal and jewelry.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/travel/chi-020428midwestevents.story

UI GRAD DISCUSSES CREDIT CARD PROBLEMS (Chicago Tribune, April 28)
A story about the risks, and benefits, of getting a credit card while in college cites the case of Scott Sabin, who graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last May and recently moved to Cincinnati for a job with a radio station. He didn't have a credit card in college, and now he's literally paying the price. The utility company did a credit check on Scott when he called to set up his gas and electric services. Because he had no history, he had to put down a $105 deposit, money that won't be returned to him for a year. "It's an extra expense at a time when you have so many other expenses, like moving, putting down a security deposit and setting up a phone line," Scott said. "And your cash is limited because you're just starting out." When he did apply for a credit card, his application was rejected. "I was dumbfounded when I got the letter," Scott said. "I didn't believe that not establishing a credit history in college would be a strike against me. I assumed that when the time came, I would be able to get a credit card and do what I needed to do."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0204280410apr28.story

UI NOTED IN TOURISM ARTICLE (St. Louis Post Dispatch, April 28)
Just 17 miles away from the nightlife and creature comforts of Iowa City and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is a small community where many people still thrive on a simple way of life reminiscent of the mid-1800s. But it's this simplicity and devotion to doing things differently that attracts thousands of people each year to Kalona, home of the largest Old Order Amish settlement west of the Mississippi River. The Amana Colonies and the National Czech and Slovak Museum and Library in Cedar Rapids are also featured in this article.
http://home.post-dispatch.com/channel/pdweb.nsf/da37732b0078d6c285256ad500494df3/86256a0e0068fe5086256ba9001e3d86?OpenDocument)

WATERS' FILM SCREENED (Albuquerque Journal, April 28)
The independent film "Razing Appalachia" is about strip mining in the hills of West Virginia, but the tragedy of what happened there could occur on some level in every community, says the film's director. "Even though the story is about a community in West Virginia, it has national implications about the importance of our national energy policies and our patterns of consumption," said SASHA WATERS, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa. "Even though people in Albuquerque may not feel like they have a connection to the West Virginia mountains, there are all sorts of energy stories to be found in every town, and we can see how problems in one community can affect other areas." The movie was shown Saturday at the SEED Center in Albuquerque. Waters' 72-minute film tells how the 300 families of Pigeonroost Hollow were affected by the thunderous blasting and dust that resulted when the mining company decided to expand an existing mine nearby. When it was all over, only 40 families remained in Pigeonroost Hollow.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=18695c74a9dea0f39d7ea2e5b440cba4&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=60a8b0e7bb2ad0f9692e54e103765383

HAT COLLECTOR FEATURED (Columbus Dispatch, April 27)
Bob Studier has a 3,000-hat garage. Where most people hang leaf rakes or Weedwackers, he hangs hats -- so many that they line the walls and ceilings, rest on shelves and nestle in drawers. Studier started collecting headgear when he was enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1960s. He hasn't stopped since.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ae961a988604d709a997652707ceea63&_docnum=4&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=95b6a5fe222286699d3c5d2393ce21c0

WHITMORE FINALIST FOR TEXAS A&M TOP POST (Houston Chronicle, April 27)
Richard Herman, provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs at the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, has withdrawn his candidacy for president of Texas A&M University. Herman, former CIA Director Robert Gates and JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, were invited to visit the campus last month.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ae961a988604d709a997652707ceea63&_docnum=5&wchp=dGLStV-lSlzV&_md5=11928fac45c0721d3dc993454b02b945

WHEATON COMMENTS ON IDT’S SUCCESS (Omaha World-Herald, April 27)
A feature on Integrated DNA Technologies Inc., one of the world's leading suppliers of synthetic DNA, says the business was started by Dr. Joseph Walder, a former biochemistry researcher with the University of Iowa College of Medicine. IDT supplies more than 20,000 customers with strands of DNA and RNA to research new drugs and design therapies for people with diseases such as Alzheimer's, cancer and AIDS. In 1984, the University of Iowa converted property that once served as the state's tuberculosis treatment center into the Technology Innovation Center. Since then, several companies that began as ideas and inventions of university faculty have set up shop at the business incubator, grown and expanded to bigger quarters in the Oakdale Research Park. IDT was among the first set of fledgling companies to take advantage of the center's cheap overhead, marketing assistance and lab space. "IDT is a really good example of how a spin-off company from the university can grow and prosper and become a vital part of the regional economy," said BRUCE WHEATON, director of the TIC and executive director of the University of Iowa Research Foundation.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=377679

UI SEX ASSAULT STATS CITED (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 27)
A federal law has caused universities in Wisconsin and the Big Ten conference to routinely underreport sexual assaults on their campuses, a newspaper reported Saturday. The law requiring colleges and universities to report sexual assaults annually does not require school officials to include assaults reported to off-campus rape crisis centers. A survey by The Capital Times newspaper of Madison found the University of Wisconsin System and Big Ten schools report far fewer sexual assaults per person than sexual assault statistics for the general public, 1.2 per every 1, 000 people in 2000, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice statistics. … At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, assaults reported to the campus rape crisis centers are reported only if the victims also make a report to police.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/2262651.html

UI 4-YEAR GRADUATE CONTRACT MENTIONED (Wall Street Journal, April 26)
From the University of Wisconsin to Baylor University, schools are getting tired of dilly-dallying students who take five and even six years to graduate. Instead of wishing the problem away, they're going on the offensive, granting tuition discounts, running television commercials and even sending out e-mail alerts to get kids into their caps and gowns. The latest tactic at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA: Asking new freshmen to sign a "contract" promising to get out in four years. While the contracts at the University of Iowa have boosted four-year graduation rates 16 percent since 1995, only about half of the students who sign them actually manage to finish on time. (The school says there's no penalty for breaking the contract.) Back at freshman orientation in 1998, JENNY FERGUSON, 22, signed a four-year contract with the University of Iowa. But the Hawkeye went ahead and switched majors her junior year anyway -- a move that meant she would have to breach the contract. "Our advisers told us to just sign it because if you didn't follow it, it didn't matter," says Ferguson.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1019774857708130000.djm,00.html
This story also appeard in the April 26 SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/26/financial1020EDT0062.DTL

ALLIANCE FORMED TO SERVE IOWA ASIANS (Omaha World-Herald, April 25)
The Iowa Asian Alliance will attract more immigrants to Iowa by promoting the Asian community that is already here, former Gov. Robert Ray said Wednesday. Ray, who helped bring Vietnamese refugees to Iowa in the 1970s, joined Asian business leaders in announcing the alliance, which will promote business and community involvement through monthly meetings, leadership seminars and political forums. Ray said B.J. Do, Iowa Asian Alliance board chairman, is the perfect example of the kind of person the alliance can serve. Do's family came to Iowa from Vietnam in the 1970s. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and now is president of ABC Virtual Communications, an Internet software business he helped start in West Des Moines.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=375445

COLLEGE REDUCING CREDIT REQUIREMENTS (Omaha World-Herald, April 24)
Students at the University of Northern Iowa can earn a bachelor's degree with fewer credits as part of a new plan to help students graduate in four years and save the university money. The Faculty Senate approved the recommendation Monday that will reduce the minimum number of credit hours to earn a bachelor of arts degree from 124 hours to 120. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES is implementing the same change beginning in the fall.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=374428

FISHER CO-AUTHORS REPORT ON WEALTH GAP (Omaha World-Herald, April 24)
The gap between rich and poor in Iowa grew exponentially during a 20-year stretch from the late 1970s to the late 1990s, a report issued Tuesday said. The income gap during the economic doldrums of the 1980s grew even wider during the economic prosperity of the 1990s, said the report by the Iowa Policy Project, a liberal think tank based in Mount Vernon. "The top fifth pulled away from the middle and bottom during the economic doldrums in Iowa in the 1980s, and they continued to pull away even more dramatically in the 1990s," said PETER FISHER, a University of Iowa professor and one of the authors of the new report, which was based on Census Bureau data. The report showed that all income groups posted a gain but that those at the top of the ladder did far better than others down the line.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=374365

UI OFFICERS TRAIN TO USE STUN GUNS (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 23)
Coming soon to public safety officers at the University of Iowa: the Taser M26 stun gun. The campus' 30 officers started training this week with the non-lethal weapon, which can hit targets with 50,000 volts of electricity, causing immediate loss of nerve and muscle control. They'll learn technical skills and complete eight hours of instructional reading before they hit the streets with the gun next week. The Taser's arrival at the university comes two-and-a-half years after public safety officials requested that officers be armed with non-lethal weapons. "Prior to this, when an officer responded to a situation like a domestic assault, or a fight in progress, we had no means to overpower someone with a knife," Public Safety Assistant Director DUANE PAPKE said. "Now, our officers won't have to have close combat with anyone."
http://www.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/srchlist.cgi?words='University+of+Iowa'&searchIn=all&pubDate=all&orderBy=date&perPage=10

UI OFFICERS TRAIN TO USE STUN GUNS (Baltimore Sun, April 23)
Coming soon to public safety officers at the University of Iowa: the Taser M26 stun gun. The campus' 30 officers started training this week with the non-lethal weapon, which can hit targets with 50,000 volts of electricity, causing immediate loss of nerve and muscle control. They'll learn technical skills and complete eight hours of instructional reading before they hit the streets with the gun next week. The Taser's arrival at the university comes two-and-a-half years after public safety officials requested that officers be armed with non-lethal weapons. "Prior to this, when an officer responded to a situation like a domestic assault, or a fight in progress, we had no means to overpower someone with a knife," Public Safety Assistant Director DUANE PAPKE said. "Now, our officers won't have to have close combat with anyone."
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-brf-campus-police-tasers0423apr23.story
A version of this Associated Press article also appeared April 23 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/23/national0402EDT0464.DTL

BENEFIT HELD FOR INJURED UI WRESTLER (Omaha World-Herald, April 23)
Cheers and a standing ovation greeted UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRESTLER RYAN HEIM at a benefit dinner and auction held in his honor. Heim, 21, is recovering from a Jan. 21 auto accident that left him in a coma for more than a month. He arrived at the Clarion Hotel for the benefit Sunday, overwhelmed by the 2,000 people who greeted him. "This shows Ryan that people really care," said his mother, Bridget Heim. "It shows him how much support he has." She said she has been at her son's side, praying for his recovery since the accident that left him with a serious brain injury.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=38&u_sid=373414

UI STUDENTS HOPE TO PROFIT ON PROJECT (Omaha World-Herald, April 23)
Two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students hope to turn their class project into a profit while helping pioneer medical breakthroughs. Biomedical-engineering students VIKAS GOEL and JAMES FENTON designed and built a specialized cell-growing device that grows cells three-dimensionally. The two seniors estimate their work will net $1.9 million in the next five years. Goel and Fenton are seeking five different patents. Their invention, a tissue bioreactor, grows cells three-dimensionally in a BB-sized ball contained in a growing chamber, a feature that simulates reality better than modern methods, Fenton said. But Goel and Fenton are at odds with the university. School policy requires all faculty, staff and students to disclose their ideas, inventions and discoveries to the university's Research Foundation if they used the school's time, materials or facilities. If the foundation shows interest and determines that it holds rights to the work, inventors are expected to surrender their work to the university.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=373407

PAPKE: TASERS GIVE OFFICERS EDGE ON CRIME (Washington Post, April 23)
Coming soon to public safety officers at the University of Iowa: the Taser M26 stun gun. The campus' 30 officers started training this week with the non-lethal weapon, which can hit targets with 50,000 volts of electricity, causing immediate loss of nerve and muscle control. They'll learn technical skills and complete eight hours of instructional reading before they hit the streets with the gun next week. The Taser's arrival at the university comes two-and-a-half years after public safety officials requested that officers be armed with non-lethal weapons. "Prior to this, when an officer responded to a situation like a domestic assault, or a fight in progress, we had no means to overpower someone with a knife," Public Safety Assistant Director DUANE PAPKE said. "Now, our officers won't have to have close combat with anyone."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A32379-2002Apr23.html
A version of the article also ran April 23 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/23/national0402EDT0464.DTL
A version of the article also ran April 23 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-brf-campus-police-tasers0423apr23.story

UI OFFICERS TRAIN TO USE STUN GUNS (New York Times, April 23)
Coming soon to public safety officers at the University of Iowa: the Taser M26 stun gun. The campus' 30 officers started training this week with the non-lethal weapon, which can hit targets with 50,000 volts of electricity, causing immediate loss of nerve and muscle control. They'll learn technical skills and complete eight hours of instructional reading before they hit the streets with the gun next week. The Taser's arrival at the university comes two-and-a-half years after public safety officials requested that officers be armed with non-lethal weapons. "Prior to this, when an officer responded to a situation like a domestic assault, or a fight in progress, we had no means to overpower someone with a knife," Public Safety Assistant Director DUANE PAPKE said. "Now, our officers won't have to have close combat with anyone."
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-BRF-Campus-Police-Tasers.html
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/23/national/23BRFS4.html
YAHOO NEWS carried an Associated Press article at
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020423/ap_on_re_us/brf_campus_police_tasers_1

AARP TO JOIN PRESCRIPTION DRUG LAWSUITS (New York Times, April 23)
AARP says it intends to join lawsuits around the country to help its 35 million members gain access to lower cost prescription drugs. Lawyers for the organization said today that they would soon become involved in two types of cases. One challenges tactics used by brand-name drug companies to delay the marketing of low-cost generic medicines. In 1984, Congress passed a law intended to reduce the time and expense of bringing generic drugs to market. HERBERT J. HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa who has written a treatise on antitrust law, said companies were "taking advantage of a kind of loophole in the statute" to delay generic competition.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/23/health/23DRUG.html

MUKHERJEE'S NEW NOVEL REVIEWED (New York Times, April 23)
In a review of Bharati Mukherjee's new novel, "Desirable Daughters," it's noted that Mukherjee left Calcutta to study creative writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA some four decades ago. "...In turning her focus from her adopted home to the India she knew as a girl, she has succeeded in writing her most thoughtful, emotionally detailed book yet," the reviewer says.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/23/books/23KAKU.html

UI STUDENT SUES BAR (Chicago Tribune, April 23)
A Palatine, Ill. college student burned last week when a flaming alcohol stunt went out of control in an Iowa City, Iowa, bar has sued the bar's owners, claiming they engaged in reckless conduct. Amy Shah, 20, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA junior, suffered second- and third-degree burns on her arms and forehead after an employee at the bar Et Cetera poured high-proof rum on a section of the bar and lit it. Shah was one of at least six people hurt in the incident.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/lake/chi-0204230056apr23.story

CONROY QUOTED ON WRITING COURSES (Christian Science Monitor, April 23)
More students are in pursuit of the perfect paragraph at colleges across the United States, and more colleges are adding creative writing programs. Such programs, which were once unknown at all but a few schools such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of New Hampshire. Today, more than 320 colleges and universities feature in-depth creative writing classes, and about 240 have established creative writing MFA programs, up from half a dozen such programs in the early 1980s. At the UI, for example, 600 aspiring fiction writers applied last year for 25 slots in the writing program. "A lot of English majors became disaffected with deconstructionism and various other scholarly fads that were in vogue," says author FRANK CONROY, who heads the Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "They said, 'I don't want to do that; I want to write.' And the thing has just ballooned. These days, we don't talk about theory very much, because nobody's particularly interested. We talk about books."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2002/0423/p15s01-lehl.html

WHITMORE WAS CANDIDATE FOR POST (Dallas Morning News, April 23)
A story about the search for the Texas A&M University president said that JON WHITMORE, provost of the University of Iowa, had been a candidate for the position.

FORMER UI BUSINESS DEAN DALY PROFILED (Financial Times, April 22)
A feature story on George Daly, dean of New York University’s Stern School of Business, says that when the school wanted to move from the second rank of business schools to the first, it recruited the slightly built, bespectacled Midwesterner to do the job. The Stern faculty were, however, used to doing things their way. They were unfazed by Daly, who had been recruited from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In his capacious, sunny corner office at Stern, Professor Daly recalls his arrival in 1993: "Here I was in New York. Somebody from Iowa. This does not bring respect or fear to the faculty." When Daly steps down this summer he can reflect on nine years that have swept aside many of the faculty's certainties and seen Stern move up to eighth place in the FT's 2002 international full-time MBA rankings. Its executive MBA course was ranked fourth in the world in the FT's 2001 survey.
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=a4d056498eeaf869091e987fe903a234&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=5de8e03ea93a50b929db1b8c907ddc4c

HONOLULU COUNCILMAN’S DEGREE QUESTIONED (Washington Post, April 20)
A story about a variety of corruption charges and accusations of unethical behavior against members of the Honolulu City Council says Councilman Steve Holmes faces questions about his education record. Holmes has said he earned a bachelor's and master's degree in botany and geology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the mid-1970s. The university says that while Holmes attended the school, it has no record that he received a degree.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A21197-2002Apr20.html
A version of the story also ran April 20 on the websites of the BALTIMORE SUN and the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2246121.html
A version of the story also ran April 20 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/20/national1713EDT0586.DTL
A version of the story also ran April 20 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020420/ap_on_re_us/council_crisis_1

ARTHUR ANDERSEN RECRUITS ARE IN LIMBO (Chicago Tribune, April 20)
In the past week, several thousand college recruits around the country were informed by telephone and e-mail that their jobs no longer exist at Arthur Andersen, a company that had been one of the nation's most active campus recruiters. For Arthur Andersen recruits, the problem has been particularly acute because they were tied to the firm as a growing number of experts began questioning whether it would survive. "It's a mess," said LYNN PRINGLE, director of the master of accountancy program at the University of Iowa, where about one-tenth of the 100 graduating accounting students accepted jobs at Andersen. "The timing is terrible for them." TY DOGGETT, 21, of Seymour, Ill., a senior at the University of Iowa who has accepted a job in the tax department of Andersen's Kansas City, Mo. office, said he did not become "alarmed by the situation" until the federal government announced it had indicted the firm. He said he has been told his job offer remains good. "They're telling me I still have a job and I have to believe it," Doggett said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/chi-0204200166apr20.story

UI STUDENT BURNED IN BAR STUNT MOVED (Chicago Tribune, April 20)
Alcohol lit afire in a stunt at an Iowa City, Iowa, bar Thursday injured three Northwest suburban college students, including a woman who was transferred to a Chicago area hospital Friday. Several people were injured with burns about 12:15 a.m. Thursday at Et Cetera, a downtown Iowa City bar, when alcohol was poured on the bar and ignited, said Iowa City police Sgt. Bill Campbell. Deanine M. Busche, 20, of Schaumburg, was taken from an Iowa hospital to Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood Friday afternoon. She was reported in fair condition, a hospital spokesman said. Athena M. Georganas, 21, of Park Ridge, and Amy B. Shah, 20, of Palatine, were treated and released Thursday from UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS. All three are University of Iowa students.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0204200253apr20.story
A version of the story also ran April 20 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/cdh/20020420/lo/3_area_students_burned_during_college_bar_stunt_1.html

PAPER CORRECTS UI TUITION FIGURES (USA Today, April 19)
A correction in the paper reads: A chart in the April 16 Your Money column listed incorrect figures for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's 2002 costs. The cost for tuition and other expenses is $11,952 for in-state students and $20,380 for out-of-state students.

UI STUDENT RECALLS FIRE SCENE (Washington Post, April 19)
Bartenders who allegedly poured rum on a bartop and ignited it to entertain patrons could face criminal charges, police said. At least six people were burned in the fire early Thursday. Bartenders at the college hangout Et Cetera learned the stunt in Acapulco, Mexico, Police Chief R.J. Winkelhake said Friday. Investigators are reviewing whether it violated fire codes. People clapped as they watched the bartenders ignite the rum, creating a flickering line of fire. "We saw this flame go up and we all backed away," said Whitney Grabinski, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A17398-2002Apr19.html
A version of the story also ran April 19 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/19/national1404EDT0638.DTL
A version of the story also ran April 19 on the website of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/mchenry/chi-0204190266apr19.story
A version of the story also ran April 20 on the website of the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=371151
A version of the story also ran April 20 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2243971.html
A version of the story also ran April 19 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020420/ap_wo_en_ge/us_fire_stunt_2

UI STUDENTS BURNED IN BAR STUNT (Chicago Tribune, April 19)
Two northwest suburban women suffered second- and third-degree burns early Thursday after a bar stunt involving flaming alcohol burst out of control near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, police said. Five college students were injured in the late-night incident at Et Cetera, an Iowa City bar that has a tradition of setting a well-worn section of its bar counter on fire with rum, according to Iowa City police. A little after midnight, a bartender poured the alcohol onto the bar and ignited it, and the flames leaped onto nearby patrons, who furiously tried to pat down their clothes and hair, according to witnesses. Amy Shah, 20, a junior from Palatine majoring in finance, had just entered with eight friends and was beside the bar when she saw flames out of the corner of her eye. "I don't know what happened, but the flames went out of control and we were standing right there," said Shah, who received second-degree burns on her arms and her hair and eyebrows were singed. Her friend Tina Georganas, 21, an education major from Park Ridge, received third-degree burns on her upper right arm and second-degree burns on her neck and abdomen, Shah said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/mchenry/chi-0204190266apr19.story?null

UI WORKSHOP METHOD CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 19)
A creative writing teacher at the University of Central Arkansas writes in a letter to the editor in response to a March 15 article titled "Undergraduates Heed the Writer's Muse" that there has been a significant rise in interest in undergraduate creative-writing programs in the past 10 years. But she says what has perhaps not caught up with this rise is the body of research and knowledge on how these students may best be taught. "Many are still taught predominantly through the model of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP, a model that was established for and works well with older graduate students," she writes. "Today's undergraduates, especially traditional undergraduates, are a somewhat different animal, requiring different techniques in addition to the workshop method. The emphasis on reading at this level is certainly part of an overall pedagogy that should be supported."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i32/32b00402.htm

UI WRITER OFFUTT AT HOME IN WOODS (New York Times, April 18)
CHRIS OFFUTT, the author of "No Heroes: A Memoir of Coming Home" (Simon & Schuster), published this month, goes to the woods the way other people go back to their house, to relax, to hide, to be happy. He has since he was a boy in Kentucky. "This is home," he said, standing. "When I feel lonely, I go to the woods. That's shagbark hickory, my favorite tree." Mr. Offutt keeps a pouch of dirt on his desk in his bedroom office in Iowa City, where he moved with his family in 1999, to teach in the writers' program at the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/18/garden/18OFFI.html

HOUSING COSTS TO RISE AT UI (Omaha World-Herald, April 18)
Students at Iowa's three state universities will pay as much as 11 percent more for campus housing next year and 15 percent more for meals, in addition to facing a 20 percent tuition increase. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a double room with full board will cost a student $5,255, an increase of 12.5 percent from this year under the package of rate increases approved by the Board of Regents, State of Iowa Wednesday. In addition to room and board rates, the regents also approved a host of fee increases and new fees. Among those was an increase from $5 to $8 for the University of Iowa fee that students pay for dropping and adding courses.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=369734

SUIT FILED AGAINST MEDICAL PROFESSOR (Omaha World-Herald, April 18)
A doctor has filed a civil lawsuit against a professor at the University of Iowa, saying that he took some of his research and published it under his name. Roger Bitar of San Diego said Dr. LOUIS KIRCHHOFF, an associate professor at the College of Medicine, authored a report on West African Sleeping Sickness for the Central African Journal of Medicine using his data. ... Bitar said he wants Kirchhoff to retract the article and agree to resubmit it under both researchers' names. It also seeks unspecified monetary damages. Kirchhoff has been conducting research in South America, the Daily Iowan reported for Monday editions. GRAINNE MARTIN, the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics research integrity officer, said she's aware of the case, but policy prohibits her from commenting.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=369161

FISK WRITES OF UI, U.S. LECTURES (The Independent, April 17)
Robert Fisk, who visited the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA April 9-10, writes of his recent U.S. lecture tour on various campuses. "I've been travelling to the United States for years, lecturing at Princeton or Harvard or Brown University, Rhode Island, or San Francisco, or Madison, Wisconsin," he writes. "…American college students are tough as nails and bored as cabbages, and in some cities -- Washington is top of the list -- I might as well talk in Amharic. If you don't use phrases like 'peace process,' 'back on track' or 'Israel under siege,' there's a kind of computerised blackout on the faces of the audience. Total Disk Failure. Why should my latest bout of Americana have been any different?" Noting that his lectures took the American media to task for "lobotomising their stories from the Middle East," Fisk writes, "I demanded to know of my audiences –- and I expected the usual American indignation when I did -- how U.S. citizens could accept the infantile 'dead or alive,' 'with us or against us,' axis-of-evil policies of their President. And for the first time in more than a decade of lecturing in the United States, I was shocked. Not by the passivity of Americans -- the all-accepting, patriotic notion that the President knows best -- nor by the dangerous self-absorption of the United States since 11 September and the constant, all-consuming fear of criticising Israel. What shocked me was the extraordinary new American refusal to go along with the official line, the growing, angry awareness among Americans that they were being lied to and deceived." He writes that the University of Iowa classes he attended were "absorbing," and that the local media seemed to understand his points, but could not escape the usual American myopia. "The headline, 'Fisk: Who really are the terrorists?' in the DAILY IOWAN last week at least caught the gist of my message, and included my own examples of American press bias in the Middle East, although it failed on the facts, wrongly reporting that it was the United Nations (rather than the far more persuasive Israeli Kahan Commission) which concluded that Sharon was 'personally responsible' for the Sabra and Chatila massacre."
http://www.independent.co.uk/story.jsp?story=285777

GREENBERG COMMENTS ON BIOFILMS (New York Times, April 17)

Harvard University scientists say a protein that controls a stubborn bacterial slime in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients has emerged as a promising target to treat drug-resistant infections. The protein was discovered in a "superbug" that grows into filmy colonies, often with fatal results. Researchers said the discovery has implications for treating a variety of drug-resistant "biofilm" infections that annually kill tens of thousands of patients and, by some estimates, cost $6 billion to treat in the United States. Details of the experiments, which were limited to the test-tube, are published in the current issue of the journal Nature. In addition to cystic fibrosis, biofilm bacteria form on many types of artificial implants such as hip joints, which often have to be removed once infected. Biofilms also can grow on transplants made of natural materials, such as heart valves. "Over the past couple of years, we've come to appreciate this problem where the bacteria under the right conditions become resistant, but what we haven't understood is anything about the mechanism," said University of Iowa microbiologist E. PETER GREENBERG, who did not work on the Nature study.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Resistant-Bioslime.html
This Associated Press article also appeared in the April 17 MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/2238203.html
A version of the story also run in the April 17 WASHINGTON POST
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A2349-2002Apr17.html
A version of the story also ran April 17 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020417/ap_on_he_me/resistant_bioslime_1

ARTHUR ANDERSEN RECRUITS ARE IN LIMBO (Washington Post, April 17)
In the past week, several thousand college recruits around the country were informed by telephone and e-mail that their jobs no longer exist at Arthur Andersen, a company that had been one of the nation's most active campus recruiters. For Arthur Andersen recruits, the problem has been particularly acute because they were tied to the firm as a growing number of experts began questioning whether it would survive. "It's a mess," said LYNN PRINGLE, director of the master of accountancy program at the University of Iowa, where about one-tenth of the 100 graduating accounting students accepted jobs at Andersen. "The timing is terrible for them." TY DOGGETT, 21, of Seymour, Ill., a senior at the University of Iowa who has accepted a job in the tax department of Andersen's Kansas City, Mo. office, said he did not become "alarmed by the situation" until the federal government announced it had indicted the firm. He said he has been told his job offer remains good. "They're telling me I still have a job and I have to believe it," Doggett said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62691-2002Apr16.html

EATING DISORDERS VIGIL PLANNED (Chicago Tribune, April 17)
The eating disorder program UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BEHAVIORAL HEALTH is listed as co-sponsor of 300 public and private ceremonies aimed to promote a healthy body image taking place in the U.S., Canada and Europe. Attendees will light candles and recite a pledge, vowing to accept their bodies and others' bodies, promote healthy lifestyles and remember those who did not survive eating disorders.

ARTHUR ANDERSEN RECRUITS ARE IN LIMBO (Miami Herald, April 17)
In the past week, several thousand college recruits around the country were informed by telephone and e-mail that their jobs no longer exist at Arthur Andersen, a company that had been one of the nation's most active campus recruiters. For Arthur Andersen recruits, the problem has been particularly acute because they were tied to the firm as a growing number of experts began questioning whether it would survive. "It's a mess," said LYNN PRINGLE, director of the master of accountancy program at the University of Iowa, where about one-tenth of the 100 graduating accounting students accepted jobs at Andersen. "The timing is terrible for them." TY DOGGETT, 21, of Seymour, Ill., a senior at the University of Iowa who has accepted a job in the tax department of Andersen's Kansas City, Mo. office, said he did not become "alarmed by the situation" until the federal government announced it had indicted the firm. He said he has been told his job offer remains good. "They're telling me I still have a job and I have to believe it," Doggett said.

KOCHANSKA: GUILT CAN MOTIVATE CHILDREN (Chicago Sun-Times, April 17)
Guilt can be a powerful motivator to get children to stay in line, but children of strict parents are less likely to feel guilty than their peers, according to new research. "Parenting that is more effective relies on reasoning rather than power assertion. Guilt can be a good thing, particularly in this mild form," said GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa who spearheaded the study. The research, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Child Development, found that children as young as 2 displayed reactions described as an early developmental antecedent of guilt.

UI TUITION TO GO UP 19 PERCENT (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 17)
A story about rising tuition at universities across the country says that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA proposed tuition hikes are in the double digits -- a 19 percent increase.

KOCHANSKA: GUILT CAN MOTIVATE CHILDREN (National Post, April 16)
Guilt can be a powerful motivator to get children to stay in line, but children of strict parents are less likely to feel guilty than their peers, according to new research. "Parenting that is more effective relies on reasoning rather than power assertion. Guilt can be a good thing, particularly in this mild form," said GRAZYNA KOCHANSKA, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa who spearheaded the study. The research, which is published in the latest issue of the journal Child Development, found that children as young as 2 displayed reactions described as an early developmental antecedent of guilt.

GRAY COMMENTS ON ANTHRAX DETECTION (New York Times, April 16)
Since the early symptoms of inhaled anthrax are similar to the flu, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say a sudden jump in sales at drug stores and supermarkets could tip off authorities before victims become ill enough to seek medical attention. The new system proposed by the Carnegie Mellon researchers would extend that to over-the-counter medicines. GREGORY C. GRAY, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa, said there is precedent for using such sales to detect disease. An outbreak of the intestinal parasite cryptosporidium in Milwaukee in the early 1990s was first detected by pharmacists who noticed a run on antidiarrheal medicines, he said.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/health/AP-Detecting-Anthrax.html
An ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in: YAHOO NEWS,
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20020415/ap_on_he_me/detecting_anthrax_1,
the WASHINGTON POST,
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A57511-2002Apr16.html,
the LOS ANGELES TIMES,
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/ats-ap_health10apr15.story?coll=sns%2Dap%2Dtophealth,
the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE,
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/15/national0217EDT0436.DTL
A similar story appeared April 15 in the NEW YORK TIMES:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Detecting-Anthrax.html
and April 16 in the OMAHA WORLD HERALD
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=54&u_sid=366820

DUNLAP'S TREEHOUSE VIOLATES CODES (Omaha World Herald, April 16)
DAVID DUNLAP's five-story wooden tower tucked within his wooded acreage is only 3 inches shy of 50 feet tall. "A tower is probably what it is," said Dunlap, 61. "I also call it a playhouse, and it remains a work in progress." The UI art professor's playhouse exceeds by nearly 35 feet the maximum height that Iowa City allows for a secondary building. It's also 15 feet taller than the maximum height for a house. The city sent Dunlap a notice of building-code violation last December after a complaint from a neighbor.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=367030

GRAY COMMENTS ON ANTHRAX DETECTION (Dow Jones Newswire, April 15)
Since the early symptoms of inhaled anthrax are similar to the flu, researchers at Carnegie Mellon University say a sudden jump in sales at drug stores and supermarkets could tip off authorities before victims become ill enough to seek medical attention. The new system proposed by the Carnegie Mellon researchers would extend that to over-the-counter medicines. GREGORY C. GRAY, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa said there is precedent for using such sales to detect disease. An outbreak of the intestinal parasite cryptosporidium in Milwaukee in the early 1990s was first detected by pharmacists who noticed a run on antidiarrheal medicines, he said.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,4286,BT_CO_20020415_008770-universityofiowa,00.html?collection=autowire/30day&vql-string=%28%22University+of+Iowa%22%29%3Cin%3E%28article%2Dbody%29
The article also appeared April 16 in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE,
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/bal-te.anthrax16apr16.story and in the BALTIMORE SUN http://www.sunspot.net/news/health/bal-te.anthrax16apr16.story

WHITMORE WAS FINALIST AT UNH (San Francisco Chronicle, April 15)
The provost of Claremont Graduate University in California, Ann Weaver Hart, was selected Monday to head the University of New Hampshire. JON WHITMORE, provost at the University of Iowa, had been a finalist for the position.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/15/state1853EDT0148.DTL

COLD, ALLERGY MEDICINE RISKS CITED (Los Angles Times, April 15)
Seemingly harmless over-the-counter remedies, such as antihistamines and decongestants, can pose unexpected health risks. Experts are most concerned about the adverse effects of antihistamines -- which control such allergy symptoms as sneezing, itching and runny nose -- and pseudoephedrine, the active ingredient in most decongestant cold medications. Antihistamines often make people feel sleepy -- which isn't a problem if you're ready for bed, but can be dangerous if you're behind the wheel. A 2000 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study, which used a simulator to test participants' responses, found that the driving performance of people who had taken the antihistamine diphenhydramine (the active ingredient in Benadryl) was even poorer than those who were legally drunk.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000026992apr15.story?coll=la%2Dheadlines%2Dhealth

VANNIER PRAISES 3-D X-RAY IMAGER (Business Week, April 15)
Emergency room doctors treating patients in life-threatening situations have a powerful new diagnostic weapon available to them. A medical imaging technology recently unveiled by Mercury Computer Systems can produce a 3-D X-ray image in about 15 seconds. "It was beyond our expectations that this could be done," says MICHAEL W. VANNIER, a radiologist at the University of Iowa.

UI PUBLISHES 'LIKE THUNDER' POEMS (Bloomsbury Review, April 15)
A story about "Like Thunder: Poets Respond to Violence in America," a collection of poems conceived and edited before Sept. 11, says the book was published this year by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PRESS RE-RELEASES RAILROAD BOOK (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 14)
More than 50 years after its initial publication, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has re-released "The Milwaukee Road: Its First Hundred Years," written by the prolific Sauk Prairie, Wis., writer August Derleth in 1948. Since 1985, when the last remnants of the once venerable rail company were absorbed by the Soo Line, the 3,000-member Milwaukee Railroad Historical Association has kept the line's story alive.

OFFUTT DISCUSSES NEW BOOK (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, April 14)
Author CHRIS OFFUTT recently completed a two-year stint teaching at the prestigious IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa. He has a new book in stores this month, "No Heroes: A Memoir of Coming Home," a curious amalgam of two very different life stories. "I'm scared to death of falling into a formula," Offutt says. In one narrative strand, he recounts his return to his home state on the eve of his 40th birthday, excited about teaching creative writing part time at Morehead University, where he received his undergraduate degree two decades earlier. In the second strand, he shares the memories of his parents-in-law, both survivors of Nazi concentration camps.
http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/epaper/editions/sunday/arts_c38b1a3936499092009f.html

U.S. NEWS RANKINGS DISCUSSED (Omaha World Herald, April 13)
In an article about U.S. News and World Report's rankings of rankings of Nebraska medical schools and their specialty programs, it's noted that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's medical school (the Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine) ranked ninth for primary-care education and 30th for research. Of its specialty programs, family medicine placed ninth, internal medicine placed 18th and rural medicine placed seventh.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=365035

UI CITED IN ADMISSIONS STORY (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 12)
A story about how on-site admissions programs let applicants know immediately whether they have been accepted to a university says it's unknown exactly how many colleges are practicing "snap-apps," as some call them, but a variety of institutions below the elite tier now admit anywhere from a handful to a couple of hundred students through the programs each fall. In the Midwest, Big Ten colleges, including Michigan State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and smaller institutions like Knox College and Lake Forest College, admit a number of students after face-to-face interviews in the fall.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i31/31a03901.htm

CONROY'S BOOK 'DOGS BARK' REVIEWED (Washington Post, April 11)
The paper reviews Dogs Bark, But the Caravan Rolls On: Observations Then And Now, by FRANK CONROY, director of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. The reviewer calls the book "a footnote of sorts to Stop-Time, the memoir that Frank Conroy published in 1967" and which "by any fair reckoning [was] a small classic of its genre, an utterly unsentimental, clear-minded exploration of the author's painful but instructive boyhood and adolescence."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29697-2002Apr11.html

UI GYMNAST ANDRADE FEATURED IN PHOTO (Los Angeles Times, April 11)
An Associated Press photo that ran on the paper's sports page carries the following caption: "Meanwhile, Back in the Batcave. Holy backflip, Commissioner! Nabil Andrade isn't merely hanging around. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gymnast is practicing his dismounts while using a trampoline at the UI Fieldhouse this week."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=730bbc30f2ec766f5f08315104c8437e&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSzS-lSlzV&_md5=f544d7e182cea0c03ccfae5b1830ac20
The photo also ran April 10, although with a different caption, on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object.cgi?object=/news/pictures/2002/04/10/dismounts9.jpg&paper=gate&file=dip.DTL&directory=/gate/archive/2002/04/10&type=gallery

JONES: UI TAKES STEPS TO CURB DRINKING (Arizona Republic, April 10)
College students who consider excessive drinking a "rite of passage" were served a sobering notice yesterday by a new study reporting that alcohol-related accidents kill 1,400 of their peers each year. In an effort to stem the flow of fraternal liquor, some schools, such as the University of Iowa, have forbidden fraternities and sororities from possessing or consuming alcohol in their chapter houses. "This campus has eliminated the chapter house as a center for abusive drinking," said Dr. PHILLIP E. JONES, dean of students at the University of Iowa. "The major problem for us is bars that admit underage students." The Knight-Ridder wire story also ran April 10 in the COLUMBUS DISPATCH in Ohio, the FRESNO BEE In California and the MIAMI HERALD.

JONES: UI TAKES STEPS TO CURB DRINKING (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 10)
College students who consider excessive drinking a "rite of passage" were served a sobering notice yesterday by a new study reporting that alcohol-related accidents kill 1,400 of their peers each year. In an effort to stem the flow of fraternal liquor, some schools, such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have forbidden fraternities and sororities from possessing or consuming alcohol in their chapter houses. "This campus has eliminated the chapter house as a center for abusive drinking," said Dr. PHILLIP E. JONES, dean of students at the University of Iowa. "The major problem for us is bars that admit underage students."
http://proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/login?url=http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=045990aba70ad31ac4c87e088a597690&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSzS-lSlzV&_md5=95b39b7a8792cf1cc3a7140e8c59a097

DIABETES TESTING OF NATIVE AMERICANS CITED (Washington Post, April 9)
Last week federal health officials recommended that all overweight adults, and some others at elevated risk, get tested for "pre-diabetes" to prevent the damage that full-blown diabetes can wreak. Native Americans are about three times more likely than whites to have the disease, according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. The idea that family members come first and one's own needs come second is deeply embedded in native cultures. This may lead some tribe members to feel it's selfish to make self-care a priority. According to findings by TONI TRIPP-REIMER, professor at the University of Iowa College of Nursing, Native Americans may fear that having diabetes reflects a failure to live properly and to be strong of spirit, causing shame -- and reluctance to pursue treatment or even reveal their diagnosis to others.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A13065-2002Apr8.html

UI RAISES MONEY OVERSEAS (Omaha World Herald, April 9)
The state's public universities, seeing a drop in donations from international sources, are working on developing new ways to raise money from overseas. "We know that our success depends on establishing and maintaining long-term relationships, and we cannot neglect those relationships with our international alumni and expect them to support us," said MICHAEL NEW, president of the University of Iowa Foundation. The university estimates that about 4,700 alumni live outside the United States. New efforts could include overseas trips and Internet communication.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=360867

CASSELL RECEIVES BRAIN STUDY GRANT (Omaha World Herald, April 9)
A University of Iowa professor has received a $660,000 grant to study how an area of the brain that influences emotion and behavior is linked to other parts of the brain. MARTIN CASSELL, associate professor of anatomy and cell biology, said the grant will help revise definitions of an area of the brain known as the amygdala, a small gray matter about the size and shape of an almond. "I am asking what is the structure of the amygdala? What operations are performed by its individual components? How are those components connected up in terms of a network?" Cassell said.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=360674

OMAHA PIANIST ATTENDED UI (Omaha World Herald, April 8)
Debra Saylor, who earned master's degrees in piano and voice performance from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, entered the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition for young professional pianists, held every four years. In the amateur contest, she won third place and a special award for best performance of a piece from the Romantic era -- "Clair de Lune." The contest encouraged Saylor, who is blind, to travel and enter more competitions.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=359962

HUNNICUTT BOOK CITED (Information Week, April 8)
Kellogg Co. founder W.K. Kellogg changed cereal-plant production schedules from three eight-hour shifts to four six-hour shifts in 1930. The company found that the shorter workday influenced employees to work harder and more efficiently. The results included drastic reductions in overhead costs, labor costs, and the number of work-related accidents. Improvement was even more dramatic outside the factory, in the town of Battle Creek. "For the first time they had real leisure," writes BENJAMIN KLINE HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure arts at the University of Iowa, in his book, "Kellogg's Six-Hour Day."
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=3e7b79dc48a298a2c2785961e4c91fe4&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLSzS-lSlzV&_md5=cb861ccdf6c546f3a92e0550c0535b52

CONROY REFLECTS ON WRITING (New York Times, April 8)
In a "Writers on Writing" column, FRANK CONROY remarks on his discovery that sentiments he'd expressed as a young writer when penning Stop-Time were mirrored in V. S. Naipaul's recent book “Half a Life” and "The Beast in the Jungle" by Henry James. Remarks Conroy: "I suspect that many, many writers have found themselves dealing with characters they have created who are waiting for something to happen, something 'magic' (Naipaul) or something 'momentous' (me) or something 'prodigious' (James) that once recognized would change everything." Conroy also discusses how he lost the original second chapter of his book “Body and Soul” and found it only after rewriting the chapter, then compared the two versions. He says that "for those with the time and interest, the two drafts can be compared on line at www.uiowa.edu/~iww/conroy -- the Web site of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP -- where the special collections office of the library has them displayed, or should by the time you read this.)"
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/08/books/08CONR.html
A version of the story also ran April 8 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nyt/20020408/en_nyt/footprints_of_greatness_on_your_turf

UI TESTS VIRTUAL BRONCHOSCOPY (Scientific American, April 8)
A story about virtual bronchoscopy, which can film the insides of body organs without the unpleasant and risky tubes, says the real benefit may lie in its ability to help doctors plan and execute medical interventions. When tumors push against the airways, doctors often insert a stent to keep breathing passages open. The stent must be exactly the right size: too small, and it could be coughed out or sucked into the lung; too big, and it won't fully expand in the airways, and could block breathing even more. Using virtual bronchoscopy, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are trying to improve the success of their intervention by measuring the exact size of the airway before inserting the stent, to assure a perfect fit.
http://www.sciam.com/explorations/2002/040802vendoscopy/index.html

BLOOM'S 'POSTVILLE' REVIEWED (Svenska Dagbladet, April 7)
A review of STEPHEN BLOOM's book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," notes that it is "both autobiography as well as a thorough and courageous piece of investigative journalism." The reviewer says that Bloom was drawn to Postville in search of a "confirmation of his own Jewish identity" after he moved from San Francisco to Iowa to accept a teaching position at the University of Iowa. (Svenska Dagbladet is the second largest newspaper in Sweden.)

UI WORKSHOP GRADUATE OFFUTT PROFILED (Seattle Times, April 7)
A feature on author Chris Offutt says he left home at 19 and worked many odd jobs, including a stint as a circus performer in a walrus suit, attended the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, then published a memoir, two story collections and a novel.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=heroes07&date=20020407

MILLER DESCRIBES POLITICAL MIDDLE CLASS (Dallas Morning News, April 7)
A story exploring the so-called American middle class, "an almost mythical creature upon whom political strategists and market researchers concentrate such energy and attention," quotes University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER. Miller, who conducts the Heartland Poll of voters in the Upper Midwest before every national election, says that -- politically speaking -- being in the middle does not necessarily mean being nonpartisan. Only 40 percent of voters identify themselves as independents; the rest say they are Republicans or Democrats, according to Miller. Politically, being in the middle "is not an identifiable position as much as knowing you're not over here and you're not over there," Miller says. "What makes the middle distinct is there's nothing distinct about the middle."

UI SEMINAR HELD IN PATZCUARO, MEXICO (Baltimore Sun, April 7)
The author of a story on the artisans of Patzcuaro, Mexico, says that every year, while thousands of American visitors head to the city to savor the Old World atmosphere, thousands of Michoacanos are heading north to seek work in the USA. A 1998 Mexican population study found that among males age 18 or older in the state, one in three has at some point gone north to the U.S. to find work, a rate that puts Michoacán among the Mexican states that export the most workers. In fact, the author says, the week before he arrived in Patzcuaro, the city played host to a traveling seminar from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK: "Understanding and Valuing the Mexican Immigrant/Guest Worker."

SMALL CAP STOCK FUNDS RESEARCHED (New York Times, April 7)
The small-cap effect in mutual funds it seems, is not as exploitable in practice as theory suggests, even by the smallest funds. Recent research by three finance professors -- Joel L. Horowitz of Northwestern, Tim Loughran of Notre Dame and N. E. SAVIN of the University of Iowa -- has found that the small-cap effect is being driven almost completely by the tiniest companies. How tiny? The three professors found that if companies with market capitalizations of $5 million or less are eliminated from the record, the small-cap effect disappears. That is devastating to the small-cap effect because it is virtually impossible to make money by investing in such companies — they hardly ever trade, and their bid-ask spreads are prohibitive.
http://college4.nytimes.com/guests/articles/2002/04/07/912288.xml

ARTIST CATLETT EARNED MFA AT UI (New York Times, April 7)
A story on the sculptor and printmaker Elizabeth Catlett, whose bronze memorial honoring the writer Ralph Ellison will go on view in August in Harlem, said that as an African-American woman whose work depicts only blacks and Mexicans, and who has, moreover, been living in Mexico for the last 50 years, she was hardly well-situated for the American art scene. During the McCarthy era, she encountered further problems: she was considered a Communist for teaching at a Harlem school for laborers in the early 1940's and for allying herself with Mexican Communist artists later in the decade. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Ms. Catlett's teacher, the painter Grant Wood, urged her to portray what she knew best. "Of course, it was my own people," she said. After receiving the university's first master of fine arts degree, in 1940, she accepted a job as head of the art department at Dillard University in New Orleans.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/07/arts/design/07GLAD.html
A version of the story also ran April 7 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nyt/20020407/en_nyt/strong_enough_to_keep_on_until_she_got_her_due

UI SEMINAR HELD IN PATZCUARO, MEXICO (Los Angeles Times, April 7)
The author of a story on the artisans of Patzcuaro, Mexico, says that every year, while thousands of American visitors head to the city to savor the Old World atmosphere, thousands of Michoacanos are heading north to seek work in the U.S. A 1998 Mexican population study found that among males age 18 or older in the state, one in three has at some point gone north to the U.S. to find work, a rate that puts Michoacán among the Mexican states that export the most workers. In fact, the author says, the week before he arrived in Patzcuaro the city played host to a traveling seminar from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK: "Understanding and Valuing the Mexican Immigrant/Guest Worker."
http://www.latimes.com/travel/destinations/mexico/la-040702patzcuaro.story

UI PRESS CITED IN REVIEW ROUNDUP (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 7)
Don Scheese's "Mountains of Memory: A Fire Lookout's Life in the River of No Return Wilderness" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 224 pages, $19.95 paper) will appeal to fans of Edward Abbey and Gary Snyder. Scheese teaches at Gustavus Adolphus College in St. Peter, Minn., and has been a fire lookout for more than 10 years in the Idaho wilderness. His memoir is a 2002 Minnesota Book Award nominee.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/2139562.html

FORMER IOWAN PRAISES UI, IOWA CITY (Washington Post, April 7)
In a letter to a columnist who goes by the moniker "Dr. Gridlock," Bette Meisel writes that she and her family moved from Iowa City to Old Town Alexandria almost six years ago. "We thought we'd stay for two years and go back to Iowa to retire. And here we are! The thought of leaving has disappeared. Why? Because this is the most fascinating place we've ever lived," Meisel writes. She adds, "Iowa has no traffic problems. Iowa City, the home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has loads of culture. It is a safe place to bring up children. You send your kids to good public schools and leave your door unlocked."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A7752-2002Apr6.html

CHURCH OFFICIAL WORKED AT UI (Newsday, April 6)
Grace Macmillan, Nassau County coordinator of Church World Service for the Long Island Council of Churches since 1986, is profiled in this article, which notes that she served as director of student activities at the Congregational Church of Iowa City on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus. The Church World Service provides food, blankets, clothing and medicine when disaster strikes.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=f31b7e85f768e3ff71ea568b87c4a115&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLSzS-lSlzV&_md5=6e68ec0c3b9ee12dbfae427b9476cb46

UI ALUMNUS DONATES $50,000 FOR OLD CAP (Omaha World-Herald, April 6)
A $50,000 contribution from an 89-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumnus has helped boost a private fund for renovating the Old Capitol building to $110,000. H. John Hawkinson of Florida, a 1936 business graduate, recently made the donation that will help repair the university's historic building. A Nov. 20 fire destroyed the building's dome. The fire also resulted in water and smoke damage inside the building. University officials have estimated costs of repair at more than $5 million. The University of Iowa Foundation is also trying to raise $2 million for the Old Capitol.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=359012

TUITION AT UI MAY GO UP 19 PERCENT (Arizona Daily Star, April 5)
A story about rising tuition at universities across the country says that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA proposed tuition hikes are in the double digits -- a 19 percent increase, to $4,191, for in-state students.

BOWLSBY EYED FOR NCAA TOP JOB (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 5)
Now that March Madness is over, the real campaign in the National Collegiate Athletic Association can get under way. Cedric W. Dempsey, the NCAA's president since 1994, announced in January that he would retire after his contract expires early next year. Among the names of numerous college leaders that keep coming up as possible successors to Dempsey is ROBERT A. BOWLSBY of the University of Iowa, even though Bowlsby said he doesn't think athletics directors would be considered. A chart listing the potential candidates' pros and cons says Bowlsby's strength is his being a longtime athletics director and a member of many NCAA panels. Listed as cons is that Bowlsby "does not have a high national profile outside athletics circles" and "has never been a campus CEO."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i30/30a03301.htm

UI PRINTS BOOK ON BARD, YIDDISH (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 5)
Call it chutzpah, but Shakespeare "translated and improved!" was all in a day's hype for Yiddish-theater promoters in 19th-century New York. And why not? As Joel Berkowitz says in "Shakespeare on the American Yiddish Stage" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS), labeling Yiddish versions of the Bard "fartaytsht un farbesert!" appealed to an audience of recent Eastern European immigrants, who favored "Zayn oder nit zayn" over "To be or not to be." They were theatergoers, he writes, who "by and large knew little of Shakespeare and the three centuries' worth of cultural baggage his name carried." They could be particular, however. "An Antony leading his legions between Egypt and Rome would offer little interest to them. A Lear, struggling to hold family and kingdom together, would and did," says the author, who teaches modern Jewish studies at the State University of New York at Albany.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i30/30a01501.htm

STUDENT-FACULTY SEX POLICY CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 5)
A growing number of colleges and universities have set specific guidelines on sex between professors and students. Whether these policies will change how professors and students conduct their personal lives remains to be seen. But if the University of Iowa, one of the first colleges in the country to have a policy on faculty-student affairs, is any indication, they may lead to a decrease in student-professor relationships. In 1986, Iowa banned consensual relationships between faculty members and students when the professor supervises or advises the student. And the Faculty Senate has just revised the policy, clarifying it and separating it from the university's sexual-harassment rules. LEE ANNA CLARK, the associate provost at Iowa, and Judith P. Aikin, who was dean of the College of Liberal Arts when the policy was developed, say they believe professors have fewer relationships with students they supervise or teach than they did 15 years ago. That's because they report such liaisons to their superiors. In 1986, Ms. Aikin says, she had about 10 cases of consensual relationships to deal with each year -- and more were dealt with by departments. Now, perhaps only one case a year reaches Ms. Clark.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i30/30a00801.htm

NIXON ADMITS BAKE SALE PITCH IS PART 'P.R.' (Chicago Sun-Times, April 4)
WILFRID NIXON
, a University of Iowa engineering professor, in announcing his proposal that the faculty hold a bake sale to try to make up for some of the state's $40 million in university budget cuts, said: "There's clearly a public relations aspect to this." The paper said that was true and that "it worked."

FOLSOM CLARIFIES 'BULL DURHAM' WHITMAN QUOTE (ESPN Online, April 4)
A story written announcing the release of a new DVD version of "Bull Durham" asks experts how true to life the movie was. At the end of the movie, for instance, Annie (played in the film by actress Susan Sarandon) says, "Walt Whitman once said, 'I see great things in baseball. It's our game -- the American game.' He said, 'It will repair our losses and be a blessing to us.' To find out if Whitman really said that ESPN turned to Whitman expert and University of Iowa professor ED FOLSOM. Folsom replied that the quote originated from an 1888 discussion with Whitman's friend and disciple Horace Traubel. According to Traubel, Whitman said to him, "I like your interest in sports -- ball, chiefest of all -- baseball particularly: baseball is our game: the American game: I connect it with our national character. Sports take people out of doors, get them filled with oxygen -- generate some of the brutal customs (so-called brutal customs) which, after all, tend to habituate people to a necessary physical stoicism. We are some ways a dyspeptic, nervous set: anything which will repair such losses may be regarded as a blessing to the race." Folsom, who has a chapter called "Whitman and Baseball" in his book "Walt Whitman's Native Representations," added, "His best baseball quote is another 1888 comment to Traubel: Traubel had told Whitman that baseball has become 'the hurrah game of the republic,' and Whitman says, 'That's beautiful: the hurrah game! Well -- it's our game: that's the chief fact in connection with it: America's game: has the snap, go, fling, of the American atmosphere -- belongs as much to our institutions, fits into them as significantly, as our constitutions, laws: is just as important in the sum total of our historic life.'"
http://espn.go.com/page2/s/closer/020404.html

UI-PUBLISHED POET REMEMBERED (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 4)
A story about how the death of faculty influences colleagues cites the case of a friend of the article's author. Michael Bugeja, associate director of the E.W. Scripps School of Journalism at Ohio University, says his former colleague -- the eminent poet Tom Andrews -- had relocated to Athens, Greece, intending to marry last summer, but contracted a rare blood disease and lapsed into a coma from which he did not wake. Andrews had written "The Hemophiliac's Motorcycle," (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) a collection of poetry that won the Iowa Poetry Prize in 1993.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/2002/04/2002040401c.htm

NIXON PROPOSES BAKE SALE TO RAISE FUNDS (USA Today, April 4)
Professors at the University of Iowa are planning a bake sale to help the school deal with more than $40 million in state budget cuts. Engineering professor WILFRID NIXON, who proposed the sale, admits that the faculty won't raise big money with cookies and cakes, but "it's better to bake a brownie than curse the cuts."

WASSERMAN: GIVE FACULTY A CUT OF GRANTS (Omaha World-Herald, April 4)
A psychology professor says the University of Iowa should improve its incentive program for faculty members who bring in federal research dollars if it hopes to remain competitive with other colleges and universities. EDWARD WASSERMAN said one way to do that is to direct a greater share of the federal money back to the researcher responsible for winning the grant. With each federal grant won by faculty, the university receives a percentage, which is used to pay overhead costs, such as heating buildings, renovating lab facilities and administering the grant. Under its existing Research Incentive Program, the university allocates from its general fund a sum equal to 4 percent of its total overhead revenue back to its 11 colleges, officials said. Last fiscal year, the university allocated nearly $1.9 million to the colleges through its research incentive program.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=356930

UI, ISU RESEARCHERS DEFEND REPORT (Omaha World-Herald, April 4)
Iowa State University and University of Iowa researchers who earlier this year released a summary report on factory farm studies are defending the document as being accurate. Some lawmakers on the Senate agriculture and natural resources panels raised questions Wednesday about the credibility of the joint summary, a compilation of many studies' results, which concludes that livestock pollution may be a threat to human health and the environment. The researchers stood by the recommendation they made in the report: that livestock farms should be regulated. Researchers on the 27-member group that wrote the summary didn't always agree on some points. But Dr. PETER THORNE, a U of I occupational health professor who was co-chairman of the project, said that is why some sections of the document contain second opinions.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=356936

ALUMNUS BEMOANS DRINKING RULES (Wall Street Journal-Europe, April 4)
In a column written by Michael Judge, an assistant features editor at the Journal, Judge bemoans what he calls "a new temperance movement sweeping across America." He writes: "Local governments, most notably in college towns, are banning happy hours, two-for-ones, dollar pitchers and a host of other insidious drink specials at an alarming rate -- never mind the fact that overall drinking among Americans, including college students, is declining. Iowa City, Iowa, for example, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, my alma mater, enacted an ordinance in August making it illegal to sell more than two servings of alcohol to one person at a time; alas, two-for-one and all-you-can-drink specials were also banned." The article originally ran March 27 in the U.S. edition of the Wall Street Journal.

UI DATA USED IN DUST GRAPHIC (Orange County Register, April 3)
An article about fears of Chinese dust storms carrying pollution to the West Coast of the United States includes a graphic that sites among its sources the UNIVERSITY O F IOWA.

PROFESSORS PLAN BAKE SALE (San Francisco Chronicle, April 3)
Professors at the University of Iowa have a secret weapon in their fight to help the school rebound after losing millions of dollars in state budget cuts. They want to hold a bake sale. "Obviously, it is unlikely that a bake sale will raise the approximately $40 million in lost funding," said engineering professor WILFRID NIXON. But "there's clearly a public relations aspect to this." The Iowa Faculty Senate approved a resolution by a 15-10 vote Tuesday to hold the sale.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/03/MNbakesale.DTL

PROFESSORS PLAN BAKE SALE (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 3)

Professors at the University of Iowa have a secret weapon in their fight to help the school rebound after losing millions of dollars in state budget cuts. They want to hold a bake sale. "Obviously, it is unlikely that a bake sale will raise the approximately $40 million in lost funding," said engineering professor WILFRID NIXON. But "there's clearly a public relations aspect to this." The Iowa Faculty Senate approved a resolution by a 15-10 vote Tuesday to hold the sale.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/2204482.html

PUBLIC HEALTH OK'S BAN ON TOBACCO MONEY (USA Today, April 3)

The faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH approved a ban on accepting research grants or other financial support tied to cigarette makers or tobacco-related companies. The vote makes the college eligible for $2.5 million in research funding from a foundation established as part of the federal settlement with tobacco companies.

UI FACULTY PLANS TO HOLD BAKE SALE (Associated Press, April 3)
Professors at the UI have a secret weapon in their fight to help the school rebound after losing millions of dollars in state budget cuts. They want to hold a bake sale. "Obviously, it is unlikely that a bake sale will raise the approximately $40 million in lost funding," said engineering professor WILFRID NIXON. But "there's clearly a public relations aspect to this." The Iowa Faculty Senate approved a resolution by a 15-10 vote Tuesday to hold the sale. "It is better to bake a brownie than curse the cuts," said Nixon, who proposed the resolution. The plan now goes to the faculty council. All money will go to help students, such as through scholarships. Not all senators found the idea palatable. Some said it would send the wrong message: that faculty members had enough time to bake. "I think this could backfire on us," said CHARLES LYNCH, a professor in the College of Public Health. SHELDON KURTZ, a law professor, joked that critics could turn around and say to the faculty, "Let them eat cake." The story appeared on the WASHINGTON POST website:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A55975-2002Apr3.html

ENROLLMENT CAPS CONSIDERED (Omaha World Herald, April 3)
Robert Koob, president of the University of Northern Iowa, says the three state universities soon may need to cap enrollment, or they will see quality drop as the schools face increasing enrollment with declining state dollars. Koob and the other university presidents see the enrollment cap as the lesser of two evils (poorer quality or fewer students). "The worst thing that could happen," said UI President MARY SUE COLEMAN, "would be for us to admit more students than we can provide with a really good educational experience. There are universities out there where the students struggle to get into classes and they truly cannot graduate within four years because they simply cannot get into course sections."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=355907

CASSILL ATTENDED UI, TAUGHT AT WORKSHOP (Chicago Tribune, April 2)
R. V. Cassill was the author of 27 novels and seven short story collections, but his greatest impact on American literature was as a teacher and editor of fiction anthologies widely used in creative writing courses. Mr. Cassill, of Providence and Truro, who taught creative writing at Brown University from 1966 to 1983, died March 25 at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence. He was 82. Ronald Verlin Cassill was born in Cedar Falls, Iowa. He graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before serving in the Army during World War II. He later earned a master's degree at Iowa, and he taught at the university's Writers' Workshop from 1948 to 1952 and from 1960 to 1966.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/chi-0204020132apr02.story
A version of this story also appeared April 2 in the BOSTON GLOBE.

UI DROPS HAT CONTRACT (San Francisco Chronicle, April 2)
In recent months, Ohio State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and other colleges have questioned or canceled contracts with New Era Cap Co., a closely held firm near Buffalo, N.Y. The schools are responding to allegations by the Worker Rights Consortium, an antisweatshop group that has dealt with companies abroad, that U.S. workers face unsafe conditions. New Era says the scrutiny is due to a dispute with the Communications Workers of America union, which represents some of its employees.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/02/financial1108EST0075.DTL

DYKEN COMMENTS ON SLEEP (ABCNews.com, April 2)
Dr. MARK DYKEN, associate professor of neurology at the University of Iowa, and several sleep experts answered questions about how to get a good night's sleep. Dyken was asked: What advice do you have for people who work the night shift? He responded: "For people who do work the nighttime shift, you'd like to tell them to keep that schedule seven days a week. For every hour of change in your sleep/wake schedule, it takes a young person 24 hours to adjust. That's jet lag. So what you want to do is say, don't try to adjust on the weekend, don't go watch the movies during the day, don't try and do a lot of daytime activities. Continue to sleep during the day, and stay up at night. That's difficult." http://more.abcnews.go.com/sections/living/dailynews/sleep_poll020401.html

UI CANCELS NEW ERA CAP CONTRACT (Wall Street Journal, Apr. 2)
In recent months, Ohio State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and other colleges have questioned or canceled contracts with New Era Cap Co., a closely held firm near Buffalo, N.Y. The schools are responding to allegations by the Worker Rights Consortium, an antisweatshop group that has dealt with companies abroad, that U.S. workers face unsafe conditions. New Era says the scrutiny is due to a dispute with the Communications Workers of America union, which represents some of its employees. New Era's Tim Freer says the company plans to meet with WRC this month. "We want to make sure rights are respected, whether it's in Bangladesh or Buffalo," says WRC's Scott Nova. He says the group doesn't take union money, though AFL-CIO official Linda Chavez-Thompson is one of 50 board members.
http://online.wsj.com/article/0,,SB1017710829701137960,00.html?mod=Page+One
The article also appeared in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2002/04/02/financial1108EST0075.DTL

UI RESEARCHERS TO STUDY STUTTERING (Omaha World Herald, April 2)
Two professors at the University of Iowa are among a team of scientists planning to study early childhood stuttering with a $4million federal grant. PATRICIA ZEBROWSKI and JERALD MOON, associate professors of speech pathology and audiology, are responsible for research at the university that is aimed at classifying stutterers into subgroups to better treat the disorder. They also will examine motor skills exhibited by the children. Research will be carried out at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Purdue University in Indiana and the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. The study is an extension of research started 13 years ago at the University of Illinois by University of Iowa alumnus EHUD YAIRI, who will serve as the project's principal researcher.
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=57&u_sid=354922

SCHOOLS HAVING TROUBLE FINDING TEACHERS (Omaha World Herald, April 2)
While a handful of Iowa school districts are letting teachers go because of budget cuts, officials in other school districts say they are having trouble finding qualified candidates for jobs that are open. For soon-to-be teachers, like Grace Jordan of Atlantic, Iowa, positions are open if they are willing to move or specialize in an area that traditionally have the most openings. Jordan, 21, is confident she'll be able to land a job in her area of specialty: elementary science and special education. "I think I'll be able to find a special-education teaching job," said Jordan, who graduates this May from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I wouldn't be so worried if there weren't so many cutbacks with the state."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=354924

MORRELL BOOK REVIEWED (Chicago Tribune, April 2)
David Morrell, a Ph.D. and former professor of literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, passes along some honest tips for starry-eyed literary aspirants in his "Lessons From a Lifetime of Writing: A Novelist Looks at His Craft." "This is no ordinary how-to manual. With remarkable candor, the author reveals exactly how his mind works when he puts a novel together. By doing so, he delves into something that has always intrigued scientists: From where do we get artistic creativity?" the reviewer says. "Any psychological trauma, never adjusted to, can be the impetus for someone to want to be a storyteller," Morrell writes. His own traumas, he confesses, were growing up without "the affectionate attention of a male authority figure" because his father died in World War II, and being put in an orphanage for a while by a financially strapped mother.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/chi-0204020259apr02.story?null

UI CONSIDERS CUTTING NIGHT, SATURDAY CLASSES (USA Today, April 1)
Adults trying to earn a college education through night and weekend courses may be the next to suffer from state budget cuts. The presidents of Iowa's three public universities say the cuts could force them to eliminate night and evening classes. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA records last year showed 9,434 enrollments in Saturday and evening classes.

AUTHOR CASSILL TAUGHT AT WORKSHOP (New York Times, April 1)
R.V. Cassill, the man of letters who was a novelist, short-story writer, editor, book reviewer and teacher of creative writing, died last Monday at Rhode Island Hospital in Providence. He was 82 and lived in Providence and Truro, Mass. The author of 24 novels and 7 collections of short stories, Cassill began writing in his teens and published his first story, "To the Clear Mountains," in a little magazine in 1939, when he was 19. Among his novels were "Eagle on the Coin" (1950), about racial equality; "Clem Anderson" (1961), about a failed writer; "Dr. Cobb's Game" (1970), about the Profumo sex scandals that rocked Britain in the early 1960's; and "After Goliath" (1985), about King David of the Old Testament. In 1946 he studied at the Art Institute of Chicago, and the following year he received an M.A. at IOWA. He taught at the UNIVERSITY'S WRITERS' WORKSHOP from 1948 to 1952 and then again from 1960 to 1966.
http://www.nytimes.com/2002/04/01/arts/01CASS.html

RZONCA: NIGHT/WEEKEND CLASSES UP IN AIR (Omaha World-Herald, April 1)
Adults with jobs and families trying to get a college education through night and weekend courses may be the next to suffer from state budget cuts. The presidents of Iowa's three public universities say that night and evening classes may be cut because of further state budget reductions. The University of Iowa has chopped about $300,000 in state funding from continuing education since July. "It's not that nontraditional students are not important," said CHET RZONCA, dean of the Division of Continuing Education. "But it's an extension of what the basic mission is." University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN said more budget cuts could mean continuing education courses that have low enrollments will be eliminated. "We certainly want to extend distance education and create opportunities for nontraditional students," she said. "However, I know that continuing education will have to go through the same process that the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences has already gone through. These are not happy choices to have to make."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_pg=36&u_sid=354251

UI PUBLISHES 'LIKE THUNDER' POETRY COLLECTION (Library Journal, April 1)
The publication reviews "Like Thunder: Poets Respond to Violence in America," a collection of poems published this year by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and conceived and edited before Sept. 11. The poems "serve as reminders that terrorists are not our only threat," the reviewer writes.

VALENTINE PLANS NATIONAL TEST FOR NDMA (Kansas City Star, April 1)
Potentially dangerous chemicals -- a nitrosamine known as NDMA -- may be formed when water is treated with a mixture of chlorine and ammonia to make it safe for drinking, according to new studies. Even though federal regulations have not yet limited the levels of NDMA in water or required testing, it would be prudent to know whether the levels are high, said RICHARD VALENTINE, a professor at the University of Iowa. Valentine is conducting the nation's first survey of drinking-water plants to examine how pervasive NDMA is.

NADS COST WORTH IT IN LIVES SAVED (Discover, April 2002)
When the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR became operational in January, it put the Daimler Chrysler simulator in Berlin —- previously the best in the world -— in the shade. For the first time, a driver in a simulator finds the world around him to be so believable he forgets that the car swerving into his lane isn't real. Believability wasn't cheap; most of the $80 million it cost to develop and build the simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Coralville research facility came from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Still, the price can seem low compared with the cost of losing about five lives every hour in highway-related accidents.

AIR QUALITY STANDARDS DEVELOPED (Veterinary Practice News, April 2002)
A new report form a team of scientists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Iowa State University recommends that the Iowa Department of Natural Resources develop ambient air-quality standards for concentrated animal feeding operations in the state. The report, released on Feb. 8, stated that while no specific diseases among community residents can be linked to air emissions from confined livestock operations, it cautions that emissions may constitute a public health hazard and precautions should be taken to minimize exposures from such operations.

MARSHALL FINDS ELDERLY DIETS LACKING (Prevention, April 2002)
Researchers at the University of Iowa studied the dietary records of 220 people age 79 and older and found that 80 percent of them got insufficient amounts of four or more vital nutrients from the foods they ate. "The elderly are vulnerable to inadequate nutrition and its effects," notes study coauthor TERESA MARSHALL, Ph.D., R.D., visiting professor in the department of preventive and community dentistry at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. "And the degree of inadequate nutrient intakes in these people was alarming."

O'HARA CITES SIGNS OF POSTPARTUM DEPRESSION (Child, April 2002)
A story about postpartum depression asks MICHAEL O'HARA, Ph.D., a professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, what signs of the condition people should watch for. O'Hara says major changes in a person's outlook can be an indication of postpartum depression. If a person experiences drastically different emotions or sleeping or eating habits, she should consult her obstetrician, nurse midwife or primary-healthcare provider. "Try to get mental health care from a psychologist, psychiatrist or counselor," O'Hara adds. "This needs to be taken seriously."

UI STUDY: ANTIHISTAMINES POSE RISKS (Better Nutrition, April 2002)
A story about pollen's role in allergies says that research conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA seems to support the conclusion that use of two common antihistamines -- diphenhydramine and fexofenadine -- can impair the performance of routine duties. The research, reported in the March 2001 Annals of Internal Medicine, found that the driving abilities of subjects who had taken diphenhydramine were more impaired than those who were given alcohol. Subjects who took fexofenadine performed better but still faced problems handling basic tasks necessary for safe driving.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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