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September 2001

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AUTHORS PEN BOOK (Columbia Journalism Review, September/October 2001)
Taking Stock: Journalism and the Publicly Traded Newspaper Company, written  by two University of Iowa professors and a former journalism school director, is a fact-rich look at exactly what has taken place to turn the news business away from news to business, wrote Geneva Overholser, a syndicated columnist for the Washington Post Writers Group, in a review of the book. "Taking Stock is not another paean to the romance of journalism or one more eulogy over the passing of what was. It's a clear-eyed and dispassionate setting-forth of the conditions that imperil news today," Overholser wrote. Taking Stock was written by University College of Law Professor RANDALL BEZANSON, UI Journalism Professor Emeritus GILBERT CRANBERG (a former editorial writer for The Des Moines Register) and former UI School of Journalism and Mass Communication Director John Soloski. On-campus access to the entire article is available via the UI Libraries' Lexis-Nexis Web Universe at
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=ce495ec21ae25f87ae0e9ecfaaf9b1b3&_docnum=8&wchp=dGLStV-lSlAl&_md5=bdc8311d8af2a4b8b8dc7635e37ab2ed

STORY BY IWP AUTHOR POSTED ON SITE (Yahoo! News, Sept. 28)
Crazy Glue, a short story by Israeli author and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITERS PROGRAM resident Etgar Keret, was published on the site. Keret was scheduled to read from The Bus Driver Who Wanted To Be God, published by Thomas Dunne/St. Martin's Press, in California at Beyond Baroque in Venice Sept. 30 and at Midnight Special in Santa Monica Oct. 1. Keret's affiliation with the UI is cited at the end of the story.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/laweekly/20010928/lo/28622_1.html

GALLERY HAS PHOTO OF UI HOMECOMING (San Francisco Chronicle, Sept. 28)
The paper's photo gallery includes an Associated Press picture taken at the University of Iowa homecoming. The caption reads: "Me, myself and 'I': UNIVERSITY OF IOWA freshman Mike Dupasquier has such an inflated opinion of himself, he just might float off the Delta Chi float. It's homecoming this weekend at U of I."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/object.cgi?object=/news/pictures/2001/09/28/bigiph6.jpg&paper=gate&file=dip.DTL&directory=/gate/archive/2001/09/28&type=gallery

CALLAGHAN CAUTIOUS ON NEW HIP SURGERY (Contra Costa Times, Sept. 28)
A Chicago doctor, teamed with surgeons in Oregon and Canada, is turning the grueling job of hip replacement into a minimally invasive operation by slipping in the artificial joint through two small incisions instead of a 12-inch slice. It's an intriguing method but will take years of study to ensure patients do as well long-term as they do with regular hip replacements, warns Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN of the University of Iowa, president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Plus, so far it is limited to thinner patients, because small incisions may not penetrate layers of fat, and those without huge hip deformities.

UI FILM SCHOOL GRADUATE IS AMONG DEAD (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 27)
A collection of anecdotes about some of the thousands killed in the Sept. 11 attacks on the Pentagon and World Trade Centers includes one on Craig Amundson, who created computer graphics at the Pentagon. An Iowa native, Amundson, 28, had moved his wife and two children to the Washington, D.C. area two years ago to take the job there. He had a bachelor's degree in film studies from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and worked as a multimedia illustrator for the Army's deputy chief of staff for personnel command. "How do you describe a person?" Mary McAfoos, Craig's aunt, said. "He was optimistic. Had an easy laugh. And he adored his family." He adored them so much that he turned down a recent promotion because it would have separated him from his family for a while.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0109270194sep27.story

GILCHRIST: GAS MASKS IMPRACTICAL (ABCNEWS.com, Sept. 27)
Heightened concern of another possible terrorist attack, this time using biological or chemical agents, is driving many people to buy what they believe is their only protection -- a gas mask. But experts question how effective they are and if they could be used in time. Dr. MARY GILCHRIST, director of the Hygienic Lab at the University of Iowa, points out that wearing a gas mask all day is not practical. Microorganisms would most likely be in the air without our knowledge, so the only way to protect oneself would be to wear the mask for 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and that, of course, would interfere with many activities.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/WTC_gasmasks010926.html
The same article was posted Sept. 27 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/abc/20010927/hl/wtc_gasmasks010926_1.html

BANNED FRATERNITY RECRUITING AGAIN (USA Today, Sept. 26)
A fraternity banned from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA six years ago because of an alcohol-related death is recruiting again. Lambda Chi Alpha plans to sign up 25-30 new members by May. Matthew Garofalo died during a pledge ceremony in 1995. Authorities said his death was caused by excessive drinking.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010926/3483036s.htm

MURRAY COMMENTS ON NEW RESEARCH (Rocky Mountain News, Sept. 25)
Researchers have found the first gene known to play a role in the most common form of cleft lip and palate, a class of disfiguring birth defects that affects one in 1,000 newborns. If more of the responsible genes can be identified, researchers could someday spot at-risk women and provide dietary supplements during pregnancy to cut the chance of defects, said Dr. Richard Spritz of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. Spritz and colleagues in California and Venezuela report their findings in the journal Nature Genetics. In the same edition, British researchers identify a different  gene linked to an inherited form of cleft lip and palate. "Taking all the new information together, we are beginning to be able to provide more specific information to families regarding recurrence risks for cleft lip and palate," University of Iowa researcher JEFFREY C. MURRAY wrote in an accompanying Nature Genetics commentary.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=fcd896cd3f651f0e0de7cb879cc6a2ef&_docnum=3&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=fce0b353261da5241a4a8cc77e9ff617

CALLAGHAN: METAL IN HIP IMPLANTS OK (Yahoo! News, Sept. 25)
Although at least one of the metals used in some hip implants has cancer-causing potential, there's no evidence that getting your hip replaced increases your risk for cancer, a study in Sweden shows. Chromium Cr(VI), also known as hexavalent chromium, one of the alloys used in a prosthetic hip, has been blamed for causing lung cancer in chemical workers and in homeowners exposed to the metal in drinking water. Nevertheless, researchers report no increased cancer rates in people who have had a hip replacement when compared with cancer rates in the general population. The materials used in the hip implant are long-lasting and well tested, says Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN, a professor of orthopedics at the University of Iowa and president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons in Iowa City. "Any metal can be carcinogenic, but chromium/cobalt alloy is the biggest concern," Callaghan explains. "But these materials are used because they have excellent wear characteristics and they have been tried and true for 30 years, without any large concern."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010926/hl/no_cancer_risk_seen_in_hip_implants_1.html

GRADUATE HEADS UP TECH AGENCY  (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Sept. 25)
Rebecca Heidepriem, a 19-year veteran of the Xerox Corp. and a 1982 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was named Tuesday by Wisconsin Gov. Scott McCallum as secretary of the newly created state Department of Electronic Government. McCallum pushed for creation of the agency to unify state information technology services under one office, in what he said would be a more efficient way to provide computer services.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/state/sep01/egov26092501a.asp

FOLSOM COMMENTS ON WHITMAN (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 25)
Walt Whitman was inspired by life -- people, nature, landscapes, cities, towns, industries, farms. He believed it was his duty to capture that inspiration on paper and he always carried notebooks with him so that he could jot down images as they occurred to him. Later they'd become material for his poetry. "Those notebooks let him record unmediated thoughts and not restrict himself by trying to fit them into conventional rhyming schemes," said ED FOLSOM, an English professor at the University of Iowa and editor of the Walt Whitman Quarterly. "When he saw his notebooks, he realized he had invented a new organic style that wasn't mechanical or cobbled together."

RUBINSTEIN: DEVICE MAY CALM TINNITUS (The Plain Dealer, Sept. 24)
In a story about tinnitus -- so-called "phantom noises" that plague people, like ringing, whistling, pinging or roaring -- an experimental approach being investigated at the University of Iowa may help quiet the noises. The new method uses an electrode implanted in the inner ear to stimulate a structure called the cochlea, which turns mechanical vibrations into a signal that the auditory nerve conveys to the brain. In healthy people, the auditory nerve fires constantly, even when there is no sound, but it has a distinctive firing pattern when sound is absent. "When you are in a quiet room, your ear is chattering away like crazy," said Dr. JAY RUBINSTEIN, an associate professor of otolaryngology and biomedical engineering at the University of Iowa. Dr. Rubinstein and his colleagues suspect that when the ear is damaged and the "chatter" stops, the brain interprets the lack of activity as noise. The electrode in their experiment mimics the normal firing pattern of the auditory nerve when there is no sound. "In theory, this is the code for the sound of silence," Dr. Rubinstein said. His experimental implant for tinnitus is not the same as the cochlear implant, a device that is not experimental and that is used to help deaf people hear. But cochlear implants for the deaf can also help with tinnitus. (The Plain Dealer is a daily in Cleveland, Ohio.)

POMONA WRITING PROGRAM COMPARED TO UI'S (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 24)
A story about Pomona College's creative writing program says the school is beginning to emerge from the shadow of the country's top creative writing programs such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S. (Graduates of Iowa's master's degree program, the article notes, have included a dozen Pulitzer Prize winners, and the faculty includes another precocious literary craftsman -- novelist and short story writer Ethan Canin.)
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-000076437sep24.story

FREYER SELLS LIFE ONLINE (The Record, Sept. 23)
University of Iowa graduate student JOHN FREYER has sold much of his life on eBay over the past eight months and chronicled where his belongings went on his Web site, http://www.allmylifeforsale.com/. Recently he embarked on a road trip to visit the strangers who bought a piece of his life. (The Record is a daily in Hackensack, N.J.

HUNNICUTT: PEOPLE CAN'T RELAX (Kansas City Star, Sept. 23)
A story that ran Aug. 5 in the San Jose Mercury News said it's increasingly difficult for people to find time for rest on Sundays, and that having too much time to sit around and think about jobs or relationships can be overwhelming for people. "We fill our lives with busy work and buying things to desperately avoid coming to grips with the burning questions of life,'' said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa and author of Work Without End.

HOVENKAMP SAYS QUICK REMEDY NOT LIKELY (Yahoo! News, Sept. 21)
The government today proposed a schedule for the remaining proceedings in the Microsoft antitrust case that by taking years to conclude could have limited effect on the company's new operating system. Antitrust prosecutors, in papers filed in United States District Court here, asked that hearings to determine how to penalize Microsoft begin in February, more than three months after the introduction of the operating system, Windows XP. Microsoft has denied accusations by rivals and critics that Windows XP, by integrating many different computer applications, presents even more problems than the earlier versions of the operating system that were at issue in the lawsuit. "I would be shocked if the district court would be able to produce a remedy order before August or September of next year," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa who has consulted with federal and state officials on the case. And an appeal of that decision, he said, would not be resolved until 2003 at the earliest.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010921/tc/microsoft_seeks_a_long_penalty_process_1.html

DAILY IOWAN EDITORIAL CITED (USA Today, Sept. 21)
A roundup of excerpts from student newspapers regarding the Sept. 11 attack on the U.S. quotes an editorial in THE DAILY IOWAN at the University of Iowa: "The enemy is radical Islam . . . a fringe political movement that is based purely on hatred for the West. . . . There is no diplomatic course of action that can win peace from these people."
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010921/3651429s.htm

GILCHRIST FAVORS FLYOVER BANS (San Francisco Chronicle, Sept. 21)
The University of Michigan will no longer allow aircraft to fly over its 107,000-seat stadium during football games. Neither will Penn State, Clemson and Alabama. University of Iowa microbiologist MARY GILCHRIST approves. She is director of the Iowa Hygienic Laboratory, part of a national network that deals with bioterrorism threats. One of her nightmare scenarios is a small plane buzzing a stadium and unleashing a biological agent that could infect tens of thousands of people at once. "I would try to avoid letting any airplanes anywhere near one of those facilities," Gilchrist said. "To avoid them dropping an explosive, to avoid them flying into a crowd and, perhaps third, to avoid them from dropping an organism." Gilchrist is credited with getting the National Laboratory Network for Bioterrorism Detection established. It links public health officials from around the country with the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and other federal agencies. Gilchrist said she watched a major league baseball game the other night and was relieved the crowd was small. "I'm so glad it was nearly empty," she said. "To mark our return to normalcy with some kind of attack, that would have been devastating. I was glad to see they were preventing people from bringing in coolers."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/09/20/sports0218EDT0028.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 20 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.

GILCHRIST FAVORS FLYOVER BANS (New York Times, Sept. 21)
The University of Michigan will no longer allow aircraft to fly over its 107,000-seat stadium during football games. Neither will Penn State, Clemson and Alabama. University of Iowa microbiologist MARY GILCHRIST approves. She is director of the Iowa Hygienic Laboratory, part of a national network that deals with bioterrorism threats. One of her nightmare scenarios is a small plane buzzing a stadium and unleashing a biological agent that could infect tens of thousands of people at once. "I would try to avoid letting any airplanes anywhere near one of those facilities," Gilchrist said. "To avoid them dropping an explosive, to avoid them flying into a crowd and, perhaps third, to avoid them from dropping an organism." Gilchrist is credited with getting the National Laboratory Network for Bioterrorism Detection established. It links public health officials from around the country with the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta and other federal agencies. Gilchrist said she watched a major league baseball game the other night and was relieved the crowd was small.  "I'm so glad it was nearly empty," she said. "To mark our return to normalcy with some kind of attack, that would have been devastating. I was glad to see they were preventing people from bringing in coolers."
 http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Attacks-Bioterrorism.html?searchpv=aponline
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 21 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010921/us/attacks_bioterrorism_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 21 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/704702.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 21 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-bioterrorism0921sep21.story
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 21 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010921/06/attacks-bioterrorism

HOVENKAMP SAYS QUICK REMEDY NOT LIKELY (New York Times, Sept. 21)
The government today proposed a schedule for the remaining proceedings in the Microsoft antitrust case that by taking years to conclude could have limited effect on the company's new operating system. Antitrust prosecutors, in papers filed in United States District Court here, asked that hearings to determine how to penalize Microsoft begin in February, more than three months after the introduction of the operating system, Windows XP. Microsoft has denied accusations by rivals and critics that Windows XP, by integrating many different computer applications, presents even more problems than the earlier versions of the operating system that were at issue in the lawsuit. "I would be shocked if the district court would be able to produce a remedy order before August or September of next year," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa who has consulted with federal and state officials on the case. And an appeal of that decision, he said, would not be resolved until 2003 at the earliest.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/21/technology/21SOFT.html?searchpv=nytToday

SHIV SAYS COBRANDING GOOD (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 19)
A story about the benefits of cobranding quotes BABA SHIV, an assistant marketing professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Shiv said co-branding can be a win-win situation for businesses and consumers. In the example of Taco John's and Maggie Moo's, Shiv said the two restaurants don't directly compete for the same customers. Locating together provides a captive audience who may end up ordering the other brand's food. "It's not the first option marketers normally think about, but it certainly is gaining in popularity," he said. "It saves money, manpower and time."
http://www.omaha.com/index.php?u_np=0&u_div=3&u_hdg=2&u_sid=199712

MORE WOMEN LEADING UNIVERSITIES (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 19)
As chancellor of the University of Illinois-Chicago, Sylvia Manning, 57, heads the largest university in the Chicago area, and symbolizes the increasing number of women at the highest levels of leadership -- presidents and chancellors -- in higher education. Among the female leaders in higher education is MARY SUE COLEMAN, President of the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/women/chi-0109190349sep19.story

ALUMNUS BUILT WRITING PROGRAM (San Francisco Chronicle, Sept. 19)
A book review of "Ambrose Bierce and the Death of Kings," by Oakley Hall, notes that the author spent 20 years developing the creative writing program at the University of California at Irvine, "until it arguably surpassed in prestige his alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." He now divides his time between San Francisco and the Sierra, where he built the Squaw Valley Community of Writers summer program from the ground up.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/09/19/DD187422.DTL

PRODUCER ATTENDED UI (New York Times, Sept. 19)
Samuel Z. Arkoff, the low-budget movie mogul who enticed two generations of teenagers into drive-in theaters with movies like "I Was a Teenage Werewolf" and "Wild in the Streets," died on Sunday in Burbank, Calif. A native of Fort Dodge, Arkoff attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and was a year shy of earning his degree when the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor and he enlisted in the Air Corps.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/19/obituaries/19ARKO.html

CALLAGHAN CAUTIOUS ON NEW HIP SURGERY (Miami Herald, Sept. 18)
A Chicago doctor, teamed with surgeons in Oregon and Canada, is turning the grueling job of hip replacement into a minimally invasive operation by slipping in the artificial joint through two small incisions instead of a 12-inch slice. It's an intriguing method but will take years of study to ensure patients do as well long-term as they do with regular hip replacements, warns Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN of the University of Iowa, president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Plus, so far it is limited to thinner patients, because small incisions may not penetrate layers of fat, and those without huge hip deformities. A version of the same Associated Press article ran Sept. 18 in the NEWS-JOURNAL of Daytona Beach, Fla. A version of the article also ran Oct. 1 in the TELEGRAM & GAZETTE of Worcester, Mass. Versions of the Associated Press article also ran Oct. 18 in the KANSAS CITY STAR, CINCINNATI ENQUIRER and the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER in Santa Ana, Calif.

CALLAGHAN CAUTIOUS ON NEW HIP SURGERY (Yahoo! News, Sept. 17)
A Chicago doctor, teamed with surgeons in Oregon and Canada, is turning the grueling job of hip replacement into a minimally invasive operation by slipping in the artificial joint through two small incisions instead of a 12-inch slice. It's an intriguing method but will take years of study to ensure patients do as well long-term as they do with regular hip replacements, warns Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN of the University of Iowa, president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Plus, so far it is limited to thinner patients, because small incisions may not penetrate layers of fat, and those without huge hip deformities.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010917/hl/easier_hip_implants_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 17 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/srchlist.cgi?words='University+of+Iowa'&searchIn=all&pubDate=all&orderBy=date&perPage=10

FORMER UI ADMINISTRATOR WINS WARD SEAT (Baltimore Sun, Sept. 17)
For two decades, Annapolis' third ward has been represented on the city  council by World War II veteran Samuel Gilmer. But Tuesday, Gilmer, 79, lost his seat to a former college administrator who challenged him for the second time. Classie Gillis Hoyle, 65, defeated Gilmer by 98 votes in the Democratic  primary. She had lost to Gilmer by 152 votes in 1997. Since no other candidates have said they will run for the position in the general election, Tuesday's vote essentially assures Hoyle the seat. Hoyle holds a doctorate in science education and higher education administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. She has served as an administrator at the University of Iowa and Clarke College in Iowa, as a health science administrator for the National Institutes of Health and as a counselor at Anne Arundel Community College.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/annearundel/bal-ar.gilmer17sep17.story

CALLAGHAN CAUTIOUS ON NEW HIP SURGERY (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 17)
A Chicago doctor, teamed with surgeons in Oregon and Canada, is turning the grueling job of hip replacement into a minimally invasive operation by slipping in the artificial joint through two small incisions instead of a 12-inch slice. It's an intriguing method but will take years of study to ensure patients do as well long-term as they do with regular hip replacements, warns DR. JOHN CALLAGHAN of the University of Iowa, president of the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Plus, so far it is limited to thinner patients, because small incisions may not penetrate layers of fat, and those without huge hip deformities.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/politics/wire/sns-ap-easier-hip-implants0917sep17.story
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 17 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/09/18/national0533EDT0484.DTL
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 17 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN: http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/politics/wire/sns-ap-easier-hip-implants0917sep17.story
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 18 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES: http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/134342978_hips18.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 19 on the Web site of the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE: http://www.sltrib.com/09192001/nation_w/133349.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 18 on the Web site of the EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER-PRESS: http://www.courierpress.com/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200109/18+hip091801_news.html+20010918
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 18 on CNN Interactive: http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/09/18/hip.implants.ap/index.html

STUTZER: FINANCIAL CRISIS AVOIDABLE (Dallas Morning News, Sept. 16)
Stock markets took an initial hit after many of the nation's crises -- from Pearl Harbor to the Kennedy assassination to the Persian Gulf War. But fundamentally the economy stayed sound.  "Initially in a crisis, people just don't know how to react, and they sometimes panic," MICHAEL STUTZER, a professor of finance at the University of Iowa, said. "But eventually cooler heads will prevail."

BOYLE ATTENDED WORKSHOP (Washington Post, Sept. 16)
A feature on T.C. Boyle says he was at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the mid-1970s. In those days giants still roamed the earth, and he studied with the likes of Frederick Exley, Raymond Carver, John Cheever, John Irving and Vance Bourjaily, Boyle's mentor in the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. By the early 1980s Boyle was already earning awards for his novels and short fiction, a track that he has followed steadily since then, garnering a handful of O. Henry Awards, Guggenheim and NEA Fellowships and the PEN/Faulkner Award, among many others.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A28551-2001Sep14.html

PHOTO FEATURES UI STUDENT, FLAG (Richmond Times-Dispatch, Sept. 15)
A story about the nation's show of unit following the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks includes a photo of ROB OSTHEIMER of Richmond, Va., a senior at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, hanging a large American flag at his apartment in Iowa City.

LEDINSKY COMMENT ON EXCHANGES (Investor's Business Daily, Sept. 14)
JIM LEDINSKY, a University of Iowa finance professor and former Morgan Stanley principal, says the Securities and Exchange Commission could have let stock trading resume in the days immediately following the Sept. 11 attack on the United States through the regional telephone exchanges and electronic trading networks. But he thinks it made sense not to rush, especially with the rescue effort underway. "They could have started trading, but this way things will be much more calm," he said.

UISG, DAILY IOWAN RESPOND TO ATTACKS (Yahoo! News, Sept. 14)
The joy of learning on the nation's campuses was dimmed by Tuesday's  terrorist attacks on New York and the Pentagon. Asking the unanswerable, students looked for ways to mourn, to show their patriotism and to act. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA STUDENT GOVERNMENT gave out red, white and blue ribbons and the student newspaper, THE DAILY IOWAN, sent an editor, two writers and a photographer by Jeep to New York to bring the story back home. "We just had to," the paper's 20-year-old news editor, CHAO XIONG, explained.
http://us.news2.yimg.com/f/42/31/7m/dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010914/us/attacks_college_campuses_1.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article was posted Sept. 14 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/468/691737.html
The same Associated Press article was posted Sept. 14 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-college-campuses0914sep14.story

WOMAN WRITES OF SON'S REACTION TO ATTACK (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 14)
A columnist compares the reaction of her father to the bombing of Pearl Harbor (he ran to sign up for the war) and of her son to the recent terrorist attacks. "On Sept. 11, 2001, Donovan Burba sat virtually riveted to his TV screen and to Internet sites in his student apartment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA," the columnist writes. "He watched a new kind of war being launched against the United States, and he didn't jump up to go fight in it. There was simply no place to go and, for all practical purposes, no one to fight."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/oped/chi-0109140266sep14.story

MENNINGER: GIVE RESEARCH AWAY (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 14)
JOHN R. MENNINGER
, a professor of biological sciences at the University of Iowa, is the author of an article titled "Research is Valuable: Let's Give it Away." Menninger writes: "Scholars exchange research results, methods, and theories as gifts. "Gift" may be a surprising word in this context, but it is appropriate: Scholarship is a communal activity, so experimental results are not deemed valuable until they are given to others, and scholars are honored according to how many results they give. The recent tendency to treat research results like commodities, goods to be exchanged for cash, threatens the contributions that university-based scholarship makes to society."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i03/03b01401.htm

BLOOM COMMENTS ON FATE OF BOOK (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 14)
STEPHEN G. BLOOM
, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Iowa and author of Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America (Harcourt, 2000), is the author of an article titled: "Hello, I Must Be Going: a Midlist Author's Fling With Fame." After failing to find Postville along with other books placed on a bookshelf for sale in a Pottery Barn catalog, Bloom writes, "I realized I was over the top. My book had come -- and now pretty much gone. Was there a reason any longer to check six times a day its Amazon.com sales ranking, which had slid from a high of 35 to its current spot well into four figures? Was there any reason to check Amazon's daily city rankings to see whether Postville was still holding strong at No. 2 in Dubuque and No. 6 in Skokie? Didn't I have better things to do than read another mean Amazon reader review, which would only drag my customer rating down to a paltry three stars? Thus is the plight of the midlist author these days."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i03/03b00501.htm

FORMER UI PROFESSOR REPRISES RECITALS (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Sept. 14)
The last time he performed all 32 of Beethoven's piano sonatas, Daniel Shapiro presented the cycle in two recitals a week for four consecutive weeks at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was teaching. To put it mildly, he was pooped by the time he came to the end of this monumental marathon. Has the California-born faculty member at the Cleveland Institute of Music come to his senses? Partly, perhaps. This season, he again will play the 32 Beethoven sonatas in eight recitals, but spaced throughout the institute's calendar at the rate of roughly one a month, starting Sunday and concluding in April. Shapiro, 38, is quick to point out that performing the sonatas in Cleveland will be a bit different from playing them further west. "Iowa City is a very nice, sophisticated, good college town," he says. "But, obviously, it's still a small town surrounded by corn fields and cows. Cleveland is a major cultural center." http://www.cleveland.com/entertainment/plaindealer/index.ssf?/xml/story.ssf/html_standard.xsl?/base/entertainment/100045989110424348.xml

UI ADVISES CONTINUED SUNSCREEN USE (Yahoo! News, Sept. 13)
Summer's almost over. No more sunny days at the beach and no more sunscreen, right? Not so fast. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DEPARTMENT OF DERMATOLOGY says it's important you use sunscreen every day of the year, even on cloudy days. And don't bother with an SPF below 15. It's not strong enough to thwart ultraviolet rays. Other tips to protect your skin include: wear a hat, use sunglasses that filter out UV rays, avoid tanning parlors and check the UV index each day and dress accordingly.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010913/hl/save_your_skin_1.html

FUORTES COMMENTS ON SOLVENT STUDY (Yahoo! News, Sept. 13)
A new study says men chronically exposed to moderate or high levels of the solvents are more likely to have low sperm counts and less active sperm, both of which are linked to reduced fertility. Canadian researchers, reporting in the October issue of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, say the risk rises as exposure increases. They say the finding makes a strong argument for reducing on-the-job exposure. The researchers suggest that more studies are needed to determine which solvents pose risks to reproductive health. Animal studies have shown that solvents known as glycol ethers, which commonly are found in paints and printing inks, may be particularly hazardous to male fertility. Dr. LAURENCE FUORTES, an associate professor of occupational and environmental health at the University of Iowa College of Public Health, says, "We need to stress the need for animal and laboratory toxicology testing of a variety of industry substances." Mixtures of various solvents commonly used also should be tested, he says.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010913/hl/chronic_solvent_exposure_cripples_sperm_1.html

PHOTO SHOWS STUDENTS REACTING TO ATTACKS (Arizona Republic, Sept. 12)
A story rounding up reaction the day after the terrorist attacks Sept. 11 includes a photo of Megan Elise McFarlane and fellow students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reacting to television coverage of the attacks.

STUTZER: FINANCIAL CRISIS AVOIDABLE (CNBC/MSN Money Central, Sept. 12)
MICHAEL STUTZER
, professor of finance at the University of Iowa, points out that Tuesday’s events were a civil and emotional crisis, not a financial crisis. An emotional crisis, he said, can lead to a financial crisis only if mishandled by government authorities. "A financial crisis is what happened in Japan, where people learned that not only were all the stocks they held were overvalued but that their government had a hand in leading their banks to bankruptcy," he said. "Nothing like that is happening here. But what does have to happen now is that the Fed must act to prevent a 'contagion of fear' from spreading and leading people to withdraw money and stop buying things. That would lead to a recession and thus to a real financial emergency."
http://moneycentral.msn.com/articles/invest/extra/7826.asp

UI STUDENTS GATHER FOR PRAYER AT UI (Associated Press, Sept. 12)
In the aftershock of the terrorist attacks in New York and Washington, many Iowans quietly sought comfort in church. Twice the usual number of students attended 5:15 p.m. Mass on Tuesday at the Newman Catholic Student Center near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, center officials said. Iowa's student government held a candlelight vigil near the Old Capitol. "I think in times like this, folks have a need of a place where they can be safe," said the Rev. Paul Akin, pastor of First United Methodist Church. Holding his rosary before the start of Mass, first-year law student Mark-Andre Timinsky said his faith comforted him during the day's terrible events. "It gives a person a greater purpose in life," he said. "If you don't invest your thoughts and energies into all these material energies in the world, then it's a lot easier to accept death and tragedy."

ANDERSEN FINDS BULIMIA, ANOREXIA AMONG MEN (The Ledger, Sept. 11)
A story about the growing number of men with eating disorders quotes a 1999 study in Psychiatric Annals by DR. ARNOLD E. ANDERSEN, an eating-disorder researcher at the University of Iowa. Andersen's study found that one in six men may have anorexia or bulimia. The Ledger is based in Lakeland, Fla.

STANGE: UI OFFICIALS LOOK FOR DOME VANDALS (USA Today, Sept. 11)
Authorities are searching for the person who vandalized the dome of the Old Capitol building, writing "L + R" on the gold-leaf structure. To reach the dome of Iowa's former capitol, the vandal had to climb an 8-foot fence and scaffolding more than 75 feet high, said Sgt. STEVE STANGE of the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010911/3618218s.htm

VANDALS TAPE OLD CAP DOME (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Sept. 11)
Graffiti of initials on the Old Capitol dome, originally thought to have been carved or painted, turned out to be duct tape. "We're thinking it's just going to peel off," University of Iowa Facilities Services Group Project Manager BILL BULGER said after inspecting the dome Monday morning. "There is a sealant over the gold, so we're not expecting any damage." The UI Department of Public Safety was notified Sunday afternoon that the letters "L + R" appeared to be scratched or spray painted onto the Old Capitol's gold-leaf dome. The vandals had to climb an 8-foot fence and scaffolding to reach the vandalism site. The university plans to improve security at the dome by adding lights to make the area more visible to foot patrols at night, officials said. "Unless someone comes forward with information, we'll never know who did this," said DUANE PAPKE, associate director at the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/467/684542.html

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON COMPAQ-HP MERGER (Computerworld, Sept. 10)
A story about the pending merger of Compaq and HP says one of two agencies will review the merger in the U.S. -- the Justice Department or the Federal Trade Commission -- and U.S. officials could raise issues with specific markets. "Once a firm operates in multiple markets, the government can challenge a merger in one market or in any group of markets that it wants," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert who works as a law professor at the University of Iowa. "And it frequently approves a merger, but only on the condition that the firms divest some part of their business."

GREENE WRITES OF UI CLUB FOOT TREATMENT (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 10)
Tribune columnist Bob Greene writes of a 34-year-old Wheaton, Ill., woman named Jessica Rocco who contacted Greene and told him that she had been born in Clinton, Iowa, with a club foot and as a child had to wear casts on her left leg. "When she was 2, the hospital at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City agreed to perform a new kind of operation on Jessica," Greene writes. "It worked -- she had a club foot no more."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/printedition/chi-0109100185sep10.story

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT (Orlando Sentinel, Sept. 9)
The same business changes the Justice Department may soon try to impose on Microsoft were proposed by the software maker last year as an alternative to the Clinton administration's breakup plan. Considering the Bush administration's decision this week not to pursue a breakup, however, legal experts predict the company now will take a harder line. Microsoft won't say what it would accept to end the four-year antitrust case. University of Iowa law professor HERB HOVENKAMP said remedies are available that would restore competition to the marketplace and deny Microsoft the fruits of its illegal behavior. He said they probably would involve giving other companies the right to sell stripped-down versions of Windows and changing the operating system to suit other markets. "There is a huge market out there for operating systems that are faster, smaller and that have fewer features than the later versions of Windows,'' he said. Hovenkamp said he doubts Microsoft would accede to such demands, because the company likely would "resist any set of remedies that affect Windows code,'' the program blueprint. A version of the story also ran in the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION Sept. 8.

ROBINSON DEDICATED TO STUDENTS (Idaho Statesman, Sept. 9)
MARILYNNE ROBINSON's 1980 novel "Housekeeping" received a Pulitzer Prize nomination, but Robinson hasn't published any fiction since. She's been working on a second novel for a very long time, but seems in no hurry to finish. Last year, she gave up most of a $250,000 grant, intended to free her to write full-time for five years, because she missed her students at the Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa.
http://www.idahostatesman.com/news/special-section/books/archive/155012.shtml

UI PRESS PUBLISHES CHICAGO BOOK (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 9)
City Watch: Discovering the Uncommon Chicago, by Tribune reporter Jon Anderson, was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. A review of the book says: "How Tribune reporter Jon Anderson discovers his offbeat stories is anybody's guess. But twice weekly in his 'City Watch' columns, he manages to unearth the real secret Chicago with an eye for the odd, the arcane and the warm-hearted. In so many ways, Anderson's observations on daily Chicago city life serve as literary comfort food. But with these simple, short passages, there is always a deeper level of subtextual truth."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/books/chi-0109080144sep09.story

UI STUDENT REACTS TO FERTILITY ADS (Valley News, Sept. 7)
Starting Tuesday, a national group of fertility doctors is launching an ad campaign to remind women -- whether they have a psychological Timex, or a wall-mounted cuckoo clock that sends out a screaming bird ever hour to signify the relentless passage of time -- that time is running out to have a baby. Thirty-five-year-old Colette Sartor, who is just starting a two-year writers program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was sitting in her Los Angeles gynecologist's waiting room when she first saw the Aug. 13 Newsweek cover story on the campaign. She freaked out. After her appointment she rushed out and bought a copy. She waited a day to say anything to her boyfriend. But the next morning, as they were making the bed, she said, "Bob, this is the situation .... " The Valley News is based in West Lebanon, N.H.

DIEKEMA, XIANG STUDY HIV (International Herald Tribune, Sept. 7)
A harmless virus discovered in 1995 and carried by tens of millions of people worldwide appears to prolong the lives of people who are also infected with the AIDS virus. The microbe, called GB virus C, decreases mortality, slows damage to the immune system and even seems to bolster the effects of AIDS drugs. In short, it behaves like a medicine specifically formulated to treat people infected with HIV, the human immunodeficiency virus. "I think it's safe to say it's not the final word on this," said Dr. DANIEL DIEKEMA, a physician at the University of Iowa College of Medicine who is a co-author of one of the studies. Diekema hastened to say that the findings did not have "direct clinical application" for the moment. In the Iowa study, Dr. JINHUA XIANG and colleagues tested 360 HIV patients for GB virus C. In many cases, GB virus C infection was diagnosed in stored blood that had been taken from patients before the microbe was discovered. They did not test for antibodies -- they looked only for the presence or absence of GB virus C in the blood.
http://www.iht.com/articles/31698.htm
A version of the story that quotes Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Iowa ran Sept. 6 on the Web site of the CANADIAN BROADCAST CORPORATION.
http://cbc.ca:80/cgi-bin/templates/view.cgi?/news/2001/09/06/hiv_hepg010906
A version of the story also ran Sept. 6 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/health/bal-hiv.story
A version of the story also ran Sept. 6 on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0109060285sep06.story
A version of the story also ran Sept. 6 on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/nation/docs/hiv06.htm

NEW COMMENTS ON BEQUEST (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 7)
In light of the controversy surrounding Iowa State's sale of land deeded to it on the condition that it remain a farm in perpetuity, Iowa's other universities may be gaining a new appreciation for the value of the state's farm heritage, according to this article. The flap over the Iowa State gift, says MICHAEL J. NEW, president of the University of Iowa Foundation, "changed the whole environment." In a situation similar to the one that has buffeted Iowa State, the University of Iowa received a bequest of 400 acres in 1997, four parcels valued at $1-million. The will of the donor, who was unknown to the university prior to his death, stipulated that the land "not be sold sooner than 10 years after my death." The foundation, assured that the moratorium was legally unenforceable, sold one of the properties and made plans to dispose of the others. Those plans, university officials say, are now on hold.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i02/02a03801.htm

WESTON WORK PLAGIARIZED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 7)
Trinity International University dismissed Winston L. Frost, the dean of its law school, last month after investigating allegations that he had plagiarized parts of an article published in its law review. Questions about the sources for Frost's article came to light in July, when the provost of the university, which is based in Deerfield, Ill., heard from individuals both inside and outside Trinity about similarities between Frost's article, "The Developing of Human Rights Discourse: A History of the Human Rights Movement," which appeared in the fall 2000 issue of Trinity Law Review, and an entry in the Encyclopaedia Britannica. Large sections of the encyclopedia entry on human rights, written by BURNS H. WESTON, a law professor at the University of Iowa, appear almost verbatim in Frost's article.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i02/02a01701.htm

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT CASE (Washington Post, Sept. 7)
The same business changes the Justice Department may soon try to impose on Microsoft were proposed by the software maker last year as an alternative to the Clinton administration's breakup plan. Considering the Bush administration's decision this week not to pursue a breakup, however, legal experts predict the company now will take a harder line. Microsoft won't say what it would accept to end the four-year antitrust case. University of Iowa law professor HERB HOVENKAMP said remedies are available that would restore competition to the marketplace and deny Microsoft the fruits of its illegal behavior. He said they probably would involve giving other companies the right to sell stripped-down versions of Windows and changing the operating system to suit other markets. "There is a huge market out there for operating systems that are faster, smaller and that have fewer features than the later versions of Windows,'' he said. Hovenkamp said he doubts Microsoft would accede to such demands, because the company likely would "resist any set of remedies that affect Windows code,'' the program blueprint.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010907/aponline164938_000.htm
The same story ran Sept. 7 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010907/tc/microsoft_antitrust_39.html
An Associated Press version of the story ran Sept. 7 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/viewers/story.php?story=678343&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same AP story ran Sept. 7 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/technology/wire/sns-ap-microsoft-antitrust0907sep07.story
The same AP story ran Sept. 7 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/09/07/national1648EDT0704.DTL

HEPATITIS-G VIRUS MAY STALL HIV ADVANCE (St. Petersburg Times, Sept. 6)
A harmless virus discovered in 1995 and carried by tens of millions of people worldwide appears to prolong the lives of people who are also infected with the AIDS virus. The microbe, called GB virus C, decreases mortality, slows damage to the immune system, and even seems to boost the effects of AIDS drugs. In short, it behaves like a medicine specifically formulated to treat people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). "If we can identify the path GBV-C is taking to inhibit HIV, then we're well on the way to making this something practical," said one of the researchers, Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Iowa. How GB virus C performs its beneficial effects is a mystery, but there are two main possibilities. The virus could be directly suppressing HIV replication. It could be stimulating the immune system to fight HIV more effectively. "I think it's safe to say it's not the final word on this," said DANIEL DIEKEMA, a physician at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, who is a co-author of one of the studies. The Bergen Record is based in New Jersey. Versions of the article also ran Sept. 6 in the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER of Santa Ana, Calif., and the SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS in Texas.

HEPATITIS-G VIRUS MAY STALL HIV ADVANCE (Bergen Record, Sept. 6)
A harmless virus discovered in 1995 and carried by tens of millions of people worldwide appears to prolong the lives of people who are also infected with the AIDS virus. The microbe, called GB virus C, decreases mortality, slows damage to the immune system, and even seems to boost the effects of AIDS drugs. In short, it behaves like a medicine specifically formulated to treat people infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). "If we can identify the path GBV-C is taking to inhibit HIV, then we're well on the way to making this something practical," said one of the researchers, Dr. JACK STAPLETON of the Iowa City Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Iowa. How GB virus C performs its beneficial effects is a mystery, but there are two main possibilities. The virus could be directly suppressing HIV replication. It could be stimulating the immune system to fight HIV more effectively. "I think it's safe to say it's not the final word on this," said DANIEL DIEKEMA, a physician at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, who is a co-author of one of the studies. The Bergen Record is based in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/virus0620010906.htm

STUDY: HEPATITIS-G VIRUS MAY STALL HIV ADVANCE (Boston Globe, Sept. 6)
An apparently toothless cousin of the deadly hepatitis C virus seems to retard the progress of another grave infection, HIV, in people carrying both organisms, new research says.  Scientists say people infected with both HIV, which causes AIDS, and a recently discovered and seemingly symptomless form of hepatitis called GB virus type C (GBV-C) are much less likely to die of AIDS in the short term than HIV patients not infected by the second virus.  "The fact that it was only first discovered in 1995, and there are plenty of diseases out there for which we really don't know the cause, leads us to be very conservative," says Dr. DANIEL DIEKEMA, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa and a co-author of one of the studies, which appear this week in the New England Journal of Medicine. "It would be premature to infect people with this virus because we may find out there are adverse effects." Led by Dr. JACK STAPLETON, the Iowa researchers tracked 362 HIV patients between 1988 and 2000, of whom 144 -- or roughly 40 percent -- also carried GBV-C. Those with only the AIDS virus were nearly 3.7 times more likely to die of the disease during the study period than those infected with both microbes, the group says.
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/249/nation/New_virus_found_to_inhibit_HIV+.shtml
The story also ran Sept. 6 on the web site of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://inq.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2001/09/06/national/AIDSBAR06.htm
The story also ran Sept. 6 on the web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/09/06/MN224678.DTL
The story also ran Sept. 6 on the web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://24hour.startribune.com/24hour/healthscience/story/679816p-721985c.html
The story also ran Sept. 5 on the web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Virus-AIDS.html?searchpv=aponline
The story also ran Sept. 5 on the web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-virus-aids0905sep05.story
The story also ran Sept. 5 on the web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
 http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=DI-CO-20010905-007519.djm
The story also ran Sept. 5 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010905/17/virus-aids
The story also ran Sept. 5 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010905/hl/virus_aids_1.html
Another version of the story, written by REUTERS HEALTH, ran on Yahoo! News Sept. 5.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010905/hl/hepatitis_1.html
Another version of the story, written by HEALTHSCOUT, ran on Yahoo! News Sept. 5.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010905/hl/hepatitis-g_virus_may_stall_hiv_s_advance_1.html
A version of the story also ran Sept. 5 on the PLANET OUT Web site.
http://www.planetout.com/pno/news/article.html?2001/09/05/3
A version of the story also ran Sept. 5 on the web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
 http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010905/aponline170058_001.htm
A version of the story also aired Sept. 5 on NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO'S ALL THINGS CONSIDERED.

MCGEHEE COMMENTS ON ADAPTIVE CRUISE CONTROL (Auto.com, Sept. 6)
New automotive technologies in the pipeline include adaptive cruise control, which adjusts a vehicle's speed to the speed of a vehicle in front of it, and sensors that warn drivers of potential collisions. DANIEL MCGEHEE, director of the Human Factors Research Program at the University of Iowa's Public Policy Center, said one of the challenges that manufacturers of adaptive cruise control systems face is how much control the systems have over the vehicle. Control is easy when the difference of speeds between two vehicles is not great, McGehee said. Easing off the throttle or even applying the brakes a little normally will keep the two vehicles at safe distances. But manufacturers are struggling to address those situations in which there is a sudden need to dramatically reduce a vehicle's speed. "That raises the question of whether the systems should alert the driver that additional braking is required or if the system should take active control of the car," McGehee said. This is a Knight-Ridder article.
http://www.auto.com:80/industry/smart6_20010906.htm

SEATTLE MAYORAL CANDIDATE ATTENDED UI (Seattle Times, Sept. 6)
A story about Seattle mayoral candidate Paul Schell says he was born Paul E. S. Schlactenhaufen on Oct. 8, 1937, in Pomeroy, Iowa, the oldest of six children of a Lutheran minister in the small Corn Belt town. After graduating from high school, Schell attended Wartburg College in Waverly, Iowa, where he played linebacker on the school football team. Schell transferred to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and went on to law school at Columbia University in New York.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=schell06m&date=20010906&query=%22UNIVERSITY+OF+IOWA%22

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON HP, COMPAQ (San Jose Mercury News, Sept. 5)
Even though the new Hewlett-Packard will lead the world in sales of computers and printers, antitrust regulators are unlikely to block the proposed deal between HP and Compaq because of intense competition, antitrust experts said Tuesday. If the deal helps HP and Compaq to become more efficient PC makers, it could be regarded as "pro-competitive" said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust professor at the University of Iowa. The key will be for executives at HP and Compaq to demonstrate that the deal produces "offsetting efficiencies, like a reduction in cost" in markets where the new company will enjoy a market share greater than 25 percent, he said. "With respect to most markets right now, this does not look like a particularly dangerous merger," Hovenkamp said.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/business/docs/antitrust05.htm

MARSHALL STUDIES ELDERLY NUTRITION (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Sept. 5)
Too many older people may be accepting a cognitive and immunological decline as a normal part of aging, when it may reflect a deficiency in nutrients such as vitamins and minerals. A simple one-a-day supplement may be all that is needed to slow that decline, recent studies show. A new study by TERESA A. MARSHALL and her colleagues at the University of Iowa looked at more than 400 Iowans age 79 and older living independently in rural areas and found that 80 percent reported consuming inadequate amounts of four or more nutrients. In findings important to disease prevention, 75 percent of those people consumed too little folate, a B vitamin that helps prevent heart disease and stroke. And, 83 percent did not get enough vitamin D and 63 percent got too little calcium, both essential to preventing osteoporosis and fractures.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/viewers/story.php?story=669819&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

VONNEGUT RETURNING TO UI (Lincoln Journal Star, Sept. 4)
Novelist Kurt Vonnegut will return to the place that he says gave him the courage to write his best-known book "Slaughterhouse Five." Vonnegut, 78, will lecture at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tuesday. "It's been on my mind a long time," he said. "I got the nerve to write it, and decided books were important after all."  Vonnegut will lecture at the Iowa Memorial Union's main lounge at 7:30 p.m. The lecture is part of the university's "Week of Welcome" to start the school year. Vonnegut moved to Iowa City in 1965 to teach two years at the university's Writer's Workshop. He has called the move a turning point in his career. "I was in my 40s, sort of in the doldrums, living on Cape Cod, where my neighbors weren't all that interested in what I did," he said. "It was really exciting to end up where literature really meant a lot and everybody was high as a kite on writing, and I became so, too."
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=4190&date=20010902&past=

COLEMAN RETURNS RAISE TO UI (Chronicle of Higher Education, Sept. 4)
A story explores the motivation of university presidents who return raises in the wake of the slowing economy, citing as one example University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN, who says she was not trying to win political points with her faculty, or be a moral exemplar for her presidential peers, when she returned her $40,000 raise to the university this past summer. Coleman says she wasn't motivated by campus politics or by her university's projected $18-million shortfall. In fact, she says, before learning of Iowa's budget woes, she had already decided to return the 16.8-percent raise, which would have increased her salary to $275,000 for the 2002 fiscal year. Coleman's donation has won her some points with faculty members like AMITAVA BHATTACHARJEE, president of the Faculty Senate at Iowa. Professors "were concerned, in a year in which we've had major budget cuts, that the president's raise should be disproportionately higher compared to the 3.5-percent raises the faculty received," said Bhattacharjee, a professor of physics and astronomy. As far as he knows, no faculty members have returned their raises.
http://chronicle.com/jobs/2001/09/2001090402c.htm

HENDRIX LEADS RESEARCH ON AGGRESSIVE TUMORS (Science Daily, Sept. 3)
The environment around and between cells is known as the extracellular matrix and is full of molecules that play important roles in how tissues look and behave. In a new study, University of Iowa researchers and their collaborators have shown that highly aggressive melanoma cells interact with this matrix differently than less aggressive melanoma cells. These differences may have important implications for the diagnosis and treatment of melanoma, as well as other types of aggressive cancers. The UI team, led by MARY J.C. HENDRIX, Ph.D., the Kate Daum Research Professor and head of anatomy and cell biology, and deputy director of the Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center at the UI, collaborated with researchers at the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., and researchers at the National Human Genome Institute and the National Cancer Institute, both parts of the National Institutes of Health, in Bethesda, Md. Their research findings are reported in the Sept. 1 issue of the journal Cancer Research. "We wanted to know what these aggressive cancer cells were doing to their extracellular matrix environment," said RICHARD E. B. SEFTOR, Ph.D., a research scientist in Hendrix's laboratory and lead author of the paper. In addition to Hendrix and Seftor, the UI researchers on the team included ELISABETH A. SEFTOR and LYNN M. G. GARDNER. http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/09/010903091625.htm
Another version of the story ran Sept. 2 on the web site of BBC NEWS.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_1518000/1518787.stm
Another version of the story, by UPI, ran Aug. 31 on the MedlinePlus web site.
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_3552.html

VONNEGUT RETURNS TO UI (Omaha World Herald, Sept. 2)
Novelist Kurt Vonnegut says he found the courage to write his best-known book “Slaughterhouse Five” while he was teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1965-1967. Vonnegut returned to the UI to give a Sept. 4 lecture on campus.

CHEEVER TAUGHT BOYLE AT UI (New York Times, Sept. 2)
A story about author T. Coraghessan Boyle's new book, After the Plague, says that author John Cheever was a teacher of Boyle's at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the mid-1970s. "As writers, they're very different. (For one thing, Cheever's word-mesh is finer by several orders of magnitude; he was a man to stroke a detail until it sang. Boyle writes a far more durable, event-laden prose.) No, what came was the realization, first, that both writers need to start a story with a concrete premise rather than, say, a feeling about character; and, second, that in both there is a strong dissenting friction between the logistics of craft and the fanciful free flights of inspiration. The mechanics of a story often push in one direction, even as the style pushes in another."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/09/02/books/review/02BIRKETTW.html?pagewanted=print

PLAYWRIGHT GILMAN ATTENDED UI (Los Angeles Times, Sept. 2)
A story about Rebecca Gilman's "Spinning Into Butter" -- a much-debated play about subtle forms of racism in the presumably enlightened, inclusive halls of ivory-tower academia -- says that after earning her master's degree in playwriting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Gilman got married, fell into the working world, and for three years put writing aside. She got a job in Iowa City, teaching testing-service employees how to grade student essays on standardized achievement tests. When her brief marriage to a fellow writer failed, she moved to Chicago and stayed in the testing field as a writer of essay questions.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/printedition/calendar/la-000070932sep02.story

KLAUS COMMENTS ON ART OF ESSAY (Chicago Tribune, Sept. 2)
The essay -- that stodgy, pipe-smoking, old bachelor uncle of a genre -- is just not itself anymore. It's looking younger and friskier. Energized by award-winning and attitude-infused collections by essayists such as David Sedaris and David Rakoff, along with magazine stars such as Time's Joel Stein and Salon's Camille Paglia, the genre is more popular with general audiences than ever. But do today's essayists go too far in the other direction? CARL KLAUS, who taught non-fiction writing at the University of Iowa for 35 years, conceded that some of today's most popular essayists display "a flipness, a shallowness, a sense of being of the moment. It worries me and angers me that that kind of stuff gets so much attention." On the other hand, Klaus is definitely bullish on the essay. He is editing a book series devoted to literary non-fiction that will debut next spring. "I am probably more hopeful about the state of the essay today than ever before."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0109020337sep02.story

IOWA CITY DRINK SPECIAL BAN CITED (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Sept. 1)
A story about a proposal by some Madison city leaders to ban drinking specials in bars near the University of Wisconsin-Madison and setting up an "entertainment district" that would regulate the types of specials those taverns can offer cites the case of Iowa City, home of the 28,000-student UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It says the city eradicated drink specials at the beginning of August after a three-year debate. Politicians and university administrators there finally convinced city leaders that the city's rowdiness problems, including the death of a student six years ago, merited the regulations.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/metro/sep01/bars02090101a.asp

UI STUDENT SELLS 'LIFE' ON EBAY (ComputerUser.com, September 2001)
Not many Web sites manage to incorporate commerce, comedy, drama, art, and adventure into one free package. But then, John D. Freyer's AllMyLifeForSale is not your typical site. Freyer, a fine-arts graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has revamped the ordinary experience of selling possessions on eBay as a way to examine his life--and yours--by auctioning all of his worldly possessions and tracking where and with whom they end up. Freyer, a thrift-store junkie who labels each item he owns with some explanation of how he came to acquire and use it, in turn asks the bidders who end up with his stuff to write in about it.
http://currents.net:80/articles/2009,4,33,1,0901,01.html

NHTSA CONDUCTS STUDY (Automotive Engineering International, Sept. 2001)
Engineers are busy devising new and better telematics applications for in-vehicle use at the same time a plethora of studies on driver distraction is being conducted. Some of those driver distraction studies are being carried out by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration at the National Advanced Driving Simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The $40-million simulator facility is large enough to accommodate entire vehicles as well as cabs of trucks and buses.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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