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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
300 Plaza Centre One
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Sept. 21, 2001

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

HEBALD READS OCT. 2 FROM MEMOIR OF MENTAL ILLNESS -- Actress, fiction writer and poet Carol Hebald, who received a Master of Fine Arts degree from the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop in 1971, will read from "The Heart Too Long Suppressed: A Chronicle of Mental Illness" at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 2 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading will be broadcast on the "Live from Prairie Lights" series, originating on UI radio station WSUI, AM 910.

The publisher, Northeastern University Press, provides this description of the book: "In a stunning act of courage and defiance, Carol Hebald threw her prescribed medicine for mental illness into the ocean. Though doctors predicted she would commit suicide, this act may have saved her life. This memoir chronicles Hebald's spiral into mental illness, her journey from one therapist to the next, her periodic hospitalizations, shock treatments and her fight against misdiagnosed medications. In the end, she finds her inner voice."

Dr. Thomas Szasz wrote in the book's foreward, "Hebald's moving account dramatically illustrates the dangers of letting the voice of authority outshout your Inner Voice: she effectively demonstrates that the sole recovery possible from the maladies a person so acquires is to regain the voice he or she has not so much lost as renounced."

Psychologist Richard E. Vatz commented in USA Today Magazine, "The most important lesson this book offers is the stultifying effect of psychiatrists' arbitrary and self-serving definings of one's ups and downs… Carol Hebald's book shows the need to be an aggressive actor in life and not let others or drugs control you. One of her most telling observations is: 'I'd been crippled by an excess of need.'"

Writer Gail Godwin, who also graduated from the Writers' Workshop in 1971, stated, "One day we may all look back on perilous journeys like Hebald's and realize that certain people were forerunners toward the next stage of heart and mind evolution."

Hebald is also the author of "Three Blind Mice: Two Short Novels," and the play "Martha." Her poems and short stories have appeared in numerous anthologies and literary journals.

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LECTURE ON "THE ADDICTIONS OF CINEMA" OCT. 4 -- Corey Creekmur, director of the University of Iowa Institute for Cinema and Culture, will present a lecture, "Cocktails for Two: The Addictions of Cinema," at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4, in the UI Museum of Art.

Admission to lecture, and to the museum, will be free.

Creekmur's lecture will examine the popular cinematic topic of addiction, asking how moral objections to excessive drinking in many films are countered by the popular figures of the comic drunk -- such as W.C. Fields -- or the sophisticated alcoholic -- such as William Powell in the "Thin Man" films.

"In other words," Creekmur said, "why has cinema so often relied on the 'attraction' of addiction? Moreover, while films seem to represent many addictions as harmful, cinema encourages addiction to itself through the creation of film fans -- the repetitive activity of going to the movies is a kind of addiction itself that films obviously do not condemn."

The talk will be accompanied by film clips from early cinema to the present.

Last February, Creekmur spoke at the Museum on "Cowboy Drag: Gender and Sexuality in the Western Film," in connection with the popular exhibition "The Lure of the West."

Creekmur holds a joint appointment at the UI in Cinema and Comparative Literature and English. He conducts research and teaches on American film genres, as well as psychoanalytic film theory and popular representations of gender, sexuality and race. He also teaches popular American literature, with specific interests in crime fiction and African-American literature. He has been developing work on popular Indian (Hindi) cinema, which links to his ongoing interest in the relationship between stars and fans, and in the connections between popular music and film.

Creekmur has books forthcoming on gender and sexuality in the film western and on the American film musical, and is editing volumes on Indian popular cinema -- with UI faculty member Philip Lutgendorf and graduate assistant Prakash Younger -- and the international film musical.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for public events at the museum during the 2001-02 season at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, and noon to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots west and north of the museum.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa.

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POET AND NOVELIST HOWE READS AT UI OCT. 4 -- Poet and novelist Fanny Howe will read from her work at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 4 in 101 Biology Building East on the University of Iowa campus. The free reading is sponsored by the UI Writers' Workshop.

Howe's new novel is "Indivisible," published by Semiotext(e)/MIT. The editors of Ploughshares commented, "In this new avant-garde novel, Howe gives us the inimitable, fast-talking Henrietta, a filmmaker and foster mother in Boston whose ragged relationships lead her to religion and mysticism. Highly charged and poetic and profound."

Christopher Martin wrote for the Rain Taxi review of books, "after nearly 300 pages of fragment, quandary, and moral debate, the action returns right back to where it began: the story of a woman, her mostly unconsummated love, and the children (young and old) that she has protected and preserved. Only then do we realize the full breadth and beauty of the narrative Howe has surreptitiously constructed all along."

Howe's "Selected Poems," drawing from nine of her earlier books, was published in paperback last year and was shortlisted for the 2001 Griffin Poetry Prize.

John Ashbery wrote of her poetry, "Fanny Howe's strangely hushed but busy landscape keeps leading us into it until we realize we're lost but wouldn't want to be anywhere else. This book is a strange joy."

Albert Gelpi described Howe as ". . . the closest thing to Emily Dickinson since Dickinson herself," and Michael Palmer wrote, "Fanny Howe employs a sometimes fierce, always passionate, spareness in her lifelong parsing of the exchange between matter and spirit. Writes Emerson, 'The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty.' Here's the luminous and incontrovertible proof."

Howe is professor of writing and literature at the University of California, San Diego. She is the author of more than 20 books of fiction and poetry. She has won two NEA awards, and the American Book Award for her novel "Nod."

For UI arts information and calendar updates, visit <www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa>. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>. Read an interview with Howe at <http://www.writenet.org/poetschat/poetschat_fhowe.html>,

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BARITONE JOHN MURIELLO PERFORMS 'BREATH OF ART' OCT. 5 -- Baritone John Muriello and pianist Shari Rhoads, faculty members from the University of Iowa School of Music, will perform songs by Gerald Finzi, Francis Poulenc and Gustav Mahler as part of the "Breath of Art" series at the UI Museum of Art, at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 5

Admission to the Museum, and to the performance, will be free.

A collaborative project between the UI Museum of Art and the UI Division of Performing Arts, "Breath of Art" is a series of musical performances held Friday evenings in the museum.

Future performances in the "Breath of Art" series will include a preview of OctOBOEfest on Oct. 12; "Ingenuity on Percussion," directed by Dan Moore on Oct. 19; the Iowa Brass Quintet on Oct. 26;the Maia String Quartet on Nov. 2; and French horn improvisations by Jeffrey Agrell on Nov. 30.

A singer whose work ranges from opera and operetta to concert and musical theater, Muriello joined the UI School of Music faculty in the fall of 1997. He has performed operatic and musical theater roles with professional companies around the United States, as well as concerts and recitals. His most recent engagements include performances in the title role of the UI Martha-Ellen Tye Opera Theater production of Tartuffe in 2001, and the Riverside theatre's production of "Sweet and Hot." In the fall of 1998 he made his directing debut with the UI School of Music production of the musical comedy "The Fantasticks," and he directed the School of Music production of "She Loves Me" in 1999.

Rhoads joined the UI School of Music faculty in the fall of 2000. Before arriving at the UI she taught music history at the Musikhochschule (Music conservatory) in Lucerne and the Conservatory of Lausanne in Switzerland. Rhoads has also been Kapellmeister at the Lucerne Theater and conductor/coach at the opera theater in Darmstadt, Germany. She was coach at the Barcelona and Madrid opera theaters, and served as staff accompanist for the Francesco Vinas (Barcelona, Spain) and Munich International competitions.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for public events at the museum during the 2001-02 season at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open noon to 5 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, and noon to 10 p.m. Thursday and Friday. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots west and north of the museum.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa.