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October 2001

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BLOOM COMMENTS ON ONLINE PUBLISHING (Cincinnati Enquirer, Oct. 31)
The Internet has become a viable alternative for authors seeking to get their works into print as e-books or traditional hardbacks and paperbacks. Magazine writers find the Internet a good place to publish their articles, too. Former newspaper journalist STEVE BLOOM, now a journalism professor at the University of Iowa, has had many of his medical articles appear in the online magazine Salon.com. National magazines such as Newsweek, written by staff writers, have presented scarce opportunities for freelance writers, Bloom said. Thousands of manuscripts are submitted for each issue, making the odds for selection tough. On the other hand, online publications such as Salon have a strong need for content. "Salon.com comes out each day so there is a voracious appetite there for stories," Bloom said. Versions of the same article ran Oct. 30 in THE TENNESSEAN of Nashville, Tenn.; and Oct. 29 in the DETROIT NEWS and the CLARION-LEDGER of Jackson, Miss.

GILCHRIST SPEAKS ON ANTHRAX (National Public Radio, Oct. 31)
MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory spoke in a Morning Edition segment about how anthrax can be spread.
http://www.npr.org/programs/morning/

COLUMNIST WRITES OF FRIEND'S DEATH (Kansas City Star, Oct. 31)
A columnist writes about the double murder conviction of Jonathan Lee Memmer in Johnson County. One of Memmer's victims was the sister of the columnist's best friend. "Jonathan Lee Memmer met Laura Watson Dalton in a college bar in Iowa City, Iowa," she writes. "He met Maria Lehner, of Belton, in another bar the next night. Firemen found their bodies. A fire had been set with gasoline in an apartment, empty because of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's spring break…The first coherent thought my friend and I had after murder was this: 'It could have happened to any of us.' …Iowa City oozes safety and calm. Like Lawrence's University of Kansas. Or Maryville's Northwest Missouri State University. Or Warrensburg's Central Missouri State University. It's not a coincidence that Memmer met Laura and Maria in bars. Memmer the predator knew meeting women around alcohol would increase his chances of finding a pliable victim. A lot of poor choices are made after or during drinking. You don't have to be drunk for this to be true, or have a problem with alcohol. Even one drink can let down what could be life-saving inhibitions."
http://www.kcstar.com/item/pages/zone.pat,local/3acd18b0.a30,.html?pageid=zCity

UI GRAD RUNS FOR CORONER IN PA. (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 30)
A listing of upcoming Pennsylvania elections and candidates lists as a Republican candidate for Westmoreland County coroner Gregory C. Spain, a podiatrist who a brief bio says attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1974-1977.
http://www.post-gazette.com/regionstate/20011030vgagateotherrowp9.asp

BALDUS DEATH PENALTY STUDY CITED (Daily Oklahoman, Oct. 30)
A University of Iowa Oklahoma sociologist is investigating whether race influences decisions jurors make in death penalty cases, according to the story, which also cites a study by University of Iowa researcher DAVID BALDUS. Frequently in homicide cases, Baldus found, the sentence is heavily influenced by the victim's race. The Iowa law professor reviewed more than 1,000 homicide cases that occurred in Georgia during the 1970s. He concluded the victim's race often influences punishment decisions.

BLOOM COMMENTS ON ONLINE PUBLISHING (USA Today, Oct. 30)
The Internet has become a viable alternative for authors seeking to get their works into print as e-books or traditional hardbacks and paperbacks. Magazine writers find the Internet a good place to publish their articles, too. Former newspaper journalist STEVE BLOOM, now a journalism professor at the University of Iowa, has had many of his medical articles appear in the online magazine Salon.com. National magazines such as Newsweek, written by staff writers, have presented scarce opportunities for freelance writers, Bloom said. Thousands of manuscripts are submitted for each issue, making the odds for selection tough. On the other hand, online publications such as Salon have a strong need for content. "Salon.com comes out each day so there is a voracious appetite there for stories," Bloom said.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/2001/10/30/writers-ebooks.htm

GILCHRIST: MICROBES EASILY OBTAINED (St. Petersburg Times, Oct. 29)
Before 1997, ordering microbes often was as simple as filling out a form, said MARY GILCHRIST, president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories and a lab director at the University of Iowa. "Basically, you had to have a convincing letterhead, know what the agent might look like and know how to spell the name of the organism," Gilchrist said. Under the 1996 Anti-Terrorism Act, anyone intending to send or receive the most dangerous microbes is required to register with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and to demonstrate a legitimate scientific or medical use for the material. But the law left enormous gaps, according to terrorism experts and many public health officials. Some exchanges of microbes are as simple as stashing a petri dish into a lab-coat pocket before jetting off to a conference, Gilchrist said. The St. Petersburg Times is based in Florida. Versions of the article also ran Oct. 28 in the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS in Minnesota and the FRESNO BEE in California.

TITZE PRAISES VOICE RATING SYSTEM (Salt Lake Tribune, Oct. 29)
Brigham Young University Professor Clayne Robison has spent much of his 30-year career asking the question: What is beautiful singing and how do you do it? The professor, who happens to be a baritone, has been able to come up with an answer using physics, statistical analysis and group dynamics -- bringing together beginning students to enhance learning, rather than teaching them privately. He shares his solution in "Beautiful Singing: What It is and How to Do It" in the September-October issue of the Journal of Singing and in his self-published book, Beautiful Singing "mind warp" moments. "To have listeners rate on a scale what is beautiful and what isn't, that's a significant contribution," says INGO TITZE, a professor of speech science and voice at the University of Iowa and director of the National Center for Voice and Speech.
http://www.sltrib.com:80/10292001/utah/144164.htm

HEART DRUG HAS MANY BENEFITS (Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Oct. 28)
A heart drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, a report in the journal Circulation says. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril --- brand name, Altace --- over a 4 1/2-year period found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed.
http://www.accessatlanta.com/ajc/epaper/editions/sunday/issue_b3bd79a1a36840c400a2.html

GILLCHRIST: MICROBES EASILY OBTAINED (Washington Post,, Oct. 28)
Before 1997, ordering microbes often was as simple as filling out a form, said MARY GILCHRIST, president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories and a lab director at the University of Iowa. "Basically, you had to have a convincing letterhead, know what the agent might look like and know how to spell the name of the organism," Gilchrist said. Congress tightened the rules in 1996 after Ohio State University student Larry Wayne Harris used a fake letterhead to obtain three vials of the bacterium that causes plague. Under the 1996 Anti-Terrorism Act, anyone intending to send or receive the most dangerous microbes is required to register with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and to demonstrate a legitimate scientific or medical use for the material. But the law left enormous gaps, according to terrorism experts and many public health officials. Some exchanges of microbes are as simple as stashing a petri dish into a lab-coat pocket before jetting off to a conference, Gilchrist said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A63210-2001Oct27.html
The same article ran Oct. 29 on the Website of the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.
http://www.iht.com/articles/37175.htm
The same article ran Oct. 29 on the Website of the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/102901/Worldandnation/Deadly_bacteria_easil.shtml
The same article ran Oct. 28 on the Website of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/nation/docs/labs28.htm
The same article ran Oct. 28 on the Website of the BERGEN RECORD in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/doom28200110281.htm

SUZUKI COMPANY TO PERFORM AT UI (New York Times, Oct. 28)
The Suzuki Company's tour, in which a third production, Euripides' "Dionysus," will occasionally replace "Electra" and/or "Oedipus Rex," continues to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Nov. 17 and 18 at the Mabie Theater.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/28/arts/theater/28FREE.html?searchpv=past7days

NELSON QUOTED (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 28)
Since 1995 at least 20 Minnesotans with mental retardation and other medical problems have died in cases in which maltreatment or questionable care was identified, a Star Tribune investigation has found. The deaths involved neglect, starvation, physical restraint, medication overdose, drowning or other circumstances. At least 15 died in group homes where authorities or workers raised questions about proper training. The state's watchdog, the Office of the Ombudsman for Mental Health and Mental Retardation, has a backlog of about 500 deaths of mentally retarded and other vulnerable people that have yet to be reviewed. A national expert, Dr. RICHARD NELSON, criticized the Minnesota system. Before becoming executive dean of the University of Iowa School of Medicine, he directed programs serving children with disabilities in Minnesota. "It's obvious something is wrong and needs to be fixed," he said. "The system is not prepared. The training is uneven, the organizations are not held accountable consistently, and it diminishes the enthusiasm of providers to put in safeguards."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/788541.html

HEART DRUG HAS MANY BENEFITS (Honolulu Advertiser, Oct. 28)
A heart drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, a report in the journal Circulation says. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril --- brand name, Altace --- over a 4 1/2-year period found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed.

MATHEW HEADS DRUG STUDY (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Oct. 28)
A heart-treatment drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, according to a report in the journal Circulation. The drug, ramipril, is known by the brand name Altace and is of the category called ACE inhibitors. Dr. JAMES MATHEW of the University of Iowa and other researchers used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril over a four-year period. They found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed. Matthew said that doctors long have known that LVH spelled trouble for heart patients. "But until now, no agent has been shown to lower risk by causing regression of LVH," he said. Because the study was large, including more than 8,000 patients, researchers expect that their findings will encourage clinicians to use ACE inhibitors.

FRANK SURPRISED BY IO VOLCANO (Grand Rapids Press, Oct. 28)
Surprised scientists report that their long-lived spacecraft, Galileo, got a whiff of danger recently when it dashed through the tallest volcanic plume ever seen -- anywhere. The car-sized spacecraft was beginning its last two years in orbit around Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, and was passing whisker-close to the strange, mottled-looking Jovian moon called Io. And once again, Io offered up surprises. "This was totally unexpected. We've had wonderful images and other remote sensing of the volcanoes on Io before, but we've never caught the hot breath of one of them until now," said planetary scientist LOUIS FRANK of the University of Iowa. "Galileo smelled the volcano's strong breath and survived." The Grand Rapids Press is based in Michigan.

FRANK COMMENTS ON IO PLUME (Science News, Oct. 27)
The Galileo spacecraft has found the tallest plume of material seen so far on Jupiter's moon Io. Towering 500 kilometers above Io -- more than 50 times the height of Mount Everest and at least 10 percent higher than any previously detected plume -- the vented gas emanates from a previously unknown hotspot near the moon's north pole. "We've had wonderful images and other remote sensing of the volcanoes on Io before, but we've never caught the hot breath from one of them until now," says Galileo scientist LOUIS FRANK of the University of Iowa.

UI CONSIDERED SAFE CAMPUS (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 27)
Joe Darnaby had his heart set on going to college out East next year. But since Sept. 11, his parents have laid down a new rule: no school more than five hours' drive from home in Deerfield, Ill. "Part of me says that he has to follow his dreams," said his mother, Maureen, who wants her son to be able to get home in an emergency. "But there must be another place closer to home where he can do that." After a decade of pushing hard for elite schools, Americans are showing a new willingness to trade prestige for location, safety and cost. With admissions season gearing up, applications are up 15 to 35 percent from last year at such bucolic institutions as Penn State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, while attendance at Indiana University recruiting events has doubled.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/785745.html

SIGWARTH CAMERA CAPTURES AURORAS (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 27)
Giant flares erupting on the surface of the sun for the past month are causing vivid displays of the Northern Lights, but few who live above the equator are aware that those same magnetic storms cause equally striking Southern Lights as well. Now a robot NASA satellite called Polar, flying in a looping orbit around the Earth, has photographed both displays simultaneously -- the first time they have ever been captured in space images with such clarity. To space physicist JOHN B. SIGWARTH at the University of Iowa, who helped design and build the satellite's main camera, the images of the two auroras pose an intriguing mystery because theories have always held that the details of both should be exactly the same. "Yet we're already finding slight differences in their intensity, and we don't understand why," Sigwarth said Friday. "It's an exciting puzzle, and because we've just now gotten the data, we've got work to do."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/10/27/MN233616.DTL

BELL: BABY SECOND TINIEST IN ILLINOIS (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 27)
A week before Halea Maurer was born, her parents began preparing for her death. Told by doctors that their daughter was not getting adequate nutrition and oxygen, Anne and Ken Maurer of Elmhurst, Ill., agreed to delivery at 27 weeks. Her only chance of survival was outside the womb, doctors said, but such an early birth would place her at great risk, too. Halea weighed in at 12 ounces--even less than doctors had expected. So her parents prepared a memento box of ultrasound images and cards from family and friends. They chose a name that is a variation of a Hawaiian word meaning "fond remembrance." But Friday, Halea (which they pronounce HAL-ee-ah) was a thriving 4-month-old infant who tips the scales at 4 pounds, 6.5 ounces. She is believed to be the second-smallest baby in Illinois to survive and the sixth-smallest baby ever. According to the University of Iowa, Halea is the second smallest baby ever to survive in Illinois. She also ties for sixth place on the list of smallest babies ever to survive. Dr. EDWARD BELL, director of neonatology at the University of Iowa's Department of Medicine, said he composed the list of tiny babies based on reports by doctors and parents.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0110270160oct27.story
The story also includes a link to the UI list of tiniest babies, which is http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/tiniestbabies

UI WRESTLER COMMENTS ON TERRORISM EFFECTS (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 26)
Anxiety may be less visible than anthrax, but it is just as insidious an aftereffect of the terrorism of Sept. 11 -- especially for athletes. Citing concerns about safety, an increasing number of athletes and teams have withdrawn from competitions in the aftermath of last month's terrorist attacks. Some American athletes still are planning overseas travel, however. American wrestlers intend to compete overseas in two imminent World Wrestling Championships, freestyle Nov. 22-25 in Sofia, Bulgaria, and Greco-Roman from Dec. 6-9 in Patras, Greece. The championships were rescheduled and relocated from Sept. 26-29, when they were supposed to be held in New York. Joe Williams, a standout wrestler at Mt. Carmel High School and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, said he would abide by USA Wrestling's decision. "The thought of terrorism is in the back of my mind, and I thought about it quite a while," he said. "But I'm looking forward to competing."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/printedition/chi-0110260331oct26.story

TOBACMAN: CARRAGEENAN POSES RISKS (Yahoo! News, Oct. 26)
Here's something else to add to that growing list of things to avoid -- carrageenan. It's a common food additive, and one researcher says it may play a role in the development of colon cancer and inflammatory bowel diseases, like ulcerative colitis. Other experts, however, are not convinced that there is enough evidence to say that the substance poses a health risk to humans. "Carrageenan is a wolf in sheep's clothing," says Dr. JOANNE TOBACMAN, an assistant professor of clinical internal medicine at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "It looks innocent, like a simple molecule, but it's really not metabolizable."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011026/hl/get_the_gum_out_1.html

UI STUDENT LAUNCHES WHEEL COVER BUSINESS (USA Today, Oct. 26)
John Smith of Orlando used to drive 30,000 miles a year for his job running a housecleaning service. When you spend that much time in a car, you notice details about other vehicles -- such as unused space on hubcaps. ''I thought, wouldn't it be great to put a sign on a wheel,'' said the 33-year-old one-time UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student. Smith is a budding sports merchandiser with a novelty product designed for the college sports fan who has everything: specialized hubcaps. His company, born from ''being broke and creative,'' is called Clever Covers. Smith started his venture in 1996, marketing it through the NCAA's official licensing arm. He has licenses with Florida, Florida State, Miami (Fla.) and Central Florida and hopes to add 30 by next year.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20011026/3572226s.htm

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT CASE (Boston Globe, Oct. 26)
The 18 states that sued Microsoft Corp. yesterday stepped up pressure on the software giant to accept curbs in its business practices by hiring veteran trial lawyer Brendan V. Sullivan Jr. By hiring Sullivan, who defended Oliver North during the Iran-Contra affair, the states are telling the number one software company and the U.S. Justice Department they won't accept a proposed settlement that allows the company to perpetuate its Windows monopoly, legal experts said. "They may be able to steer the settlement more in their direction," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust at the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/299/business/States_hire_ex_Iran_Contra_lawyer+.shtml
The same article from Bloomberg News appeared in the Oct. 26 SEATTLE TIMES
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/businesstechnology/134358844_antitrust26.html

PRESTON ARTICLE CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 26)
Frans B.M. de Waal, a professor of psychology and the director of the Living Links Center at Emory University, writes about the origin of empathy in an article summing up a forthcoming review of the emotion by de Waal and STEPHANIE PRESTON, a postdoctoral researcher in neurology at the University of Iowa, that will run in the journal Behavioral and Brain Sciences. De Waal writes: "We are so used to empathy that we take it for granted, yet it is essential to human society as we know it. Our morality depends on it: How could anyone be expected to follow the golden rule without being able to mentally trade places with a fellow human being? It is logical to assume that the capacity to trade places came first, well before the rule was developed. It is even likely that the capacity predates our species. I have always been intrigued by the degree to which other large-brained mammals, like great apes and dolphins, share our empathic abilities. Stories of those animals' aiding others -- even sacrificing themselves for others -- abound, yet even if they provide the most striking examples by far, they are by no means alone. Charles Darwin noted in The Descent of Man that many animals, even those with smaller brains, sympathize with each other's distress or danger."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i09/09b00701.htm

MATHEW: DRUG MAY CURB HEART ENLARGEMENT (The State, Oct. 25)
A heart-treatment drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, according to a report in the journal Circulation. The drug, ramipril, is known by the brand name Altace and is of the category called ACE inhibitors. Dr. JAMES MATHEW of the University of Iowa and other researchers used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril over a four-year period. They found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed. Matthew said that doctors long have known that LVH spelled trouble for heart patients. "But until now, no agent has been shown to lower risk by causing regression of LVH," he said. Because the study was large, including more then 8,000 patients, researchers expect that their findings will encourage clinicians to use ACE inhibitors. The State is based in Columbia, S.C.

ROBINSON'S NOVEL 'HOUSEKEEPING' DISCUSSED (Washington Post, Oct. 25)
A transcript of an online meeting of The Washington Book Club, a monthly program presented by the editors and writers of Washington Post Book World, that featured a discussion on author MARILYNNE ROBINSON's novel "Housekeeping" includes a visitor's question of whether Robinson "is still at Iowa. Is she in the Writing Program or some other department?" The forum's moderator, Book World senior editor Michael Dirda, responds: "I don't think Robinson is at Iowa." But another on-line visitor notes that Robinson is in fact still at the University of Iowa, teaching creative writing.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/liveonline/01/books/bookclub_dirda1025.htm

NEWSPAPER CORRECTS ERROR (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 24)
In its Corrections & Amplifications column, the paper told readers that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is in Iowa City, and that Iowa State University is in Ames. A Marketplace article about teach-ins on college campuses Thursday misidentified the location of the University of Iowa.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB100381215334640200.djm

UI CONTINUES TO GUARD ANTHRAX (International Herald Tribune, Oct. 24)
Some American establishments have even begun destroying their own stocks of anthrax microbes. Iowa State University killed off its deadly anthrax germs more than two weeks ago, deciding that they were not worth the trouble after Iowa's governor sent members of the National Guard to patrol the laboratory where they were stored. Joe Shannahan, a spokesman for Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa, said armed guards were still protecting anthrax supplies at a federal Department of Agriculture laboratory in Ames and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.iht.com/articles/36719.htm

FRANK COMMENTS ON GALILEO ENCOUNTER WITH IO (Newsday, Oct. 24)
It was a close encounter of the hot kind. Surprised scientists report that their long-lived spacecraft, Galileo, got a whiff of danger recently when it dashed through the tallest volcanic plume ever seen -- anywhere. The car-sized spacecraft was beginning its last two years in orbit around Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, and was passing whisker-close to the strange, mottled-looking Jovian moon called Io. And once again, Io offered up surprises. "This was totally unexpected. We've had wonderful images and other remote sensing of the volcanoes on Io before, but we've never caught the hot breath of one of them until now," said planetary scientist LOUIS FRANK of the University of Iowa. "Galileo smelled the volcano's strong breath, and survived." Frank, the head of Galileo's particle-sensing team, said the flakes Galileo encountered came up directly from an erupting volcano, one that had not been identified before. So the encounter yielded the first direct sample of volcanic material coming from Io's interior.
A version of the same story ran Oct. 24 in the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE and on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=galileo24&date=20011024&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22

UI PLANS DOUBLE-DIGIT TUITION HIKE (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 24)
Rising college expenses and a tumbling economy have drained Illinois' student grant program six months earlier than usual, forcing it to suspend new aid awards for the current academic year. The cutoff comes as tuition expenses are beginning to spiral upward at state universities across the country, according to the College Board's annual survey on college costs, released Tuesday. The survey found that four-year public institutions raised tuition and fees an average of 7.7 percent this year, compared with a 5.5 percent increase for four-year private institutions. Both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Minnesota have announced double-digit increases for next year.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0110240319oct24.story

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON ANTHRAX (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 23)
While state-sponsored programs invested fortunes in developing missiles and bombs to launch germ warfare, bioterrorists have found a simpler dispersal method -- ordinary envelopes sent through the postal system -- to readily infect both mail recipients and mail handlers, contaminating facilities along the way. News of two suspicious deaths of Washington postal workers, amid the rising number of people exposed and infected by anthrax spores in letters, has sent mail anxiety soaring once again. One question troubling many people: How easily could spores intended to infect the recipient of a laced letter leak out of the envelope, exposing a chain of mail handlers and office personnel en route? The answer: quite easily. Flaps of many business envelopes aren't airtight, but have half-inch to one-inch wide gaps in the factory-applied adhesive. Sorting machines and rough handling by mail carriers could easily squeeze out the powdery contents of an envelope, allowing bacterial spores to escape on a puff of air. MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said she doubts paper is porous enough to let spores pass through. But because of the potential for spores to seep out of the corners of an envelope, technicians in her laboratory use safety cabinets with controlled airflow to test suspicious envelopes.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB1003791478582724880.djm

UI CONTINUES TO GUARD ANTHRAX SAMPLE (New York Times, Oct. 23)
Some American establishments have even begun destroying their own stocks of anthrax microbes. Iowa State University killed off its deadly anthrax germs more than two weeks ago, deciding that they were not worth the trouble after Iowa's governor sent members of the National Guard to patrol the laboratory where they were stored. Joe Shannahan, a spokesman for Gov. Tom Vilsack of Iowa, said armed guards were still protecting anthrax supplies at a federal Department of Agriculture laboratory in Ames and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/23/national/23GERM.html?pagewanted=print

HELMS COMMENTS ON ANTHRAX EFFECTS (New York Times, Oct. 23)
While drugs are useful in treating infections by some potential germ agents like anthrax, medical experts prize vaccines because they can prevent infections altogether or, in the case of anthrax, work with antibiotics to combat an infection. But the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, a group of outside experts that advises the CDC on vaccine use, concluded in December that a sustained course of antibiotics was the best protection for people who might have inhaled spores, and that vaccination was not necessary. "You can do pretty darn well with antibiotics alone," said Dr. CHARLES M. HELMS of the University of Iowa, a panel member. "Particularly if you have limited doses of vaccine to offer, there is no reason to get hung up on the issue of using both." But Dr. Helms said there was always the risk that bioterrorists "would recognize the usual antibiotic and may create an antibiotic-resistant strain." He added, "I think we should clearly have more vaccine available."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/23/health/anatomy/23PREP.html?pagewanted=1

ST. PAUL WRITER HEYNEN ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 23)
A story about St. Paul, Minn., writer JIM HEYNEN, whose new collection of stories "The Boys' House" was recently published, quotes him as saying it was a foregone conclusion that after graduation from high school he would go to Calvin College in Grand Rapids, Mich. Then it was "off to graduate school and secular pollution" at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he aimed to become a Milton scholar. "It was just natural, going to the period of English literature in which the Reformation occurred," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/775039.html
A separate bio of the author also mentions his UI connection.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/775543.html

BLOOM'S POSTVILLE REVIEWED (The American Prospect, Oct. 22)
The magazine reviews "two recent books about strangers who ride into town and decide to stay," including "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," by STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a UI journalism professor.
http://www.prospect.org/print/V12/18/graff-e.html

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (Discovery Channel Canada, Oct. 22)
The Discovery Channel in Canada aired a segment about research by Drs. EDWARD WASSERMAN and MICHAEL YOUNG of the University of Iowa that found that monkeys may be able to think abstractly. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. The link to view a the segment on the Web is available at
http://www.exn.ca/discovery/all_run1.asp?date=10/22/01

CHOI STUDIES FRUCTOSE INTOLERANCE (Yahoo! News, Oct. 22)
If you're prone to intestinal distress, fruits and honey could be your gastronomic enemies. Bad reactions to the simple, natural sugar commonly found in apples, juices, honey and candy might be behind some cases of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), a new study suggests. When researchers at the University of Iowa Medical Center tested 219 people who complained of unexplained gas, bloating and stomach pain, they found that when they drank a fructose mixture, the majority of them showed fructose intolerance and many also had symptoms of IBS. What this means is staying away from fructose may be a simple way to ease the pain of IBS for some of the disease's 15.4 million sufferers, the researchers say. "It may be a useful tool to try to identify the disease," says the lead author, Dr. YOUNG K. CHOI, a gastroenterology expert at the university. "It's something to look further into."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011022/hl/giving_you_gas_1.html

CHOI: FRUCTOSE-INTESTINAL DISCOMFORT LINK (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 22)
Researchers at the University of Iowa tested 219 men and women with unexplained gas, bloating and abdominal pain after giving them fructose. They took breath samples and found 78 percent of these people tested positive for hydrogen or methane gas, which only turn up in breath when someone's body doesn't digest fructose. They also found that more than half the people given fructose developed the same unpleasant digestive symptoms they'd been at a loss to explain. It may turn out a low-fructose diet could spell relief for some sufferers, according to lead researcher Dr. YOUNG K. CHOI, whose findings were set to be released today at the 66th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology in Las Vegas.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000084098oct22.story

MATHEW: DRUG MAY CURB HEART ENLARGEMENT (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 21)
A heart-treatment drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, according to a report in the journal Circulation. The drug, ramipril, is known by the brand name Altace and is of the category called ACE inhibitors. Dr. JAMES MATHEW of the University of Iowa and other researchers used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril over a four-year period. They found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed. Matthews said that doctors long have known that LVH spelled trouble for heart patients. "But until now, no agent has been shown to lower risk by causing regression of LVH," he said. Because the study was large, including more then 8,000 patients, researchers expect that their findings will encourage clinicians to use ACE inhibitors.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0110210269oct21.story

ANSTREICHER SOLVES 40-YEAR-OLD MATH PROBLEM (HPC Wire, Oct. 19)
A University of Iowa researcher -- KURT ANSTREICHER, professor of management sciences in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business -- has helped solve an applied mathematics problem that had challenged computer scientists for 40 years, just one year after he helped find the solution to a 32-year-old problem. HPC Wire is the "Electronic News Magazine for High-Performance Computing."

RIETZ: SEPT. 11 SPOOKED INVESTORS (Dow Jones Newswire, Oct. 19)
Investors will never forget the tragic events of Sept. 11 and many are still struggling to come to terms with a pervasive sense of grief and loss. Nevertheless, more than a month later, some psychologists familiar with markets and investor patterns sense an incipient march back toward more "normal" behavior. THOMAS RIETZ, an associate professor of finance at the University of Iowa, rejects the idea that "risk is quantifiable, in fact risk is frightening to investors," right now, he says, because "something like Sept. 11 is not part of their (previous) experience." Americans today "really don't have any type of historical perspective," from U.S. history at least, to get a handle on these feelings of vulnerability they may have in Sept. 11's aftermath, Rietz adds.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=BT-CO-20011022-002922.djm

KERBER GETS HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION AWARDS (Deseret News, Oct. 19)
The year was 1968, and LINDA K. KERBER was writing a thesis in American history and, of course, she wanted to be taken seriously, so, of course, she chose the Founding Fathers for her topic. Almost as an aside, she included two paragraphs about women. "Alexander Hamilton figured out that if you are going to industrialize, you are going to need a working class," Kerber explains. But in the 18th century, there was still plenty of land and money to be made. The average man had little incentive to work in a factory. Hamilton figured that impoverished women might be interested in long hours and low wages. As it turned out, he was right. "Women and children were the first proletariat," says Kerber. A history professor at the University of Iowa, Kerber came to Salt Lake City this week as the University of Utah's O. Meredith Wilson lecturer. She has received two awards from the American Historical Association -- one for women's history and one for legal history. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110190066

UI STRUGGLES WITH BUDGET CUTS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 19)
Public colleges throughout the nation are facing new reductions in their state support as a result of the continued deterioration of the economy and the financial aftershocks of the events of September 11. Governors of at least nine states ... have either ordered, or told public colleges to prepare for, midyear rescissions in their state appropriations, ranging from 1 percent to 7 percent. ... In Iowa, for example, Gov. Thomas J. Vilsack, a Democrat, has called on lawmakers to reduce spending on public colleges and other state agencies by 7 percent. Given that lawmakers slashed spending on higher education by a similar amount entering this fiscal year, public-college officials and student leaders warn that the latest round of cuts will have a devastating impact on their institutions. Last month, NICK KLENSKE, president of the University of Iowa Student Government, told the state Board of Regents, which oversees its three public universities, that students in his history and classics courses already are being assigned fewer papers because the university cannot afford to hire enough teaching assistants to grade the usual course load. ... JON WHITMORE, the provost at Iowa, argued last week that the university has maintained quality, and that the classroom experiences cited by Mr. Klenske are atypical.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i08/08a02202.htm

CHAPPELL HIRED BY ABT (International Herald Tribune, Oct. 19)
The American Ballet Theater (ABT) has appointed WALLACE CHAPPELL to the position of executive director. Chappell, 60, comes to the ABT after a 15-year term as director of the Hancher Auditorium at the University of Iowa. He will be replacing Louis Spisto, who resigned in July after less than two years on the job. "My love for dance is as strong as my love for theater and music," Chappell said. "All three disciplines are united in the art of ballet."
http://www.iht.com/articles/36219.htm
A version of the story also ran Oct. 19 on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/lifestyle/chi-0110190151oct19.story

HOCH: DIVERSE VIEWS IMPORTANT (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 18)
After years of encouraging diversity in admissions and curricula, universities are now faced with this modern-day conundrum: how to keep peace on campus among young people whose views about the U.S. war on terrorism fall all over the map. At the University of Iowa (which the paper mistakenly places in Ames), graduate student Osama Saba says the teach-ins there help students grapple with questions like: "How can I punish those responsible without becoming one of them?" When Muslim students expressed anti-American views at a University of Iowa event, "many people were not happy," says STEVEN HOCH, associate provost. Nevertheless, he says, "we wanted to reinforce what the mission of a university is ... it's a place of divergent views, tolerance and community. The entire spectrum of views is represented here."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/10/18/financial1205EDT0113.DTL

HOCH: DIVERSE VIEWS IMPORTANT IN CRISIS (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 18)
After years of encouraging diversity in admissions and curricula, universities are now faced with this modern-day conundrum: how to keep peace on campus among young people whose views about the U.S. war on terrorism fall all over the map. At the University of Iowa (which the paper mistakenly places in Ames), graduate student Osama Saba says the teach-ins there help students grapple with questions like: "How can I punish those responsible without becoming one of them?" When Muslim students expressed anti-American views at a University of Iowa event, "many people were not happy," says STEVEN HOCH, associate provost. Nevertheless, he says, "we wanted to reinforce what the mission of a university is ... it's a place of divergent views, tolerance and community. The entire spectrum of views is represented here."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB1003356166936909080.djm&template=printing.tmpl

BALDUS: LIMIT DEATH PENALTY REQUESTS (Lincoln Journal Star, Oct. 18)
If Nebraska would limit asking for the death penalty, there would be almost no question whether race or wealth of the criminal or victim was a factor in receiving the death penalty. DAVID BALDUS, who conducted a two-year study of Nebraska's death penalty, said Wednesday at a Judiciary Committee hearing there would be fewer questions about application of the death penalty if prosecutors sought the extreme sanction only in cases with two or more aggravating factors. Many death penalty opponents testified at the hearing that there would be no problems with applications of the death penalty if it were banned in Nebraska. Baldus, a University of Iowa law professor, said none of the 27 defendants who received the death penalty in Nebraska since 1973 was convicted as a result of less than two aggravating circumstances. Aggravating factors include terrorism; contract murder; heinous, atrocious, cruel or depraved murder; killing a police officer or prison guard; trying to hinder government function; multiple victims or presenting a great risk of death to others.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=4529&date=20011018&past=

GILCHRIST: ANTHRAX MAKERS RISK EXPOSURE (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 18)
The anthrax spores delivered to a Senate office appear to be concentrated, pure and processed to a minute size that would make them a formidable weapon, government officials said Wednesday, suggesting that the biological attack required sophisticated expertise. One challenge of making such agents is to avoid getting infected, said MARY GILCHRIST, a University of Iowa microbiologist who helped form the CDC's nationwide bioterrorism detection network. Such prevention could take "some pretty exotic safety devices," Gilchrist said. The sort of knowledge necessary to make such spores might have come from technicians who once worked in a state bioweapons program, said Ackerman of the Monterey Institute. It's also possible that the spores were stolen from a foreign weapons lab or intentionally supplied to the attackers by a rogue state.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0110180285oct18.story

TOBACMAN STUDIES CARRAGEENAN (Environmental News Network, Oct. 17)
Containers of pudding, ice cream, yogurt, or cottage cheese may include the ingredient carrageenan, a thickener derived from red seaweed. For decades, it has been presumed to be safe to eat, but new research from a medical doctor on the faculty the University of Iowa shows that presumption may be wrong. Carrageenan is a water-soluble polymer, also known as a gum, that is used as a fat substitute in processed meats and can be found in condensed milk and some soy milk products. "Evidence from animal models has demonstrated that degraded carrageenan causes ulcerations and malignancies in the gastrointestinal tract," said JOANNE TOBACMAN, M.D., University of Iowa assistant professor of clinical internal medicine. After conducting epidemiologic and laboratory research on carrageenan, Dr. Tobacman published an extensive review of 45 investigations on harmful gastrointestinal effects of carrageenan in animal experiments. The article was published in the October issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, the journal of the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences.
http://www.enn.com:80/news/enn-stories/2001/10/10172001/s_45265.asp

CHAPPELL TO HEAD AMERICAN BALLET THEATRE (New York Times, Oct. 17)
The American Ballet Theater today named a veteran arts administrator as its new executive director after two years of board and staff resignations and backstage furor that rivaled any onstage drama. Appointed to the post is WALLACE CHAPPELL, 60, the director of the Hancher Auditorium at the University of Iowa since 1986, who has also held ranking staff positions with the Mark Taper Forum in Los Angeles, the Alliance Theater in Atlanta and the Repertory Theater of St. Louis. He replaces Louis G. Spisto, who resigned under pressure in July after completing two years of a three-year contract. Gedalio Grinberg, the new chairman of the Ballet Theater board, who was one of four longtime board members who resigned in the last days of Mr. Spisto's tenure and returned with his departure, described Mr. Chappell as having "a very big dedication." "Wally understands the ballet very well," Mr. Grinberg said. "He seems very knowledgeable about how companies work, and as a presenter he has a good sense of how the numbers work. He also understood that working with the board — with all the members — was important."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/17/arts/dance/17APPO.html
A version of the story also ran Oct. 17 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20011017/en/ballet_theater_appoints_new_director_1.html
An abbreviated version of the story ran Oct. 17 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/10/17/entertainment0836EDT0547.DTL

BROCHU RESEARCH: T-REX WAS 'T-WRECK' (Newsday, Oct. 16)
Even the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex can't escape the merciless progress of scientific knowledge. The truth is cruel: T-rex was probably T-wrecks. "If we did Jurassic Park 4," says Wyoming paleontologist Robert Bakker, "T-rex would be portrayed in a fear-, angst-ridden role -- sort of a large Woody Allen character." The fearsome thunder-lizards lived wretched lives, he said: "They were beat up, limping, had oozing sores, were dripping pus and disease-ridden, and had to worry about their children starving and other T-rexs coming in and kicking them out." Bakker, of the Wyoming Dinosaur Society, knows this because of research by Elizabeth Rega, a physical anthropologist at Western University in Pomona, Calif. Rega and University of Iowa Paleontologist CHRIS BROCHU examined three T-rexs, including Sue, one of the most complete specimens in the world. They found signs of diseases common to many mammals. "These diseases were most likely chronic, long-term, non-life-threatening infections," Rega said. A version of the story also ran Oct. 16 on the Web site of the OTTAWA CITIZEN in Canada. A version of the story also ran Oct. 16 on the ENVIRONMENTAL NEWS NETWORK Web site.
http://www.enn.com:80/news/enn-stories/2001/10/10152001/shrimp_45242.asp
A version of the story also ran Oct. 14 on the Web site of the DESERET NEWS in Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110150318
A version of the story also ran Oct. 15 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/011014/12/exp-t-wrecks

WALLACE ELECTED TO INSTITUTE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 16)
ROBERT B. WALLACE, M.D., professor of epidemiology and internal medicine, department of epidemiology, Colleges of Public Health and Medicine, University of Iowa, is one of 60 new members elected Monday to the Institute of Medicine -- an arm of the National Academies. The Institute of Medicine's mission is to enhance health care by providing objective scientific information about health policy to the public, government, and corporations. Recent reports by the institute have dealt with new technologies for breast-cancer screening, how biochemical differences affect men's and women's health, and ways to confront mental illness in developing countries.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/10/2001101607n.htm

GILCHRIST INTERVIEWED ABOUT BIOTERRORISM THREAT (CNN, Oct. 15)
MARY GILCHRIST -- a University of Iowa microbiologist and president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories -- was a featured guest on CNN's "The Point With Greta Van Susteren." Among other things, Gilchrist was asked what kind of medical detective work is involved in tracking down anthrax. "Well, that step is done by the law enforcement individuals and sometimes by HAZMAT teams," Gilchrist said, according to a draft transcript of the interview. "They deliver the specimens to us and we evaluate them for the presence of anthrax. And we have a variety of tests. Our laboratory response network is a network of laboratories throughout the United States and right now, all of the laboratories are very busy. What they're doing is evaluating envelopes that arrived at people's doors that people are worried about. And we're working very hard to rule out any kind of concern." The transcript can be viewed at: http://www.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0110/15/tpt.00.html

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (Boston Globe, Oct. 15)
Monkeys may be able to think abstractly, according to the first study to suggest that a creature that is neither ape nor man can possess a central aspect of human intelligence. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study by a team in France and America has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. In a series of five experiments, Dr. Joel Fagot of the Centre for Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Marseille, Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN, of both the Centre and the University of Iowa, and Dr. MICHAEL YOUNG of Iowa, trained two adult baboons, one male and one female, to use a personal computer and joystick to select grids that had varying collections of pictures. The Journal of Experimental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that the researchers rewarded the baboons with banana-flavored pellets for selecting, from two choices, the array that showed the same relationships among pictures as the sample -- either same icons or different icons -- to see if the baboons could perceive "sameness" even when its cues were abstract. The team says more work is required on other animals before theorists assert that the capability for abstraction lies only with certain species. "Analogical thinking . . . may very well be found in non-human animals -- if only we assiduously look for them," it said. The same Washington Post article ran Oct. 15 in the TULSA WORLD in Oklahoma.

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 15)
Monkeys may be able to think abstractly, according to the first study to suggest that a creature that is neither ape nor man can possess a central aspect of human intelligence. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study by a team in France and America has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. In a series of five experiments, Dr Joel Fagot of the Centre for Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Marseille, Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN, of both the Centre and the University of Iowa, and Dr. MICHAEL YOUNG of Iowa, trained two adult baboons, one male and one female, to use a personal computer and joystick to select grids that had varying collections of pictures. The Journal of Experimental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that the researchers rewarded the baboons with banana-flavored pellets for selecting, from two choices, the array that showed the same relationships among pictures as the sample -- either same icons or different icons -- to see if the baboons could perceive "sameness" even when its cues were abstract. The team says more work is required on other animals before theorists assert that the capability for abstraction lies only with certain species. "Analogical thinking . . . may very well be found in non-human animals -- if only we assiduously look for them," it said.

SWANSON OFFERS INTERVIEWING TIPS (Employment Review, Oct. 15)
A story offering interview tips for job-seekers quotes JAYNE SWANSON, a placement specialist at the University of Iowa. "There are a number of books on the market that can help identify interviewing questions," Swanson says. "Practice out loud or ask a friend to serve as the interviewer. Think about the key skills you possess for the job and make sure these come out in your answers." The Employment Review is based in West Palm Beach, Fla.

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (Rocky Mountain News, Oct. 15)
Monkeys may be able to think abstractly, according to the first study to suggest that a creature that is neither ape nor man can possess a central aspect of human intelligence. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study by a team in France and America has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. In a series of five experiments, Dr Joel Fagot of the Centre for Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Marseille, Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN, of both the Centre and the University of Iowa, and Dr. MICHAEL YOUNG of Iowa, trained two adult baboons, one male and one female, to use a personal computer and joystick to select grids that had varying collections of pictures. The Journal of Experimental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that the researchers rewarded the baboons with banana-flavoured pellets for selecting, from two choices, the array that showed the same relationships among pictures as the sample -- either same icons or different icons -- to see if the baboons could perceive "sameness" even when its cues were abstract. The team says more work is required on other animals before theorists assert that the capability for abstraction lies only with certain species. "Analogical thinking . . . may very well be found in non-human animals -- if only we assiduously look for them," it said. Versions of the same article also ran Oct. 15 in THE RECORD of Hackensack, N.J. and the VANCOUVER SUN of Vancouver, British Columbia.

TOBACMAN STUDIES CARRAGEENAN-CANCER LINK (Yahoo! News, Oct. 15)
A number of studies have found that the widely used food additive carrageenan causes cancer in laboratory animals, and, according to a new report, its use in human food should be reconsidered. Although the studies have been conducted only in animals, ''enough evidence exists about the cancer-causing effects of carrageenan limit the use of the food additive,'' said Dr. JOANNE K. TOBACMAN of the University of Iowa Health Care in Iowa City. Carrageenan, an extract from red seaweed, is used in a variety of foods such as milk products and processed meat as a thickener, stabilizer and texturizer. It can be found in products such as ice cream, whipped cream, pudding and yogurt, Tobacman told Reuters Health. Tobacman reviewed 45 previously published animal studies and found that carrageenan is associated with the formation of ulcers in the intestines and cancerous tumors in the gut. "Both undegraded as well as degraded forms of carrageenan are associated with malignancies,'' she said. Her report is published in the October issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011015/hl/additives_1.html
A version of the story also ran Oct. 15 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/011015/14/health-additives

ANSTREICHER SOLVES 32-YEAR-OLD MATH PROBLEM (Science Daily, Oct. 15)
A University of Iowa researcher has helped solve an applied mathematics problem that had challenged computer scientists for 40 years, just one year after he helped find the solution to a 32-year-old problem. KURT ANSTREICHER, professor of management sciences in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, working with NATHAN BRIXIUS, who earned his doctoral degree in computer science from the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 2000, discovered how to link 34 computer components together on a 9-by-4 grid using the shortest-possible wiring scheme. The problem, formally known as "ste36a" and based on the design of a UNIVAC computer, was posed by researcher Leon Steinberg in 1961. The solution to the problem was scheduled to be presented at a Friday, Oct. 12 mathematics workshop held in Berlin, Germany.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/10/011015055814.htm

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (Science Daily, Oct. 15)
Monkeys may be able to think abstractly, according to the first study to suggest that a creature that is neither ape nor man can possess a central aspect of human intelligence. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study by a team in France and America has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. In a series of five experiments, Dr Joel Fagot of the Centre for Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Marseille, Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN, of both the Centre and the University of Iowa, and Dr. MICHAEL YOUNG of Iowa, trained two adult baboons, one male and one female, to use a personal computer and joystick to select grids that had varying collections of pictures. The Journal of Experimental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that the researchers rewarded the baboons with banana-flavoured pellets for selecting, from two choices, the array that showed the same relationships among pictures as the sample -- either same icons or different icons -- to see if the baboons could perceive "sameness" even when its cues were abstract. The team says more work is required on other animals before theorists assert that the capability for abstraction lies only with certain species. "Analogical thinking . . . may very well be found in non-human animals -- if only we assiduously look for them," it said.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/10/011015055219.htm
A version of the story also ran Oct. 15 on the Web site of the EVANSVILLE COURIER PRESS in Indiana:
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200110/15+shartraits101501_news.html+20011015
A version of the story also ran Oct. 15 on the Web site of the DESERET NEWS in Utah:
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110150521
A version of the story also ran Oct. 15 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stories/484/758832.html

WASSERMAN, YOUNG STUDY BABOONS (CNN Interactive, Oct. 15)
Monkeys may be able to think abstractly, according to the first study to suggest that a creature that is neither ape nor man can possess a central aspect of human intelligence. Two Guinea baboons, using a joystick to operate a computer, may have used some features of analogous thinking, when they matched arrays of symbols. The new study by a team in France and America has profound implications for the evolution of human intelligence and what it is that separates homo sapiens from other animals, marking the latest piece of research to blur the distinction between humans and their hairy cousins. In a series of five experiments, Dr. Joel Fagot of the Centre for Research in Cognitive Neuroscience, Marseille, Dr. EDWARD WASSERMAN, of both the Centre and the University of Iowa, and Dr. MICHAEL YOUNG of Iowa, trained two adult baboons, one male and one female, to use a personal computer and joystick to select grids that had varying collections of pictures. The Journal of Experimental Psychology, published by the American Psychological Association, reported that the researchers rewarded the baboons with banana-flavoured pellets for selecting, from two choices, the array that showed the same relationships among pictures as the sample -- either same icons or different icons -- to see if the baboons could perceive "sameness" even when its cues were abstract. The team says more work is required on other animals before theorists assert that the capability for abstraction lies only with certain species. "Analogical thinking . . . may very well be found in non-human animals -- if only we assiduously look for them," it said.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/TECH/science/10/15/baboonintelligence.ap/index.html
Versions of the story also ran Oct. 15 in THE DAILY TELEGRAPH, THE GUARDIAN, THE TIMES and THE INDEPENDENT of London, THE SCOTSMAN, the WASHINGTON POST, ABC NEWS Web site:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011014/aponline190138_000.htm
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk_news/story/0,3604,574164,00.html
http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/science/story.jsp?story=99495
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20011015_54.html
http://www.cnn.com/2001/TECH/science/10/15/baboonintelligence.ap/index.html
http://www.portal.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2001/10/15/wmonk15.xml&sSheet=/news/2001/10/15/ixhome.html
The Web site of BERGEN RECORD of New Jersey:
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/baboo1520011015.htm
The PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Web site:
http://inq.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2001/10/15/national/BABOON15.htm
The SEATTLE TIMES Web site:
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=baboon15&date=20011015
The BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/news/printedition/bal-te.baboons15oct15.story
The SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/10/14/national1901EDT0566.DTL
The LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000082302oct15.story
A version of the article also ran Oct. 14 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011014/sc/baboon_intelligence_1.html
Versions of this article also appeared in the following: FLORIDA TIMES UNION, Oct. 15, ASBURY PARK (N.J.) PRESS, Oct.15, ORLANDO SENTINEL, Oct. 15, THE TIMES-PICAYUNE (New Orleans), Oct. 15, THE TIMES-HERALD (Norristown, Pa.), Oct. 15, DENVER POST, Oct. 15, THE NEWS-JOURNAL (Daytona Beach, Fla.), Oct. 15, THE VIRGINIAN-PILOT (Norfolk, Va.), Oct. 15, THE NEWS JOURNAL (New Castle, Del.), Oct. 15, THE HONOLULU ADVERTISER, Oct. 15.

UI PLASTIC SURGERY SITE TOUTED (Yahoo! News, Oct. 15)
A story on plastic surgery provides readers seeking more information with a link to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE'S DEPARTMENT OF PLASTIC SURGERY: COSMETIC AND RECONSTRUCTIVE.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011014/hl/a_face-off_that_s_more_than_cosmetic_1.html

BROCHU RESEARCH: T-REX WAS 'T-WRECK' (Washington Post, Oct. 14)
Even the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex can't escape the merciless progress of scientific knowledge. The truth is cruel: T-rex was probably T-wrecks. "If we did Jurassic Park 4," says Wyoming paleontologist Robert Bakker, "T-rex would be portrayed in a fear-, angst-ridden role -- sort of a large Woody Allen character." The fearsome thunder-lizards lived wretched lives, he said: "They were beat up, limping, had oozing sores, were dripping pus and disease-ridden, and had to worry about their children starving and other T-rexs coming in and kicking them out." Bakker, of the Wyoming Dinosaur Society, knows this because of research by Elizabeth Rega, a physical anthropologist at Western University in Pomona, Calif. Rega and University of Iowa paleontologist CHRIS BROCHU examined three T-rexs, including Sue, one of the most complete specimens in the world. They found signs of diseases common to many mammals. "These diseases were most likely chronic, long-term, non-life-threatening infections," Rega said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011014/aponline120150_000.htm
Versions of the article also ran Oct. 14 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011014/sc/exp_t_wrecks_1.html
The LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-exp-t-wrecks1014oct14.story

AUDIT: UI SIMULATOR'S COST DOUBLED (Dallas Morning News, Oct. 13)
A nearly $81 million, federally funded driving simulator designed to improve highway safety cost taxpayers twice as much as expected because federal officials failed to properly control costs, according to an audit released Tuesday. The report by the Transportation Department's inspector general found that government officials allowed the private contractors who built the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR to spend more money than was budgeted. The officials also failed to raise the amount of private funding ordered by Congress and, as costs mounted, did not accurately portray the price, the report said. The three-ton simulator is housed in a four-story building at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It is owned by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and run by the university. DEREK WILLARD, the University of Iowa's associate vice president for research, said the university would not comment on the audit or its fees until discussing it with NHTSA. Versions of the article also ran Oct. 3 in the DAILY BREEZE in Torrance, Calif., and THE TENNESSEAN in Nashville, Tenn.

PASCARELLA STUDY: WOMEN LEARN LESS (Herald-Sun, Oct. 13)
Women learn only two-thirds of what men learn during college, according to a study co-authored by ERNEST PASCARELLA, who holds the Mary Louise Petersen Chair in Higher Education at the University of Iowa. The findings, which appear in The Journal of Higher Education, are based on results of an achievement test given just once to 19,000 college students at 56 four-year colleges and universities in 13 states. "We were somewhat disconcerted about the results," Pascarella said. "We don't know why that is the case." The Herald-Sun is based in Durham, N.C.

GILCHRIST SAYS LAB GETTING MUCH MAIL (Boston Herald, Oct. 13)
A story about federal officials' call for calm in the wake of a New York anthrax case quotes Dr. MARY J.R. GILCHRIST, director of the Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa and an expert on bioterrorism. Gilchrist said the FBI and health agencies have sent scores of mailed items to her lab for testing from frightened civilians. Gilchrist said many refuse to open mail with certain postmarks on it and numerous magazines have been forwarded because publishers put cornstarch in packages to keep the plastic from sticking to the magazines. "We definitely want to test every powder and every envelope that might make somebody sick," she said. "We want to try to minimize fear and terror."

PASCARELLA STUDY: WOMEN LEARN LESS (Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Oct. 13)
Women learn only two-thirds of what men learn during college, according to a study co-authored by ERNEST PASCARELLA, who holds the Mary Louise Petersen Chair in Higher Education at the University of Iowa. The findings, which appear in The Journal of Higher Education, are based on results of an achievement test given just once to 19,000 college students at 56 four-year colleges and universities in 13 states. "We were somewhat disconcerted about the results," Pascarella said. "We don't know why that is the case."

UI UROLOGY CHIEF TESTIFIES AT HEARING (Lincoln Journal Star, Oct. 13)
A Lancaster County District Court jury on Friday awarded a St. Joseph, Mo. man $105,000 in a malpractice lawsuit against two Lincoln urologists. Virgil E. Mehlig and his wife, Doris Mehlig, alleged that doctors Richard A. Crusinberry, James W. Peck and Urology P.C. were negligent in their care of him after surgery for prostate cancer. A third doctor and his practice were dismissed from the lawsuit before trial. The jury chose not to compensate Doris Mehlig for loss of companionship of her husband while he was sick. The case -- which stemmed from complications that arose in 1993 following surgery -- had already been through the court system once. The doctors argued that their care was appropriate and the heads of urology at both the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Nebraska Medical Center testified on their behalf.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/local?story_id=4843&date=20011013&past=

ANTHRAX STORY FEATURES UI PHOTO (New York Times, Oct. 12)
A story about the growing anxiety over the nation's anthrax cases includes a photo of a member of the National Guard standing watch at the IOWA HYGIENIC LABORATORY at Oakdale, which the cutline says works with anthrax.

COLEMAN: MILLIONS LACK HEALTH INSURANCE (Detroit Free Press, Oct. 12)
Millions of Americans lack health insurance and, with the economy floundering, that is likely to increase, the National Academy of Sciences reported Thursday. "Unless health insurance is made more affordable, the number of uninsured Americans is likely to continue growing over time," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, co-chairwoman of the committee that wrote the report. She also is president of the Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa, Iowa City. The report is the first of six planned by the Institute of Medicine over two years. The series is planned to find out who lacks health insurance and why, determine what the consequences are and provide the groundwork for debate on how to correct the problem. The institute is part of the academy, a private organization chartered by Congress to advise the government of scientific matters. This first report seeks to draw a picture of the millions who lack insurance. It does not offer any recommendations. Versions of the Associated Press article also ran Oct. 12 in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL and the DAILY LEGAL NEWS, based in Cleveland, Ohio.

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON BIOTERRORISM THREATS (CNN, Oct. 12)
MARY GILCHRIST, a University of Iowa microbiologist who established the National Laboratory Network for Bioterrorism Detection, was interviewed last week for a segment on the threat of bioterrorism that aired on the network Friday.

BALDUS STUDY ON DEATH PENALTY CITED (Lincoln Journal Star, Oct. 12)
Michael Radelet, an internationally recognized death penalty scholar, was the featured speaker at the Nebraskans Against the Death Penalty annual dinner Saturday, Oct. 13. Radelet, a sociology professor at the University of Colorado, will discuss the recently completed study of the death penalty in Nebraska. The focus of Radelet's talk Saturday, the Nebraska death penalty fairness study, was commissioned by the state Legislature and completed in July. Conducted by University of Iowa researcher DAVID BALDUS, the study reviewed a wide range of aspects of capital punishment in the state.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=4486&date=20011012&past=

WELLMARK DONATES $500,000 TO UI (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 12)
In its Gifts & Bequests column, the paper reports a $500,000 donation from Wellmark Blue Cross Blue Shield to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for creation of a professorship in community health.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i07/07a03802.htm

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON PATHOGENS (Miami Herald, Oct. 11)
Before new rules were created in 1997 to clamp down on the mailing of anthrax and other deadly pathogens to anyone who claimed to be a researcher, ordering microbes often was as simple as filling out a form, said MARY GILCHRIST, president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories and a lab director at the University of Iowa. "Before that, it was not that hard to obtain," Gilchrist said. She cited cases where people bought anthrax using fake letterheads to pose as laboratory researchers. "It is widely distributed around the United States for research purposes," Gilchrist said.

WEINSTOCK USES WORMS TO TREAT AILMENT (News & Observer, Oct. 11)
JOEL WEINSTOCK
, who directs the Center for Digestive Disease at the University of Iowa Medical School, tested the premise that the immune system could be redirected by feeding a dose of the eggs of a harmless intestinal worm, common in pigs, to six people with Crohn's disease. Within a few weeks, five of the six were symptom free. After two more doses, the sixth subject was also. Weinstock is now testing his theory on a larger number of subjects. The News & Observer is based in Raleigh, N.C.

COLEMAN: MILLIONS LACK HEALTH INSURANCE (CNN Interactive, Oct. 11)
Millions of Americans lack health insurance and, with the economy floundering, that is likely to increase, the National Academy of Sciences reported Thursday. "Unless health insurance is made more affordable, the number of uninsured Americans is likely to continue growing over time," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, co-chairwoman of the committee that wrote the report. She also is president of the University of Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa, Iowa City. The report is the first of six planned by the Institute of Medicine (news -- web sites) over two years. The series is planned to find out who lacks health insurance and why, determine what the consequences are and provide the groundwork for debate on how to correct the problem. The institute is part of the academy, a private organization chartered by Congress to advise the government of scientific matters. This first report seeks to draw a picture of the millions who lack insurance. It does not offer any recommendations.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/10/11/uninsured.ap/index.html

COLEMAN: MILLIONS LACK HEALTH INSURANCE (Washington Post, Oct. 11)
Millions of Americans lack health insurance and, with the economy floundering, that is likely to increase, the National Academy of Sciences reported Thursday. "Unless health insurance is made more affordable, the number of uninsured Americans is likely to continue growing over time," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, co-chairwoman of the committee that wrote the report. She also is president of the Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa, Iowa City. The report is the first of six planned by the Institute of Medicine (news - web sites) over two years. The series is planned to find out who lacks health insurance and why, determine what the consequences are and provide the groundwork for debate on how to correct the problem. The institute is part of the academy, a private organization chartered by Congress to advise the government of scientific matters. This first report seeks to draw a picture of the millions who lack insurance. It does not offer any recommendations.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011011/aponline110148_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/10/11/national1058EDT0612.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011011/hl/uninsured_2.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on the Web site of the DESERET NEWS in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110110150
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/751261.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-uninsured1011oct11.story
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 11 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/011011/11/uninsured

UI STUDIES ELECTRON SPIN (The Hindu, Oct. 11)
A story on the history of the development of electron spin says that shuffling groups of electronic charges around a semiconductor circuit has been the traditional technology for the construction of semi-conductor devices. But electrons also spin, producing a magnetic field like a tiny bar magnet. Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have developed the ideas further. If the spin axes of all the electrons in a group are aligned, the phenomenon of spin polarization occurs and further it shows stability. The group exhibits another property that was really not expected: the spin-up can correspond to the Os and the spin-down to the 1s of digital electronics. One of the most exciting possible applications is in quantum computers, which will use the quantum uncertainty of electron spins to process data at superfast speeds.

LASANSKY BUILT PRINTMAKING DEPARTMENT (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 11)
Artist Mauricio Lasansky built the foremost printmaking department in the country at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after World War II. But he built much of his own reputation on the Nazi Drawings, a series of pencil, wash and earth-color drawings with collage created between 1960 and 1966. The 33 life-sized pieces examining the brutality of the Nazi regime were chosen as an inaugural exhibition at the Whitney Museum in 1967, and are now the subject of a new 25-minute documentary, "The Nazi Drawings." The film, which has garnered awards from several film festivals, screens Sunday in West Hollywood followed by interviews with filmmaker Lane Wyrick and Lasansky by ABC News correspondent Judy Muller.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/printedition/calendar/la-000081017oct11.story

UI GRADUATE IS TIED TO PERU CORRUPTION CASE (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 11)
Once they ran the Peru's finances. Now some are on the run from the police. Several former finance ministers face charges they formed part of a web of corruption set up by now-jailed ex-spy chief Vladimiro Montesinos. One former finance minister, 61-year-old Juan Carlos Hurtado, has been on the run from justice for months, surfacing now and then to give interviews from clandestine locations, proclaiming his innocence. He fled arrest earlier this year after authorities received a secretly taped video allegedly showing him receiving funds from Montesinos for a local election campaign. Hurtado, with graduate degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and from Harvard University, became Fujimori's first finance minister in 1990, launching a sweeping restructuring program. He later returned to the cabinet as Industry Minister. Meanwhile, former Fujimori stalwart Victor Joy Way remains jailed on various charges.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=DI-CO-20011011-005117.djm

UI COMMUNICATION STUDIES WEBSITE CITED (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Oct. 10)
A resource page of photos, graphics and video about the war on terrorism includes a link to the "University of Iowa -- Visual Records of the Attacks," which the paper describes as a collection of links on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COMMUNICATION STUDIES resources site to Web sites archiving visual records of media coverage of the Sept. 11 air attack and its aftermath. The citation can be found at:
http://www.post-gazette.com/headlines/2001images16.asp
The resources website can be found at:
http://www.uiowa.edu/~commstud/resources/visualsites.html

MCPHERSON DISCUSSES RICHARD PRYOR (Indianapolis Star, Oct. 10)
JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON
, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and professor in the creative writing program at the University of Iowa, was scheduled to be the keynote speaker during the Black Film Center/Archive and Department of Afro-American Studies film retrospective at Indiana University in Bloomington Oct. 10. McPherson's talk was titled "Crazy Like a Fox: the Vernacular Style of Richard Pryor."

NADS CAN AID STUDY OF DRUNKEN DRIVING (New York Times, Oct. 10)
Researchers have tested drivers who had small amounts of alcohol, but only on closed and empty courses. Soon, however, researchers can study in detail how a fully loaded driver handles, say, a crowded highway in a downpour. Handle in a simulated way, that is, within the confines of the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR, a new $80 million laboratory. The simulator is a high-powered cousin of the virtual reality rides that are popular in arcades. But the booth in this case is a dome large enough to hold a car, or the cab of a tractor-trailer. The simulator, which is owned by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but will be operated by the University of Iowa, is scheduled to officially open for business early next month. The story ran with a photo of NADS

GANTZ: LIMBAUGH'S DEAFNESS LIKELY PERMANENT (ABC News, Oct. 9)
Conservative radio talk show host Rush Limbaugh shocked his listeners Monday, revealing on air that he has suffered a dramatic hearing loss and is now virtually deaf. He said his hearing loss is not genetic but would not elaborate on doctors' diagnoses and "theories." Hearing experts say there are many possible causes. Extremely sudden hearing losses, over a very short period of time, are usually caused by viral infections of the ear, or vascular accidents such as a spasm or clotting of an artery. It's not likely that Limbaugh will ever be cured, according to Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, head and neck surgeon at the University of Iowa. "If the change in hearing has been present since May, it is likely that it will be permanent," Gantz said. The radio personality says his condition has worsened to the point that standard hearing aids are no longer able to help him. However, experts say a cochlear implant, a high-tech hearing device, may be a viable treatment option. "Most post-lingually deafened individuals [those who have lost hearing after learning to speak] are able to understand speech sufficiently to talk on the telephone using the device," says Gantz.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/limbaugh_deaf011009.html
The story also ran Oct. 9 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/abc/20011009/en/limbaugh_deaf011009_1.html

BROCHU RESEARCH: T-REX WAS 'T-WRECK' (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 9)
Even the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex can't escape the merciless progress of scientific knowledge. The truth is cruel: T-rex was probably T-wrecks. "If we did Jurassic Park 4," says Wyoming paleontologist Robert Bakker, "T-rex would be portrayed in a fear-, angst-ridden role -- sort of a large Woody Allen character." The fearsome thunder-lizards lived wretched lives, he said: "They were beat up, limping, had oozing sores, were dripping pus and disease-ridden, and had to worry about their children starving and other T-rexs coming in and kicking them out." Bakker, of the Wyoming Dinosaur Society, knows this because of research by Elizabeth Rega, a physical anthropologist at Western University in Pomona, Calif. Rega and University of Iowa paleontologist CHRIS BROCHU examined three T-rexs, including Sue, one of the most complete specimens in the world. They found signs of diseases common to many mammals. "These diseases were most likely chronic, long-term, non-life-threatening infections," Rega said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2001/10/09/fix100901.DTL

KRIEG: BIOTECHNOLOGY OFFERS HOPE, RISKS (New York Times, Oct. 9)
Since Sept. 11, the government has been stepping up efforts to improve the nation's ability to respond to a germ attack. Much of the focus has been on improving the public health system's ability to spot an outbreak, quarantine the infected and deliver medicines. Another focus has been to accelerate production of vaccines for anthrax and smallpox. But experts say it is also necessary to develop much better technology to detect, diagnose and treat biological agents. That is partly because there are dozens of pathogens that might conceivably be used in an attack, including some unnatural ones made by genetic engineering, and it would be impractical to develop vaccines for all of them. Dr. ARTHUR M. KRIEG, a medical professor at the University of Iowa and chief scientific officer at Coley Pharmaceutical Group in Wellesley, Mass., believes that certain DNA sequences common in bacteria but not in people are recognized by the human immune system as a sign of infection. So giving these DNA segments as a drug might put the immune system on high alert. Of course, biotechnology can be used not only for defense but for offense. Terrorists might try to use genetic engineering to make pathogens resistant to common antibiotics or vaccines or even to create entirely new pathogens. So new defenses might always be needed. "The image I have in my mind was who was going to develop the bomb first, Germany or the United States," said Dr. Branch of Mount Sinai. "Now there is a different kind of race."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/09/health/anatomy/09BIOT.html?pagewanted=1

UI STUDENTS PROTEST ACTION (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 9)
Students at several colleges walked out of classes and held protests Monday in response to U.S. military actions in Afghanistan. The rallies -- at Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges, the University of California at Berkeley, and Wesleyan University -- attracted hundreds of students, although many students did not attend or held counter-protests backing the government's response to last month's terrorist attacks. At some colleges, student protesters joined local activists in community-wide rallies. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, students and nonstudents alike heard professors speak at a rally in downtown Iowa City.
http://chronicle.com/free/2001/10/2001100901n.htm

UI GRADUATE HEADS UNION (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Oct. 9)
If there's an antithesis to the gruff, tough, cigar-chomping union leader, it's Peter Benner, a cerebral, self-effacing 52-year-old who studied religious history in college and for 25 years has been a leader of Council 6 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME). The only one of the four top state and labor officials to have gone through the last state workers strike, in 1981, Benner ascribes his life-long union work to "the very strong social justice component in church teaching" he received in the late 1960s and 1970s. Benner graduated from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Mass., with a degree in history, and earned a master's degree, focusing on religious history, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While in Iowa, as a teaching assistant, he tried to organize the teaching assistants into a union and "totally failed." But he also got hooked up with the AFSCME local at the college, found he enjoyed working with union folks, "and somebody concluded that I knew what I was doing."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/744445.html

BLANCK COMMENTS ON BIAS STUDY (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Oct. 8)
Blacks with disabilities are less likely to receive vocational rehabilitation services than whites, according to a new study. PETER BLANCK, director of Law Health Policy and Disability at the University of Iowa, says he agrees with the study's author that "one of the strongest predictors of successful vocational rehabilitation outcomes is counselor attitudes." Blanck said that if counselors are displaying "a conscious or subconscious racial bias, it's disturbing." Blanck -- who neither endorsed nor disputed the study -- said that rehabilitation counselors may be responding to new economic incentives to close individual cases quickly, and thus may be "creaming" -- that is, "taking the relatively less disabled individuals who happen to be predominantly white."

NELSON COMMENTS ON IEM MAKEOVER (CBS Marketwatch, Oct. 8)
The business school at the University of Iowa has given its electronic market a complete makeover, giving everyone -- not just students -- the chance to bet on the outcome of Federal Open Market Committee meetings. The Iowa Electronic Markets is a pure play on the FOMC. Unlike the federal funds futures market at the Chicago Board of Trade, which can be tricky to decipher, the payoff on the Iowa market comes directly from the policy changes at the Fed. "It's easier to interpret" the Iowa market than the CBOT market, said FORREST NELSON, an economic professor at the University of Iowa who helps run the electronics market.

HOVENKAMP INTERPRETS PILLSBURY RULING (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 8)
U.S. antitrust enforcers, concerned about the Pillsbury Doughboy's future, are urging a court challenge to block cereal maker General Mills Inc.'s $10.5-billion purchase of Pillsbury from Diageo, people familiar with the case said. Federal Trade Commission lawyers are worried that a plan to share the Doughboy brand is anticompetitive, the people said. General Mills proposed selling the Pillsbury line of baking mixes that compete with the cereal maker's Betty Crocker brand to International Multifoods Corp. Betty Crocker and Pillsbury are the two leading baking mixes, and the proposed divestiture was intended to ease FTC concerns the combination of General Mills and Pillsbury would reduce competition. FTC lawyers have rejected the plan to share the Doughboy brand, the people said. The staff believes that letting the giggling blue-eyed character be the mascot for two companies would undermine its value, the people said. The FTC lawyers "clearly concluded that a significant asset in these products is the brands," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-000080287oct08.story
The same Bloomberg News article ran Oct. 8 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/741975.html

ATTACKS DRAW STUDENTS TO ASLAN'S CLASS (USA Today, Oct. 8)
Suddenly, courses on the Middle East and on terrorism are in high demand on college campuses nationwide as students seek an explanation for the atrocities of Sept. 11. To meet the interest, faculties are revamping course material, adding sections or moving to larger classrooms. University of Iowa students in Iowa City are showing up for REZA ASLAN's religion courses on Islam just to listen in.

HOVENKAMP COMMENS ON MICROSOFT CASE (Florida Times-Union, Oct. 7)
Government attorneys told Microsoft yesterday they were abandoning their pursuit of a breakup of the software giant and now intend to seek tough conduct remedies that could place tight restraints on future software products. Those restraints could include a requirement that Microsoft license its Windows operating system to other corporations or limit what features could be included in the software. "The one thing that makes Microsoft unique among monopolization cases is that software itself is a divisible product," said University of Iowa antitrust professor HERB HOVENKAMP. "You can break up the company or break up the product." The Florida Times-Union is based in Jacksonville, Fla.

KERBER TO SPEAK ON GENDER, INEQUALITY (Deseret News, Oct. 7)
The paper's "Literary Notes" column says that LINDA K. KERBER, professor of history at the University of Iowa and author of numerous books on women's history, will deliver the annual O. Meredith Wilson Lecture, "Gender and Inequality," Thursday, Oct. 18, 7 p.m., Fine Arts Auditorium, University of Utah. Sponsored by the Department of History. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110080295

HARVEY: ANXIETY MAY REFLECT FEAR OF DEATH (Los Angeles Times, Oct. 7)
As the nation mourns its losses and worries about the future, some health experts point to recent, largely overlooked evidence on the psychological impact of violence that may encourage distraught Americans: Most victims of trauma recover, and many say life is better and more meaningful than before disaster struck. Research on many thousands of traumatized people, from prisoners of war to rape victims to those injured in car accidents, has led hardened clinicians to appreciate human nature's resilience. JOHN HARVEY, a University of Iowa psychologist and editor of the Journal of Loss and Trauma, said some of the anxiety and sadness following the terrorist attacks may reflect the surfacing of the fear of death itself. "At some level we all see ourselves in the stories about people who have lost loved ones," he said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000080250oct07.story

UI OFFERS BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING DEGREE (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 7)
In the days following the terrorist attacks last month that stunned America and the world, doctors sent out a call for artificial skin--developed in the late 1990s--to treat burn victims. And earlier, the world learned that the first self-contained artificial heart had been implanted successfully in a man. Behind these medical advances was the work of biomedical engineers, scientists melding the disciplines of medicine and engineering. As the technology they work with changes rapidly, and research brings new revelations almost daily, graduate schools across the country are dramatically altering their biomedical engineering programs. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is among schools that offer biomedical engineering graduate programs.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/custom/educationtoday/chi-0110050439oct07.story

MERRILL: HUMOR FOUND IN DARKEST TIMES (USA Today, Oct. 5)
Have you heard the one about the comedian who couldn't get away with anything? Those who have studied humor in times of crisis certainly have. But they don't expect it to last forever. CHRISTOPHER MERRILL, author of "Only the Nails Remain: Scenes from the Balkan Wars" (Rowman & Littlefield, 1999) was in Sarajevo during the terror siege there. "Humor was the great pressure release," says Merrill, the director of the University of Iowa International Writing Program in Iowa City. "I heard more jokes on a daily basis in Sarajevo than I have ever heard at any place or any time in my life. I was in the basement of a house under shellfire for a day. One guy, just to relieve pressure, was lifting a dumbbell again and again, and when he was done, he said, 'And now for a shower' -- and sprayed his underarm with a deodorant. While you're waiting around for something awful to happen, your wits are working overtime and you try to find funny things to relieve the boredom and the pressure."
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20011005/3513653s.htm

PARENTS EYEING SAFER SCHOOLS, LIKE UI (Wall Street Journal, Oct. 5)
For many families, the conventional wisdom about choosing a college has been turned on its head. After a decade of pushing hard for elite schools, Americans are showing a new willingness to trade prestige for location, safety and cost. With admissions season gearing up, applications are up 15 percent to 35 percent from last year at bucolic institutions like Penn State and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, while attendance at Indiana University recruiting events has doubled. And despite the recent boom at urban universities, Boston College and Fordham say they now worry fewer out-of-area students will come because of fears about air travel and further terrorism. An accompanying list of "hot picks" by a group of guidance counselors includes the University of Iowa, saying tuition is $8,392 in-state and $16,820 out-of-state. It also says out-of-state applications are up 36 percent. In the comment section, the authors say the UI's "pastoral setting is a draw for families worried about safety."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB1002235808949709160.djm

UI'S RICKETTS FEATURED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Oct. 5)
On paper -- in this case, on a fold-out map of campus parking lots -- DAVE RICKETTS'S job at the University of Iowa is to manage 14,000 parking spaces and a collection of commuting-related services, among them a 27-vehicle, student-operated bus system; a van pool that serves 752 riders; and 4,700 spaces for locking up bikes. In practice, though, what he manages is human behavior -- the good, the bad, and the ugly. His tools are familiar ones: meters, cashiers, permits, signs, bus passes, and the kind of good, old-fashioned fear that issuing 120,000 parking tickets a year can inspire. "The underlying principle is, you're never going to have enough space to meet everyone's needs, so you're going to have to allocate, and you will have to do that in accord with the mission of the institution or unit," says Mr. Ricketts, a tall, hearty Iowa native who writes mysteries in his spare time and keeps an eye out for parking-related New Yorker cartoons. When he's talking about parking, though, his friendly demeanor becomes serious: "We issue violations to make sure the people we've allocated the space to get it."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i06/06a05601.htm

FRANK COMMENTS ON IO ERUPTION (San Francisco Chronicle, Oct. 5)
To the astonishment of earthbound scientists, a spacecraft exploring the moons of Jupiter has captured wisps of a gas plume more than 300 miles above a volcano erupting on the surface of Io, the most violently active world in the solar system. Instruments aboard the spacecraft Galileo found that the gas particles, which resemble tiny white snowflakes, are largely composed of sulfur dioxide, the same pungent stuff that pollutes air on Earth from coal-burning plants and metal refineries. "This was totally unexpected," said LOUIS A. FRANK, a space physicist at the University of Iowa who heads a team studying the volcanic nature of the Galilean moon. Frank said that although a different volcano already known to the scientists had been erupting seven months earlier, the existence of this even more violent one, a fountain of lava escaping from Io's surface at a temperature of more 1,700 degrees, had been completely unknown. But what was even more surprising, he said in a telephone interview, was the spacecraft's luck as it flew right through the rising gas -- fortunately without encountering any ash or larger particles that could have damaged if not destroyed Galileo's delicate instruments.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/10/05/MN61427.DTL
A version of the story also ran Oct. 5 on SPACE.COM.
http://www.space.com:80/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/io_plumes_011004.html

TOMBLIN COMMENTS ON LANGUAGE GENE (Florida Times-Union, Oct. 4)
Scientists say they have discovered the first gene tied to a language and speech disorder -- a find that may bring the genetics revolution closer to identifying the biological roots of conscious thought and defining what it means to be human. The gene, FOXP2, is not specifically a gene that enables us to talk. Instead, it is responsible for a protein that enables the brain's language circuitry to function. Other researchers said it is also premature to conclude from this study whether a gene or genes are solely responsible for language in humans. "I know everyone would like a nice simple 'Yes, Eureka! We found it,'" said BRUCE TOMBLIN, professor of speech pathology and audiology at the University of Iowa. "But it's not that simple.'' The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Times-Union is based in Jacksonville, Fla.

FREYER SELLS LIFE ONLINE (Arizona Republic, Oct. 4)
University of Iowa graduate student JOHN FREYER has sold much of his life on eBay over the past eight months and chronicled where his belongings went on his Web site, http://www.allmylifeforsale.com/. Recently he embarked on a road trip to visit the strangers who bought a piece of his life. A version of the article also ran Sept. 29 in the TORONTO STAR and Sept. 13 in the PRESS-TELEGRAM of Long Beach, Calif.

UI SUSPENDS INTERNAL FACULTY GRANTS (USA Today, Oct. 4)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has suspended internal faculty grant programs while officials decide how to fulfill a state mandate to cut $21.9 million from the budget. Six of seven university grants will be on hold until final budget decisions are made. The suspensions allow the university to freeze about $1.1 million.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20011004/3508239s.htm

FORMER HAWKEYE SIMMONS DIES (Chicago Tribune, Oct. 4)
An obituary of Ozzie Simmons, who died Sept. 26 at the age of 87, says that he once ignored racial insults from the stands as he rushed to victory as a Hawkeye at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, accepted denigrating nicknames as grudging compliments, and ultimately won recognition as one of the first black All-American college football players. His controversial presence on the field started the tradition of awarding the prized Floyd of Rosedale to the winner of the Iowa versus Minnesota lineup. State governors first offered the prize in 1935--then a living pig, now a coveted bronze trophy--to smooth over tensions that developed because of Simmons' presence on the team. On Saturday, Oct. 6, Simmons will be buried in the black jacket with "Hall of Fame" stitched in gold honoring his 1989 induction as a charter member of the National Iowa Varsity Club Hall of Fame. "He was quite a popular player and took quite a lot of physical abuse around the Big Ten because he was black and there were some real racial feelings in the league at that time," said George Wine, Iowa's former director of sports information.
http://chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/chi-0110040158oct04.story?coll=chi%2Dnewsobituaries%2Dhed
An abbreviated Associated Press version of the article ran Oct. 4 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011004/us/deaths_25.html
The article also ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the SPORTING NEWS.
http://www.sportingnews.com:80/cfootball/articles/20011004/348663.html
The article also ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011004/aponline233728_000.htm
The article also ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/736079.html
The article also ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-fbc-obit-simmons1004oct04.story
The article also ran Oct. 4 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/011004/23/deaths
The article also ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/sports/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-fbc-obit-simmons1004oct04.story

TOMBLIN: LANGUAGE GENE UNLIKELY (New York Times, Oct. 4)
A team of geneticists and linguists say they have found a gene that underlies speech and language, the first to be linked to this uniquely human faculty. The discovery buttresses the idea that language is acquired and generated by specific neural circuitry in the brain, rather than by general brain faculties. Asked about the new finding, Dr. J. BRUCE TOMBLIN, a language researcher at the University of Iowa, said that several variant genes that seemed at first to affect only speech had turned out to cause other cognitive problems as well and that the same might prove true of the new gene. "I am inclined to think there probably aren't such things" as language or speech genes, Tomblin said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/10/04/science/04LANG.html?pagewanted=print

TOMBLIN COMMENTS ON LANGUAGE GENE (Deseret News, Oct. 3)
Scientists say they have discovered the first gene tied to a language and speech disorder -- a find that may bring the genetics revolution closer to identifying the biological roots of conscious thought and defining what it means to be human. The gene, FOXP2, is not specifically a gene that enables us to talk. Instead, it is responsible for a protein that enables the brain's language circuitry to function. Other researchers said it is also premature to conclude from this study whether a gene or genes are solely responsible for language in humans. "I know everyone would like a nice simple 'Yes, Eureka! We found it,'" said BRUCE TOMBLIN, professor of speech pathology and audiology at the University of Iowa. "But it's not that simple.'' The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0110030095

TOMBLIN COMMENTS ON LANGUAGE GENE (Washington Post, Oct. 3)
Scientists say they have discovered the first gene tied to a language and speech disorder -- a find that may bring the genetics revolution closer to identifying the biological roots of conscious thought and defining what it means to be human. The gene, FOXP2, is not specifically a gene that enables us to talk. Instead, it is responsible for a protein that enables the brain's language circuitry to function. Other researchers said it is also premature to conclude from this study whether a gene or genes are solely responsible for language in humans. "I know everyone would like a nice simple 'Yes, Eureka! We found it,'" said BRUCE TOMBLIN, professor of speech pathology and audiology at the University of Iowa. "But it's not that simple.''
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011003/aponline145915_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS.
http://dailynews.philly.com:80/content/daily_news/2001/10/04/national/LANG04W.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 4 on the Web site of the BERGEN RECORD in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/lang4200110047.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of CNN INTERACTIVE.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/10/03/language.gene.ap/index.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-ap-language-gene1003oct03.story
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/10/03/national1457EDT0714.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of the DETROIT NEWS.
http://detnews.com:80/2001/health/0110/03/-309535.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/features/health/sns-languagegene.story
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/732074.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 3 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011003/hl/language_gene_2.html

GILCHRIST SAYS GERM TRANSPORT NOT DIFFICULT (Salon, Oct. 3)
A story exploring the likelihood of a biological or chemical attack on the United States quotes University of Iowa microbiologist MARY GILCHRIST, who the story says is generally credited with establishing the National Laboratory Network for Bioterrorism Detection. It says Gilchrist takes issue with those who say dissemination obstacles make germ warfare unlikely. "Someone can carry a small bag of material that can infect hundreds of thousands of people," she told the AP. "You can carry that bag through virtually every airport security system I'm aware of. It won't attract attention from a drug-sniffing dog, either ... I think it could happen at any time."
http://www.salon.com:80/people/feature/2001/10/03/bioterror/index.html

AUDIT: UI SIMULATOR'S COST DOUBLED (Washington Post, Oct. 2)
A nearly $81 million, federally funded driving simulator designed to improve highway safety cost taxpayers twice as much as expected because federal officials failed to properly control costs, according to an audit released Tuesday. The report by the Transportation Department's inspector general found that government officials allowed the private contractors who built the National Advanced Driving Simulator to spend more money than was budgeted. The officials also failed to raise the amount of private funding ordered by Congress and, as costs mounted, did not accurately portray the price, the report said. The three-ton simulator is housed in a four-story building at the University of Iowa. It is owned by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and run by the university. DEREK WILLARD, the University of Iowa's associate vice president for research, said the university would not comment on the audit or its fees until discussing it with NHTSA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20011002/aponline192727_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 2 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011002/us/driving_simulator_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 2 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/730172.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 2 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-driving-simulator1002oct02.story
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 2 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/011002/19/driving-simulator
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 2 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-driving-simulator1002oct02.story

UI STUDENTS QUOTED ON ATTACK (Newsday, Oct. 2)
In a first-person article, columnist James Pinkerton writes: The anti- globalization movement may be history, but the anti-war movement has a future. And yet, the anti-anti-war movement has a bright outlook, too. This became clear on Saturday, as I stood amid a thousand or so protesters milling around in front of the World Bank headquarters in Washington, just a block from the White House. I had been there in April 2000, when a crowd perhaps 50 times the size had gathered to "spank the bank" for promoting capitalist globalization. That was a mostly light-hearted assemblage, protesting and celebrating everything from Starbucks to sea turtles. But others were more serious, such as Karly Whitaker, 25, a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. I asked her: What changed on Sept. 11? "It brought home to me the fragility of our situation," she answered. And so what to do? "Let's not fight the wrong war. Let's get to the root causes. Let's evaluate sanctions on Iraq, our support for Israel and for military dictatorships around the world."
The same column ran Oct. 2 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
http://www.latimes.com/news/opinion/commentary/la-000078617oct02.story

MATHEW HEADS BLOOD-PRESSURE DRUG STUDY (Yahoo! News, Oct. 2)
A class of popular blood-pressure drugs that ease the burden on the heart also can keep it from becoming enlarged and, in the process, trim the risk of heart attacks and strokes, new research says. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, which dilate blood vessels and improve blood flow, appear to prevent and even reverse unhealthy buildup of stiff muscle in the heart's main pumping chamber, a condition called left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). The latest findings, reported in the Oct. 2 issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association, are based on analysis of a larger study that looked at the effects of the ACE inhibitor ramipril on a variety of cardiovascular conditions. In the analysis, a team led by Dr. JAMES MATHEW of the University of Iowa College of Medicine compared the effects of ramipril and a dummy pill on heart size in nearly 8,300 people over an average of about 4.5 years.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011001/hl/hypertension_drug_also_keeps_heart_sleek_1.html

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON BIOTERRORISM (Lincoln Journal-Star, Oct. 1)
University of Nebraska-Lincoln officials have banned flights by small airplanes carrying banners over Memorial Stadium since the terrorist attacks. MARY GILCHRIST, a University of Iowa microbiologist, approves of the ban. Gilchrist is director of the Iowa Hygienic Laboratory, part of a national network that deals with bioterrorism threats. One of her nightmare scenarios is a small plane buzzing a stadium and unleashing a biological agent that could infect tens of thousands of people at once. "I would try to avoid letting any airplanes anywhere near one of those facilities," Gilchrist said. "To avoid them dropping an explosive, to avoid them flying into a crowd and, perhaps third, to avoid them from dropping an organism. I think it could happen at any time," she said. "The problem we may have had before is that the average person thought it was science. Now, most people will believe it's a threat."
http://www.journalstar.com/nebraska?story_id=4408&date=20011001&past=

NADS TO TEST DRIVER DISTRACTION (Scientific American, Oct. 1)
A story about the growing number of electronic gadgets and services available in new vehicles -- such as voice-activated e-mail -- says the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) in Washington, D.C. has begun a series of studies on the topic of driver distraction. The investigations will make major use of the new NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR, a $50-million high-fidelity system that is just coming online in Iowa City. The simulator will allow scientists to duplicate highway driving in a safe and controlled laboratory setting. NHTSA researchers are also conducting in-vehicle research on test tracks. The story includes a photo of NADS with a caption that says the simulator is based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

BLOOM'S 'POSTVILLE' IS REVIEWED (Jewish Currents, Oct. 2001)
In his book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a UI journalism professor, "presents a revealing though troubling insight into a corner of the American Hasidic world," a reviewer writes. "Throughout Bloom's narrative one is impressed by his perceptiveness in describing how a particular group of Jews, acting from a Hasidic mindset, ruined the opportunity of gaining the goodwill of their non-Jewish neighbors." The reviewer also calls the book "well-written and well-researched."

KIENZLE DESCRIBES TELEMEDICINE (Healthcare Informatics, October 2001)
As part of a state program, University of Iowa Health Care provides all healthcare services to Iowa prisoners, exclusive of what is provided by prison medical staff. But with some prisons up to 200 miles away, the Department of Corrections was spending $500,000 a year on transportation and security to bring inmates to UI Hospitals. In 1997, the department began working with UI Hospitals' in-house telecommunications partner, NEC, to network across nine facilities. Today, UI Hospitals performs 300 to 400 prison telemedicine consultations a year. After prison medical and nursing staff do preliminary patient workups, the physician "visits" each site electronically. "I am in one room just sitting there doing my work, and I am seeing patients at three or four prisons," says MICHAEL KIENZLE, M.D., associate dean for clinical affairs and biomedical communications at the UI College of Medicine. Healthcare Informatics is based in Minneapolis, Minn.

GRAHAM DISCUSSES PET SCANS (Diagnostic Imaging, October 2001)
A story that says the increasing use of Positron Emission Tomography to monitor the effects of cancer therapies on patients will require new protocols, and it quotes Dr. MICHAEL M. GRAHAM, director of nuclear medicine at the University of Iowa Hospital and Clinics. Graham says that of 30 proposed ways to measure fluorine-18 flurodeoxyglucose metabolism, seven are accurate, reproducible, or practical enough to warrant close consideration. The most accurate of the protocols are also the most complex. Diagnostic Imaging is based in San Francisco.

UI STUDENT SPEAKS AT MATH WORKSHOP (SIAM News, October 2001)
LOUIS BEAUGRIS, a graduate teaching assistant in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS, was among a group of speakers at the fifth Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop July 11 in San Diego. Presentations during the workshop covered a range of topics, including cyclic codes and their primitive idempotents, robust empirical likelihood confidence intervals and global continuation in higher-order elasticity. SIAM News is the news journal of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

HUNNINGHAKE STUDIES LUNG BIOPSY NEED (Pulmonary Review, Oct. 2001)
In cases with confident diagnoses of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) based on clinical history, transbronchial biopsy and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT), surgical lung biopsy may be unnecessary, said GARY W. HUNNINGHAKE, M.D., and colleagues. "These are very sick people, so this procedure is not something you undertake lightly," said Hunninghake, Sterba Professor of Medicine at University of Iowa College of Medicine. Pulmonary Review is based in Clifton, N.J.

UI TRACKS IMMUNIZATION HISTORIES (ACP/ASIM Observer, Oct. 2001)
A story about overcoming barriers to immunizations says UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE has developed a reminder system that flags records in the practice's electronic medical records software. When nurses take vaccination histories from patients, they enter information into the system. They also update vaccination information when they take patient vitals. When physicians call up a patient's electronic chart, the system automatically flags individuals who are due for a vaccination. The ACP/ASIM Observer is based in Philadelphia, Penn.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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