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UI in the News

November 2001

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BIOTERRORISM RESEARCH LACKED FUNDING (Chronicle of Higher Ed. Nov. 30)
The federal government is expected to sharply increase spending on research aimed at thwarting bioterrorism and attacks on computer systems, two research areas that were largely neglected before September 11. And federal officials say they are working quickly to establish top scientific priorities in the war against terrorism. In the next few weeks, the National Institutes of Health will announce a new round of grant opportunities in bioterrorism studies. The NIH is promising a faster-than-usual review of proposals, in order to put scientists to work promptly. NIH officials say their next round of grants is in large part a response to the dearth of scientists with bioterrorism expertise. The neglect of such studies has hampered efforts to understand how anthrax can be spread and treated, says MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University of Iowa's Hygienic Laboratory. Federal efforts have not always focused on practical problems, such as how deadly viruses and bacteria might be dispersed by terrorists, says Dr. Gilchrist. When the first letters with anthrax were found, she doubted that the bacteria's spores could seep through sealed envelopes. But that's exactly what happened, according to investigators. "That was a surprise," Dr. Gilchrist says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i14/14a01901.htm

GRANT'S HISTORY WITH UI CITED (Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 30)
CHRISTINE GRANT
has always been committed to making a difference in college sports. Even in retirement, the former women's athletic director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is devoted to doing what she can to train the next generation of athletic administrators. "I feel strongly about what kind of educational preparation they should have," she says of her teaching duties in the graduate program of athletic administration. Grant has a wealth of experience, which makes her a respected voice nationally. When she stepped down last year at Iowa after 27 years at the women's helm, the National Collegiate Athletic Association carried a lengthy retrospective of her career in the NCAA News. It recounted how she taught physical education in her native Scotland before moving to Canada to coach the national field-hockey team, then moved to Iowa City in 1969 to pursue graduate studies. Although she had no intention of staying, she soon was asked to head up a newly emerging program of women's varsity sports at the school. She became such a respected leader of the emerging women's sports movement that she rose to president of the Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW), an organization that eventually was dissolved in the early 1980s, when the NCAA began offering women's championships. The story is followed by a question-and-answer interview with Grant.
http://www.csmonitor.com/2001/1130/p12s1-alsp.html

COLUMNIST IS UI GRADUATE (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Nov. 29)
A biographical note about Tom Daykin, who writes in the current edition of the paper about the significant renovations required at many older movie theaters, says he has been writing about commercial real estate for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel since 1995. Prior to that, he covered commercial real estate and other topics at the Milwaukee Sentinel. He is a 1984 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/bym/news/nov01/daykcol30112901a.asp

COLEMAN: DOME'S LOSS LIKE 'WOUND' (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 29)
Months earlier, during her son's freshman orientation, Lillian Neil took out her camera and positioned the family perfectly, making sure to capture the bright golden dome in the background. On Sunday she returned again, camera in hand, to the same spot. This time, however, the majestic cupola of Iowa's Old Capitol was gone, victim of a spectacular fire Nov. 20. The loss of the 161-year-old dome has rallied this university community of 62,000 people. Officials have vowed to rebuild the dome, which has long served as the symbol of the University of Iowa and Iowa City. But damage was extensive -- initial estimates have run as high as $5 million -- and restoration could take years. "It's far more than just a building to us," said the university's president, MARY SUE COLEMAN. "You feel like this is a big wound to the center of campus." MARY BENNETT, special collections coordinator for the State Historical Society of Iowa, said the building housed the office for the university's president until 1970, when fears of anti-war protests sent the president to a less prominent building. NICK KLENSKE, student body president, said his office has designed a button that will be handed out to thousands of students, depicting the likeness of the dome. "We want to maintain a presence," he said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0111290238nov29.story

REGENT NEIL ASKS WHY UI KEPT CONTRACTOR (USA Today, Nov. 29)
A member of the Iowa Board of Regents is asking why the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA didn't fire a contractor before a fire last week destroyed the dome on the Old Capitol. David Neil was responding to a report that university officials knew almost a month before the fire that workers were using blowtorches to remove asbestos. The fire caused $2 million damage.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20011129/3659725s.htm

BALDUS STUDIED HOMICIDE PRESENTENCINGS (Lincoln Journal Star, Nov. 29)
Presentencing and criminal information used in a study on Nebraska's death penalty will remain confidential, Attorney General Don Stenberg said Wednesday. No further information -- other than what was released in August -- will be available from Nebraska's $180,000 two-year death penalty study. Details about presentencing investigations and the crimes themselves may not be made public, Stenberg said. State law prohibits release of any presentence report or psychiatric examination of the offender to anyone beyond judges and probation officers, he said. Nebraska's Crime Commission was given permission to peruse the presentencing investigations for 177 homicides between 1973 and 1999 for a study conducted by DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor. The results of the study were made public in August but specific information about the murders that led to the death penalty was kept confidential.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=4908&date=20011129&past=

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON ROLE OF WORK (Weblogger, Nov. 29)
A story in Portuguese about the changing role of work in people's lives quotes BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor at the University of Iowa, who says that work now defines the person. "It now answers the traditional religious questions" such as "who am I," Hunnicutt says. The Weblogger is based in Brazil.
http://aeassjur.weblogger.com.br/

SANDERS COMMENTS ON GRADUATE SCHOOL (Black Collegian, Nov. 29)
The magazine interviewed KATRINA SANDERS, Ph.D., who is on the faculty of the University of Iowa's College of Education, for an article seeking advice about the graduate school process. Asked what she might have done to better prepare herself for graduate school, Sanders, who received her doctorate in educational policy studies from the University of Illinois in 1997, replied: "Since many students attend graduate school away from their hometown, learn as much as possible about the school, the city, and the demographics." In response to the question, "What one or two things would you tell current undergraduates?" Sanders said, "Identify support systems and coping strategies early. Get to know your department secretaries -- they can make all the difference. Discipline and self-motivation are crucial. Graduate school is not about retaining information long enough to regurgitate it on a test. The graduate arena holds you accountable for helping to generate knowledge."
http://www.black-collegian.com/graduateschool/tellmemore2001-1st.shtml

GUTHMILLER COMMENTS ON TYPE 1 DIABETES (Excite News, Nov. 28)
Pregnant women with type 1 diabetes may be at risk of developing a severe bacterial gum infection that can make blood sugar more difficult to control and raise the risk of preterm labor, study findings indicate. All pregnant women are at risk of gum inflammation, also known as gingivitis, the researchers note in the November issue of the Journal of Periodontology. But pregnant women with type 1 diabetes appear to be even more susceptible to the disease, which develops when bacteria in plaque cause the gums to become red and inflamed. Gingivitis can also undermine attempts to stabilize blood sugar by increasing insulin resistance. This, in turn, can put the mother-to-be at risk for a surge in blood pressure, preterm labor and Cesarean delivery, and also increases the baby's risk of respiratory distress and diabetes, according to Dr. JANET M. GUTHMILLER from the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues. "In the future, we would like to see periodontal evaluations included in the prenatal care of pregnant diabetic women similar to the routinely performed ophthalmologic exam," Guthmiller said in an interview with Reuters Health.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/011128/10/health-preggers
The same article ran Nov. 28 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011128/hl/preggers_1.html

AIU PRESIDENT WAS CANDIDATE FOR TOP UI POST (Yahoo! News, Nov. 28)
A story about Judith Albino, who in 1997 became president of the California School of Professional Psychology in San Francisco, which recently merged with San Diego-based United States International University to become Alliant International University, says her journey to the Golden State from the Rockies was somewhat bumpy. Albino's tenure and resignation from the University of Colorado were mired in controversy. Months after stepping down, Albino filed a lawsuit against two professors and a vice chancellor whom, she said, damaged her chances for employment at another university, according to reports published in. Albino was offered a $500,000 settlement for her resignation from the university's Board of Regents, which came under fire from Colorado's legislators after a newspaper reported on it. In 1994, the publicly elected, partisan Board of Regents attempted to oust Albino. She was considered for the presidency of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but withdrew after she contended a few CU-Boulder professors interfered with her candidacy, according to published reports.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/sddt/20011128/lo/new_aiu_president_has_put_rocky_times_behind_her_1.html

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (New York Times, Nov. 28)
Offering a strong signal that it wants to settle its antitrust case in Europe, Microsoft has told the European Commission that it will forgo its right to a hearing next month, company officials and European regulators said yesterday. The previous antitrust settlement Microsoft agreed to in 1994 -- a "consent decree" in the United States, and an "undertaking" in Europe -- was negotiated simultaneously in Washington and Brussels. But in the current round, the timing is not as coordinated and the antitrust climate may be different in Europe and America. As an example, antitrust experts point to the European resistance earlier this year that derailed the merger of General Electric and Honeywell, even though Washington had approved. "We're not operating in as close harmony with Europe as we have at times in the past," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/11/28/technology/28SOFT.html?pagewanted=print
The same story ran Nov. 28 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20011128/bs/microsoft_move_may_hasten_settlement_of_european_case_1.html

WEILER COMMENTS ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Nov. 27)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close."
http://www.post-gazette.com/healthscience/20011127hdrive2.asp

PASCARELLA SKEPTICAL OF OWN STUDY (Christian Science Monitor, Nov. 27)
Women learn less than men in college - about one-third less, according to new research peering into the mysterious realm of what students actually learn on campus. Discovering just how much undergraduates learn in English, math, science, and social studies was the aim of a study of 19,000 students at 56 four-year colleges and universities in 13 states. But when researchers compared students' scores on a standardized test, one finding leaped out: gender was a huge factor in how much those scores improved over time. Women's scores improved only two-thirds as much as men's over the course of four years. Women lagged most in math and science, but also in other areas. "To me, the finding is disconcerting," says ERNEST PASCARELLA, a University of Iowa professor of education and co-author of the study. "We're the first to have found this gender effect, at least as far as I know," he says. "I'm still a tad skeptical until someone else has similar results or we do another study and find the same thing."
http://www.csmonitor.com/2001/1127/p14s1-lehl.html

UI GAME SECURITY SAYS 'TERRORISTS WON' (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 27)
If you don't read every single word of this story, then the terrorists have won. That might sound preposterous, but compared to some of the other "terrorists have won" pronouncements buzzing around, it's relatively sane. For example, Martha Stewart recently asked her underlings to forgo a big company Christmas party in favor of hosting small soirees for 10 in their own homes. She promised each volunteer $300 to cover costs, but said they wouldn't be able to choose their guests, according to a report in the New York Post. When employees balked, Stewart fired off a memo: "To me, the terrorists have certainly succeeded if so few of you participate in a companywide effort to 'get together.'" Likewise, in Iowa, a letter to the (Iowa City) Press-Citizen newspaper complained that heavy security at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game would create long waits to enter the stadium and thus reduce time for pregame tailgate parties: "Tight security takes fun away from the game. We are letting the terrorists win!"
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-112701terrorwar.story

FORMER PROFESSOR ARRESTED FOR THREATS (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 27)
A research scientist at the City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte has been charged with making death threats against his supervisor and two colleagues. Thomas William Balon, 49, allegedly told a fellow scientist on Nov. 1 that he was planning to kill the three men, authorities said. One source said Balon may have been frustrated about a "lack of recognition" his work was getting at City of Hope. According to the scientist to whom Balon confided his plans, Balon talked about a Nov. 1, 1991, shooting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA during his tenure there as an assistant professor in which a student killed four people and then committed suicide. "I'm going to tell you something that's going to make it hard for you to sleep at night: Do you know what 10-year anniversary this is?" Balon told the witness, according to a Sheriff's Department report. Balon then named the colleagues he planned to kill, saying: "I'm going to put a bullet in [their] heads," the report states.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000094471nov27.story
A version of the story also ran Nov. 27 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/11/27/state0325EST0016.DTL

PETERS COMMENTS ON TAX CREDITS (Forbes, Nov. 26)
From Jan. 1, 1996 through Sept. 11, 2001, Congress created or expanded some two dozen corporate and individual income tax credits, while state legislatures piled on hundreds more. The politicians have used these credits not just to reward special interests, but also to micromanage the economy, promote social goals and redistribute wealth. So it was inevitable that all sorts of credit proposals should emerge from the rubble of Sept. 11. Research on the cost effectiveness of credits designed to stimulate economic activity is sparse, if generally encouraging. "Most states, in effect, have adopted an industrial policy through the tax code. But it's a bad idea. They pass a credit because it sounds good and have no idea what the consequence will be," says ALAN PETERS, a University of Iowa professor who studies state enterprise-zone tax credits.

EDITORIAL: DOMES ARE TREASURED SYMBOLS (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 26)
A Tribune editorial ponders the significance of domes in the wake of last week’s fire at the Old Capitol. "Last Tuesday morning, in workplaces like the Tribune that have lots of native Iowans on the payroll, the urgent e-mails flashed from screen to screen: The dome of the Old Capitol in Iowa City is on fire—pass the word. The structure, now home to UNIVERSITY OF IOWA offices and a museum, was the territorial capitol before, in 1846, Iowa became the first free state carved from the Louisiana Purchase. But more was at stake Tuesday than one state's heartbreak. Domes are treasured symbols across this nation. Just as the Old Capitol dome has inspired Iowans as the protective umbrella spread over the place where their state was shaped, other domes speak to authority and inclusion rather than militancy and raw power… After surviving 160 years of lightning, storms and winds, the Old Capitol dome may have succumbed to a workman's torch during a $900,000 renovation. The dome and a cupola beneath it collapsed in flames. No one was hurt; a 1920s-era firewall and gutsy work by Iowa City firefighters saved most of the National Historic Landmark building, which at first appeared doomed. Iowa's governor and the president of the university have left no doubt that the dome will be rebuilt. Rather than waiting for insurance liability to be meted out, Iowans and former Iowans are rushing donations to a reconstruction fund. They really have no choice. To do anything but rebuild for another 160 years or more would spite a people's history. In Iowa as in most places, there's no walking away from architecture that has overseen so much history and earned so much love. Such is the power of a dome."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/chi-0111260211nov26.story

UI PROGRAM IS MODEL FOR UW (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 26)
A planned research lab to study new pharmaceuticals at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Pharmacy could bring in millions of dollars in royalties from drug companies, school officials said. The lab is designed to perform research on drugs in early development that pharmaceutical companies would not have to duplicate, giving the school the ability to ask for higher royalties when those drugs hit the market. The program will try to modify newly developed drug entities so they can be more easily made into drug products, said George Zografi, pharmaceutical sciences professor and chairman of the committee looking for a lab director. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Kentucky have similar programs, Zografi said.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/853768.html

WEILER COMMENTS ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Nov. 26)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/846198.html
This Associated Press article also appeared in the Nov. 23 WASHINGTON POST
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A3874-2001Nov22.html

UI BUSINESS ALUMNUS TO HEAD AMA (Modern Healthcare.Com, Nov. 26)
After a three-month search, the American Medical Association has selected a business-oriented physician as its third top executive in as many years. Michael Maves, M.D., president of the Consumer Healthcare Products Association, Washington, will be introduced as executive vice president when the AMA gathers in San Francisco for its midyear policy meeting beginning Dec. 1. Maves, a former captain in the U.S. Army Medical Corps, received his medical degree from Ohio State University and his MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION.
http://www.modernhealthcare.com:80/currentissue/topten.php3?refid=8087&db=mh99up&published=20011126

NEUMANN: IOWA HIRING FOREIGN WORKERS (Burlington Free Press, Nov. 26)
Thousands of foreign-born skilled workers have moved to Iowa in the past decade to snap up high-paying jobs in technology that have gone begging. The flow of trained temporary workers, many of them computer analysts and researchers from Asia, have filled a chronic need not met by college graduates from Iowa. "We can't find enough people to fill these very specialized jobs," University of Iowa economics professor GEORGE NEUMANN said. "Employers have been desperate." Neumann said that a study he co-wrote at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business found that more college graduates are moving into Iowa than are leaving. The Burlington Free Press is located in Vermont.

UI INVOLVED IN DEMENTIA STUDY (Philadelphia Inquirer, Nov. 25)
If automated, touch-tone phone answering systems drive you bonkers, imagine one designed to test your skills. That is generally the idea behind an experimental program set up to screen older callers for early signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, and supporters say it is not as way-out as it sounds. In a study of 155 patients, the system identified warning signs in 80 percent of patients who had been diagnosed with mental impairments by their doctors. It also gave passing grades to 80 percent of patients diagnosed as normal. The results appeared in a recent issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine. Participants were patients ages 56 to 93 at clinics in Madison and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who had been previously screened by their doctors.
http://inq.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2001/11/25/national/DEMENTIA25.htm

UI DENTISTRY SIMULATION CLINIC CITED (Yahoo! News, Nov. 24)
A story about virtual dental patients -- a new class of computerized mannequins that are helping future dentists learn to drill, probe and fill cavities with confidence in dental schools nationwide -- sites as a source for more information the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S DENTISTRY SIMULATION CLINIC at http://dentistry.vh.org/simclinic.html.
The story itself can be found at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011123/hl/toothsome_beauties_who_know_the_drill_1.html

BLOOM BOOKS DESCRIBES POSTVILLE (Raleigh News & Observer, Nov. 24)
Rabbi Pinchas Lew, who moved to Chapel Hill three years ago to start a new life and ended up struggling to defend his past, has given up his ministry after a rabbinical council decided he could no longer be effective in his job. Lew's troubles began early this year after a book written by a University of Iowa journalism professor circulated in the Jewish community here. The book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" by STEPHEN G. BLOOM, described the social collision between the mostly Lutheran residents of Postville, Iowa, and the Lubavitcher Jews who opened a kosher slaughterhouse on the outskirts of town. Two chapters in the book describe a crime involving Lew, known by his nickname, "Pinny," and a onetime friend, Phillip Stillman. The two men, who worked at the slaughterhouse, borrowed a car and robbed a convenience store. During the robbery, Stillman shot the clerk. Lew pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit a forcible felony and was sentenced to 10 years in prison. A judge later reconsidered the sentence and placed him on five years' probation. The News & Observer is based in North Carolina.
http://www.newsobserver.com/saturday/news/triangle/Story/840361p-827461c.html

EX-HERKY SUES OSU OVER BANANA INCIDENT (USA Today, Nov. 23-25)
A former mascot of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sued Ohio State University for injuries she allegedly received from being hit in the head with a foam banana by a member of the OSU marching band. Angela Anderson, 22, said she suffered a cracked vertebra and couldn't finish the 1999 season as Herky the Hawk because of her injuries. Her attorney said the University of Iowa covered some of her expenses.

GILCHRIST: PUBLIC LABS ARE IN NEED (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 23)
In Iowa, the state's public health laboratory is housed in a former tuberculosis sanitarium. Technicians carry hazardous chemicals down its long narrow halls, trying to avoid people working in other offices. As the nation struggles with the specter of chemical and biological terrorism, attention is focusing on the need to upgrade laboratories, a crucial part of the public health infrastructure that addresses the question, "What kind of substance are we dealing with?" For years these institutions have been underfunded and neglected. In congressional testimony last month, MARY GILCHRIST, president of the Association of Public Health Laboratories, argued that $125 million in federal funding was needed for the 3-year-old Laboratory Response Network, a group of 81 local, state and federal labs gearing up to deal with bioterrorism. "Our personnel are very limited," said Gilchrist, who runs the University Hygienic Laboratory at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. Security needs at the Iowa lab, and many others, are a pressing issue. With many windows and doors, the Iowa facility is vulnerable to break-ins. The lab is asking the state for an extra $300,000, Gilchrist said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0111230193nov23.story

UI JOINS IN CRANE PROJECT (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 23)
Students, faculty members, and staff members at a dozen Midwestern colleges folded 8,000 paper cranes last month to express their hope for peace and their solidarity with victims of the Sept. 11 attacks. In Japanese folklore, 1,000 origami cranes symbolize a long and happy life, and they are often sent to console grieving families. Participants say that the activity helps them feel connected to the victims of the terrorist attacks. "I had felt kind of distant from the whole event, being in Iowa and not knowing anyone in New York," says BRIAN S. EARL, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. So Mr. Earl folded cranes over lunch every Friday for six weeks with his fellow Japanese-language students.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i13/13a00604.htm

BROCHU RESEARCH: T-REX WAS 'T-WRECK' (The Tennessean, Nov. 23)
Even the mighty Tyrannosaurus rex can't escape the merciless progress of scientific knowledge. The truth is cruel: T-rex was probably T-wrecks. "If we did Jurassic Park 4," says Wyoming paleontologist Robert Bakker, "T-rex would be portrayed in a fear-, angst-ridden role -- sort of a large Woody Allen character." The fearsome thunder-lizards lived wretched lives, he said: "They were beat up, limping, had oozing sores, were dripping pus and disease-ridden, and had to worry about their children starving and other T-rexs coming in and kicking them out." Bakker, of the Wyoming Dinosaur Society, knows this because of research by Elizabeth Rega, a physical anthropologist at Western University in Pomona, Calif. Rega and University of Iowa Paleontologist CHRIS BROCHU examined three T-rexs, including Sue, one of the most complete specimens in the world. They found signs of diseases common to many mammals. "These diseases were most likely chronic, long-term, non-life-threatening infections," Rega said.

BLOOM BOOK TOUCHES NERVE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 23)
ALVIN SNIDER, a UI professor of English, writes about a discussion with his Jewish colleagues of UI journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." "An argument erupted over what kind of Judaism Hasidism is and why a baby boomer would write a book about it," Snider writes. "The discussion, I thought afterward, revealed a lot about how we Jewish academics respond to issues that touch on our own -- and others' -- religious beliefs; in particular, how we respond to exclusivity and unassimilable difference on the borders of our own communities."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i13/13b01001.htm

SOWERS RESPONDS IN LETTER (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 23)
JEANNIE SOWERS
, a UI visiting instructor of Political Science, responds to an article about the author of "Ivory Towers on Sand: The Failure of Middle Eastern Studies in America." In a letter to the editor she argues that the author's argument is misleading. "That scholarly works do not necessarily dovetail with current policy concerns (and in fact, are often rather critical of the consequences of the narrow pursuit of U.S. interests) is a sign that Middle Eastern studies is thankfully both broader and more diverse" than the author suggests, she writes.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i13/13b00402.htm

UI DENTISTS: PIERCINGS MAY DAMAGE TEETH (Yahoo! News, Nov. 22)
If you're planning to have your tongue pierced, take heed. Tongue piercing has many risks, most notably infection. But a little-known hazard of tongue piercing is that the chunk of metal stuck in your tongue will crack your back teeth. A group of dentists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA evaluated different types of dental restorations for fixing damage caused by tongue bars. Their recommendations, published the journal Practical Peridontics and Aesthetic Dentistry were to use an "adhesive composite inlay."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011121/hl/here_s_a_sound_bite_1.html

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Virginian-Pilot, Nov. 22)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close." The Virginian-Pilot is based in Norfolk, Va. The same Associated Press article also ran Nov. 20 in the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN in Texas and the NEWS & OBSERVER in Raleigh, N.C.

PAPER REPORTS ON DOME FIRE (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 21)
The famed golden dome and cupola set atop the state's first Capitol building on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus was destroyed by fire Tuesday. Five university employees and eight construction workers were evacuated from the building as the 100-foot wooden tower and copper-plated dome burned. No one was injured. Renovation work by two contractors on the Greek Revival-style building's dome was started this summer. University officials said they did not know what caused the blaze, but construction workers said it was accidentally started by use of hand torches.

UI SITE OFFERS KNEE REPLACEMENT INFORMATION (Yahoo! News, Nov. 21)
Health officials are calling on the nation's doctors to report any suspicious cases of joint surgery infection following the sudden and mysterious deaths of three Minnesota men who suffered catastrophic infections after elective knee surgery. In a press conference today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it is investigating a "few" potential cases of complications after joint surgery since Oct. 1, but has yet to confirm any additional patients. To learn more about knee surgery, readers of this article are directed to visit the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S VIRTUAL HOSPITAL at http://www.vh.org/Patients/IHB/Ortho/KneeReplace/KneeReplacement.html
The story itself can be found at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011121/hl/cdc_probes_for_answers_in_knee_surgery_deaths_1.html

FIRE DESTROYS OLD CAPITOL DOME (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Nov. 21)
The famed golden dome and cupola set atop the state's first Capitol building on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus was destroyed by fire Tuesday. Five university employees and eight construction workers were evacuated from the building as the 100-foot wooden tower and copper-plated dome burned. No one was injured. Renovation work by two contractors on the Greek Revival-style building's dome was started this summer. University officials said they did not know what caused the blaze, but construction workers said it was accidentally started by use of hand torches.
(Those with a University of Iowa web connection can find this article at http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=5013934fd08db47c252de8e2530f9446&_docnum=7&wchp=dGLStS-lSlAl&_md5=ea8b856dcddbfa4d4b6cf6d9ef48f2dc)

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Columbus Dispatch, Nov. 20)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close." The Columbus Dispatch is based in Ohio

FIRE DESTROYS OLD CAPITOL DOME (Chicago Tribune.com, Nov. 20)
The famed golden dome and cupola -- set atop the state's first capitol building on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus -- was destroyed by fire Tuesday. Fire Marshal Roger Jensen said the fire started in the area below the dome where workers raise the American flag. Renovation work has been under way on the Greek Revival-style building's gold dome. Sgt. Mike Lord, of the Iowa City Police Department, said fire officials have not determined the cause of the fire. But construction company employees working on the dome's renovation project said the fire was accidentally started by workers using hand torches to remove asbestos-laden paint from the dome.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-011120iowafire.story

GRAHAM COMMENTS ON NEW SINUS SURGERY (ABCnews.com, Nov. 20)
A new kind of surgery, called "Stealth," is helping to make sinusitis less painful. More than 30 million Americans suffer from the pain and pressure of the occasional or chronic sinus infection. When sinusitis turns serious, surgery is often the sufferer's only option. Unfortunately, traditional sinus surgery can be a complicated procedure. New image-guided surgery, also known as stealth surgery, allows physicians to minimize the chances of sinus surgery complications, operate more thoroughly, and perform more difficult procedures. "It gives surgeons greater confidence about where they are so the surgery can be more thorough and theoretically the complications can be lessened," says Dr. SCOTT GRAHAM, of the Department of Otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, "but it is not a replacement for surgical judgment."
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/sinussurgery_011114.html

WEILER COMMENTS ON DRIVING, DRUGS (CNN.com, Nov. 20)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close."
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/11/20/drugs.driving.ap/index.html
This Associated Press article also appeared Nov. 20 on the web site of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC: http://www.azcentral.com/offbeat/articles/1120DrugsDriving-ON.html

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Toronto Star, Nov. 20)
A top official with the National Transportation Safety Board urged federal regulators Wednesday to place more warning labels on household drugs such as cold medicines that can trigger drowsiness and cause accidents on roads, railways and in the air. A panel of experts from across the country testified on the issue Wednesday at the safety board's headquarters. Researchers delivered mixed opinions to transportation and drug regulators on the possible dangers of driving while taking some medicines. Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, who studies the relationship between drugs and driving, said his research has indicated that several common respiratory drugs make driving difficult. At a driving simulator in Iowa City, extensive tests have revealed some drivers have difficulty following cars, keeping consistent speeds and staying in one lane of traffic while taking over-the-counter drugs. He said the effects vary from person to person.
This Associated Press story also appeared in the Nov. 20 DETROIT NEWS:
http://detnews.com/2001/health/0111/20/a05-348350.htm
This Associated Press story also appeared in the Nov. 20 SALT LAKE TRIBUNE:
http://www.sltrib.com/11202001/nation_w/150559.htm
This Associated Press story also appeared in the Nov. 20 BOSTON GLOBE:
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/324/nation/Common_cures_may_imperil_drivers+.shtml
This Associated Press story also appeared in the Nov. 20 PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER: http://inq.philly.com/content/inquirer/2001/11/20/national/DRIVING20.htm

MATHEW: DRUG MAY CURB HEART ENLARGEMENT (Press-Enterprise, Nov. 20)
A heart-treatment drug not only reduces blood pressure but also can prevent or reduce the enlargement of a heart caused by increased workload, according to a report in the journal Circulation. The drug, ramipril, is known by the brand name Altace and is of the category called ACE inhibitors. Dr. JAMES MATHEW of the University of Iowa and other researchers used electrocardiograms to follow the progress of patients taking ramipril over a four-year period. They found that heart enlargement, called left ventricular hypertrophy, was prevented or reversed. Matthew said that doctors long have known that LVH spelled trouble for heart patients. "But until now, no agent has been shown to lower risk by causing regression of LVH," he said. Because the study was large, including more then 8,000 patients, researchers expect that their findings will encourage clinicians to use ACE inhibitors. The Press-Enterprise is based in Riverside, Calif.

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Orange County Register, Nov. 20)
Some common medications for colds, allergies or anxiety can impair driving ability as much as alcohol does -- but in ways so subtle that people may not know they're zonked behind the wheel. The government is debating how to warn people about medicating before driving cars, boats, trains or airplanes. It's also considering whether it's time to test crash victims' blood for legal medications. Fine-print warnings on dozens of over-the-counter medications say they can cause sedation. But new research using driving simulators and other sophisticated tests suggests sedation is the wrong word: You may not feel sleepy even as the drug slows your reaction time or leaves you weaving across the road. Consequently, people who aren't yawning may falsely assume it's OK to drive, critics told a joint meeting of the nation's top drug regulators and driving safety experts last week. So what should consumers do before taking the wheel? "I'm a consumer, too, and even I find it very confusing," says Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, whose tests in a state-of-the-art driving simulator found a common cold remedy, diphenhydramine, can impair driving as much as alcohol. "Unfortunately, there is no list" of drugs to avoid while driving, he says. "We are not there yet. We are not even close." The same Associated Press article also ran Nov. 20 in the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE.

FRANK COMMENTS ON IO VOLCANO (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19)
Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active world in the solar system. Several spacecraft that have orbited Io in past years have captured pictures of different volcanoes ejecting huge plumes of gas and particles. In early August, NASA's Galileo spacecraft captured a shot of the biggest volcanic plume ever seen. Gas and dust from the volcano rise about 310 miles above the surface. Galileo did more than just take pictures of the volcano. It also caught particles freshly released during the explosion -- giving scientists a direct sample of extraterrestrial volcanic material to analyze. "We've had wonderful images" of volcanoes before, said one of the mission's scientists, LOUIS FRANK of the University of Iowa. "But we've never caught the hot breath from one of them until now. Galileo smelled the volcano's strong breath and survived."
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000092336nov19.story

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19)
A top official with the National Transportation Safety Board urged federal regulators Wednesday to place more warning labels on household drugs such as cold medicines that can trigger drowsiness and cause accidents on roads, railways and in the air. A panel of experts from across the country testified on the issue Wednesday at the safety board's headquarters. Researchers delivered mixed opinions to transportation and drug regulators on the possible dangers of driving while taking some medicines. Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, who studies the relationship between drugs and driving, said his research has indicated that several common respiratory drugs make driving difficult. At a driving simulator in Iowa City, extensive tests have revealed some drivers have difficulty following cars, keeping consistent speeds and staying in one lane of traffic while taking over-the-counter drugs. He said the effects vary from person to person.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000092421nov19.story
(This article originally appeared in the Nov. 15 CHICAGO TRIBUNE: http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0111150288nov15.story
It also appeared in the Nov. 15 BALTIMORE SUN
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/sns-druglabels.story)

STUDENT LEFT UI TO LEARN VIOLIN MAKING (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 19)
Thomas Metzler was 8 years old when he started playing the violin. And though the Glendale resident held onto his aspirations of becoming a professional musician until college, it wasn't until he was halfway through his education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that he found his true calling. After being inspired one summer by four German co-workers who had studied the art of making stringed instruments, Metzler finally ended up leaving the university to attend a violin-making school in Germany for 3 1/2 years. Now he owns Thomas Metzler Violin Shop in Glendale, offering local musicians a selection of nearly 600 instruments for sale and rental.
http://www.latimes.com/tcn/glendale/news/la-gn0019578nov19.story

HALL COMMENTS ON ELDER CARE (USA Weekend, Nov. 18)
An advice columnist responds to a question about putting an ailing parent in a nursing home. In addition to her own advice, the columnist quotes GERI HALL, an advanced practice nurse with the University of Iowa's Center on Aging. "Look for a place that feels comfortable to visit, where the residents are engaged in activities and there's positive interaction between the staff and residents," she says.
http://www.usaweekend.com/01_issues/011118/011118relationtips.html

RIETZ: FUTURES MARKET TRACKS CANDIDATES (New Scientist, Nov. 17)
In the past four U.S. presidential elections, THOMAS RIETZ and his colleagues at the University of Iowa have set up a futures market in which players have a financial stake in predicting the result of the election. Traders buy shares in the candidate they think will win, which they can cash in when the contest is over. Rietz says the predictions of the markets consistently beat the pollsters.

HALL GIVES ADVICE ON FINDING NURSING HOME (USA Weekend, Nov. 16-18)
In response to a question from a man struggling with guilt over his desire to place his aging and widowed mother in a nursing home, a column suggests finding a place that's easily accessible to the man's home for visits and emergencies. "Look for a place that feels comfortable to visit, where the residents are engaged in activities and there's positive interaction between the staff and residents," says GERI HALL, an advanced practice nurse with the University of Iowa's Center on Aging.

REGENTS APPROVE TUITION HIKE (USA Today, Nov. 16)
Tuition is increasing for students at Iowa's three public universities for the 2002-2003 school year. The Board of Regents approved the largest increase in 20 years: an 18.5% increase for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. Base tuition and fees for in-state students will go up almost $700 to about $4,100. Regents said they had no choice after the Legislature cut spending this year because of the slowing economy.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20011116/3631603s.htm

GRONBECK BOOK ON SPEECH CITED (The Yomiuri Shimbun, Nov. 16)
A first-person story about the importance of public speaking cites BRUCE GRONBECK, DOUGLAS EHNINGER, and ALAN MONROE of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA as posing the question: "Why study speech communication? Because every public speaking situation is an opportunity to improve your relationships and further career goals. You can learn the skills necessary to survive, even thrive, in your community and on the job." The reference is to a book coauthored by the three titled "Principles of Speech Communication. "

SONG FEATURES WRITERS' WORKSHOP (Boston Globe, Nov. 16)
A story about a recent two-hour concert by Suzanne Vega says that singer- guitarist Bob Hillman opened the show "with a set of sweet, smart tunes that ran the gamut from a melodic indictment of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP to a ballad that relates the works of Tolstoy to a romantic night out in New York."
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/320/living/Rebounding_Vega_shows_expansive_side+.shtml

GRANT WANTS ATHLETICS CHANGES (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 16)
To keep their teams competitive on the court, college basketball coaches are increasingly looking across the ocean for players. And the Laseges and Mikulases of the world are keeping up with the Joneses. But getting to the court has suddenly become a lot harder for them. This past summer, the National Collegiate Athletic Association began cracking down on foreign athletes accused of violating the association's rules governing amateur status. The irony is that the NCAA is suddenly trying to enforce its rules forbidding players from competing with professionals at the very same time that it is lobbying its members to relax those rules. CHRISTINE H.B. GRANT, the former women's athletics director at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has led a two-year campaign to alter principles designed to ensure that American players are not professionals, because those principles are often lost in translation for overseas athletes.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i12/12a04401.htm

KELLY: LITTLE INTEREST IN ROTC (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 16)
Although the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks inspired students who were already considering ROTC, some observers doubt that students with no prior interest in ROTC will suddenly apply. "A lot of people want to see September 11 as a big call to arms for students," says Maj. STEVE KELLY, a professor of military science and an officer in the ROTC unit at the University of Iowa. "But since then, nobody's been knocking down my door." John Lestor, a sophomore and psychology major at the University of Iowa, spent most of his teenage years garbed in the uniform of punk rock -- black clothes, spiked hair, and a sneer for authority. So when he put on his Army ROTC uniform for the first time this fall, Lestor had to laugh at how much he'd changed. "When I finally looked into it, I found the people there are nothing like that drill sergeant in Full Metal Jacket, and many of the cadets were just like me," he says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i12/12a04101.htm

UI'S BOND RATING GOES UP (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 16)
A list of institutions whose bond ratings were either upgraded or downgraded during October 2001 includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Standard & Poor's raised the UI's rating from A to A+, a rating that applies only to $47 million in dormitory-revenue bonds. Reasons cited for the upgrade include strong demand for on-campus housing, driven in part by the lowest room-and-board costs of any Big-10 Conference university; "sound financial performance" throughout the university, including the medical center; and a 15-percent increase in freshmen applications since 1997.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i12/12a03201.htm

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Health News Daily, Nov. 15)
A top official with the National Transportation Safety Board urged federal regulators Wednesday to place more warning labels on household drugs such as cold medicines that can trigger drowsiness and cause accidents on roads, railways and in the air. A panel of experts from across the country testified on the issue Wednesday at the safety board's headquarters. Researchers delivered mixed opinions to transportation and drug regulators on the possible dangers of driving while taking some medicines. Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, who studies the relationship between drugs and driving, said his research has indicated that several common respiratory drugs make driving difficult. At a driving simulator in Iowa City, extensive tests have revealed some drivers have difficulty following cars, keeping consistent speeds and staying in one lane of traffic while taking over-the-counter drugs. He said the effects vary from person to person. Health News Daily is based in Chevy Chase, Md.

COLEMAN: MILLIONS LACK INSURANCE (Physicians Financial News, Nov. 15)
Millions of Americans lack health insurance and, with the economy floundering, that is likely to increase, the National Academy of Sciences reported Thursday. "Unless health insurance is made more affordable, the number of uninsured Americans is likely to continue growing over time," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, co-chair of the committee that wrote the report. She also is president of the Iowa Health System and the University of Iowa, Iowa City. The report is the first of six planned by the Institute of Medicine over two years. The series is planned to find out who lacks health insurance and why, determine what the consequences are and provide the groundwork for debate on how to correct the problem. The institute is part of the academy, a private organization chartered by Congress to advise the government of scientific matters. This first report seeks to draw a picture of the millions who lack insurance. It does not offer any recommendations. Physicians Financial News is based in Seacaucus, N.J.

WEILER TESTIFIES ON DRIVING, DRUGS (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 15)
A top official with the National Transportation Safety Board urged federal regulators Wednesday to place more warning labels on household drugs such as cold medicines that can trigger drowsiness and cause accidents on roads, railways and in the air. A panel of experts from across the country testified on the issue Wednesday at the safety board's headquarters. Researchers delivered mixed opinions to transportation and drug regulators on the possible dangers of driving while taking some medicines. Dr. JOHN WEILER of the University of Iowa, who studies the relationship between drugs and driving, said his research has indicated that several common respiratory drugs make driving difficult. At a driving simulator in Iowa City, extensive tests have revealed some drivers have difficulty following cars, keeping consistent speeds and staying in one lane of traffic while taking over-the-counter drugs. He said the effects vary from person to person.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0111150288nov15.story

UI WRITERS SPEAK IN D.C. (Washington Post, Nov. 15)
A roundup of upcoming events in the D.C. area says that on Friday writers from a workshop of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF CREATIVE WRITING will read from their works at the Hirshhorn Gallery.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29220-2001Nov14.html

DYER TO SPEAK AT MYSTERY CONFERENCE (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 14)
The 2002 Mystery and Suspense Conference, sponsored by the College of DuPage Continuing Education Office, will be held Feb. 1-3 in the Wyndham Northwest Chicago Hotel in Itasca. Among the authors scheduled to speak or to participate in panel discussions at the conference include "Nancy Drew" series scholar CAROLINE DYER, a professor of journalism at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/tribwest/chi-0111140252nov14.story

UI TO STUDENTS: CURTAIL DOWNLOADS (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 13)
Students who live in University of Iowa dormitories have been told to curtail their use of programs that download music and videos or the programs will be banned. "Our goal is not to ban programs like these, but instead to promote responsible use so that further action is not needed," said STEVE FLEAGLE, the university director of telecommunications and network services. Residence hall Internet connections have been congested as students increasingly use programs such as KaZaA, Morpheus and Bearshare, officials said. Major congestion occurs when outside computers download files from machines hooked to the residence halls system, resulting in slower connections.

ECONOMY CURBS RECRUITING AT UI (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 13)
Some 14 high-profile companies have canceled recruitment trips to the University of Iowa this fall, as the number of companies visiting the campus to recruit has plunged by 28 percent. "It is definitely a different time than it was a year ago," said CATHY COLONY BUNNELL, director of Engineering Career Services for the College of Engineering. Companies canceling trips, including Microsoft, Sprint Finance and H&R Block, would have done so regardless of the Sept. 11 attacks, said JERRY PASCHAL, executive director of Career Services.

COLLEGE MAY CUT REQUIRED CREDIT HOURS (Omaha World Herald, Nov. 13)
The University of Iowa is looking at ways to save money and may reduce the credit hours students need to graduate from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Officials have proposed decreasing the 124 hours required in the college to 120, said FREDERICK ANTCZAK, associate dean of the college. "I'm not sure why we didn't do it when we instituted the present set of general education requirements," said JOHN ERICKSON, a member of the college's educational policy committee. The college changed standards in 1996 by eliminating a four-hour physical education credit-hour requirement, but it did not reduce the number of credit hours needed for graduation.

WEILER COMMENTS ON ASTHMA DRUGS, ATHLETES (Star-Ledger, Nov. 13)
The days in which asthmatics were relegated to quite, indoor lifestyles are long past. Improved pharmaceutical options mean that asthma no longer automatically precludes a person from participating in sports. Physicians complain, however, that the combination of a sports mindset that makes people think they are invincible, and an international sporting world obsessed with getting drugs out of sports -- even those needed to treat a medical condition -- is hampering treatment efforts. "Compliance is the biggest problem we have," said JOHN WEILER, M.D., a professor of internal medicine with the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "The medications we have today are wonderful, but they don't do anything if they're not taken." The Star-Ledger is based in Newark, N.J.

UI PART OF TOUCH-TONE TEST FOR DEMENTIA (Spokesman-Review, Nov. 12)
Automated touch-tone phone answering systems could help screen older callers for early signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. In a study of 155 patients, a touch-tone system identified warning signs in 80 percent of patients who had been diagnosed with mental impairments by their doctors. It also gave passing grades to 80 percent of patients diagnosed as normal. The results appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine. Participants were patients aged 56 to 93 at clinics in Madison, Wis. and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who'd been previously screened by their doctors. The Spokesman-Review is based in Spokane, Wash. The story also ran in the KANSAS CITY STAR and the OPELIKA-AUBURN NEWS in Opelika, Ala.

SEN. FEINGOLD TO SPEAK AT UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Nov. 12)
U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, the lone dissenter of a landmark anti-terrorism bill passed by the Senate last month, said Sunday that ensuring national security should not overshadow Americans' constitutional rights. Feingold, D-Wisc., was at the University of Michigan on Sunday night, his first stop in a tour of U.S. college campuses he planned before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The story says Feingold is scheduled to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Nov. 19.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/568/822557.html

SEN. FEINGOLD TO SPEAK AT UI (Detroit Free Press, Nov. 12)
U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, the lone dissenter of a landmark anti-terrorism bill passed by the Senate last month, said Sunday that ensuring national security should not overshadow Americans' constitutional rights. Feingold, D-Wisc., was at the University of Michigan on Sunday night, his first stop in a tour of U.S. college campuses he planned before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The story says Feingold is scheduled to speak at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Nov. 19.
http://www.freep.com:80/news/metro/fein12_20011112.htm
A version of the Associated Press story also ran Nov. 11 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A12304-2001Nov11.html
A version of the Associated Press story also ran Nov. 11 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/11/11/national1549EST0498.DTL
A version of the Associated Press story also ran Nov. 10 on the Web site of the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/nat/nov01/dcnotes11111001.asp

UI ANTHRAX SPECIMENS GUARDED (The New Yorker, Nov. 12)
A story about Iowa State's anthrax samples says that on Oct. 10, Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack ordered law-enforcement officers to stand guard over the Iowa State laboratory and at the state's other labs with anthrax (including the Agriculture Department's lab in Ames and labs at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA). The Iowa State anthrax collection was beginning to seem like more trouble than it was worth, and the college's dean, Norman F. Cheville, after consultation with the lab's director and a school health-and-safety group, decided to do something about it. On Oct. 12, they destroyed all their samples.
http://www.newyorker.com/FACT/?011112fa_FACT2

DAMASIO QUOTED ON RESEARCH (U.S. News & World Report, Nov. 12)
Neurologists are working on unraveling many of the intricate neural systems underlying our most elusive traits, including consciousness, morality and empathy. "Everything that happens in the brain is based on the work of systems like music in an orchestra performed from a score," says ANTONIO DAMASIO, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa. "It all sounds like one thing, but it's coming from 100 or more individual parts. What we're doing is finding out those little parts."

UI PART OF TOUCH-TONE TEST FOR DEMENTIA (CNN.com, Nov. 12)
Automated touch-tone phone answering systems could help screen older callers for early signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. In a study of 155 patients, a touch-tone system identified warning signs in 80 percent of patients who had been diagnosed with mental impairments by their doctors. It also gave passing grades to 80 percent of patients diagnosed as normal. The results appear in Monday's Archives of Internal Medicine. Participants were patients aged 56 to 93 at clinics in Madison, Wis. and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who'd been previously screened by their doctors.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/11/12/touch.tone.dementia.ap/index.html
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in the Nov. 12 LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL-STAR:
http://www.journalstar.com/nation?story_id=6636&date=20011112&past
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in the Nov. 11 LOS ANGELES TIMES:
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/wire/sns-ap-touch-tone-dementia1111nov11.story
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in the Nov. 12 CHICAGO TRIBUNE:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0111120026nov12.story
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in the Nov. 11 BALTIMORE SUN:
http://www.sunspot.net/features/health/wire/sns-ap-touch-tone-dementia1111nov11.story
A version of this Associated Press article appeared in the Nov. 11 SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/11/11/national2005EST0564.DTL

FRANK SURPRISED BY IO VOLCANO (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Nov. 11)
Surprised scientists report that their long-lived spacecraft, Galileo, got a whiff of danger recently when it dashed through the tallest volcanic plume ever seen -- anywhere. The car-sized spacecraft was beginning its last two years in orbit around Jupiter, the solar system's largest planet, and was passing whisker-close to the strange, mottled-looking Jovian moon called Io. And once again, Io offered up surprises. "This was totally unexpected. We've had wonderful images and other remote sensing of the volcanoes on Io before, but we've never caught the hot breath of one of them until now," said planetary scientist LOUIS FRANK of the University of Iowa. "Galileo smelled the volcano's strong breath and survived."
(Those with a University of Iowa web connection can find this article at
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=30464412aa78d7e8d22e1855b346c461&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlzV&_md5=a4d53b6ee92334d42a83a0a1cc010570)

GRADUATE PONDERS AFGHAN'S FUTURE (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Nov. 11)
Before anyone else, Afghans who moved to the United States saw the brewing turmoil in Afghanistan. And though Washington's Afghan American community -- one of the largest in the country -- could never have imagined how it would spill over into the United States on Sept. 11, they tried to alert Americans to their country's horror. From his nine-bedroom Springfield home, Yosuf M. Mir started writing letters to members of Congress. Mir traveled to the United States in 1973 to study public administration at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, became a citizen and never went home. He was part of the first wave of Afghans, many of them aristocrats, who came when the fashion was to get an American education before they took up their professions in Kabul. Because of the Russian invasion in 1979, they all stayed. Some, including Mir, still own land in Afghanistan. Mir, who had hoped to take his government skills home, now works throughout Northern Virginia as a translator of several languages.

TOUCH-TONE TEST CHECKS FOR DEMENTIA (Yahoo! News, Nov. 11)
Automated touch-tone phone answering systems could help screen older callers for early signs of dementia and Alzheimer's disease, researchers say. In a study of 155 patients, a touch-tone system identified warning signs in 80 percent of patients who had been diagnosed with mental impairments by their doctors. Participants were patients aged 56 to 93 at clinics in Madison, Wisc. and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who'd been previously screened by their doctors. http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011111/hl/touch_tone_dementia_3.html

FORMER UI GYMNAST TEACHES LIFE SKILLS (Kansas City Star, Nov. 10)
A former Kansas City Chiefs cheerleader has founded a program designed to teach students both cheerleading and life skills. Christy Cowell of Leawood, Kan., cheered for the Chiefs in 1987 and 1988. An Iowa native, she also was a gymnast and cheerleader while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After serving as a volunteer coach for various area programs, Cowell decided to start her own program. Called All American Cheer & Stunt, the program offers both noncompetitive and competitive cheerleading instruction at a variety of locations. Classes are structured so that students complete a life skills workbook at the same time they are receiving cheerleading instruction, Cowell said.

STONE EXPLAINS REASONS FOR DRY SKIN (Weather.com, Nov. 9)
MARY STONE
, M.D., UI associate professor of dermatology, discusses the reasons why skin dries out in cold weather and provides tip on how to prevent and treat dry skin caused by winter conditions.
http://www.weather.com/newscenter/topstories/health/skinhealth/011109winterskin.html

UI GRADUATE WRITES COLUMN FOR ONLINE SPORTS 'ZINE' (ESPN.com, Nov. 9)
Eric Neel, a former managing editor of Sportsjones who holds a Ph.D. in English from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, now reviews sports culture in his regular "Critical Mass" column for Page 2 on the ESPN web site. His latest column is a review of John Edgar Wideman's new book, "Hoop Roots," a memoir and meditation on the appeal of playground ball.
http://espn.go.com/page2/s/neel/011109.html

UI GRADUATION PLAN CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Nov. 9)
When Jaclyn Houghton arrived at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the fall of 1998, she signed a contract with the university promising to graduate in four years. Many institutions have copied the Iowa idea of guaranteeing a four-year path to graduation for students who agree to take a full load each semester. But officials say the success of such programs largely depends on the number of participants. At Iowa, where roughly three out of four freshmen signed a contract this year, the university's four-year graduation rate has risen to 37 percent, from about 30 percent in 1995, when the university first offered the deal.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i11/11a02201.htm

NIXON DISCUSSES ABRASIVES STUDIES (CBC, Nov. 8)
WILFRID NIXON, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, was interviewed Thursday by the Canadian Broadcast Company (CBC) for it's show "The Trailblazer" with Randy Henderson. The morning radio show explored some abrasives studies with which Nixon has recently been involved.

DEAD ATTORNEY ATTENDED UI (Los Angeles Times, Nov. 8)
Police in Newport Center, Calif., are still perplexed about what caused the death of a 41-year-old Huntington Beach man whose body was found at the base of a Newport Center parking garage Monday morning. Jeffrey Paris Wall worked as an attorney with the firm O'Melveny & Myers, located next to 24 Hour Fitness in the 600 block of Newport Center Drive. The coroner is performing toxicology tests on Wall, which could take weeks, but a report they will release today or Friday should help investigators "tie some loose ends," said Newport Beach Police Sgt. Steve Shulman. "We're looking at his work relationship, his personal background and family background as part of the investigation," he said. Shulman said it is still not clear whether the incident was a homicide, an accident or a suicide. Wall earned a medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, from which he graduated with honors. He also had degrees in microbiology and chemistry.
http://www.latimes.com/templates/misc/printstory.jsp?slug=la%2Ddp0024919nov08

BHATTACHARJEE: UI MAY AVOID LAYOFFS (Omaha World-Herald, Nov. 6)
University of Iowa officials say they hope the school can accommodate budget cuts without temporary layoffs or furloughs. "It looks like this time we may not have to bite the bullet of furloughs," said Faculty Senate President AMITAVA BHATTACHARJEE. Gov. Tom Vilsack had earlier proposed a 7 percent cut in certain areas of the state's budget, a plan that would have meant $21.9 million in cuts from the university. Layoffs were discussed by MARY SUE COLEMAN, university president, after the initial cuts were announced. Some school officials say the impact might be less severe now.

EX-OLYMPIAN TAUGHT AT UI (Salt Lake Tribune, Nov. 6)
Barbara Day Lockhart, a professor of physical education at Brigham Young University, was the first member of the first women's speedskating team that t he United States sent to the Olympics. But for a fall, she might have trumped that distinction by winning a medal in 1964. As it is, she had a successful athletic career as a two-time Olympian, and she has followed that with a distinguished record in academia. She has served on the faculties of Temple University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and in 1991 she returned to BYU, where she had earned her doctorate 20 years earlier.
http://www.sltrib.com/11062001/tuesday/146323.htm

SINGAPORE ARTIST ATTENDED UI (The Straits Times, Nov. 6)
"Life Like Chess" is Chng Seok Tin's 18th solo art exhibition. Her first solo exhibition was at the National Museum Art Gallery in 1979 and she has notched up a total of 74 exhibitions, many of them overseas, in the United States, Britain, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Yet, Chng remains unaffected by her exposure. In a worn T-shirt and flip-flops, she might be on her way to the market. She is equally casual about her art. "I don't like to have a lot of theory," she says. "I am not very profound." She is being modest. She has a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hull College in Britain, a Master of Arts from New Mexico State University in the U.S., and a Master of Fine Arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. In addition, she studied at Atelier 17 in Paris and St Martin's School of Arts in London, two of the most prestigious art schools in Europe. The Straits Times is based in Singapore.

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON BIOTERRORISM RESPONSE (ABC News, Nov. 5)
MARY GILCHRIST, director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory, was interviewed for a story on the public health response to bioterrorism. The story aired during ABC Evening News With Peter Jennings.

ASLAN CITED IN STORY ON WAR INTEREST (US News & World Report, Nov. 5)
The speed with which colleges nationwide have raced to accommodate the stampede of undergraduates suddenly interested in war-related subject areas has stunned even seasoned educators. Though more than 1,000 schools offer Middle East concentrations, only about 50 have comprehensive programs that incorporate research centers, language studies, literature, politics, and religion, according to the Middle East Studies Association of North America. For example, REZA ASLAN is the Islamic Studies department at the University of Iowa -- a school that serves some 29,000 students in a state with one of the nation's earliest Muslim communities and its oldest surviving mosque (built in Cedar Rapids in 1934).
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/011105/education/5college.htm

GRADUATE PONDERS AFGHAN HOMELAND'S FUTURE (Washington Post, Nov. 5)
Before anyone else, Afghans who moved to the United States saw the brewing turmoil in Afghanistan. And though Washington's Afghan American community -- one of the largest in the country -- could never have imagined how it would spill over into the United States on Sept. 11, they tried to alert Americans to their country's horror. From his nine-bedroom Springfield home, Yosuf M. Mir started writing letters to members of Congress. Mir traveled to the United States in 1973 to study public administration at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, became a citizen and never went home. He was part of the first wave of Afghans, many of them aristocrats, who came when the fashion was to get an American education before they took up their professions in Kabul. Because of the Russian invasion in 1979, they all stayed. Some, including Mir, still own land in Afghanistan. Mir, who had hoped to take his government skills home, now works throughout Northern Virginia as a translator of several languages.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A39690-2001Nov4.html

UI PRESS BOOK COVERS NEW ENGLAND NATURE (Boston Globe, Nov. 4)
One good windstorm and the fall foliage will be gone for another year -- along with the leaf peepers -- but before that iconic regional image is all raked up and hauled off, there is Kent C. Ryden's question: What is natural about New England? The question is the title of the concluding essay in his immediately engaging "Landscape With Figures: Nature and Culture in New England," published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. (Those with a University of Iowa web connection can find this story at
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c019eabb22d603000eb2926d3af955b8&_docnum=1&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=975b3f3105bd1233595b178e5ddc7f93)

ARTIST ATTENDED UI (The Straits Times, Nov. 4)
A profile of artist Chng Seok Tin's notes that she holds a Master of Fine Arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Straits Times is a daily newspaper in Singapore. (Those with a University of Iowa web connection can find this story at
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=c019eabb22d603000eb2926d3af955b8&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLStk-lSlAl&_md5=3287b36bfa4287214542e4f6954195ec)

MILMAN: ART SHOULD PROVOKE (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 4)
Do people want art that will soothe and calm or art that will stimulate, rouse and rile? The two sides of art's bright coin -- art as consolation or art as provocation -- seem especially at odds now, as the nation girds itself for a long and difficult struggle against terrorism. Should art deliver a kiss or a kick in the pants? ESTERA MILMAN, director of the Alternative Traditions in Contemporary Arts program at the University of Iowa, is in the boot-in-the-keister camp. "Comfort art turns the arts into sugar pills, instead of allowing them to represent the diversity of culture," she said. "You don't transform people through comfort." Milman is curator of NO!art and the Aesthetics of Doom, an historical exhibition that opens Thursday and runs through Jan. 13 at the Mary and Leigh Block Museum of Art at Northwestern University. NO!art was a New York artists' cooperative in the 1950s and '60s whose members used painting, sculpture, photography and collage to critique sexual taboos, consumer culture, the Holocaust and the proliferation of atomic weapons.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/arts/chi-0111040439nov04.story

GILCHRIST COMMENTS ON TESTS (CNN, Nov. 3)
MARY GILCHRIST
, director of the University of Iowa Hygienic Laboratory, was interviewed for a story on the availability and dependability of tests for exposure to biological agents.

UI OFFERS TIPS FOR ANXIOUS EXPECTANT MOTHERS (Yahoo! News, Nov. 3)
For many women, the idea of natural childbirth is one of excited anticipation. For others, the mere thought of delivering a baby induces a sense of panic so strong it can affect the entire course of the pregnancy. Obstetricians who recognize their patients' fears -- and offer nervous moms-to-be even minimal counseling -- can make a big difference in the health and safety of the delivery for both mother and child, a new study published in the journal Obstetrics and Gynecology says. For more information on dealing with fears of childbirth, visit the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE CENTER. The link to the article is:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011102/hl/mother_of_all_fears_1.html
The link to the University of Iowa Health Care Center is:
http://www.uihealthcare.com/topics/pregnancyandchildbirth/preg4890.html

GAFFNEY: HAIR-PULLING IS A DISORDER (Yahoo! News, Nov. 3)
Most people feel like pulling their hair out now and then but never do it. People with trichotillomania struggle with such impulses every day and almost always act on them. The result? Patches of hair loss, stubby or missing eyebrows, eyelashes or body hair, and even baldness, often accompanied by low self-esteem. "Recent surveys of college students show that about 1 to 2 percent of them have a past or current history of the condition," says Dr. GARY R. GAFFNEY, associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "It's not a disorder that gets a lot of attention, but it's definitely one that affects many people." Generally classified as psychological in origin, trichotillomania is described as similar to obsessive compulsive disorders -- a group of conditions characterized by persistent or repetitive thoughts or behaviors over which an individual has little conscious control. "Compulsive hair pullers generally feel mounting tension before pulling out their hair," Gaffney says. "The tension is relieved only by the act of pulling."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011103/hl/hair_today_gone_tomorrow_1.html

UI MUSLIM STUDENT COMMENTS ON COLLEGE LIFE (New York Times, Nov. 3)
College provides an instant Muslim support group most never had in high school. Asma Haidri said she was the only Muslim in her high school in Bloomfield, Iowa, but now as a junior and pre-law student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she is part of an active Muslim Student Association with 150 members. "I go to the mosque at least once every day. Sometimes I go five times a day, in between classes. I study there. It's like my second home now," said Ms. Haidri, 20, who also began covering her head in college.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/11/03/education/03SCAR.html?pagewanted=print

UI JOURNALISM GRADUATE PENS CHILDREN'S BOOK (Kansas City Star, Nov. 3)
There are a lot of similarities between the protagonist of a newly published children's book and the book's author, Ronica Stromberg. Like Samantha, the lead character in "The Glass Inheritance," Stromberg inherited a piece of Depression glass that sparked a desire to learn more about the years involving the Great Depression and World War II. Stromberg and Samantha also share a Scandinavian heritage. The author wove her love of glass collecting, her newly acquired historical knowledge and her heritage into her first published fiction work, now available at Borders bookstores in Johnson County. "It's a puzzle mystery geared toward children age 10 to 14," Stromberg said. "The first piece of glass Samantha inherits from her grandmother provides clues that lead to another piece, which leads to another piece, until she has her entire inheritance." And in the process of revealing the inheritance mystery, Samantha also uncovers and solves a mystery about her grandmother, which leads to a better understanding of her grandmother's life. A native of Iowa with a journalism degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Stromberg has always loved reading and writing. And she's been published in collective nonfiction books.

UI GRADUATE TO HEAD BANK (Financial Times of London, Nov. 1)
Piraye Antika, chief executive of HSBC's small but profitable Turkish subsidiary, is to head the much bigger HSBC Bank that the UK-based global bank plans to establish in Turkey following its acquisition on Tuesday of Demirbank. Antika, 41, a Turkish national, who played an instrumental role in putting the deal together, said that Turkey was a "natural address for any consumer business" but that "you have to know the country to buy a bank." She started her banking career with Chase Manhattan in London in 1985 after graduating in economics from Bosporus University in Istanbul and obtaining a master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UI SHOOTINGS TOOK PLACE 10 YEARS AGO TODAY (Chicago Tribune, Nov. 1)
The paper's almanac reports that on this date in 1991 a gunman shot six people to death and left one paralyzed on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/chicago/chi-0111010179nov01.story

STAPLETON QUOTED ON HIV STORY (Yahoo! News, Nov. 1)
A benign strain of herpes may run molecular interference in a way that shields cells from initial infection by the AIDS virus, new research shows. Scientists in the United States and Europe say human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) gums up the molecular ports HIV 1 uses to enter host cells. However, they add, the harmless microbe may be a little too protective, stimulating HIV to seek other routes to infect its targets and promoting more severe disease. Dr. JACK STAPLETON, the University of Iowa physician who first linked GBV-C infection and less-aggressive HIV, says, "There's a large clinical observation that having GBV-C is associated with a reasonably good outcome" of AIDS. The same remains to be seen for "co-infection" with HHV-6, he notes.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011031/hl/harmless_herpes_virus_may_block_hiv_1.html

ALBANY MULLS MOVE FROM OAKDALE PARK (Times Union, Nov. 1)
Albany Molecular Research Inc. is consolidating operations in the Midwest by relocating its Biocatalysis Division from Iowa City to a lab it purchased in September near Chicago. The drug-discovery firm has 29 employees in that division, currently located in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S OAKDALE RESEARCH PARK. During the first half of 2002, Albany Molecular will move those operations -- and any employees interested in relocating -- to the 88,000-square-foot laboratory in Mount Prospect, Ill., about 20 miles from downtown Chicago. The Times Union is based in Albany, N.Y.

BERGUS OFFERS TIPS FOR EASING EAR PAIN (Parenting, November 2001)
An article offering suggestions for easing the pain of an ear infection includes giving a child acetaminophen or Ibuprofen. "Offer it on a regular schedule -- don't wait for pain to become extreme," says GEORGE BERGUS, M.D., professor of family medicine at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine.

UI SHOOTING INSPIRED PLAY (American Theatre, November 2001)
The 1991 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA shooting that left six people dead and one paralyzed inspired playwright Frank Higgins to pen "Gunplay," described in the article as a "crazy quilt of tableaux exploring Americans' relationship to firearms -- a female cop riffing on domestic violence, right-wingers lampooning liberals' attitudes towards muggers and a barroom flirtation loaded with gun-lingo." Riverside planned to perform Gunplay for the shootings' 10th anniversary Nov. 1 in the form of a staged reading.

MARSHALL STUDIES ELDERLY NUTRITION (Better Nutrition, November 2001)
The elderly are especially vulnerable to the effects of inadequate nutrition. Disease, inability to perform certain functions and mental (cognitive) decline are all characteristics that were traditionally associated with old age, but these same characteristics area also closely tied to poor nutrient levels. Dr. TERESA MARSHALL and others from the University of Iowa looked at these connections in a study that appeared in the Journal of Nutrition. The authors recommend that older people should consume more varied diets and a multivitamin/mineral supplement (with calcium) to help achieve adequate nutrient levels. Better Nutrition is based in Stamford, Conn.

STUTTERING ARTICLE RAISED QUESTIONS (Lingua Franca, Nov. 2001)
Among the unintended consequences of former San Jose Mercury News reporter Jim Dyer's two-part article on a stuttering experiment directed at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA by the late Wendell Johnson in 1939 has been a resurgence in debate among academics over Johnson's premise that stuttering is caused by parents and teachers conspicuously referring to children as stutterers. The emotional pull of Dyer's story rested on the notion that Johnson and his research assistant Mary Tudor had "turned the children into stutterers," but the theory that stuttering is learned behavior has long been abandoned and many academics were disgusted to see his theory given credence in the news article. University of Maryland speech pathologist Nan Ratner wrote in a newsletter published by the American Speech-Language Hearing Association that the evidence suggested John and Tudor had created not stutterers but people with "communication apprehension." In the end, the author notes, Dyer's article has provided "a glimmer of hope for those who believe that Johnson's science was right even if his methods were all wrong." (The article is not available online, but information about the magazine is at
http://www.linguafranca.com/

CANIN ATTENDED, NOW TEACHES AT, UI (Identity Theory, November 2001)
A question-and-answer interview with author ETHAN CANIN, whose most recent book includes "Carry Me Across the Water," says Canin attended the University Of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, "after which, despairing of becoming a writer, he attended Harvard Medical School." It says Canin practiced medicine until the publication of his fourth book and is now on the faculty at the Iowa Writer's Workshop. Identity Theory is an online publication covering art, cinema, books and other topics.
http://www.identitytheory.com/people/birnbaum23.html

DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH (Office Solutions, November 2001)
As employers desperately seek to fill jobs in today's superheated employment market, many companies have discovered diamonds in the rough -- disabled workers. According to statistics, not only are disabled workers capable employees, they have an unusually strong work ethic and high levels of loyalty. University of Iowa law professor PETER BLANCK has been tracking a group of mentally disabled workers and their employers for a number of years. In a 1990 survey, he found 96 percent of the employers surveyed were highly satisfied with the attendance of the mentally disabled employees and six in 10 were satisfied with their productivity and initiative.

UI STUDY URGES FOLIC ACID FOR WOMEN (Vitality Magazine, November 2001)
A list of health briefs includes one credited to research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which found that after pregnancy, women's folic-acid intake decreases, probably because they stop taking prenatal vitamins. The nutrient helps prevent heart disease, so women should take 400 mcg. of it every day after delivering a baby.

CORYELL STUDIES SUICIDE-HORMONE LINK (Reader's Digest, November 2001)
University of Iowa scientists believe they've found a way to assess a person's risk for suicide: a blood test that checks glands controlling the stress hormone cortisol. Overactive glands may be a corollary to the mental turmoil that leads people to take the final step. WILLIAM CORYELL, who studied patients given the "dexamethasone suppression test" while hospitalized for major depression, found that 32 of the 78 patients were churning out excess cortisol. Tracking the group over 15 years, Coryell found that seven of the 32 with abnormal results had killed themselves, compared with only one of the patients who had normal results.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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