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UI in the News

March 2001

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UI SENIOR IS FOCUS OF WEB ARTICLE (College Bound Mag., March/April 2001)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
senior and journalism major Alissa Swango is featured on the Web site of this publication. The story says Swango was recently named one of the top 10 journalism students in the country by the Scripps Howard Foundation. As a sophomore, she was graphics editor of the university's student-run newspaper, The Daily Iowan; last year, she was president of the campus chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. She currently serves as news director of the student radio station, KRUI, media coordinator for the UI Lecture Committee, and a desktop publishing intern at the UI Center for Conferences and Institutes. "I've had to learn a great deal of time management," she says. Since 1986, College Bound Magazine -- based in Staten Island, N.Y., -- has been distributed free to high school students nationwide.
http://www.collegeboundmag.com/mar-apr_01/superstudent.html

MCPHERSON IS FEATURED (Poets &Writers, March/April 2001) JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, a professor in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, is featured in a lengthy profile. The article notes that he earned his MFA at the UI after earning a law degree at Harvard. He won a MacArthur "genius grant" in 1981, the same year he joined the faculty at the UI. In response to the question, "How should African-American artists try to resolve the tensions that result when their personal visions clash with values in different segments of their ethnic community or in society at large?" McPherson responds, "Oh, that's easy. Go to Iowa and drink good Scotch."

ALASKA NATIVES PART OF UI TEAM (Anchorage Daily News, March 31)
In a letter to the editor, Cedar Rapids resident Dan Garrett, a former Alaska resident, writes: "I wanted to take this opportunity to let you and your readers know how proud they should be of two Alaskans who just finished outstanding seasons playing for the University of Iowa women's basketball team…I am referring to BEATRICE BULLOCK and LEAH MAGNER. For someone to play in the Big Ten, arguably one of the top conferences in the nation, is outstanding, but to have two people from Alaska doing so on one team is incredible. The Hawkeyes were not expected to do that well, but they turned it around and won the Big Ten conference championship. People of Alaska should be very proud of Beatrice and Leah, because they made great contributions to the team."
http://www.adn.com/sports/story/0,2637,253979,00.html

FOX TO DONATE TO UI ON ACTOR'S BEHALF (Variety, March 30)
Fox execs have put a last-second halt to "That '70s Show" star Ashton Kutcher's plans to play for charity on ABC's May sweeps celeb edition of "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire." Kutcher had a very personal reason for doing "Millionaire." His brother once underwent a heart transplant, and he wanted to play for a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA center that provides support to the families of transplant patients. ABC offered to not air any of Kutcher's "Millionaire" moments on a Tuesday or Wednesday night, when they would have competed with "That '70s Show," and it seemed for a while that Fox would consent. But Thursday, a day before taping of the celeb "Millionaire," Fox executives leaned on Kutcher's handlers to kill his appearances, industry insiders said. Kutcher, apparently not wanting to anger Fox honchos, has now pulled out. As a consolation, Fox is donating $32,000 to the University of Iowa -- the minimum amount bio-chem major Kutcher could have won.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010330/01/entertainment-kutcher-dc

UI CITED IN STORY ON GAMBLING CASE (Los Angeles Times, March 30)
A story about college basketball gambling scandals discusses the case of Connie Hawkins, who was a New York playground legend when he enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1960. There, he met Jack Molinas, onetime Columbia star who'd been thrown out of the NBA in 1954 for shaving points while playing for the Fort Wayne Pistons. Hawkins was never charged with a crime. But he was guilty of not being careful with whom he associated. Molinas, Hawkins later admitted, once lent him $200. When Molinas and his associate, Joe Hacken, were accused of masterminding a widespread gambling ring, Hawkins, a freshman not even eligible to play varsity basketball, was swept up. Because he had associated with Molinas, he was taken back to New York by investigators from a multi-agency task force. When he admitted to the loan, he was freed. Iowa kicked him out of school -- and the NBA blackballed him.
http://www.latimes.com/sports/times/20010330/t000027258.html

SOLOSKI NAMED DEAN AT U. OF GA. (The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, March 30)
JOHN SOLOSKI,
director of the University of Iowa's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, has been named dean of the University of Georgia's Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. If approved by the Board of Regents, Soloski is expected to assume duties in July. Soloski is considered an authority on libel and media law and a leader in journalism education. He is the co-author of two books on libel law. He did his undergraduate work at Boston College, getting his degree in 1974, and graduate work at Iowa.
http://www.accessatlanta.com/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/today/local_news_a34c1dc566c2312d00d1.html

U. OF GA. NAMES SOLOSKI J-SCHOOL DEAN (Athens Daily News, March 29)
JOHN SOLOSKI
, director of the University of Iowa's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, was named Thursday as the new dean of the University of Georgia's Henry W. Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication. Soloski's appointment is pending approval by the state Board of Regents. He is expected to assume duties as dean in July. An authority on libel law and a leader in journalism education, Soloski joins the Grady College after more than 20 years at Iowa.
http://www.athensnewspapers.com/stories/033001/uga_0330010026.shtml

KELLEY WARNS OF ANTIBIOTIC DANGER (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 29)
Scientists fear that antibiotics fed to livestock and applied to crop fields in manure are running off into streams and contributing to an increase in antibiotic-resistant bacteria, The Des Moines Register reported Thursday in a copyright story. Health officials worry that people will get sick when they drink or come into contact with untreated water or go fishing, canoeing or swimming. It could become a serious problem, said RICHARD KELLEY, a water quality researcher at the University of Iowa's Hygienic Laboratory office in Des Moines. "We view this as an emerging issue primarily because we don' t know much about it," Kelley said.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0329BC-MN-AGR--ANTIB&date=29-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

STUDENTS MADE BOMBS FOR FISHING (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, March 29)
Three University of Iowa students arrested last week for making pipe bombs in a residence hall didn't want to hurt anyone with the devices, school officials said earlier this week. They just wanted to do some fishing. "It was all going to be a fishing expedition later down the road," DUANE PAPKE, associate director of the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety, told the Des Moines Register. Officials say Adam Fisher, 19, Nathaniel Krotz, 19, and Andrew Ritchie, 18, planned to drop the pipe bombs into a pond or river to kill or stun fish.
http://www.ardemgaz.com/today/spt/G2nworeidpath0329.html

BOWLSBY, ALFORD AGREE ON EXTENSION (Washington Post, March 28)
Iowa coach STEVE ALFORD has reached a tentative agreement on a five-year, $4.5 million contract extension that would keep him with the school through 2009. The $900,000 annual salary doesn't include incentives, Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY said Wednesday. "I appreciate very much the commitment that Mr. Bowlsby and the University of Iowa have presented," Alford said. "I couldn't be more pleased with all phases of our program."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010328/aponline211158_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 28 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010328/21/bkc-alford-contract

UI STUDENTS PLANNED TO BOMB FISH (USA Today, March 28)
Officials say three UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students arrested last week for making pipe bombs in a residence hall planned to use them to kill fish in a river or pond. They face charges of possession of an explosive device.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20010328/3181963s.htm

BOWLSBY, ALFORD AGREE ON EXTENSION (The Sporting News, March 28)
Iowa coach STEVE ALFORD has reached a tentative agreement on a five-year, $4.5 million contract extension that would keep him with the school through 2009. The $900,000 annual salary doesn't include incentives, Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY said Wednesday. "I appreciate very much the commitment that Mr. Bowlsby and the University of Iowa have presented," Alford said. "I couldn't be more pleased with all phases of our program."
http://www.sportingnews.com/cbasketball/articles/20010328/306167.html
A version of this Associated Press story appeared on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/sports/AP-BKC-Alford-Contract.html?searchpv=aponline
A version of this Associated Press story appeared on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/03/28/sports2110EST0479.DTL

FORMER UI PROFESSOR TO LEAD CITY COLLEGE (New York Times, March 27)
The trustees of City University of New York named Gregory H. Williams the new president of City College, a once-storied campus that is under enormous pressure to raise standards but still provide access for many poorly prepared high school graduates. Williams has been the Dean of Ohio State University's law school. Much of Dr. Williams's professional career, first at George Washington University, then at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and now in Ohio, has been focused on increasing opportunity for minority students. At Iowa, for example, he helped develop a weekend program to introduce high school and college students to law and to the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/27/nyregion/27CCNY.html

UI'S GIFTED-TALENTED CENTER IS CITED (The Oregonian, March 27)
The University of Iowa's Connie Belin & Jacqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education & Talent Development is cited indirectly in a feature article on Miraca U.M. Gross, a professor of gifted education and director of the Gifted Education Research, Resource and Information Centre at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. Asked if there are similar centers around the world, Gross said there are four that have an impact worldwide, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Later, Gross says, "I very much like the talent search programs in America. There's a program running out of the University of Iowa that identifies kids from the Midwest by allowing them to do tests in math, science and reading well above their grade levels."
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/01/03/cu_31tag27.frame

UI GRADUATE IS VP OF TIMES PUBLISHING (Editor & Publisher, March 27)
Neil Brown, managing editor of the St. Petersburg Times, has been elected a vice president of the newspaper's parent, Times Publishing Co., which is owned by the Poynter Institute. Brown, 42, joined the Times in 1993 as world editor after serving as managing editor of its Washington affiliate, Congressional Quarterly. The Chicago native is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a former reporter and editor at The Miami Herald.
http://www.mediainfo.com:80/ephome/news/newshtm/stories/032701n7.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 26 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010326/aponline151346_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 26 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0326AP-TIMES-BROWN&date=26-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran March 26 on the YAHOO! FINANCE Web site.
http://biz.yahoo.com/apf/010326/times_brown_2.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 26 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010326/bs/times_brown_2.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 26 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/010326/15/times-brown

OLSHANSKY COMMENTS ON HEART STUDY (Yahoo! News, March 26)
A therapy used to treat lead poisoning that's been touted as an alternative treatment for coronary heart disease doesn't work, the first clinical trial on the treatment shows. Chelation therapy using ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), a recognized treatment for heavy metal poisoning, showed no significant difference between patients given a placebo and those who had the treatment, researchers say. But the debate on chelation may not be over. "The study did not look at the arteries, nor did the researchers use such tools as an angiogram," says Dr. BRIAN OLSHANSKY, director of cardio electro-physiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals. "The end points for this research are very soft, and also the time they were following the patients was very short. If there's going to be any change in atherosclerosis, it may take a longer time."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010327/hl/alternative_heart_disease_therapy_no_good_1.html

STUDENTS MADE BOMBS FOR FISHING (Omaha World Herald, March 24)
Three University of Iowa students arrested recently for making pipe bombs in a residence hall didn't want to hurt anyone with the devices, school officials said. They just wanted to do some fishing. "It was all going to be a fishing expedition later down the road," DUANE PAPKE, associate director of the University of Iowa Department of Public Safety, told the Des Moines Register. Officials say Adam Fisher, 19, Nathaniel Krotz, 19, and Andrew Ritchie, 18, planned to drop the pipe bombs into a pond or river to kill or stun fish.

GABLE ERA ENDS AT IOWA (Chicago Tribune, March 23)
An editorial praises the magnificent career of University of Iowa wrestling coach DAN GABLE. "Fans love to argue over who is, or was, the best at any given sport. In wrestling circles, these discussions don't last much longer than one word: Gable. It's tempting to call him the Michael Jordan of wrestling, although the phrase really isn't accurate; Jordan, for all he brought to basketball, never enjoyed Gable's relentless success, and has yet to show that he can teach his magic to others less talented. Gable, by contrast, dominated as both athlete and coach like no other sports figure ever has. Going into last weekend's NCAA finals, his University of Iowa wrestlers had won a remarkable 18 of the last 23 national titles. Gable retired from coaching in 1997 with a career record of 355 wins, 21 losses and five ties. He remains on the school's athletic staff, and last weekend watched the very last of the wrestlers he recruited to Iowa City leave the mat for good. His era is finished. Gable's successor, Jim Zalesky, can now build his own dynasty. Zalesky is one of many former pupils of Gable -- six in the Big Ten alone -- who now coach, and increasingly dominate, college wrestling. They are Gable's most impressive legacy. It's one thing to be the very best. It's quite another to teach your disciples how to do the same."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/article/0,2669,SAV-0103230006,FF.html

STORY CITES UI WEB SITE ON SKIN DISORDERS (Yahoo! News, March 23)
A story about a Web site that spotlights the skin conditions that plague Hollywood actors and actresses also mentions a separate Web site at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, if -- it warns -- you have "a strong stomach and want to see medical pictures of skin disorders." The story was written by HealthScout.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010323/hl/web_site_details_stars_skin_problems_1.html

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON FTC NOMINEE (New York Times, March 23)
Signaling a sharp shift in the enforcement of the nation's antitrust laws, the White House announced today its intention to nominate Timothy J. Muris, a leading critic of the Clinton administration's antitrust policies, to become the next chairman of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Experts said today that it was certain to lead to a significant easing of reviews of corporate mergers and a far less aggressive policy toward prosecuting cases of monopoly. "Efficiency defenses will undoubtedly be taken more seriously under a Muris regime," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust scholar at the University of Iowa College of Law. "His appointment is clearly a move to the right. He's more aligned with the Reagan era of antitrust, but I wouldn't regard him as far right."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/23/business/23FTC.html

MOORE COMMENTS ON BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS (New York Times, March 23)
The new year was only hours old, but Kimberly Groninga already wanted the world to know about an early 2001 blessing -- her newborn daughter. So Groninga, 30, of Iowa City, was grateful when friends and relatives responded to the local newspaper announcement of her daughter's birth on Jan. 2. But if Groninga's daughter had been born just a few weeks later, there would probably have been fewer cards. Her hospital, like many others across the country, decided to stop releasing birth announcements to protect against infant abductions. Some Iowa hospitals require written consent to release birth data, but at least eight hospitals throughout the state, and in Arizona, Illinois and Wyoming, are not giving the information to newspapers at all. UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, where Groninga's daughter was born, talked to patients before deciding to discontinue birth announcements. "The parents were understanding and accepting. I'm not aware of any criticism from patients thus far," spokesman TOM MOORE said.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Birth-Announcements.html?searchpv=aponline

COLEMAN TESTIFIES (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 23)
University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN testified last week before the Senate Finance Committee, which held hearings to examine tax proposals that could affect how much people donate to colleges. Committee leaders said they planned to introduce legislation -- which higher-education officials say would unleash a significant new source of donations -- that would allow people to take money from traditional individual-retirement accounts and give it to charity without paying taxes. Coleman testified that the proposal would "unlock substantial new resources" for nonprofit groups. "We know that tax implications are not the only motivations people have for private giving," Coleman said. But, "based on the fact that many inquire about giving I.R.A. funds, but few make the gifts, the tax code does present barriers that inhibit this form of giving."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i28/28a02201.htm

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON FTC NOMINEE (Houston Chronicle, March 23)
Signaling a sharp shift in the enforcement of the nation's antitrust laws, the White House announced today its intention to nominate Timothy J. Muris, a leading critic of the Clinton administration's antitrust policies, to become the next chairman of the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Experts said today that it was certain to lead to a significant easing of reviews of corporate mergers and a far less aggressive policy toward prosecuting cases of monopoly. "Efficiency defenses will undoubtedly be taken more seriously under a Muris regime," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust scholar at the University of Iowa College of Law. "His appointment is clearly a move to the right. He's more aligned with the Reagan era of antitrust, but I wouldn't regard him as far right."

UI CITED IN COMMENTARY (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 23)
An opinion piece about the College and University Work/Family Association's recent conference, which was titled "Balancing Professional and Personal Lives in Higher Education: a Focus on Women Faculty," says that "the more one transcends old standards of every assistant professor for himself or herself, the more CUWFA's cutting-edge activities seem positively irresistible. It's fun to imagine a whole internecine English department marching up to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S human-resources department to take advantage of its 'Workgroup conflict management.'"
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i28/28b01201.htm

UI DENTAL SCHOOL IS CITED IN STORY (Arizona Republic, March 22)
A story about the allure of tattoos quotes the owner of Blue Dragon Tattoos in Phoenix and Glendale, Ariz., who says he has his equipment tested monthly by the COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to make sure it is working properly. "I do it voluntarily because I feel I owe that to my customers," says Goldman. "I owe them the best and safest that I can possibly give them."
http://www.azcentral.com:80/health/0322tattoo22.html

FORKENBROCK IS QUOTED ON GPS STUDY (Excite! News, March 21)
Nine states and the Federal Highway Administration are funding a controversial study to determine whether global positioning systems using satellites can be tailored to assess a tax on vehicles tied to where and how many miles they've traveled. Motor fuel taxes are now the primary way states and the federal government raise money -- about $50 billion a year -- from road users, according to DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the University of Iowa's Public Policy Center, which began the two-and-a-half-year study with the assistance of the University of Minnesota last summer. The problem is the gas tax "is not all that long for this world," he said, pointing to technological advances with alternative vehicle fuels and increased fuel efficiency.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/r/010321/09/transport-vehicle-tax

FORKENBROCK QUOTED ON GPS STUDY (New York Times, March 21)
Nine states and the Federal Highway Administration are funding a controversial study to determine whether global positioning systems using satellites can be tailored to assess a tax on vehicles tied to where and how many miles they've traveled. Motor fuel taxes are now the primary way states and the federal government raise money -- about $50 billion a year -- from road users, according to DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the University of Iowa's Public Policy Center, which began the two-and-a-half-year study with the assistance of the University of Minnesota last summer. The problem is the gas tax "is not all that long for this world,'' he said, pointing to technological advances with alternative vehicle fuels and increased fuel efficiency.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/business/business-transport-ve.html?searchpv=reuters
The same Reuters article ran March 21 on the Web site of YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010321/bs/transport_vehicle_tax_dc_1.html

UI RAPE SUSPECT CONVICTION UPHELD (Lincoln Journal Star, March 21)
A state appeals panel Tuesday affirmed the conviction and sentence of former "Star Search" comedian Vinson Champ for the rape of a Union College student. The 39-year-old California man is also a suspect in a string of rapes on small, mostly Midwestern college campuses. Champ is also under investigation for rapes in Iowa, Illinois, Wisconsin and California. He faces possible life sentences for rapes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City, Iowa, in 1996 and at St. Ambrose University in Davenport, Iowa, in 1997.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/local?story_id=3072&date=20010321&past=
The same Associated Press article ran March 20 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0320BC-WI--CAMPUSRAP&date=20-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

ENGELBERT FINDS SAVINGS ONLINE (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, March 20)
In a story about strategies for saving money on airfare, hotels and rental cars, MATTHEW ENGELBERT, a video coordinator for the University of Iowa, said he saved a lot of money when he booked his hotel in Tampa, Fla., online. "We were getting rates of $160 a night for some of the hotels, and we felt that was too much money," he recalls. Then he surfed over to Travelocity.com, the online travel megamart, where he found a $107 rate at the Wyndham Westshore in Tampa.

UI TELEMEDICINE EFFORTS CITED (CNN Interactive, March 20)
On-the-move telemedicine, using wireless technology to link the desperately ill to a neurologist from the moment they're strapped into an ambulance, is a pioneering experiment that University of Maryland doctors hope could one day help more of the nation's 600,000 stroke victims get treatment in time to save brain tissue. It also may rejuvenate interest in telemedicine, until now hospital-based instead of in moving ambulances. Telemedicine uses computer technology to let doctors virtually examine patients over long distances. Consider a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA program in which specialists hundreds of miles away examined and treated rural children with cerebral palsy and other disabilities using two-way video, saving families $125 in time and travel per session plus the struggle of repeated long-distance doctor visits.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/03/20/telemedicine.ap/index.html
The same Associated Press article ran Mach 20 on the Web site of the ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION.
http://www.accessatlanta.com:80/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/tuesday/news_a37b0abf220d41ff0030.html

KINSEY TO SPEAK ON MORAN'S ART (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, March 20)
A story about an exhibition of American artist Thomas Moran at The Frick Art & Historical Center in Pittsburgh says that on Thursday JONI KINSEY, professor of art and art history a the University of Iowa, will speak at the art center on "Places into Paintings: Thomas Moran's Working Method."
http://www.post-gazette.com/magazine/20010320moran2.asp

UI TELEMEDICINE EFFORTS CITED (San Francisco Chronicle, March 20)
On-the-move telemedicine, using wireless technology to link the desperately ill to a neurologist from the moment they're strapped into an ambulance, is a pioneering experiment that University of Maryland doctors hope could one day help more of the nation's 600,000 stroke victims get treatment in time to save brain tissue. It also may rejuvenate interest in telemedicine, until now hospital-based instead of in moving ambulances. Telemedicine uses computer technology to let doctors virtually examine patients over long distances. Consider a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA program in which specialists hundreds of miles away examined and treated rural children with cerebral palsy and other disabilities using two-way video, saving families $125 in time and travel per session plus the struggle of repeated long-distance doctor visits.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/03/20/national0114EST0421.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010319/hl/telemedicine_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/010319/16/telemedicine
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM Web site.
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:POLITICS22A/1:POLITICS22A0319101.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010319/aponline160258_000.htm
The same Associated press article ran March 19 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0319AP-TELEMEDICINE&date=19-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Telemedicine.html?searchpv=aponline
The same Associated Press article ran March 19 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/health/men/menswire/20010319/tCB00V8676.html

DONHAM STUDIES HOG LOG EFFECTS (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 19)
Studies led by Dr. Steven Wing, an epidemiologist at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and University of Iowa researcher KELLEYDONHAM have linked dust and gases from large hog farms to greater numbers of health complaints. A study in 1996 led by Donham and seven other researchers studied 18 Iowans living in a 2-mile radius of a 4, 000-hog operation. According to the study published in the Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health in 1997: "Results indicate that neighbors of the large-scale swine operation reported experiencing significantly higher rates of four clusters of symptoms known to represent toxic or inflammatory effects on the respiratory tract. These clusters of symptoms have been well documented among swine confinement workers."
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0319BC-MN--HOGFARMS-&date=19-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

TOMKOVICZ FILES FRIEND OF COURT BRIEF (MSNBC, March 19)
University of Iowa law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ is mentioned in an article about the U.S. Supreme Court case Danny Lee Kyllo vs. United States. The case raises questions of whether police violate the Fourth Amendment's protection against unreasonable searches when they use a thermal-imaging device to detect whether heat lamps are being used inside a house to illegally grow marijuana. Tomkovicz, who along with several other individuals and organizations, filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the case arguing that to overcome the presumption of privacy in the home, the government must show that a member of the public could gain the same information the police did from a lawful vantage point using unaided senses, or show that an individual fails to take normal precautions to protect privacy.
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/530829.asp?cp1=1

UI STUDENT CITES HIGH FUEL BILL (USA Today, March 19)
College students are struggling to pay whopping fuel bills for the winter. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sophomore Michael Cavato said he and seven roommates paid $800 in January to heat their old house.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010319/3152311s.htm

UI HIGHLIGHTS CITED IN RETIREMENT STORY (Wall Street Journal, March 19)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is cited extensively in an article that ran in the paper's special section on favored retirement cities. It says the UI's 27,000 students constitute more than one-third of the town's population, and that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS is regularly ranked among the nation's top health-care facilities by medical-school accreditors and government regulators. It also mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ART MUSEUM, "a spacious, well-lighted building overlooking the Iowa River, just across the water and north of downtown at the edge of the main campus," and HANCHER AUDITORIUM, the city's premier performing-arts venue. And it says the university is home to the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, among the best-known laboratories in the U.S. for authors to polish their fiction, poetry and nonfiction skills.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB984597988718307525.djm

RICHENBACHER COMMENTS ON HEART LASER (Los Angeles Times, March 19)
A story about the debate over the effectiveness of using laser surgery to zap holes in hearts and, ostensibly, relieve otherwise unmanageable angina, says the procedure has its skeptics, including Dr. WAYNE RICHENBACHER of the University of Iowa. While some say the holes cause inflammation that in turn triggers the heart to grow more tiny blood vessels, a process called angiogenesis, Richenbacher and others say that often patients feel better the very next day -- too soon for new blood vessels, which take a month or more to sprout. "They come out of the operating room in pain, or they come out and say, 'I feel great,' " says Richenbacher. "That makes absolutely no sense if you think angiogenesis is the effect."
http://www.latimes.com/print/health/20010319/t000023858.html

ARTHUR, HALL ORGANIZE MASK CONFERENCE (American Theater, March 18)
The University of Iowa Department of Theatre Arts will host a National Conference on Masks of the Theatre, May 17-20 on the UI campus in Iowa City. The UI organizers are faculty members LOYCE L. ARTHUR, resident costume designer in the Department of Theatre Arts, who has studied masking traditions in West Africa; and movement specialist RALPH HALL, who has an extensive background as a director of mask theater.
http://www.americantheaterweb.com/news/ind.asp?id=5431

CITY COLLEGE FINALIST WORKED AT UI (New York Times, March 18)
Dr. Gregory H. Williams, the law school dean at Ohio State University and a finalist for president of City College in New York, spent 16 years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, working in admissions and financial aid at the law school and then as associate vice president for academic affairs for the university, where he increased the recruitment of minority students and faculty.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/18/nyregion/18COLL.html

UI GRAD STEPPING DOWN FROM 911 JOB (Chicago Sun-Times, March 18)
When the temperature soars above 90 degrees or there's a major power outage in Chicago, Sarah Pang rushes off to command the troops at the city's 911 emergency center. This summer, Pang, the longest-serving member of the mayor's senior staff, has decided to leave her $119,808-a-year City Hall job and the 60-hour workweeks that have consumed her since early 1993. A benign brain tumor -- removed Nov. 30 during 16 hours of surgery -- convinced the 41-year-old first deputy chief of staff that it was time to take a giant step back at the end of May. Pang is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/pang18.html

MARK QUOTED ON NIH FUNDING (Yahoo! News, March 16)
House Republicans, taking their cue from President Bush, proposed a $2.8 billion increase in federal research support to seek cures for cancer, Parkinson's disease, AIDS and other afflictions. The proposed increase for the National Institutes of Health budget for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1 would be the largest single increase for the federal health research centers, lawmakers said. Bush proposed an identical amount in his budget outline. "Cutting-edge medical facilities help put a human face on how the federal budget can have a direct impact on people's lives and their well-being," said House Speaker Dennis Hastert, who appeared Friday at a federally financed cancer center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There, he met doctors studying the behavior of cancerous cells. Such research could help develop treatments that prevent the spread of breast cancer, said Dr. ALLYN MARK, a research dean in the College of Medicine at the Iowa City, Iowa, campus. The school is among the top public college recipients of federal research funds, he said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010316/pl/gop_health_budget_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 16 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010316/18/gop-health-budget
The same Associated Press article ran March 16 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010316/aponline182644_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 16 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/03/16/national1824EST0696.DTL

UI STUDENT'S DEATH CITED IN CASE (St. Paul Pioneer Press, March 16)
The brothers of a New Brighton woman who fatally shot their mother and wounded their sister were unhappy Thursday when a Ramsey County district judge sentenced her to serve about 19 years in prison. Sue Ann Wieczorek, 44, pleaded guilty last month to second-degree murder in the death of her mother, Marcella Wieczorek, 81, and attempted second-degree murder in the wounding of her sister, Jane Massie, 49, on Nov. 29. According to court records, Wieczorek, who shared a home with her mother on the 1000 block of Pike Lake Drive, got into an argument with her sister over Social Security benefits from the death of Wieczorek's 19-year-old son, Michael, who died in May after jumping off the roof of a dormitory at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.pioneerplanet.com:80/seven-days/fri/news/docs/023093.htm

PART-TIME MBA STUDENT PROFILED (Business Week Online, March 15)
In a story about how part-time MBA students juggle jobs, school, and family, PAUL PFOHL, student in the UI TIPPIE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT's part-time MBA program is profiled detailing his day at home, work and class. Pfohl, 46, of Dubuque is a second vice-president at American Trust & Savings Bank in Dubuque, Iowa, and has four children under the age of 12. Pfohl balances his classes with his family life, and says the degree will give him a leg up in his industry. It will provide him the skills he needs to continue to move up the ladder. Already, he is adding value to his career by applying his classwork to his bank job.
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/content/mar2001/bs20010315_706.htm

ADOLPHS, HOWARD STUDY PREFRONTAL CORTEX (USA Today, March 15)
A new study, published in the January Nature Neuroscience, suggests that brain cells in the prefrontal cortex help humans make fast decisions about risky situations. RALPH ADOLPHS at the University of Iowa and his colleagues studied a volunteer with a healthy prefrontal cortex. Adolphs' team showed this man a series of happy, neutral or unpleasant pictures. At the same time, the scientists snapped pictures of his brain and monitored individual brain cells in the prefrontal cortex. There was no change in the prefrontal cortex when the man viewed happy or neutral scenes, Adolphs says. But when the man looked at mutilated bodies and other images of war, the firing pattern of the cells in the prefrontal cortex changed dramatically. Instead of firing at their regular rate, the brain cells stopped, and then all at once erupted in a rapid-fire message. That signal probably gets sent off before the man realizes he has seen an unpleasant image, Adolphs says. Also quoted in the story is Iowa researcher MATTHEW HOWARD.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010315/3141681s.htm

BUTLER: AMERICANS HAVING MORE GAY SEX (PlanetOut, March 15)
Positive media images of gay life -- like hit TV shows "Ellen" and "Will and Grace" -- may be helping spur an increase in gay sexual activity among Americans, a new study suggests. A national survey has found the percentage of US women who say they recently had gay sex has increased 15-fold from 1988 to 1998, with rates among American men doubling over the same period. In her study, AMY C. BUTLER of the University of Iowa examined 1988-1998 data from the General Social Survey, a poll of adult Americans over the age of 18 conducted every two years by the National Opinion Research Center. According to the survey, the number of men who said they had recently had gay sex rose from 2 percent in 1988 to 4 percent in 1998, while rates among women climbed from 0.2 percent in 1988 to nearly 3 percent ten years later. The results are published in a recent issue of the Journal of Sex Research. This is a Reuters Health article. PlanetOut is a Web site that covers gay and lesbian issues.
http://www.planetout.com/pno/news/article.html?2001/03/15/5

COLEMAN GOES BEFORE CONGRESS (Chronicle of Higher Education, March 15)
The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee said on Wednesday that he and the panel's top Democrat plan to introduce legislation that would provide a tax incentive for charitable giving that higher-education officials say would unleash a significant new source of donations to colleges. On Wednesday, MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, was one of seven people to testify at the hearing. She argued that allowing people to make tax-free withdrawals from individual retirement accounts so that they could donate the money to nonprofit groups would "unlock substantial new resources for the support of charitable organizations and their public-service missions."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/03/2001031501n.htm

HOOVER COMMENTS ON BUSH PROPOSAL (Education Week, March 14)
For more than 30 years, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) has provided information on what American students know and can do in the core academic subjects. Now, a proposal by President Bush could permanently change the nature of the testing program by using NAEP results to confirm a state's own testing data before determining federal rewards or penalties for states based on student achievement. "I actually was prepared to say this whole thing was stupid, but it isn't as onerous, as currently stated, as I thought it was going to be," said H.D. HOOVER, a professor of education at the University of Iowa and the president-elect of the National Council on Measurement in Education. Even so, he pointed out, it's more technically complicated than simply eyeballing the two types of assessments to see if the trends are headed in the same direction.
http://www.edweek.org:80/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=26naep.h20

SANDLOW VASECTOMY STUDY IS CITED (Yahoo! News, March 14)
For some men about to undergo a vasectomy, pain ranked high on their list of concerns, according to results of study conducted by a team of Midwestern researchers. They contend that men should receive counseling about their expectations after surgery as well as about the reversibility of the vasectomy procedure. Dr. JAY I. SANDLOW, from the University of Iowa, and colleagues studied 74 prospective vasectomy patients aged 22 to 62 years, who were seen at a urology clinic. The men were asked to complete a questionnaire designed by the researchers. Analysis of the data showed that these men had been considering a vasectomy for an average of 1 year and "were fairly certain of their decision." Fear of pain, "fear of the unknown" and potential side effects were the most frequent causes of any anxiety men felt about having the procedure. This is a REUTERS Health article.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010314/hl/vasectomy_1.html
The same Reuters Health article ran March 14 on the Website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/health-vasectomy.html?searchpv=reuters
The same Reuters Health article ran March 14 on the Website of EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010314/18/health-vasectomy

BUTLER: AMERICANS HAVING MORE GAY SEX (Yahoo! News, March 14)
Positive media images of gay life -- like hit TV shows "Ellen" and "Will and Grace" -- may be helping spur an increase in gay sexual activity among Americans, a new study suggests. A national survey has found the percentage of U.S. women who say they recently had gay sex has increased 15-fold from 1988 to 1998, with rates among American men doubling over the same period. In her study, AMY C. BUTLER of the University of Iowa examined 1988-1998 data from the General Social Survey, a poll of adult Americans over the age of 18 conducted every two years by the National Opinion Research Center. According to the survey, the number of men who said they had recently had gay sex rose from 2 percent in 1988 to 4 percent in 1998, while rates among women climbed from 0.2 percent in 1988 to nearly 3 percent ten years later. The results are published in a recent issue of the Journal of Sex Research. This is a REUTERS Health article.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010314/hl/gay_1.html
The same ReutersHealth article ran March 14 on the Website of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/health-gay.html?searchpv=reuters

MERRILL IS SLATED TO READ FROM WORKS (Los Angeles Times, March 14)
The politics, heroism and human anguish of war have fueled the language of many poets. In recent history, the Balkan War provided a backdrop for poets whose work reflected the horror or provided escape from it. As part of the "Shaping the Great City" exhibition at the Getty Center, poets CHRISTOPHER MERRILL and Tomaz Salamun will read from their original work tonight. Merrill, who translated "Feast" and edited "Melancholy," is the author of three collections of poetry, including "Watch Fire," and he made frequent trips to Yugoslavia in the 1990s. He directs the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.latimes.com/print/calendar/20010315/t000022473.html

UI TAKES PART IN SHOCK THERAPY STUDY (Yahoo! News, March 14)
Electric shock therapy, a treatment abused and vilified decades ago, is emerging as a valuable and common tool to combat the most severe forms of depression, researchers reported on Tuesday. "It is time to bring (the therapy) out of the shadows,'' remarked Richard Glass, deputy editor of the Journal of the American Medical Association, which published a new report on the subject in this week's edition. That study, from the New York State Psychiatric Institute, and the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Columbia University, New York, found that a combination of lithium and the antidepressant drug nortriptyline following shock therapy substantially lowered the relapse rate of patients with major depression. The study published on Tuesday was conducted from 1993 to 1998 at the Carrier Foundation, Belle Meade, New Jersey, and at psychiatric facilities at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City, and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, Pittsburgh. The researchers said shock therapy is normally used only in cases where patients are resistant to drugs, but the relapse rate exceeds 50 percent. The story was written by REUTERS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010313/sc/health_shock_dc_1.html
The same Reuters article ran March 13 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/science-health-shock-.html?searchpv=reuters
The same Reuters article ran March 13 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010313/16/science-health-shock-dc

ZALESKY IS QUOTED IN STORY ON NCAA WRESTLING (USA Today, March 13)
This week's NCAA Division I Wrestling Championships will be at a familiar venue with the usual big crowds and top teams -- but there is a twist. For the first time, Saturday's finals at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will be televised nationally the same day they are wrestled. ESPN2's tape-delayed broadcast begins at 6 p.m. ET. That's a breakthrough for an event annually lost in the shuffle of basketball's March Madness. All six sessions (83,684 tickets) have been sold out since January. The convention and visitors bureau reports all 2,045 rooms in Iowa City, including bed and breakfasts, have been sold out for 10 months. The nearest available rooms are 45 miles away. "Any time you have it at home, that's an advantage,'' Iowa coach JIM ZALESKY says. But, he adds, ''I don't think there's a real big favorite. Whoever comes in and wrestles the best tournament is going to win.''
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010313/3132679s.htm

BALDUS COMMENTS ON RACE IN CAPITAL CASES (AlterNet, March 13)
University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS is quoted in a story that raises questions of race in a case in which a black man killed his girlfriend's ex-husband, who was white. The defendant was sentenced to death in the case. "People always think it's the race of the defendant, when that's not true," Baldus says. "You're twice as likely to get the death penalty if the victim is white." In the mid-'80s, Baldus became the first researcher to document that the race of victims was a major factor in capital cases. His work was the basis of a 1987 U.S. Supreme Court decision, McClesky v. Kemp, which is considered one of the most important death penalty cases ever. AlterNet, based in San Francisco, describes itself as "a new online magazine, information source and community that combines quality journalism, public-interest content, interactivity, passionate advocacy and links to useful resources."
http://www.alternet.org:80/story.html?StoryID=10572

UI STUDENT SPENDS BREAK IN CANCUN (Deseret News, March 13)
Bathing suit switching, wet T-shirt contests, striptease -- and excessive drinking. Local tourism officials say Cancun is popular because of its reputation as a fun, safe place to spend Spring Break, but many American students are lured by a different slogan: Anything goes. "It's a nonstop party. You just lose yourself,'' said Annie Neyman, 19, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student drinking an enormous strawberry margarita from a long beaker-shaped glass while lounging in a bikini in front of the Oasis Cancun hotel Saturday afternoon. Neyman's friend, 18-year-old Emily Lottman, said she particularly enjoyed the bathing suit switching contest that morning, when men and women ran into the ocean, ripped off their suits and put on someone else's before running back out. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0103130176

PETERS COMMENTS ON IOWA CENSUS (USA Today, March 13)
Farms and rural areas dwindled while the suburbs of Iowa's big cities boomed, according to 2000 Census data released Monday. Decreases in rural population are "inevitable," says ALAN PETERS, an urban planning professor at the University of Iowa. "Family farms are not what they once were and it's an older population."

UI LABOR CENTER SPONSORS SONG CONTEST (Wall Street Journal, March 13)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Labor Center sponsors a labor song contest. The winner gets $500.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB984451398370649496.djm

MATH TOURNAMENT COMING TO UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, March 13)
The math version of March Madness came to Eagan High School on Monday. It was the Minnesota High School Math League Tournament, and it was no place for the arithmetic-impaired. Sines, cosines and logarithms came flying like hockey pucks at the state tourney, and contestants had 30 seconds to answer a brain-twister while their fans whooped and hollered. The top three schools got trophies, and the top three students got scholarships. The tournament's top 10 finishers will go to the nationals in June at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=MATH13&date=13-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

UI LINK GIVEN IN STORY ABOUT TOURETTE (Yahoo! News, March 12)
A link to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is provided at the end of a story that says an experimental drug to suppress tics in patients with Tourette syndrome (TS) helps children feel better about themselves, but for an unexpected reason. Researchers say children with TS who take the drug called baclofen report a greater sense of well-being, though the medication doesn't control the motor and vocal spasms that mark their illness. At the end of the story is a link to the University of Iowa, which it says has information about TS. The story was written by HealthScout.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010313/hl/tourette_drug_has_unexpected_effect_1.html

UI STUDENT SPENDS BREAK IN CANCUN (San Jose Mercury News, March 12)
Bathing suit switching, wet T-shirt contests, striptease -- and excessive drinking. Local tourism officials say Cancun is popular because of its reputation as a fun, safe place to spend Spring Break, but many American students are lured by a different slogan: Anything goes. "It's a nonstop party. You just lose yourself,'' said Annie Neyman, 19, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student drinking an enormous strawberry margarita from a long beaker-shaped glass while lounging in a bikini in front of the Oasis Cancun hotel Saturday afternoon. Neyman's friend, 18-year-old Emily Lottman, said she particularly enjoyed the bathing suit switching contest that morning, when men and women ran into the ocean, ripped off their suits and put on someone else's before running back out. http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/world/docs/cancun12.htm

FEDERAL JUDGE ATTENDED UI (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 12)
A profile of U.S. District Chief Judge John Coughenour, who will be presiding over a high-profile trial in Seattle, has a reputation for being a no-nonsense jurist who demands strict adherence to rules of professional conduct. It says Coughenour, 59, was raised and schooled in the Midwest, earning his law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1966.
http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com:80/local/judge12.shtml

UI STUDENT SPENDS BREAK IN CANCUN (Bergen Record, N.J., March 12)
Bathing suit switching, wet T-shirt contests, striptease -- and excessive drinking. Local tourism officials say Cancun is popular because of its reputation as a fun, safe place to spend Spring Break, but many American students are lured by a different slogan: Anything goes. "It's a nonstop party. You just lose yourself,'' said Annie Neyman, 19, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student drinking an enormous strawberry margarita from a long beaker-shaped glass while lounging in a bikini in front of the Oasis Cancun hotel Saturday afternoon. Neyman's friend, 18-year-old Emily Lottman, said she particularly enjoyed the bathing suit switching contest that morning, when men and women ran into the ocean, ripped off their suits and put on someone else's before running back out. http://www.bergen.com:80/morenews/cancun1220010312.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 12 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/03/12/international0036EST0404.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran March 11 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010311/aponline165653_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 11 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010311/wl/spring_break_cancun_2.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 11 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE Web site.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0311AP-SPRING-BREAK-&date=11-Mar-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

ANDREASEN COMMENTS ON DEPRESSION (The Age, March 10)
A story about the incidence of depression in Australia quotes University of Iowa professor NANCY ANDREASEN, a leading international mental health authority. Andreasen, commenting on the debate over the merits of antidepressants and therapy in treating depression, says: "Genes are influenced by the environment and their behavior is changed by it. The genetic code is not the rigid dictator that many people think it to be." As for psychotherapy, often denigrated as "just talk", it is, in its own way, she explains, "as biological as the use of drugs." The Age is a newspaper in Melbourne, Australia.
http://www.theage.com.au:80/news/2001/03/10/FFX7ZC3R2KC.html

UI CITED IN STORY ON IOWA LANGUAGE DEBATE (Yahoo! News, March 9)
In an opinion piece, William F. Buckley Jr. discusses three events that took place almost the same day: Iowa declared English to be the state's official language; Drake University, Iowa's largest private college, announced that it would cease offering modern languages in its curriculum; and the Census Bureau announced that the proportion of Hispanic Americans had grown to 12.5 percent of the population, 35 million people. Buckley asks, "Will the Hispanic living in Iowa simply be required to learn English, not only if he wishes to attend Drake, but also the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA?"
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ucwb/20010309/cm/xenophobia_on_the_wing__1.html

FORKENBROCK DEFENDS STUDY (Detroit News, March 9)
Michigan lawmakers may move to yank state funding for a controversial study into using satellites to tax drivers for every mile they travel. The universities of Minnesota and Iowa are spearheading the study, which will take at least two years. Backers said the odometer tax would eliminate the gas tax and toll booths, increase funding for well-traveled cities and be the most fair way to fund transportation. Fears about spying are unfounded, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the University of Iowa's Public Policy Center. The system would only track miles traveled, not destinations, through computer panels that would be placed in cars, Forkenbrock said. "Gas taxes are in serious peril," he said. "Fuel sales may decline and with the increase in hybrid vehicles, it's not a reliable source of revenue. We have to do something different."
http://detnews.com:80/2001/metro/0103/10/d01-197404.htm

KNIGHT HOPES TO RETAIN MINORITIES AT U. WASH (Seattle Times, March 9)
An editorial about the debate over Initiative 200, a Washington State measure to roll back affirmative action, says two years later the measure has significantly reduced minority attendance at schools across the state. Losses are even more pronounced at certain professional schools, such as the University of Washington School of Law. The UW's newly named law school dean, W.H. "JOE" KNIGHT JR., professor at the University of Iowa, is ready to lead the school and reverse the trend of declining minority enrollment. http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=knighted09&date=20010309

UI STUDENT SELLS POSSESSIONS ON WEB (USA Today, March 8)
Returning to Iowa City last year after a summer in New York, John Freyer came to the depressing realization that the things in the trunk of his Honda Civic ''were the same as what was in the trunk ... when I (first) came to Iowa City the year before.'' Determined to trim some of the clutter from his trunk and his life, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA fine-arts grad student placed his notebook computer and several other items for sale on the auction site eBay. But what began as simple cleaning quickly escalated into a philosophical fire sale. Last December, Freyer launched AllMyLifeForSale.com, a Web site featuring photos and detailed descriptions of his worldly possessions, each one for sale to the highest bidder. http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010308/3120767s.htm

U. OF WASHINGTON PICKS KNIGHT AS LAW DEAN (Seattle Times, March 7)
The University of Washington School of Law has selected University of Iowa professor W.H. "JOE" KNIGHT JR. to be its new dean. Pending approval from the UW Board of Regents later this month, Knight will become the 13th dean and the first African American to lead the 101-year-old law school. Knight, who earned his law degree from Columbia University, has been a professor at Iowa's College of Law since 1988, specializing in commercial law. He has also focused on critical race theory, a field of study that emerged in the past decade looking at the impact of race in the legal system.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=lawdean07m&date=20010307

KNIGHT NETS DEANSHIP AT U. OF WASH. (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 7)
The new head of the University of Washington School of Law wants to strengthen the school's connections to other departments and inculcate tomorrow's lawyers with a greater sense of civic responsibility. "Attorneys should be seen as a vibrant force for civic improvement in the community," said University of Iowa professor W.H. "JOE" KNIGHT JR., who yesterday was named dean of the UW law school. "With all the focus today on the adversarial system, sometimes the public doesn't see us as community builders." In his new role, Knight becomes one of seven African American law school deans in the country, three of whom run law programs at historically black colleges.
http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com:80/local/law07.shtml

UI'S BLACK IS INTERVIEWED FOLLOWING SCHOOL SHOOTING (CNN, March 6)
University of Iowa professor of psychiatry Dr. DONALD BLACK, an expert on obsessive-compulsive behavior, was interviewed for about 10 minutes as part of the network's coverage of the recent Santana High School shooting in San Diego.

DOEBBELING: HIV EXPOSURE STILL HIGH (Yahoo! News, March 6)
Despite improvements in technology and strong federal guidelines designed to prevent exposure to blood-borne diseases such as HIV, rates of exposure are still "unacceptably high" among hospital healthcare workers, researchers report. "Prevention of these events should be a high priority for all healthcare institutions," Dr. BRADLEY N. DOEBBELING, of the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City, and multicenter colleagues stress. The researchers studied programs designed to cut the spread of blood-borne diseases in 153 hospitals in Iowa and Virginia.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010306/hl/workers_1.html
The same Reuters Health article ran March 6 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/health-workers.html?searchpv=reuters

LANDON NOT IMPRESSED BY INTERACTIVE BOOKS (New York Times, March 5)
Some writers are forsaking ink on paper for text on a screen -- publishing books that allow readers to participate in the telling of the tale by entering an interactive world of animated images. Some critics have caveats about this new world. For instance, BROOKS LANDON, chairman of the English department at the University of Iowa, says he is not convinced that a new form of storytelling has really arrived. Although he is interested in electronic literature, he said he has not been enthralled by the early examples. "The promised immersive experience just isn't there for me yet," Mr. Landon said. "Our imagination of the technologized future of narrative remains much more intriguing than the actual narratives that keep turning up." He noted that multimedia works were often visually seductive, but that was "not in itself enough to challenge, much less change, the power of a good story." http://www.nytimes.com/2001/03/05/arts/05ARTS.html

BELL COMMENTS ON PREEMIE (The Oregonian, March 4)
Sophia Epiphany Louise Wisdom weighed 10.5 ounces when she was born 15 weeks early -- the second-smallest infant in the nation to survive, according to the University of Iowa data registry of tiniest babies. The baby born was smaller than doctors expected -- half the size of average babies that gestational age. But weight isn't as critical as developmental maturity, said Dr. EDWARD BELL, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa and founder of the registry. Today is Sophia's first birthday. http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/01/03/lc_11baby04.frame This story also appeared in the Seattle Times, March 5 http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=babysophia05m&date=20010305

DOCTOR AIDS OVERWEIGHT PATIENTS (Seattle Times, March 4)
Adrian Heap, a Seattle-area doctor who specializes in gastric bypass surgery, has been performing the surgery for 31 years, including as a faculty member of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which was then on the cutting edge of bariatric surgery. http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=fatsurgery04m&date=20010304

ACTOR STUDIED AT UI (Richmond Times-Dispatch, March 4)
A story about TheatreVirginia's production of "Coming of the Hurricane," says that actor Ansa Akyea, who was born in Ghana, recently studied fight choreography as a graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and came from Chicago to play a fighter from the Caribbean.

ROSS COMMENTS ON EDWARDS CANDIDACY (Charlotte Observer, March 4)
A story about Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina and his possible plans to run for president quotes University of Iowa political science professor RUSSELL ROSS. Ross says of Edwards' recent visits to Iowa, "Everybody here knows that this is all about politics. He has so little notoriety outside of your area (North Carolina), he needs to get an early start."

JOURNALISM EDUCATOR, UI GRADUATE, DIES (The Oregonian, March 3)
Edward P. Bassett, 72, a leading American journalism educator who nurtured two generations of reporters, editors and photographers, died Thursday. In a four-decade career, Bassett led journalism programs at five major U.S. universities, including the University of Washington, and spent four years as executive editor of the Statesman Journal in Salem. He earned his Ph.D. in journalism at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1967. http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/01/03/lc_61bass02.frame

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (Seattle Post-Intelligencer, March 2)
Now that oral arguments are finished in Microsoft's appeal of its antitrust case, all eyes are on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. Just what the court will say has been the topic of intense speculation this week among Microsoft watchers. One possibility is they could throw out most of what District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson did, asking a new trial judge to take a fresh look at the factual record developed at trial, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law professor at the University of Iowa. That judge could then develop new findings of fact, conclusions of law and a remedy. http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com/business/msft026.shtml

SINGER ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, March 2)
A profile of vocalist Al Jarreau notes that he earned a master's degree in psychology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Jarreau is now an international star, the first vocalist to win Grammys in jazz, pop and R&B. He performs at jazz festivals, in concert halls, on cruise ships and, for the past three years, with orchestras. http://www.startribune.com/viewers/qview/cgi/qview.cgi?template=free_article&slug=loc02

VANDERVELDE DISCUSSED SCOTT CASE (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, March 1)
A story about Dred Scott, a Missouri-born slave who claimed to be free on the basis of residing for seven years in Illinois and the Wisconsin Territory, says the National Park Service was to commemorate the historic case with a discussion about Scott's wife, Harriet, by Professor LEA VANDERVELDE of the University of Iowa Law School.

UI, TARGETED GENETICS SIGN PACT (Genetic Engineering News, March 1)
Targeted Genetics Corp. entered into licensing and sponsored-research agreements with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The licensing agreement provides Targeted Genetics with exclusive licenses to technologies that increase the gene transfer efficiency of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors and enable AAV to be used as a delivery system for genes that are too large to package in standard AAV vectors.

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Power Engineering, March)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.

UI BUILDS NADS DRIVING SIMULATOR (Popular Science, March 2001)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has built a $60 million vehicle simulator to test driving behavior too dangerous for public roads. The National Advanced Driving Simulator simulates on-road conditions, allowing researchers to study such behaviors as cell phone distraction and drunken driving.

BROWN QUESTIONS COMPUTER PLAN (Online Learning, March 2001)
KENNETH BROWN, a professor in the University of Iowa's department of management and organizations, questions the Massachusetts Board of Higher Education's plan to require all students at state colleges and universities to own laptop computers. "For many incoming freshman, the upfront cost of a computer -- event if it's offset by some financial aid -- is just too much," he says.

TITLER, BUCKWALTER CITED (Journal of Gerontological Nursing, March 2001)
The University of Iowa Gerontological Nursing Interventions Research Center was developed as a result of a grant from the National Institute of Nursing Research. The Research Development and Dissemination Core of the DNIRC provides opportunities for nurses to share research findings directly with hearth care providers and consumers. Named in the story are DR. MARITA TITLER, director of nursing research and quality management at the UIHC, and KATHLEEN BUCKWALTER, associate provost for the UI.

RACIST SLOGANS POSTED (Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, March 2001)
Fliers and stickers with swastikas and racists slogans were attached to bulletin boards on the campus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SHEPPARD TESTIFIES BEFORE CONGRESS (ADA News, March 2001)
A story about student debt says KIMBERLY SHEPPARD, a fourth-year dental student at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry, testified before Congress on education-related tax initiatives. "It was my first experience and I was really nervous," she said. "At least I made eye contact. I think it was a good experience."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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