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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: March 23, 2001

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

DOYLE READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ APRIL 3 -- Poet Ben Doyle, a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from "Radio, Radio," his first collection of poetry, at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 3 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

"Radio, Radio" received the 2000 Walt Whitman Award from the Academy of American Poets. Doyle’s winning manuscript was chosen from among 1,200 entries by Susan Howe.

"These poems are rebellious, dangerous, ironic, unstable, and deliberate," Howe says. "They brilliantly articulate the paradoxical, anticlimactic inconsistencies of our postmodern American landscape where, no matter what, ‘the news nine trafficopter hides overhead like a tricky god.’"

A recipient of a Teaching-Writing Fellowship while a student in the Writers’ Workshop, Doyle earned his Master of Fine Arts degree from the UI in May 2000.

For more information about this event, contact the Prairie Lights bookstore at 337-2681.

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KAMEN READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ APRIL 4 -- Author Paula Kamen will read from "Her Way: The Report on Young Women’s Sexual Choices" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 4, at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

A visiting research scholar at Northwestern University’s Women’s Studies Program, Kamen is the author of "Feminist Fatale: Voices from the Twentysomething Generation Explore the Future of the Women’s Movement." Her work has appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, Ms., the Chicago Tribune and Newsday.

"Her Way" is based on more than a hundred interviews with women across the country. The book documents the shift in women’s attitudes about sex during the past 30 years.

The New York Times calls the book "an exhaustive and complex survey of what young women want."

For more information about this event, contact the Prairie Lights bookstore at 337-2681.

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SEMKEN READS APRIL 5 -- Nature writer Steve Semken will read from his new book, "The Tin Prayer: Words of the Wolverine," at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 5 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Semken’s previous books include "River Tips and Tree Trunks" and "Moving With the Elements." All of Semken’s books are published by the North Liberty-based Ice Cube Press, which Semken founded and continues to operate.

Semken wrote "The Tin Prayer," a collection of spiritual observations about nature, while he was writer-in-residence at the Island Institute in Sitka, Alaska.

"Steve Semken shows us that the particulars of everyday Midwestern life and landscape occupy a deep dimension in all flatlanders’ souls," says Thomas Dean, director of the Iowa Place Education Initiative.

For more information about this event, contact the Prairie Lights bookstore at 337-2681.

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‘STALLS’ AND ‘EVERY AFTERNOON’ ON GALLERY SERIES APRIL 5-7 -- The University Theatres gallery series will present an evening of theater about the things women say to each other, at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, April 5-7 in Theatre B of the University of Iowa Theatre Building.

The evening will feature "Stalls," a new play written and directed by UI theater student Jane Beachy and "Every Afternoon" by Gertrude Stein.

"Stalls" is a compilation of women’s bathroom graffiti from various areas both in and outside of the United States. The piece explores the things that women say to one another through this universal medium.

Beachy says, "Through voices of vulgarity, of rebellion, of shame, and of joy, the women who write on the bathroom stalls provide a direct reflection on the movement of a large portion of society in an uncensored environment. The theatrical event takes these words from their hiding places and speaks them out loud."

"Every Afternoon" is a collage of dialogues between women -- lovers, friends and sisters -- exploring their lives together. Written around 1920, this rarely produced play exemplifies Stein’s playful use of language. The production is directed by UI student William Barbour.

Admission to "Stalls" and "Every Afternoon" will be $3 for students and $5 for non-students, at the door.

The event includes material of an adult nature. Potential audience members who are concerned about whether the event is appropriate for them should contact the UI Department of Theatre Arts, 319-335-2700, for additional information.

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LECTURE ON HANDEL’S ‘SAUL’ APRIL 6 -- Ruth Smith, an independent scholar of 18th-century literature and music from Cambridge University in England, will present a lecture on "Scripture dramatized in Handel’s ‘Saul’" at 4:30 p.m. Friday, April 6, in Harper Hall of the University of Iowa Voxman Music Building.

Smith’s lecture, which is sponsored by the UI School of Music, the UI Opera Studies Group and the Alpha of Iowa Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, will be free and open to the public.

Smith is the author of the award-winning study of Handel’s oratorio texts, "Handel’s Oratorios and Eighteenth-Century Thought" (Cambridge University Press, 1995). By examining the attitudes in 18th-century England to the Bible, religion, politics, the drama, the role of music and the subjects of Handel’s oratorios, this book has created a new understanding of the meaning of the oratorios and why they are as they are.

"Handel’s Oratorios" is the fruit of 25 years’ study, which began with Smith’s undergraduate dissertation on Handel’s word-setting in "Acis and Galatea," for her degree in English literature at the University of Cambridge. She received her doctorate for her published work, which includes the first full account of the achievements of Charles Jennens, librettist of "Messiah."

For 15 years she worked in publishing, and since 1983 she has been a Careers Adviser at Cambridge University. She is regularly invited to lecture on Handel in the United Kingdom and United States, and in 2000 she gave the American Handel Society Lecture at the University of Maryland.

The School of Music is part of the Division of Performing Arts in the UI College of Liberal Arts. With the support of the College of Liberal Arts, Phi Beta Kappa, the oldest honorary society in the country, honors high achievement among undergraduate students and encourages intellectual exchange in the community.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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MIN READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ APRIL 6 -- Chinese emigre and novelist Anchee Min will read from "Becoming Madame Mao," her second novel, at 8 p.m. Friday, April 6 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Min is the author of the memoir "Red Azalea" and the novel "Katherine." A native of Shanghai, Min appeared in several propaganda films produced by Madame Mao’s Shanghai Film Studio, and she draws on that experience in "Becoming Madame Mao."

"This is an audacious but balanced narrative of a mean-spirited woman’s life, caught in desire, ambition, and political intrigues," author Ha Jin says of the novel. "With vivid drama and keen psychological acumen, Anchee Min has rendered the White-boned demon human -- Madame Mao is finally given her own voice. A remarkable accomplishment."

Min moved to the United States in 1984 with the assistance of actress Joan Chen. After arriving she quickly learned English and eventually wrote "Red Azalea," which was named a New York Times Notable Book of 1994 and became an international bestseller.

For more information about this event, contact the Prairie Lights bookstore at 337-2681.