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UI in the News

June 2001

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DAMASIO SPEAKS ON FEELING, EMOTION (Financial Times of London, June 30)
The World Congress of Neurology in London in June had 600 speakers and 1,500 poster presentations -- almost all focusing on diseases of the brain and nervous system or on details of neural function. The program had just one entry that addressed a really big question about how the brain works: "The neurology of emotion, Damasio A (USA)." ANTONIO DAMASIO, head of neurology at the University of Iowa, is one of a tiny group of researchers who believe science is ready to investigate emotions, feelings and consciousness. As the author of two popular books about the brain, "Descartes's Error" (1994) and "The Feeling of What Happens" (1999), he is also among the few neuroscientists for whom public communications is a vital part of the job.
http://globalarchive.ft.com/globalarchive/articles.html?id=010630001098&query=Damasio

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT (International Herald Tribune, June 30)
There is still a remote chance that Microsoft could be broken up: a federal appeals court left some wiggle room in its order yesterday that a lower court reconsider the remedy for the finding that Microsoft had abused its monopoly power in the software business. But if a district court judge, as yet unnamed, agrees with the suggestion by the appellate judges that breaking up the software company is inappropriate, there are a range of other options it will probably consider, antitrust experts said yesterday. Of the two sorts of remedies that can be applied to a company found to have violated antitrust law, Microsoft seemed to many experts ripe for the more draconian "structural" approach a breakup that Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson had imposed. That was partly because the alternative, a "conduct" remedy setting rules to govern the company's behavior, was widely seen as having been tried, and having failed. The government's antitrust lawsuit, after all, resulted from its conclusion that Microsoft failed to comply with a 1995 consent decree in which the company agreed not to use the power of its operating system to gain an advantage in the market for other software applications. "In my view that was one of the strongest reasons for not wanting another conduct remedy," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at University of Iowa whose treatise on antitrust is cited in the appeals court opinion. "There was nothing Microsoft refused to bundle as a result of that decree."
http://www.iht.com/articles/24640.htm

TIPPIE SUMMER ENROLLMENT UP (Omaha World-Herald, June 29)
Enrollment at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS is up more than 13 percent this summer from a year ago. Last year, the college had 537 students; this year the total is 609. The increase is the largest among Iowa's colleges, the registrar's office said.

MICROSOFT PROSECUTION FACES OWN HURDLES (NPR, June 29)
Since an appeals court ruled that Microsoft doesn't have to be split into two companies, the U.S. Department of Justice and the 19 states that are parties in the government's anti-trust lawsuit against the software giant are now faced with the challenge of maintaining their united front. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an anti-trust law expert at the University of Iowa, said changes in the federal administration's personnel will make holding the parties together tougher and that it seems less likely all will agree on a structural remedy. "If Microsoft doesn't accept a settlement, it's up to a new judge who could come up with an immediate conduct remedy with a 'time clock' of perhaps five years to observe Microsoft's behavior and to see if the market does become more competitive," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.npr.org/ramfiles/atc/20010629.atc.03.ram

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON RULING (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 29)
In an anxiously awaited ruling, a federal appeals court Thursday unanimously overturned the proposed breakup of software giant Microsoft Corp. But the ruling kept intact much of a lower-court judge's findings that the company had maintained an illegal monopoly, even as it harshly criticized his conduct in the case. ... "This decision basically gives the go-ahead to the private plaintiffs suing Microsoft," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school. There are more than 100 private antitrust cases pending against Microsoft. The same story ran June 29 in the BUFFALO (N.Y.) NEWS.

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT CASE (Investor's Business Daily, June 29)
A torrent of new civil lawsuits may drown Microsoft in the wake of last week's appeals court ruling that upheld an earlier finding that the software colossus is an illegal monopoly. It was a huge win for consumers and rivals of Microsoft. Their attorneys now need not spend thousands of hours and millions of dollars trying to prove Microsoft broke federal antitrust law. "All (consumers and businesses) have to show is causation and damage," says HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust professor at the University of Iowa. "There is significant exposure on Microsoft's part."

HOVENKAMP: MICROSOFT SUITS COULD ADD UP (Washington Post, June 29)
Spared a potentially devastating breakup by a federal appeals court, Microsoft Corp. still faces about 100 private antitrust suits with the potential to expose the software giant to billions of dollars in damages. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor whose treatise on antitrust law was frequently cited in the government's antitrust case against Microsoft, said the plaintiffs now need to prove only that they were injured because of Microsoft's monopoly power and that they suffered financial damages as a result of Microsoft's actions. Competitors and consumers who bring successful class-action antitrust claims can recover as much as three times the amount of money they were overcharged for a product. "The extent of damages could range from some small sum into several billion dollars," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.latimes.com/news/asection/20010629/t000053812.html

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (New York Times, June 29)
There is still a remote chance that Microsoft could be broken up: a federal appeals court left some wiggle room in its order yesterday that a lower court reconsider the remedy for the finding that Microsoft had abused its monopoly power in the software business. But if a district court judge, as yet unnamed, agrees with the suggestion by the appellate judges that breaking up the software company is inappropriate, there are a range of other options it will probably consider, antitrust experts said yesterday. Of the two sorts of remedies that can be applied to a company found to have violated antitrust law, Microsoft seemed to many experts ripe for the more draconian "structural" approach a breakup that Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson had imposed. That was partly because the alternative, a "conduct" remedy setting rules to govern the company's behavior, was widely seen as having been tried, and having failed. The government's antitrust lawsuit, after all, resulted from its conclusion that Microsoft failed to comply with a 1995 consent decree in which the company agreed not to use the power of its operating system to gain an advantage in the market for other software applications. "In my view that was one of the strongest reasons for not wanting another conduct remedy," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at University of Iowa whose treatise on antitrust is cited in the appeals court opinion. "There was nothing Microsoft refused to bundle as a result of that decree."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/29/technology/29REME.html
The same story also ran June 29 on the Web site of YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010629/bs/the_remedy_microsoft_still_faces_a_range_of_antitrust_actions_1.html

HOVENKAMP: 'ALL BETS OFF' IN ANTITRUST CASE (Washington Post, June 29)
The mixed ruling yesterday in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case puts Attorney General John D. Ashcroft and the Bush administration in a difficult position, forcing them to navigate treacherous legal and political terrain in deciding whether to settle the case or continue to fight in court. The Justice Department must choose whether to press the case with a new trial judge, who will reconsider the remedy for Microsoft's antitrust violations. The government lawyers could push for a breakup of the company and aggressive limits on its business practices as they successfully proposed last year, or they could scale back their objectives to address only controls on Microsoft's illegal conduct. HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa antitrust professor who has advised the government in the case, said that "all bets are off as to what's going to happen in the next couple of months. You are going to see a widening rift between the [Justice Department's] antitrust division and the states. I expect the antitrust division to throw in the towel on the structural remedy and the states are going to disagree."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A61280-2001Jun28.html

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON RULING (Los Angeles Times, June 29)
In an anxiously awaited ruling, a federal appeals court Thursday unanimously overturned the proposed breakup of software giant Microsoft Corp. But the ruling kept intact much of a lower-court judge's findings that the company had maintained an illegal monopoly, even as it harshly criticized his conduct in the case. ... "This decision basically gives the go-ahead to the private plaintiffs suing Microsoft," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school. There are more than 100 private antitrust cases pending against Microsoft.
http://www.latimes.com/business/updates/lat_micro010629.htm
The same article ran June 29 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/06/29/BU146032.DTL

UI GRAD PRACTICES INTEGRATED MEDICINE (Honolulu Star Bulletin, June 28)
A feature on Dr. James McKoy, who practices "integrated medicine" that combines traditional and alternative therapies to treat chronic diseases, says that after a "totally black experience" in grade school, high school and college, McKoy went to medical school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It was one of the biggest struggles of my life. ... But I got focused and said: 'This is what I have to do. I can't let the baggage of yesterday hinder me from accomplishing what I need to do.'" He finished his residency in 1978 at the UI and his rheumatology specialty in 1981, then came to Hawaii in the Army as a rheumatologist at Tripler Medical Center.
http://starbulletin.com:80/2001/06/28/news/story10.html

FELDSTEIN TAKES PART IN ART SHOW (Kansas City Star, June 28)
One of the featured artists at the "Fresh: 2001 Summer Invitational" will be PETER FELDSTEIN, a longtime teacher at the University of Iowa, who shows examples from three series of inkjet prints. Precise and intricate, these convey the delicacy of original drawings though they are in fact digitally crafted. Fine lines, arcs, ellipses and other geometrical forms are layered atop one another to form complex compositions that suggest elaborate architectural drawings of grand cathedrals, gorgeous in the density of their detail.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,fyi/3accc7fd.627,.html

HARPER QUOTED ON ILL CHILDREN (International Herald Tribune, June 28)
When a child is chronically ill, the whole family feels the pain, particularly the parents. Regardless of the disease, whether an emotional disorder or a physical disability, the stress suffered by families is remarkably similar. Mothers and fathers talk about guilt, anger and sheer exhaustion. Brothers and sisters can feel neglected. "All of these children need a lot of extra work, and typically the mothers get the brunt of it, and sometimes they resent it," said Dr. DENNIS C. HARPER, professor of pediatrics and rehabilitation at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Dr. Harper has been studying the impact of chronically ill children on families for 30 years. "It's common to feel angry and then guilty for feeling that way," he said. "I think one of the biggest issues is the ambivalence around the future and not being able to predict very well."
http://www.iht.com/articles/24235.htm

HOVENKAMP: FEDS COULD WIN CASE (International Herald Tribune, June 28)
The Justice Department moved yesterday to resuscitate an important antitrust case against American Airlines and parent company AMR Corp., appealing a federal judge's decision to dismiss the suit just weeks before trial. The government has charged American with using cut-rate ticket prices to sweep fledgling competitors out of the Dallas-Fort Worth market, then raising its fares after competitors faltered. In April, Judge J. Thomas Marten handed American a lopsided victory, ruling the company may have squashed three nascent competitors with harsh, even "brutal" tactics, but that it had not violated the restrictions against predatory pricing contained in the Sherman Antitrust Act. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law expert at the University of Iowa who briefly advised the Justice Department on the difficulty of winning the American case, said the government nonetheless may have some success if it emphasizes the number of aircraft American shipped to the Dallas-Fort Worth hub rather than the prices it charged passengers. "I personally believe that's an anti-competitive strategy," said Hovenkamp. "We have not yet been able to develop law that fits that strategy into the existing predatory pricing rubric. . . . It will clearly make some new predatory pricing law if it's reversed."
http://www.iht.com/articles/24283.htm

UI TO STUDY DRIVING DISTRACTION (ABC News, June 27)
So far, researchers don't know exactly what role in-vehicle electronic devices play in driving safety, but both the government and automakers are investing in research and development to determine just how many annoyances a motorist can handle. A government lab studying driver distraction will open at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA this summer, said Tim Hurd, a spokesman with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/us/DailyNews/distractedriving010626.html

UI ART GRADUATE PUTS CHAIRS IN YARD (Omaha World Herald, June 27)
An Oskaloosa resident named Elaine Beck erected a massive display of chairs in her front yard. There are upholstered chairs and folding chairs, wicker chairs and floating pool chairs, even a wheelchair, giving the whole thing what Beck has called "a PC look." Beck, a graduate student of art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is using the chairs as her graduate art project and has encouraged the 10,989 people of Oskaloosa to get involved. They can dump chairs there; they can rearrange chairs there; they can sit on the chairs there. Somebody even sneaked onto her property one night and wrapped all the chairs in plastic, an act of creative vandalism Beck laughingly has called "collaborative intervention."

BLAISE PENS BOOK ON TIME ZONE CREATOR (St. Paul Pioneer Press, June 27)
CLARK BLAISE
, 60, a native of Canada who recently retired from his post as director of the University of Iowa's International Writing Program, is the author of "Time Lord: Sir Sandford Fleming and the Creation of Standard Time." The book is about the prim, diligent and mathematically inclined Canadian who developed time zones.

BELIN-BLANK CENTER GETS AP GRANT (FRM Weekly, June 27)
The U.S. Department of Education has awarded the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CONNIE BELIN AND JACQUELINE N. BLANK INTERNATIONAL CENTER FOR GIFTED EDUCATION AND TALENT DEVELOPMENT a $1.6 million grant to develop and deliver Advanced Placement (AP) courses over the Internet. The Technology Challenge/AP Online Pilot Project Grant is designed to increase student participation in AP courses and exams in high schools. FRM Weekly is based in Garden City, N.Y.

CORYELL: GLAND, SUICIDE LINK POSSIBLE (Detroit Free Press, June 26)
A new test, called the dexamethasone suppression test, measures the activity of three critical glands -- hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal -- called the HPA axis. A low level of activity is linked to suicide. A study of 78 patients with depression or schizophrenia showed that those with low HPA activity had a 26.8 percent risk of suicide during a three-year period compared with a 2.9 percent risk of suicide in patients with normal HPA activity, said Dr. WILLIAM CORYELL of the University of Iowa School of Medicine. The study appeared in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

HOVENKAMP: FEDS COULD WIN AMERICAN CASE (Washington Post, June 26)
The Justice Department moved yesterday to resuscitate an important antitrust case against American Airlines and parent company AMR Corp., appealing a federal judge's decision to dismiss the suit just weeks before trial. The government has charged American with using cut-rate ticket prices to sweep fledgling competitors out of the Dallas-Fort Worth market, then raising its fares after competitors faltered. In April, Judge J. Thomas Marten handed American a lopsided victory, ruling the company may have squashed three nascent competitors with harsh, even "brutal" tactics, but that it had not violated the restrictions against predatory pricing contained in the Sherman Antitrust Act. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law expert at the University of Iowa who briefly advised the Justice Department on the difficulty of winning the American case, said the government nonetheless may have some success if it emphasizes the number of aircraft American shipped to the Dallas-Fort Worth hub rather than the prices it charged passengers. "I personally believe that's an anti-competitive strategy," said Hovenkamp. "We have not yet been able to develop law that fits that strategy into the existing predatory pricing rubric. . . . It will clearly make some new predatory pricing law if it's reversed."
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A49435-2001Jun26.html

HARPER COMMENTS ON CHRONICALLY ILL KIDS (New York Times, June 26)
When a child is chronically ill, the whole family feels the pain, particularly the parents. Regardless of the disease, whether an emotional disorder or a physical disability, the stress suffered by families is remarkably similar. Mothers and fathers talk about guilt, anger and sheer exhaustion. Brothers and sisters can feel neglected. "All of these children need a lot of extra work, and typically the mothers get the brunt of it, and sometimes they resent it," said Dr. DENNIS C. HARPER, professor of pediatrics and rehabilitation at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Dr. Harper has been studying the impact of chronically ill children on families for 30 years. "It's common to feel angry and then guilty for feeling that way," he said. "I think one of the biggest issues is the ambivalence around the future and not being able to predict very well."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/26/health/26VOIC.html

NYGAARD DISCUSSES BLADDER-CONTROL DRUGS (Washington Post, June 26)
A story about treatments for bladder-control problems says many practitioners prescribe either oxybutynin (Ditropan and its generic cousins) or the newer Detrol or Ditropan XL. All these drugs inhibit involuntary contractions of the bladder. According to INGRID NYGAARD, a urogynecologist and associate professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, the advantage of the newer drugs over the decades-old oxybutynin is extended relief -- once-a-day dosing instead of three times a day -- and lessened side effects, which include dry mouth and constipation. The disadvantage, she says, is cost: Oxybutynin is about $20 a month vs. $70 or $80 a month for the newer medicines. But Nygaard cites recent studies that indicate behavior-changing techniques may be more effective than drugs.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/health/print/A45488-2001Jun25.html

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON MIXED RULINGS (National Law Journal, June 25)
The Supreme Court in its current term has issued what some scholars believe are conflicting opinions in cases involving the Fourth Amendment. But despite the mixed rulings, JAMES TOMKOVICZ of the University of Iowa College of Law, says at least three decisions that went against law enforcement this term can be read as sending a signal. He says that the court is taking the amendment’s warrant requirement more seriously, particularly when core Fourth Amendment values—such as the near-inviolate privacy of the home—are implicated, and it is moving away from a reasonableness balancing approach to the competing interests in each case.

BRINIG COMMENTS ON CUSTODY PROPOSAL (Detroit News, June 25)
Michigan state Rep. Andrew Raczkowski, R-Farmington Hills, is sponsoring a "parental parity" proposal in his state's Legislature that would make court-ordered joint custody a requirement in parental disputes. MARGARET BRINIG, a law professor and economist at the University of Iowa, said she declined to testify in support of the Raczkowski proposal, even though she is an advocate of both parents raising children. She said joint-custody arrangements are not appropriate in all cases. Sometimes, she said, people seek joint custody for self-serving reasons, such as leveraging a better financial situation for themselves with reduced child-support payments. Joint custody can also lead to more litigation if it doesn't work for both parties.
http://detnews.com/specialreports/2001/friend/625lead/625lead.htm

NAZARETH EDITS VOLUME (Sunday Nation, June 24)
A review of the book “Critical Essays on Ngugi wa Thiong’o” notes that the editor, PETER NAZARETH, is a professor of English and African-American world studies at the Univeristy of Iowa. (The Nation is a newspaper in Nairobi, Kenya.)

UI STUDENT DISCUSSES 'QUARTERLIFE' CRISIS (Grand Rapids Press, June 24)
A story about the "quarterlife crisis" -- the confusion and disillusionment that strike many people in their 20s -- uses as an illustration the case of Kara Heinzig, 22 of Des Moines, who says she is searching for her passion. Early this year, she says, she was "in total chaos." She was approaching graduation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a degree in journalism and film but didn't want to do either. "Seriously, every other day I'd decide I'd want to do something else," she said. The same Newhouse News Service story ran June 19 in the PLAIN DEALER of Cleveland, Ohio.

BLOOM COMMENTS ON IOWA IMMIGRATION (The Oregonian, June 24)
A story about Postville, Iowa, where half of the residents come from somewhere else and the population has more than doubled to 2,200 in just a decade, says the city's struggles prove that Iowa is not ready for a mass immigration. "The mandate to make Iowa the new destination for the world's immigrants is misguided and pie in the sky," said STEPHEN BLOOM, a professor of journalism at University of Iowa and author of a book on Postville. "It's not well thought out because the social and physical infrastructure is not here and can't handle such a great influx of people."

ARCHITECTURE CONTEST WINNER ATTENDED UI (Chicago Tribune, June 24)
A story on the second annual student architectural competition sponsored by the Home Builders Association of Greater Chicago says the first-place winner was James P. McNamee of the University of Illinois-Chicago. McNamee formerly studied pre-dentistry and pre-business at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Following his gut that those majors weren't a good fit, he decided to try his hand at architecture closer to home. The competition entrants -- all from the University of Illinois' Urbana-Champaign and Chicago campuses -- each agreed to design a 3,500- to 5,000-square-foot house for a wooded, 2-acre lot on a floodplain in north suburban Libertyville. The competition judged student designs on their sensitivity to existing trees and topography, their response to the floodplain condition and their relationship to development of neighboring lots.
http://chicagotribune.com/leisure/homegarden/article/0,2669,SAV-0106240266,FF.html

KERBER WRITES OP-ED ARTICLE ON RULING (Boston Globe, June 23)
LINDA K. KERBER, a professor of history at the University of Iowa and the author of "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship," is the author of an op-ed piece about the Supreme Court's recent ruling on a case involving a child born out of wedlock to a Vietnamese mother, who abandoned him at birth, and an American father, who cared for the boy since his birth. Although his father embraced responsibility, provided financial support, and even, recently, DNA evidence of paternity, he never did the paperwork to make his son a U.S. citizen. A child born to an American woman overseas automatically shares her citizenship, but an American father must legally establish paternity, providing clear and convincing evidence of blood relationship before the child turns 18. In this case, the son was fighting deportation, the result of a sexual assualt conviction. But the court ruled that the father missed his chance to establish his son's citizenship; the son had not established citizenship in his own right and therefore could be deported. Kerber writes, "It is now up to Congress to act so that one of the last barriers to women's equal citizenship will no longer infect the integrity of American law."

GRADUATE STARTS UP BUSINESS USING NETWORK (Business Week, June 23)
A story about the growing number of foreign-born entrepreneurs cites the case of Vani Kola, who left her native India in 1985 to study computer and electrical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After difficulty securing venture capital, she learned through her Indian connections about an influential networking group of South Asian entrepreneurs called The Indus Entrepreneurs (TIE) in Santa Clara, Calif. She pitched them her business plan for RightWorks, a company that would produce an e-commerce software product for business-to-business transactions. Kola says she found TIE's members were high-caliber people willing to give plenty of time -- and apparently money: She raised more than $3 million in seed funding from TIE investors. "Vani's degree of tenacity and focus is among the best I've ever seen," says Suhas Patil, a veteran TIE member who mentored Kola and invested in RightWorks.
http://www.businessweek.com/magazine/content/01_25/b3737602.htm

ACCUSED RAPIST IS INVOLVED IN UI CASE (Lincoln Journal Star, June 23)
A former "Star Search" comedian accused in a string of rapes at colleges throughout the Midwest, including one in Wisconsin, is fighting his transfer from Nebraska for trial in Iowa. Vinson Champ's attorneys were to argue against the transfer in the Nebraska Court of Appeals on Friday. Champ, 39, of Los Angeles is serving a 30- to 40-year prison sentence in Nebraska after being convicted of raping a student at Union College, a small Seventh-day Adventist school in Lincoln. Champ also was sentenced to serve an additional 25 to 30 years in prison for attacking a University of Nebraska at Omaha faculty member about one month after the Lincoln attack. Champ faces two potential life sentences in Iowa. Johnson County authorities charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping and rape in a September 1996 attack of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=3605&date=20010623&past=

UI STUDENT SELLING 'LIFE' ON WEB (Evansville Courier & Press, June 23)
John Freyer, 28, is selling his life -- or at least every material representation of it -- via eBay. Clothing, records, tapes and CDs. Books and photographs, furniture, toiletries and even food. What started out as an effort to downsize soon evolved into a case of art imitating reality with a project called All My Life for Sale. Last December, Freyer set up a Web site -- www.allmylifeforsale.com -- and started selling everything in his Iowa City, Iowa, apartment. Freyer, who is pursuing a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says the initial concept was more figurative than literal. "When I initially started the project, I didn't think I'd go through the effort of selling everything," he says during a phone interview. "But when I registered my (Web site's) domain name, I started to think about what that actually means -- if I had called it 'yard sale,' then it would have all been different."
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200106/23+selling062301_news.html+20010623

SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENT TO ATTEND UI (Los Angeles Times, June 23)
The Glendale-Burbank Area Alumnae Panhellenic has selected seven local high school graduates and three college women as its 2001 scholarship winners. Among the recipients from Burbank High School is Holly Childers, who will attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and major in astronomy.
http://www.latimes.com/communities/news/burbank-glendale_metro/20010623/tbl0005142.html

UI CITED IN STORY ON CHILDHOOD CANCER (Yahoo! News, June 22)
American and Canadian children are less likely to receive a general anesthetic while undergoing major invasive cancer treatments than children in Europe, says a survey by a British doctor. However, the finding doesn't mean that American children aren't getting safe and sufficient pain relief, says an American specialist in pediatric pain management. The story informs readers that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has online information about pain and children at:
http://rd.yahoo.com/Dailynews/hsn/inlinks/*http://www.nursing.uiowa.edu/sites/pedspain/resources/kids.htm
The story, written by HealthScout, can be found at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010622/hl/comparing_pain_care_for_kids_with_cancer_1.html

ACCUSED RAPIST INVOLVED IN UI CASE (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 22)
A former " Star Search" comedian accused in a string of rapes at colleges throughout the Midwest, including one in Wisconsin, is fighting his transfer from Nebraska for trial in Iowa. Vinson Champ's attorneys were to argue against the transfer in the Nebraska Court of Appeals on Friday. Champ, 39, of Los Angeles is serving a 30- to 40-year prison sentence in Nebraska after being convicted of raping a student at Union College, a small Seventh-day Adventist school in Lincoln. Champ also was sentenced to serve an additional 25 to 30 years in prison for attacking a University of Nebraska at Omaha faculty member about one month after the Lincoln attack. Champ faces two potential life sentences in Iowa. Johnson County authorities charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping and rape in a September 1996 attack of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0622BC-WI--COA-CAMPU&date=22-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WITT CELEBRATES TENURE (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 22)
Professors from around the country tell the paper how they celebrated winning tenure, including DORIS S. WITT, who became an associate professor of English at the University of Iowa after being awarded tenure in April. Witt says she marked the occasion by spending three nights at Star Hill Inn, an astronomy resort in Sapello, N.M., then three nights at Vega-Bray Observatory, in Benson, Ariz. "When I was little, I wanted to be an astronomer, but eventually I realized I was a lot better with words than numbers, so I pursued my degrees in English."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i41/41a00801.htm

UI PRESS ISSUES DICKINSON BOOK (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 22)
A story about Emily Dickinson is coauthored by Sheila Coghill and Thom Tammaro, editors of Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickinson (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2000).
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i41/41b01601.htm

PAPERS DEBATE WHO WAS FIRST ON STUDY STORY (Metro, June 21-27)
A Metro writer comments on a San Francisco Chronicle columnist who challenged the San Jose Mercury News' claim that it was the first to publish information about stuttering experiments that took place at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1930s. The Chronicle columnist said that after a 1999 novel, "Abandoned: Now Stutter My Orphan," by Jerome Halvorson appeared, several papers, including the Portland Oregonian, recounted the facts behind the novel. The Metro writer contacted the Mercury News for a response, which was provided by Editor George Judson: "Have some people known about it? Of course. ... Yes, we knew about the Halvorson novel -- which, of course, is a novel, that is, fiction, in which the experiment plays one part. It is also a self-published novel, briefly reviewed in a handful of newspapers. We carefully examined everything that had been published and concluded: this story is yet to be told." Metro is a weekly arts and entertainment publication covering the San Francisco Bay Area.
http://www.metroactive.com:80/metro/public-eye-0125.html

WRITERS’ WORKSHOP MENTIONED (New York Times, June 21)
There are growing numbers of elaborate workshop programs to encourage blacks to write professionally. There are, of course, the famous writing programs, like the IOWA WRITERS’ WORKSHOP, attended by such luminaries as John Irving, Jane Smiley, and Raymond Carver; the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference in Middlebury, Vt.; and many others, and these do have minority students. But Toi Derricotte, the black poet, said, “Usually black students at many of these writers’ workshops conferences are uncomfortable, just by the fact they may be the only black or one of few.”

CLAIBORNE PLEADS GUILTY (Omaha World-Herald, June 20)
A former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student pleaded guilty in June to crimes that terrorized minority students at the College of Dentistry more than a year ago. Tarsha Claiborne, 24, who now lives with her mother in Baton Rouge, La., was sentenced to four years' probation for making threats in violation of individual rights, trespassing and reckless use of fire. She also was ordered to pay $17,000 restitution plus court fees and follow any treatment recommended by her current doctor.

UI ART STUDENT SELLING 'LIFE' OVER INTERNET (Sacramento Bee, June 20)
John Freyer, 28, is selling his life -- or at least every material representation of it -- via eBay. Clothing, records, tapes and CDs. Books and photographs, furniture, toiletries and even food. What started out as an effort to downsize soon evolved into a case of art imitating reality with a project called All My Life for Sale. Last December, Freyer set up a Web site -- www.allmylifeforsale.com -- and started selling everything in his Iowa City, Iowa, apartment. Freyer, who is pursuing a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says the initial concept was more figurative than literal. "When I initially started the project, I didn't think I'd go through the effort of selling everything," he says during a phone interview. "But when I registered my (Web site's) domain name, I started to think about what that actually means -- if I had called it 'yard sale,' then it would have all been different."
http://www.sacbee.com:80/lifestyle/news/lifestyle05_20010621.html

UI LAW GRADUATE TO BECOME JUDGE (Washington Post, June 20)
The impending retirement of Chief Fairfax Circuit Court Judge F. Bruce Bach has set off a chain reaction resulting in the promotion of three Fairfax lawyers, including Circuit Court Judge Michael P. McWeeny to take Bach's place as head of the state's busiest court. McWeeny was elected chief judge by a vote of the other circuit judges. Bach's judgeship will be filled by Fairfax Juvenile and Domestic Relations Court Judge Gaylord L. Finch Jr., who moves to Circuit Court after 19 years on the lower bench, six as chief judge there. Lawyer Kimberly J. Daniel, a 20-year veteran of juvenile and domestic law, will take Finch's spot on the family court. Bach's retirement takes effect July 1, and Finch and Daniel plan to start hearing cases immediately thereafter. They were selected from large applicant pools by the Northern Virginia delegation to the state General Assembly and submitted to Gov. James S. Gilmore III (R), who formally nominated them. Daniel, 45, is a Falls Church native who attended J.E.B. Stuart High School, George Mason University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A23530-2001Jun20.html

QUALLS: ERASER MARKS MAY HINT AT CHEATING (Education Week, June 20)
Too many eraser marks on a standardized test could signal that someone is cheating, says AUDREY L. QUALLS, an associate professor of educational measurement and statistics at the University of Iowa. As the states surrounding achievement tests have risen in recent years, so, too, have reports of cheating. But little is known about detecting whether teachers or principals are erasing and changing students' answers, said Qualls. So she decided to analyze answer sheets from the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills.

ADOLPHS: SOCIAL SKILLS NEED COMPLEX BRAINS (Dallas Morning News, June 18)
RALPH ADOLPHS
of the University of Iowa has shown two different evolutionary strategies for solving the problem of social interaction. One approach was taken by the social insects, who employ a rigid system of precise social roles. In supposedly more advanced life forms (people, for example), social behavior is more flexible and complex. In other words, bees get along fine without thinking, but people have to give some thought to how they behave in groups.

UI GRADUATE HEADS TECH FIRM (The Wall Street Transcript, June 18)
A profile of Randol E. Kirk, founder of Rad-Source Technologies Inc., says he received his bachelor of arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Wall Street Transcript is based in New York.

TOMKOVICZ: SEARCH RULING LIMITED (Arizona Journal, June 18)
In an important declaration of the constitutional limits on new privacy- threatening technology, the Supreme Court ruled that the use by the police of a thermal imaging device to detect patterns of heat coming from a private home is a search that requires a warrant. JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, a law professor at the University of Iowa, said the ruling did not address whether law enforcement officers can use the technology to search cars or luggage, which are not considered at "the very core of the Fourth Amendment" for government intrusion, as the court articulated in 1961 in Silverman v. United States.

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON RULING (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, June 18)
In the clash at the Supreme Court last week between old-fashioned personal privacy and newfangled law enforcement technology, few people predicted privacy would be the clear-cut winner. But it turned out that way when the court ruled that the police need a warrant to aim a thermal imaging device at the outside of a house to look for patterns of heat that could suggest indoor marijuana cultivation. The ruling is the latest of several decisions suggesting that this famously law-and-order court has begun to display a new skepticism toward the arguments that police and prosecutors bring before it. "It's refreshing that the court is not quite predictable these days," said another Fourth Amendment expert, Prof. JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ of the University of Iowa Law School, who filed a brief for the defendant in the thermal imaging case. "Everyone is taking these cases one at a time, trying to do what they think is right." Among the recent cases, a consistent theme is a new sensitivity to what Professor Tomkovicz called the "threshold" question. What is a search? When does the Fourth Amendment begin to operate? But more important than the details of any one case, he said, is the court's message, both to the lower courts and to law enforcement officials, "that there are constraints, that the Constitution is alive and well."

BLOOM COMMENTS ON IOWA IMMIGRATION (Boston Globe, June 18)
A story about Postville, Iowa, where half of the residents come from somewhere else and the population has more than doubled to 2,200 in just a decade, says the city's struggles prove that Iowa is not ready for a mass immigration. "The mandate to make Iowa the new destination for the world's immigrants is misguided and pie in the sky," said STEPHEN BLOOM, a professor of journalism at University of Iowa and author of a book on Postville. "It's not well thought out because the social and physical infrastructure is not here and can't handle such a great influx of people."
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/169/nation/Immigrants_redefine_an_Iowa_city+.shtml

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON 4TH AMENDMENT RULINGS (Law.Com, June 18)
A story about the U.S. Supreme Court's Fourth Amendment decisions this term quotes JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ of the University of Iowa College of Law, who says at least three decisions that went against law enforcement this term can be read as sending a signal. He says that the Court is taking the amendment's warrant requirement more seriously, particularly when core Fourth Amendment values -- such as the near-inviolate privacy of the home -- are implicated, and it is moving away from a reasonableness balancing approach to the competing interests in each case.
http://www.law.com/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?pagename=law/View&c=Article&cid=ZZZ4HBVA0OC&live=true&cst=1&pc=0&pa=0&s=News&ExpIgnore=true&showsummary=0

UI BUDGET CRUNCH CITED IN STORY (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 18)
A story about budget cuts at colleges and universities in Minnesota says Iowa's souring farm economy and a balanced budget requirement resulted in a 6 percent reduction in 2001-02 funding for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa. That's a real cut of $42 million. Because Iowa finances university salaries through a separate appropriation that covers state employees, faculty members and others will get raises. But the universities have to cut other expenses. Freezing open jobs, cutting travel and purchases and deferring building improvements are among the options, said Frank Stork, executive director of the board that governs the three universities. Layoffs will be a last resort, he said. Iowa sets its tuition and fees almost a year in advance. For residents, 2001-02 rates will be almost 10 percent higher than last school year. Future tuition rates are still an open question, Stork said. "Our greatest concern is if [a poor economy] continues," says Stork. "Next year doesn't look good."
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=UNIV18&date=18-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

TOMKOVICZ FINDS RULING TREND 'REFRESHING' (New York Times, June 17)
In the clash at the Supreme Court last week between old-fashioned personal privacy and newfangled law enforcement technology, few people predicted privacy would be the clear-cut winner. But it turned out that way when the court ruled that the police need a warrant to aim a thermal imaging device at the outside of a house to look for patterns of heat that could suggest indoor marijuana cultivation. The ruling is the latest of several decisions suggesting that this famously law-and-order court has begun to display a new skepticism toward the arguments that police and prosecutors bring before it. "It's refreshing that the court is not quite predictable these days," said another Fourth Amendment expert, Prof. JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ of the University of Iowa Law School, who filed a brief for the defendant in the thermal imaging case. "Everyone is taking these cases one at a time, trying to do what they think is right." Among the recent cases, a consistent theme is a new sensitivity to what Professor Tomkovicz called the "threshold" question. What is a search? When does the Fourth Amendment begin to operate? But more important than the details of any one case, he said, is the court's message, both to the lower courts and to law enforcement officials, "that there are constraints, that the Constitution is alive and well."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/17/weekinreview/17GREE.html

WRITER COMPARES UI, BYU WRITING PROGRAMS (Deseret News, June 17)
A story about Writers at Work -- a nonprofit literary arts organization founded in 1984 by a group of Utah writers and arts patrons to cultivate the literary arts -- includes comments by Brady Udall. Udall, a Brigham Young University-educated English professor at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pa., has published a number of short stories in national magazines and is the author of "Letting Loose the Hands," a short-story collection, and a new novel, "The Miracle of Edgar Mint." He says he considers his BYU background to be superior to his experience at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which he says "has the best writing program in the country." The Deseret News is based in Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0106180255

UI BUILT MORMON HANDCART PARK (Deseret News, June 16)
A story about the third annual Mormon Trek Heritage Festival says the event took place June 9 at the Hawkeye Intramural Fields adjacent to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Mormon Handcart Park, which was created in the 1970s by the UI. The site of a Mormon pioneer campsite and burial ground, it has several monuments describing the history. It is jointly maintained by the church and the university. The Deseret News is based in Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0106180024

WILDER DONATES SCRIPTS TO UI (Chicago Tribune, June 15)
Gene Wilder and his brother-in-law Gilbert Pearlman have donated a collection of Wilder's scripts and other material related to his films to the University of Iowa. Wilder is an Iowa graduate. The donation includes scripts for 1974's "Young Frankenstein,'' 1980's "Stir Crazy'' and the 1999 TV film "The Lady in Question.'' SAM BECKER, a professor emeritus, helped arrange the donation. He's a friend to both men. The pair donated 20 scripts of films either produced or abandoned. "The individual scripts are fairly rare and probably fairly valuable,'' said SID HUTTNER, head of the library's special collections department. “But it's hard to know, if they were in the open market, what they would bring.''

WISCONSIN PROFESSORS KNEW (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 15)
While the rest of the world learned just this week about a secret 62-year-old experiment that caused lifelong stuttering problems in children at an Iowa orphanage, a pair of Wisconsin professors say they've known about the study for years -- but couldn't get anyone to listen to them. In the 1930s, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student Mary Tudor trained orphans to be more conscious of small speech lapses to see whether calling attention to the problems made them worse. The experiment, directed by Tudor's professor, Wendell Johnson, turned some of the children into lifelong stutterers despite later efforts to reverse the damage. One who learned about the study was Franklin H. Silverman. Now a speech pathology professor at Marquette University, Silverman worked with Johnson for several months as a doctoral student before the doctor died of a heart attack in 1965. Another professor, Dean E. Williams, took up Johnson's research and noticed that Silverman was interested in the fact Johnson's published research used no direct evidence. "I realized the evidence he used was a really indirect kind of evidence," said Silverman, who discussed the flaws in the research with Williams. "He told me that wasn't the real evidence on which it was based. Johnson knew that what he had in the diagnosogenic theory would have affected students because, through the Tudor study, he had actually done it."
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/metro/jun01/stut16061501a.asp

PAPER 'LAMENTS' UI STUDY (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 15)
The paper's column "Weekly Laurels and Laments" says: "It was disclosed this week that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor, in an attempt to test his theory about the origin of stuttering, used psychological pressure on orphans to make them stutter. It worked. But at least one of the children says now that the dreadful experience marked her for shame and failure and destroyed her life. Destroying lives to make them better wasn't just a contradiction; it was child abuse masquerading as science."
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/editorials/jun01/laurels-edit061501.asp

UI APOLOGIZES FOR ORPHAN STUDY (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 15)
Following a newspaper exposé this week, the University of Iowa apologized on Wednesday for an experiment directed by one of its leading researchers more than 60 years ago in which orphans were deliberately taught to stutter. The research was designed by the late Wendell Johnson, a groundbreaking scientist in speech pathology for whom the university's speech and hearing clinic is named. Describing the experiment as "regrettable," the university's statement of apology said that strict policies now in place ensure that "experiments of this nature cannot happen again." University officials say they will not rename the Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, which is one of the leading institutes for speech pathology and audiology in the nation. "In no way does his excellent reputation and other good work change the fact that this was a regrettable study," said DAVID J. SKORTON, vice president for research at the university. "But we do continue to recognize his excellence as a practitioner and teacher of speech pathology, and the excellence of the program he built."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/06/2001061503n.htm

UI APOLOGIZES FOR 1939 EXPERIMENT (USA Today, June 15)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
officials Wednesday issued a formal apology for an experiment conducted by their speech pathology department 60 years ago in which orphans were induced to stutter. The experiment was designed by Wendell Johnson, a speech expert for whom the university's speech and hearing clinic is named.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20010615/3405385s.htm

UI ISSUES APOLOGY FOR STUDY (Chicago Tribune, June 14)
University of Iowa officials Wednesday issued a formal apology for an experiment conducted by their speech pathology department in 1939, in which orphans were induced to stutter. The apology comes in the wake of an investigative report published this week by the San Jose Mercury News of California that detailed the experiment and the psychological scars suffered by some of the subjects. Calling the experiment "regrettable," the brief apology said that policies now make the university "confident that experiments of this nature cannot happen again." "This is not a study that should ever be considered defensible in any era," said Dr. DAVID SKORTON, the university's vice president for research.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0106140216,FF.html\

GRADUATE USES ELECTRONIC RECORDS (Honolulu Star Bulletin, June 14)
A story about Hawaii physician Dan Heslinga, who uses electronic medical records that he also makes accessible to patients, says the practice was something he wanted to do from the moment he finished his residency at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1987.
http://starbulletin.com:80/2001/06/14/news/story11.html

UI APOLOGIZES FOR STUTTERING STUDY (San Jose Mercury News, June 14)
University of Iowa officials issued a formal apology Wednesday for an experiment conducted by their speech pathology department in 1939, in which orphans were induced to stutter. "This is not a study that should ever be considered defensible in any era," said Dr. DAVID SKORTON, the university's vice president for research and current spokesman. The experiment was designed by Dr. Wendell Johnson, a severe stutterer and prominent speech pathologist at the university. Skorton said he and University President MARY SUE COLEMAN received calls this week demanding that Johnson's name be removed from the university's internationally renowned speech and hearing center. "In no way would I ever think of defending this study. In no way. It's more than unfortunate," Skorton said. "But this man made enormous contributions, both by his direct work with patients and with training so many practitioners and students over the years. So in consideration of all these things, we decided to leave the name as it is."
http://www0.mercurycenter.com/partners/docs/068627.htm
An abbreviated version of the story ran June 14 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/krsanjose/20010614/lo/officials_apologize_for_tests_on_stuttering_1.html
An abbreviated version of the story also ran June 14 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=ndig14&date=20010614&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22
An abbreviated version of the story also ran June 14 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64195-2001Jun13.html

DOERN HEADS STUDY OF RESISTANT BACTERIA (New York Times, June 13)
The proportion of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics continues to increase at an alarming rate in the United States, according to a new report. S. pneumoniae is the leading bacterial cause of middle ear infections, pneumonia and invasive pneumococcal diseases such as meningitis, an infection of the membranes surrounding the brain, and infections of the blood stream. "With the exception of what happened with staphylococcus aureus and penicillin resistance in the early 1940s, what's happened with antibiotic resistance to S. pneumoniae in the U.S. in the last decade is without precedent," Dr. GARY V. DOERN said in a telephone interview with Reuters Health. "The organism has changed dramatically in the context of resistance, and at some point that will translate into unfavorable outcomes in patients treated with antibiotics." Doern and a team from the University of Iowa in Iowa City have spearheaded three national surveillance projects that have tracked the scope and magnitude of antibiotic resistance to S. pneumoniae.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/health-strep.html?searchpv=reuters
The same REUTERS HEALTH article ran June 13 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010613/15/health-strep

BLOOM'S BOOK CITED IN N.C. CASE (Raleigh News and Observer, June 13)
A Hasidic rabbi who recently acknowledged his role in an armed robbery 10 years ago was arrested Tuesday afternoon and charged with exposing himself to a woman in his home. Pinchas "Pinny" Lew, 31, was charged with misdemeanor assault on a female, said Chapel Hill, N.C., Police Chief Gregg Jarvies. The alleged assault took place on May 16, the same day the Durham-Chapel Hill Jewish Federation called Lew to a meeting at Duke University to explain his past: In September 1991, he drove the getaway car in an Iowa armed robbery that resulted in the shooting of Marion Bakken, 49. That incident was revealed in "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," by STEPHEN G. BLOOM, a journalism professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.newsobserver.com/wednesday/news/triangle/Story/506096p-504089c.html

SAN JOSE PAPER NOT FIRST TO CITE STUDY (San Francisco Chronicle, June 13)
A columnist for the paper writes: On Friday, the San Jose Mercury News made this claim on its PR news wire: "In a chilling investigative story beginning Sunday, the San Jose Mercury News reveals for the first time the complete story of a secret experiment conducted 60 years ago to induce a group of orphans to stutter." First time? Well, not quite. In 1999 Jerry Halvorson, a Wisconsin professor of communications disorders, wrote a novel revealing the 1939 "Monster Study" in which the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Dr. Wendell Johnson and his assistant Mary Tudor used "negative therapy" to turn normal children into stutterers, causing them a lifetime of pain. After Halvorson's novel appeared, several papers, including the Portland Oregonian, recounted the horrible facts behind the novel. Now, two years later, the Mercury News weighs in with its experiment at winning a Pulitzer.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/06/13/MN184268.DTL

HUNNICUTT COMMENTS ON WORK WEEK (Arizona Republic, June 13)
BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT
, an author and University of Iowa professor, says in a story on proposals for a shorter workweek that he is concerned about the deterioration of leisure time in American's lives. For two decades, he's studied the history of the reduced workweek, including extensive research at the Kellogg Co. in Battle Creek, Mich. The company went to a six-hour day in 1930 to counter Depression-era unemployment, and to the company's surprise, employees were 3 to 4 percent more productive.

BALDUS: STUDY ON HOLD (South Florida Sun-Sentinel, June 12)
A story about the scheduled execution of convicted murderer and drug kingpin Juan Raul Garza says some death penalty opponents accused the Bush administration of stalling a government study of racial and geographic disparities in capital punishment procedures. Former attorney general Janet Reno authorized the National Institute of Justice, the Justice Department's research arm, to conduct a study of disparities, using independent experts. But some death penalty experts who were to be involved in that study said they believe it either has been put on hold or scuttled -- including DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who attended a Jan. 10 meeting of experts in Washington that was called by Reno to launch the study.

ANTCZAK: CHEATING LIKELY TO CONTINUE (Omaha World Herald, June 12)
FRED ANTCZAK
, associate dean for academic programs at the University of Iowa, said an upward trend in Internet cheating among college students will probably continue. "I think this is a problem that's permanently with us," he said. The story says cheating in the UI's College of Liberal Arts has more than tripled over the past three years, due largely to the amount of information available over the Internet.

TOMKOVICZ IS QUOTED (Beneath The Surface, KPFK Radio, Calif., June 12)
JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ
, professor in the University of Iowa College of Law, provided guest legal analysis of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling last Monday requiring police to obtain a warrant before using technology that can detect activity taking place in a private home. Tomkovicz, who applauded the high court's ruling as guarding against unlawful invasion of privacy, filed a friend-of-the-court brief in Kyllo v. United States on behalf of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.

TOMKVICZ CALLS SEARCH RULING IMPORTANT (New York Times, June 12)
In an important declaration of the constitutional limits on new privacy- threatening technology, the Supreme Court ruled today that the use by the police of a thermal imaging device to detect patterns of heat coming from a private home is a search that requires a warrant. The court said further that the warrant requirement would apply not only to the relatively crude device at issue but also to any "more sophisticated systems" in use or in development that let the police gain knowledge that in the past would have been impossible without a physical entry into the home. The decision was important and "surprisingly broad," said JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, a law professor at the University of Iowa who filed a brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the American Civil Liberties Union. "It was important for the court to say that there are general limits on the ability of technological developments to erode Fourth Amendment privacy," he said in an interview. http://www.nytimes.com/2001/06/12/national/12SEAR.html
The same article was reprinted on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONCILE June 12.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/06/12/MN239076.DTL

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON RULING (Christian Science Monitor, June 12)
In a major decision that strengthens privacy protections in the face of increasingly sophisticated law-enforcement snooping devices, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled yesterday that police must obtain a warrant from a neutral judge prior to using technology that reveals even relatively minor details about what's going on inside a private home. "The use of technology in this way clearly exposes private information concealed in the home," says JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law. The ruling, he adds, may set a standard on when technology triggers constitutional protections. "The Fourth Amendment values privacy in the home above all else, and technology makes it possible ... without physically intruding [the way] the British did [when] the Constitution was framed," says Tomkovicz, who filed an amicus brief for the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/06/12/fp4s1-csm.shtml

TOMKOVICZ: RULING LIMITS TECHNOLOGY USE (Legal Times, June 12) The U.S. Supreme Court voted 5-4 Monday that government agents should have obtained a search warrant before pointing a heat detection device at a suspected indoor marijuana farm. But the decision by Justice Antonin Scalia, joined by fellow conservative Clarence Thomas and liberals David Souter, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Stephen Breyer, looked beyond the use of thermal imaging to detect high-intensity lamps used to cultivate marijuana. Scalia wrote that the majority did not want to "leave the homeowner at the mercy of advancing technology -- including imaging technology that could discern all human activity in the home." JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa Law professor who wrote an amicus brief supporting Kyllo for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, says the "general public use" section could diminish the decision's impact as technology advances. But Tomkovicz says the decision "sends a message that there are strict limits on how much technology" can decrease personal privacy in the home.
http://www.law.com/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?pagename=law/View&c=Article&cid=ZZZDSUGQUNC&live=true&cst=1&pc=0&pa=0&s=News&ExpIgnore=true&showsummary=0

TOMKOVICZ QUOTED ON HIGH COURT RULING (Oregonian, June 12)
The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday used an Oregon marijuana growing case to say that advancing technology should not be allowed to undo the centuries-old idea that the home is an especially private place that should be free from government intrusion. The court said federal agents should have had a warrant before they used a thermal imager, a cameralike device that measures heat, to gather evidence that Danny Lee Kyllo of Florence was growing marijuana in his attic with the help of high-intensity lights. "I'm gratified to see that," said James J. Tomkovicz, a criminal law professor at the University of Iowa whose friend-of-the-court brief asked for a decision that would guide future technology issues. "It is not typical of their recent decisions in the Fourth Amendment area. They tend to write very narrow opinions that do not have much precedent value." The Oregonian is based in Portland, Ore.
http://www.oregonlive.com/news/oregonian/index.ssf?/news/oregonian/lc_31therm12.frame

TOMKOVICZ: RULING VICTORY FOR 4TH AMENDMENT (Seattle Times, June 12)
Police may not use heat detectors and other such high-tech devices to look inside a person's home, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday. In a surprisingly strong defense of the right to privacy, the court threw out drug evidence against a Florence, Ore., man who was growing marijuana plants in his house and ruled that law-enforcement agents violated his rights by using a thermal imager on a public street to spot his. "This is an important victory for the Fourth Amendment because it says again the home is a protected area," said University of Iowa law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ, who filed a friend-of-the-court brief for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). "I think (the justices) were worried about what comes next, the technology that would allow the government to stay out but detect what is going on inside the home."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=snoop120&date=20010612

UI'S 'SAY SOMETHING' POSTERS CITED (Los Angeles Times, June 12)
Hundreds of thousands of college students across the country are being subjected to the latest thinking about how to reduce risky behavior among young people: Show them it's not popular. The practice, called "social norms marketing," has grown rapidly in the last three years, along with the realization that scolding, scaring, educating and even passing laws can't stop young people from harming themselves and others. In sharp contrast to generations of adults who argued, "If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you?" the new theory encourages the young to conform, since most of their peers aren't up to much anyway. A "Say Something" campaign at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA produced posters saying "67% of UI students have had their studying or sleep interrupted by a loud, obnoxious, drunken student. Say something!" The program was not formally evaluated, but some students said that until then they hadn't realized they had a right to speak up. http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20010612/t000048919.html

UI STUDY ON GIFTED STUDENTS CITED (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 12)
A story about the struggles academically gifted students face in rural school districts says a recent study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA came to the unsurprising conclusion that gifted students are overlooked in rural schools. The study said gifted students lacked advanced placement courses, were socially isolated from peers, and didn't have access to cultural opportunities. Negative attitudes toward gifted children are deeply ingrained in many rural districts.
http://www.post-gazette.com/regionstate/20010612rural0612netp6.asp

FISHER/GORDON STUDY FINDS LOW PAY IN IOWA (Chicago Tribune, June 12)
Wages paid to workers in Iowa are among the lowest in the region and the nation, and that's led to sluggish population growth and a steady outmigration, according to a study released Monday. "For the majority of Iowa families, their income, when you correct for inflation, is about the same or less than it was 20 years ago," said PETER FISHER, one of the authors. "When you look at why we don't do a better job of attracting college graduates the answer is the jobs aren't here," Fisher said. Fisher and fellow University of Iowa PROFESSOR COLIN GORDON spent a year gathering economic data for the study, titled "The State of Working Iowa 2001." The study was conducted under the auspices of a liberal non-profit think tank called the Iowa Policy Project.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0106120342,FF.html

WILDER DONATES SCRIPTS TO UI (Yahoo! News, June 12)
Gene Wilder and his brother-in-law Gilbert Pearlman have donated a collection of Wilder's scripts andother material related to his films to the University of Iowa. Wilder is an Iowa graduate. The donation includes scripts for 1974's "Young Frankenstein,'' 1980's "Stir Crazy'' and the 1999 TV film "The Lady in Question.'' SAM BECKER, a professor emeritus, helped arrange the donation. He's a friend to both men. The pair donated 20 scripts of films either produced or abandoned. "The individual scripts are fairly rare and probably fairly valuable,'' said SID HUTTNER, head of the library's special collections department. ``But it's hard to know, if they were in the open market, what they would bring.''
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010612/en/gene_wilder_scripts_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 12 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010612/aponline082110_002.htm
The same Associated Press article ran June 12 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0612AP-GENE-WILDER-S&date=12-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran June 12 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Gene-Wilder-Scripts.html?searchpv=aponline
The same Associated Press article ran June 12 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010612/08/ent-gene-wilder-scripts
The same Associated Press article ran June 12 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/06/12/entertainment0832EDT0496.DTL

TOMKOVICZ PRAISES SEARCH RULING (Los Angeles Times, June 12)
The police cannot use heat detectors and other such high-tech devices to look inside a person's home, the Supreme Court ruled Monday. In a surprisingly strong defense of the right to privacy, the court threw out drug evidence against an Oregon man who was growing marijuana in his house and ruled that law enforcement agents violated his rights by using a thermal imager on a public street to spot his hothouse. "This is an important victory for the 4th Amendment because it says again the home is a protected area," said University of Iowa law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ, who filed a friend-of-the-court brief for the American Civil Liberties Union. "I think [the justices] were worried about what comes next, the technology that would allow the government to stay out but detect what is going on inside the home." http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20010612/t000048914.html

GRADUATE LED STUTTERING STUDY (Chicago Tribune, June 12)
For four months during the Great Depression, Mary Tudor instructed a handful of children at an Iowa orphanage in a lesson they would never forget -- she taught them to stutter. The experiment eventually led to a theory that helped thousands of children overcome the speech impediment. But it also condemned some of the children in Tudor's class to lives as outcasts and misfits. A lifetime later, the private story of 22 orphans who unwittingly submitted to the experiment has been examined through an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News, which reported on its findings Sunday and Monday. Tudor, then an eager graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now 84-year-old Mary Tudor Jacobs, a retired speech therapist who lives in the San Francisco Bay area suburb of Moraga. Her subjects, at least 13 of whom are still alive, learned of the experiment only this spring when the Mercury News contacted them. The experiment was designed by Tudor's professor, Dr. Wendell Johnson, who went on to become one of the nation's most prominent speech pathologists. Johnson died in 1965 at the age of 59. In 1968, the University of Iowa founded the Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, which remains one of the nation's leading institutes for speech pathology and audiology. "Today we might disagree with what he did, but in those days it was fully within the norms of the time," said DUANE SPRIESTERSBACH, a close colleague of Johnson who went on to become a professor of speech pathology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0106110164,FF.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the EVANSVILLE COURIER PRESS in Indiana.
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200106/11+monster061101_news.html+20010611
National Public Radio's "ALL THINGS CONSIDERED" carried an interview with the reporter of the original San Jose Mercury News article at 8:25 a.m. today, June 12. And the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's nationwide "AS IT HAPPENS" carried an extensive interview with the reporter at 9 p.m. Monday, June 11.

CALLAGHAN COMMENTS ON HIP PROCEDURE (Chicago Tribune, June 12) With new surgical techniques, doctors in Chicago are seeking to make hip-replacement operations markedly less painful and invasive, allowing patients to go home the day after surgery and speeding recovery time by months. For 20 years, doctors have favored single, big incisions for hip replacements, making cuts 12 to 18 inches long to replace the damaged bone and cartilage with a metal ball-and-socket prosthetic. With the new procedure, surgeons make two small holes in the proper position--one for each half of the prosthetic and each incision measuring about 1.5 inches long. At the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, Dr. JOHN CALLAGHAN said the new procedure, while promising, needed more long-term study before anyone could be sure it's better. "It's going to take some time for us to figure out if it's a true advance," said Callaghan, an orthopedic surgeon at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "It's experimental. Whether or not the limited-incision surgery will have any long-term effects will take us years to find out."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/chicago/article/0,2669,SAV-0106120273,FF.html

GRADUATE LED STUTTERING STUDY (Lincoln Journal Star, June 11)
For four months during the Great Depression, Mary Tudor instructed a handful of children at an Iowa orphanage in a lesson they would never forget -- she taught them to stutter. The experiment eventually led to a theory that helped thousands of children overcome the speech impediment. But it also condemned some of the children in Tudor's class to lives as outcasts and misfits. A lifetime later, the private story of 22 orphans who unwittingly submitted to the experiment has been examined through an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News, which reported on its findings Sunday and Monday. Tudor, then an eager graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now 84-year-old Mary Tudor Jacobs, a retired speech therapist who lives in the San Francisco Bay area suburb of Moraga. Her subjects, at least 13 of whom are still alive, learned of the experiment only this spring when the Mercury News contacted them. The experiment was designed by Tudor's professor, Dr. Wendell Johnson, who went on to become one of the nation's most prominent speech pathologists. Johnson died in 1965 at the age of 59. In 1968, the University of Iowa founded the Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, which remains one of the nation's leading institutes for speech pathology and audiology. "Today we might disagree with what he did, but in those days it was fully within the norms of the time," said DUANE SPRIESTERSBACH, a close colleague of Johnson who went on to become a professor of speech pathology at the University of Iowa.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nation?story_id=4867&date=20010611&past=

HIGH COURT: POLICE NEED WARRANT FOR SENSOR (Bloomberg, June 11)
Police need a warrant before using heat-sensing devices that help detect marijuana plants growing inside homes, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled. The justices ruled 5 to 4 that using the infrared devices amounts to an unconstitutional invasion of privacy unless police have gotten a judge's permission by showing evidence of a crime. Civil libertarians hailed the ruling. ``Unregulated, random imaging is not tolerable in a society that values privacy,'' said University of Iowa law professor JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, who filed a brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the American Civil Liberties Union. http://quote.bloomberg.com/fgcgi.cgi?ptitle=Top%20World%20News&s1=blk&tp=ad_topright_topworld&T=markets_bfgcgi_content99.ht&s2=ad_right1_windex&bt=ad_position1_windex&middle=ad_frame2_windex&s=AOyUgEBVZUG9saWNl

O'HARA SUGGESTS POST-PARTUM REGIMEN (The News-Journal, June 11)
A story about the Houston woman accused of drowning her five children says that guidelines developed by Dr. MICHAEL O'HARA, a University of Iowa expert on postpartum depression, call for women to be treated with antidepressants (such as Prozac or Zoloft) and psychotherapy. Other types of medications, such as Haldol, an antipsychotic, may be used for postpartum psychosis. The News-Journal is based in Daytona Beach, Fla.

WELSH SEES HOPE IN GENE THERAPY (Wall Street Journal, June 11)
In 1992, after several of its test drugs failed to work as treatments for cystic fibrosis, Genzyme Corp. decided to try gene therapy, which attempts to treat diseases by inserting healthy genes into people's bodies. The company's scientists had been the first to prove several years earlier that gene therapy could work -- at least in theory. The researchers put a healthy copy of the gene in a petri dish with cells taken from cystic fibrosis patients. Suddenly, the diseased cells began transporting chloride, just like normal cells. "It immediately made you wonder, 'Could this be done in human beings?'" says MICHAEL WELSH, a Genzyme collaborator at the University of Iowa. "It suddenly made it seem like it might be possible."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB992206688603757149.djm

GRADUATE LED STUTTERING STUDY (San Jose Mercury News, June 11)
For four months during the Great Depression, Mary Tudor instructed a handful of children at an Iowa orphanage in a lesson they would never forget -- she taught them to stutter. The experiment eventually led to a theory that helped thousands of children overcome the speech impediment. But it also condemned some of the children in Tudor's class to lives as outcasts and misfits. A lifetime later, the private story of 22 orphans who unwittingly submitted to the experiment has been examined through an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News, which reported on its findings Sunday and Monday. Tudor, then an eager graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now 84-year-old Mary Tudor Jacobs, a retired speech therapist who lives in the San Francisco Bay area suburb of Moraga. Her subjects, at least 13 of whom are still alive, learned of the experiment only this spring when the Mercury News contacted them. The experiment was designed by Tudor's professor, Dr. Wendell Johnson, who went on to become one of the nation's most prominent speech pathologists. Johnson died in 1965 at the age of 59. In 1968, the University of Iowa founded the Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, which remains one of the nation's leading institutes for speech pathology and audiology. "Today we might disagree with what he did, but in those days it was fully within the norms of the time," said DUANE SPRIESTERSBACH, a close colleague of Johnson who went on to become a professor of speech pathology at the University of Iowa.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com/special/experiment/experiment.htm (this URL will take you to the start page of a two-part series by the paper.)
An Associated Press version of the article ran June 11 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/krsanjose/20010611/lo/theory_improved_treatment_and_understanding_of_stuttering_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Stuttering-Orphans.html?searchpv=aponline
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR in Nebraska.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nation?story_id=4867&date=20010611&past=
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=stutter11&date=20010611
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0611AP-STUTTERING-OR&date=11-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010611/03/stuttering-orphans
The same Associated Press article ran June 10 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A49266-2001Jun10.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 10 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/06/10/national1258EDT0467.DTL
A Knight-Ridder version of the article ran June 11 on the Web site of the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/nat/jun01/stutter11061001.asp

VIJH SAYS TRACKING STOCKS PERFORM POORLY (Washington Post, June 11)
The track record of tracking stocks is not good, said ANAND VIJH, a professor of finance at the University of Iowa, in a story about MCI stock. They lag far behind other stocks in their own industries as well as the market as a whole, Vijh concluded after looking at all the tracking stocks issued between 1984 and 1998. Over the past three years, the new tracking stocks underperformed the market by an average of 40 percent and the shares of the original company performed about the same as the rest of the market. "The shareholder of the old stocks didn't do that badly," he said. "The new shareholders of the tracking stocks did quite badly."
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A48886-2001Jun10.html

CORYELL: GLAND, SUICIDE LINK POSSIBLE (Post and Courier, June 11)
A new test, called the dexamethasone suppression test, measures the activity of three critical glands -- hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal -- called the HPA axis. A low level of activity is linked to suicide. A study of 78 patients with depression or schizophrenia showed that those with low HPA activity had a 26.8 percent risk of suicide during a three-year period compared with a 2.9 percent risk of suicide in patients with normal HPA activity, said Dr. WILLIAM CORYELL of the University of Iowa School of Medicine. The study appeared in the American Journal of Psychiatry. The Post and Courier is based in Charleston, S.C.

GRADUATE LED STUTTERING STUDY (Buffalo News, June 11)
For four months during the Great Depression, Mary Tudor instructed a handful of children at an Iowa orphanage in a lesson they would never forget -- she taught them to stutter. The experiment eventually led to a theory that helped thousands of children overcome the speech impediment. But it also condemned some of the children in Tudor's class to lives as outcasts and misfits. A lifetime later, the private story of 22 orphans who unwittingly submitted to the experiment has been examined through an investigation by the San Jose Mercury News, which reported on its findings Sunday and Monday. Tudor, then an eager graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is now 84-year-old Mary Tudor Jacobs, a retired speech therapist who lives in the San Francisco Bay area suburb of Moraga. Her subjects, at least 13 of whom are still alive, learned of the experiment only this spring when the Mercury News contacted them. The experiment was designed by Tudor's professor, Dr. Wendell Johnson, who went on to become one of the nation's most prominent speech pathologists. The Buffalo News is based in Buffalo, N.Y. The same Associated Press article ran June 11 in the CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, the KANSAS CITY STAR, the ARIZONA REPUBLIC, the DAYTON (Ohio) DAILY NEWS, the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, the ARIZONA REPUBLIC, the SALT LAKE (Utah) TRIBUNE, the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the FRESNO BEE (Sacramento, Calif.), the SEATTLE TIMES, the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, the ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER and the DAILY NEWS (Woodland Hills, Calif.). The story also ran June 12 in the SACRAMENTO BEE, the COMMERICAL APPEAL (Memphis, Tenn.), the LODI NEWS-SENTINEL (Lodi, Calif.), the BIRMINGHAM NEWS (Ala.), the OTTAWA CITIZEN (Ontario), the TENNESSEAN (Nashville, Tenn.), and the ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS. Another version of the story ran June 11 in the NEW YORK POST.

GRADUATE NAMED CAPELLA PRESIDENT (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 10)
The paper's business section profiles Mike Offerman, 53, new president and CEO of Capella University, Minn. Offerman received a B.A. degree in history and secondary education in 1970 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=PERS10&date=10-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

PLAYWRIGHT GILMAN ATTENDED UI (San Francisco Chronicle, June 10)
A story about Rebecca Gilman and her new play, "Spinning Into Butter," says she began writing in high school (short stories, poetry, the homecoming skit), enrolled at Middlebury College (the unacknowledged model for the campus in "Spinning Into Butter") and eventually wound up at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's prestigious MFA playwriting program.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/06/10/PK25223.DTL

DONELSON COMMENTS ON ROUTH'S WORK (Seattle Times, June 9)
Joseph Routh, a former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA biochemistry professor who played a lead role in the development of the pain reliever Bufferin and the antacid Rolaids, died Tuesday. He was 91. Routh and University of Iowa colleagues were instrumental in the development of Bufferin, according to JOHN DONELSON, head of the Iowa biochemistry department. Routh's last project before his retirement involved research into the drug L-dopa for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. He founded Exercise for Better Life in Highland Park, Ark., a place filled with exercise equipment where the community, particularly the elderly, could become active and improve their health.
The same Associated Press article ran June 9 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/nation/states/ma/A46183-2001Jun9.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 9 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0609AP-DEATHS&date=09-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran June 8 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/nyregion/AP-Deaths.html?searchpv=aponline

ATKINS: DEFIBRILLATOR SPOTS PROBLEMS IN KIDS (Morning Call, June 9)
A device used to restore a normal heartbeat during cardiac arrest can also recognize heart-rhythm abnormalities in children, study findings show. In recent years, automated external defibrillators (AEDs) have been placed in airports, police stations and other public places in an effort to provide better emergency treatment, according to the study's senior author, Dr. DIANNE L. ATKINS of the University of Iowa. But until recently, no AEDs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in children younger than 8, she explained in an interview with Reuters Health. The concern was that the devices might misclassify heart rhythms in children and give them unnecessary shocks, according to Atkins. She noted that the devices were designed to recognize abnormalities in adults, and their heart activity differs slightly from children's. The Morning Call is based in Allentown, Pa.

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'DINNER ROLES' (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 8)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS recently published author Sherrie A. Inness's book "Dinner Roles: American Women and Culinary Culture," which is excerpted in the Chronicle.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i39/39b00401.htm

UI ETHICS CASE CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, June 8)
The University of Iowa has reprimanded a longtime astronomy professor for violating the university's ethics policy after he criticized two of his colleagues in a local newspaper. In addition to a letter of reprimand, LOUIS A. FRANK, an astronomy professor at Iowa since 1964, will lose a year's worth of the extra money he gets for holding an endowed chair -- about $13,500. MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the university, upheld the recommendation of the Faculty Judicial Commission, which found "clear and convincing evidence" that Mr. Frank had wrongly accused ROBERT L. MUTEL and JOHN D. FIX of scientific fraud. Frank described the past year as one of stress and agony -- "a tale of horror as a reward for my 37 years of loyal service." In a telephone interview with the Chronicle, he said that now that the university's administrative procedure was complete, he planned to take legal action because the university had violated his civil rights.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i39/39a01101.htm

PROSTATE CANCER STUDY BEGAN AT UI (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, June 7)
Early results from a very large international study suggest that a drug used to treat advanced prostate cancer might also prevent recurrence or spread of the disease when given in higher doses. Bicalutamide, sold as Casodex, cut the risk of recurrence by 42 percent after an average of three years' followup of more than 8,000 men, doctors reported Wednesday at a urology convention in Anaheim, Calif. "The urological community has been a little slower to follow the breast cancer community in testing this concept," said William See, chief of urology at Froedtert Memorial Lutheran Hospital and the Medical College of Wisconsin in Wauwatosa and the physician who leads the Casodex study in the United States. The study began in 1995 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where See worked before coming to Wisconsin two years ago. Patients were recruited and treated at the Iowa program and several hundred other sites around the nation.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/alive/news/jun01/prosta060701.asp

GABLE CONSIDERS BID FOR GOVERNOR (Omaha World-Herald, June 7)
Wrestling legend DAN GABLE has discussed plans to meet with President Bush and other leading Republicans as he considers a run for governor of Iowa. Gable led the University of Iowa to 15 national titles in 21 years. He retired as the Hawkeyes' coach in 1997 and has since worked as an assistant athletic director.

UI STUDENT MINGLES WITH CELEBRITIES (Minneapolis Star Tribune, June 5)
A story about attendees to a recent celebrity-packed party at the South Beach night club says that John Fasig, who identified himself as a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medical student studying pathology, was a guest of the club owner's family and held a doll for the owner's 8-month-old daughter. Among the other guests were Kim Fields, who starred in the TV sitcom "The Facts of Life," and musical artist Prince.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=CJ05&date=05-Jun-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WOMAN LAUDS VIRTUAL HOSPITAL (Design News, June 4)
A story about a woman whose mother underwent a knee replacement says she found a wealth of information about the procedure on the Internet. She writes: "One of the best sites I found on-line about knee surgery, as well as just about anything else anyone might want to know about the world of medicine, is the Virtual Hospital site (www.vh.org). The U.S. version is sponsored by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but there are on-line versions for Australia, Iceland, Japan, Korea, Taiwan and Venezuela as well."

UI TECHNOLOGY AIDS ELDERLY (U.S. News & World Report, June 4)
The rush online by seniors, now the fastest-growing population of surf-ers, is just a hint of how technology might transform elderly lives. New products reach beyond the Internet's communication and entertainment features, promising to bolster independence for tomorrow's retirees while helping them fight the isolation and illness that can accompany aging. Each weekday, Inez Jones gets a glimpse of that future through a 13-inch TV in her modest living room in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The camera-equipped TV gives the 69-year-old diabetic and heart patient an audiovisual connection to a nurse some 240 miles away, at the offices of resourceLink, an Iowa City company owned by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Each session, Jones reports her blood pressure and sugar levels, and the nurse checks for visual cues of problems.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/010604/tech/tech.htm

JONES TESTIFIES ABOUT VOTING SYSTEMS (Federal Computer Week, June 4)
The federal government should not mandate uniform electronic voting systems, but it should impose the voluntary standards for those systems, voting experts told lawmakers recently. "The current system of regulation for voting machinery suffers from significant flaws," said DOUGLAS JONES, associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa and chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems.

BALDUS: CAPITAL PUNISHMENT STUDY ON HOLD (Washington Post, June 3)
With slightly more than two weeks left before the scheduled execution of convicted murderer and drug kingpin Juan Raul Garza, death penalty opponents today accused the Bush administration of stalling a government study of racial and geographic disparities in capital punishment procedures. Former attorney general Janet Reno authorized the National Institute of Justice, the Justice Department's research arm, to conduct a study of disparities, using independent experts. But some death penalty experts who were to be involved in that study said they believe it either has been put on hold or scuttled. DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who attended a Jan. 10 meeting of experts in Washington that was called by Reno to launch the study, said: "At the time there were expectations it would go forward. . . . But since then nothing much has happened." He said the federal prosecutors attending the meeting "didn't seem very interested in it."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A12583-2001Jun2.html

CORYELL: GLAND, SUICIDE LINK POSSIBLE (Chicago Tribune, June 3)
A new test, called the dexamethasone suppression test, measures the activity of three critical glands -- hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal -- called the HPA axis. A low level of activity is linked to suicide. A study of 78 patients with depression or schizophrenia showed that those with low HPA activity had a 26.8 percent risk of suicide during a three-year period compared with a 2.9 percent risk of suicide in patients with normal HPA activity, said Dr. WILLIAM CORYELL of the University of Iowa School of Medicine. The study appeared in the American Journal of Psychiatry.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0106030505,FF.html
The same article ran June 4 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/features/health/sns-health-cancertest.story

CONROY: WRITERS DON'T READ HOW-TO BOOKS (Charlotte Observer, June 3)
A quote by FRANK CONROY, director of the University of Iowa's Writers' Workshop, ran in the paper. "We never use a book that teaches you to write; we never even read them. I don't think you can learn writing from a book, except from reading literature," Conroy says.

WORKSHOP GRAD'S FIRST BOOK PUBLISHED BY UI (Chicago Tribune, June 3)
A review of author Thisbe Nissen's debut novel, "The Good People of New York," says the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP graduate's first book was a short-story collection titled "Out of the Girls' Room and Into the Night," which the story says was published first by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/books/article/0,2669,SAV-0106030055,FF.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES BOOK ON 'DINNER ROLES' (Baltimore Sun, June 3)
Ever go to a cookout and notice that the men are clustered around the grill, while the women are in charge of salads and desserts? Ever notice that women are usually in charge of the day-to-day cooking and grocery shopping, even in families where both spouses work? Author Sherrie Inness tackles these food-related questions and others in her latest book, "Dinner Roles: American Women and Culinary Culture" (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 2001).
http://www.sunspot.net/news/printedition/bal-hf.dinner03jun03.story

UI PRESS'S 'ENEMIES' CITED (San Jose Mercury News, June 2)
A list of events in the San Jose, Calif., area listed a radio interview with John Christgau, author of the book "Enemies, World War II Alien Internment," which was published in 1985 by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/local/docs/wwiibox02.htm

PHARMACY RESEARCHERS WRITE LETTER (Wall Street Journal, June 1)
JOHN M. BROOKS
and ELIZABETH CHRISCHILLES, researchers in the Program in Pharmaceutical Socioeconomics at the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy, write a letter in response to a May 11 article "Health Advocates Seek Guidelines that Stick to Proven Treatments." They write that their research highlights the distinction between treatment efficacy (the demonstrated benefit of a treatment for well-defined populations within controlled clinical research) and treatment effectiveness (the treatment benefits that patients can expect in real world practice). There are many circumstances in which some patients with a given condition can expect to gain substantially from a treatment, while others may gain little or even be harmed by a treatment.
http://interactive.wsj.com/articles/Letters.htm

UI STUDY: NITRATES LEAD TO CANCER (Urology Times, June 2001)
Women who drank tap water that contained levels of nitrates below the maximum level of 10 mg/L as set by the Environmental Protection Agency were still nearly three times more likely to develop bladder cancer than those who consumed lower levels of nitrates, according to a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study.

NYGAARD COMMENTS ON FEMALE INCONTINENCE (Redbook, June 2001)
A story about incontinence among women says INGRID NYGAARD, a urogynecologist at the University of Iowa, found that only one in three women she studied sought medical help for bladder-control problems, perhaps believing them to be an untreatable condition or a result of childbirth.

YOUNG COAUTHORS OBESITY REPORT (American Family Physician, June 2001)
DONALD C. YOUNG
, M.D. with the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is coauthor of an article titled: Obesity: Assessment and Management in Primary Care. The original version of the article was presented as Report 6 of the Council on Scientific Affairs at the 1999 American Medical Association Interim Meeting.

HAYNES COMMENTS ON REHABILITATION (Biomechanics, June 2001)
A story about how practitioners handle football injury rehabilitation quotes RUSS HAYNES, associate director of the University of Iowa's athletic training program. "How we rehabilitate the injury often depends on the type of injury and also the condition of the athlete after the injury, his strength and tissue tolerance," Haynes said.

HINGTGEN: UI USES TELERADIOLOGY (Medical Imaging, June 2001)
The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics made an early entrance into providing teleradiology services -- the electronic transmission of radiographic images and reports from one location to another. After 10 years, the UIHC now serves a dozen healthcare facilities in Iowa. "Our focus has always been trying to use [teleradiology] in terms of outreach to under-served areas," says MARK HINGTGEN, the university's radiology administrator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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