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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: June 15, 2001

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

BAXTER READS JUNE 25 -- Charles Baxter will read from the new paperback edition of his novel "The Feast of Love," a finalist for the National Book Award, at 8 p.m. Monday, June 25 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

In the New York Times Book Review, critic Jacqueline Carey wrote, "'The Feast of Love' is as precise, as empathetic, as luminous as any of Baxter's past work. It is also rich, juicy, laugh-out-loud funny and completely engrossing."

The critic of the Washington Post Book World called the novel "a near perfect book, as deep as it is broad in its humaneness, comedy and wisdom."

And Howard Norman, author of "The Bird Artist" and "The Museum Guard" wrote, "Emotionally, intellectually, in all the ways that the very best literature attends us, Charles Baxter's brilliant symphony of love, loss, memory, astonishing metaphysical boldness, is a complete sustenance, a perfect invention. . . Baxter's passionate writing raises the level of regard for life itself, let alone the art of writing."

Baxter, who teaches at the University of Michigan, is the author of six previous works of fiction, including "Believers," "Harmony of the World" and "Through the Safety Net."

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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HORAN READS JUNE 26 -- Wisconsin writer Richard Horan, author of the new novel "Goose Music," will read at 8 p.m. Tuesday, June 26 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Paul Doro wrote in OnMilwaukee.com: "Wisconsin writer Richard Horan has crafted a strikingly original and brilliantly written novel entitled 'Goose Music.' It concerns a man who returns home and investigates the strange death of his brother, who disappeared long ago. Set around the town of Baraboo, the story involves the Circus World Museum and Native American mythology, making the setting a vital character."

Horan teaches high school English, and he earlier taught in South Korea. "Goose Music" is his second novel, following "Life in the Rainbow."

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681. For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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MACLEOD READS JUNE 27 -- Canadian author Alistair MacLeod will read from the new paperback edition of his recent novel of Nova Scotia fishermen, "No Great Mischief," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, June 27 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Thomas Mallon wrote, "MacLeod's world of Cape Breton -- with its Scottish fishermen and their displaced heirs, the miners and young professionals it has mournfully sent to the rest of the nation -- has become a permanent part of my own inner library."

"MacLeod writes with such 'simple' lucidity as is achieved only by mighty efforts in, one suspects, the wee small hours," Angus Calder wrote in the Independent. "The book is pervaded by humor and color, intensely vivid, and very, very moving.

MacLeod was born in Saskatchewan and raised among an extended family in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia. He worked as a logger, a miner, and a fisherman to finance his education, and he is now a professor of English at the University of Windsor, Ontario. He has also taught creative writing at the University of Indiana and the Banff Center. He still spends his summers in Cape Breton, writing in a cliff-top cabin looking west toward Prince Edward Island.

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681. For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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SCATTERGOOD READS JUNE 28 -- Poet Amy Scattergood, a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, will read from her new collection, "The Grammar of Nails," at 8 p.m. Thursday, June 28 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Poet Bin Ramke called Scattergood's work "a collision between word and world which is exciting and, in its clarity and precision, a little dangerous."

Scattergood's poems have previously appeared in journals including the Paris Review, Grand Street, the Prairie Schooner and the Beloit Poetry Journal.

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681. For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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BERNE READS JUNE 29 -- University of Iowa Writers' Workshop alumna Suzanne Berne will read from her new novel "A Perfect Arrangement" at 8 p.m. Friday, June 29 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From

Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

A Publishers Weekly preview summarized, "Quotidian details of an apparently perfect domestic life spell suspense in Berne's second novel. Berne is an assured writer and is at her best with careful, observant descriptions of family life."

Berne's first novel, "A Crime in the Neighborhood," won the Orange Prize in the United Kingdom, was a New York Times Notable Book and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times and the Edgar Allan Poe first fiction awards.

"Suzanne Berne has many gifts, among them the talent to describe with eloquence and empathy the fault line of her characters," wrote Jane Hamilton, author of "A Map of the World" and "Disobedience."

Berne teaches in the Harvard University English department.

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681. For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.