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UI in the News

July 2001

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AUTHOR BERNE COMMENTS ON WORKSHOP (Poets & Writers, July/Aug. 2001)
A question-and-answer feature on writer Suzanne Berne, whose second novel "A Perfect Arrangement" was recently published by Algonquin, quotes her response to the question: Was your time at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP important, influential? "One of the things I appreciated was that for two years, I was doing what everyone else was doing," Berne says. "It wasn't weird trying to be a writer because everyone I knew was writing."

CORRECTION: An article in the Aug. 3 issue of the Chronicle of Higher Education mistakenly reported that a couple donated $500,000 to the University of Iowa for a sports arena, and the mistake was repeated in the Monday, July 30 UI News Digest. The gift was to the University of Northern Iowa.

HOCH QUOTED ON LANGUAGE LAB CLOSING (Omaha World-Herald, July 31)
The University of Iowa plans to close its only language lab, which provides translation services to faculty, staff and students. The closure will save the school an estimated $100,000, officials said. The lab has been scheduled for an internal review to consider its usefulness, said STEVEN HOCH, associate provost and dean of international programs. Hoch said the decision to close the lab was not directly related to the university's budget problems.

STRAUSS COMMENTS ON MONEY FOR BLOOD (St. Petersburg Times, July 31)
A sustained national blood shortage is forcing some hospitals and blood banks to ask: Should we pay our blood donors? Proponents say donors now get "incentives" one way or another, be it paid time off work, tickets to cultural events or smaller gifts, such as ice cream coupons. "The definition of 'paid' is very imprecise and frankly unscientific," said Dr. RON STRAUSS, medical director of the DeGowin Blood Center at the University of Iowa. "How one cash is OK and how one cash is not OK doesn't make any sense to me." It is almost unheard of in the United States for blood banks to pay donors for red blood cells -- but several agencies, including the blood center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; and Sherman Oaks-based HemaCare Corp., say they have safe and successful paid-donor programs for platelets, the cells that cause blood clotting.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/073101/Worldandnation/Blood_banks_consider_.shtml

UI LABOR CENTER PICKS UNION SONG (Wall Street Journal, July 31)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S LABOR CENTER has named "Union Song," by Jim Pilcher, a Machinists union member, as winner of its union song contest.

STUTTERING STORY REPORTER RESIGNS (San Francisco Chronicle, July 31)
A reporter for the San Jose Mercury News has resigned after being criticized for not identifying himself while doing research on a series about orphans who were taught to stutter, the newspaper said yesterday. Executive Editor David Yarnold said Jim Dyer, who is also a master's degree candidate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, presented himself only as a graduate student to gain access to an Iowa archive. The archive is not open to journalists. The Mercury News series described how a teacher caused some children at an Iowa orphanage to stutter. The 1930s experiment eventually helped thousands of children overcome the speech problem, but it also condemned some to lives as outcasts. "Dyer says he subsequently verified all of the information he obtained in the archives through his own independent reporting," Yarnold added. "There will be some who argue that Dyer did nothing improper or that the outcome justified the means. We disagree."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/07/31/MN31203.DTL

O'LEARY FINDS SMELL, SCHIZOPHRENIA LINK (New York Times, July 31)
Schizophrenia is best known by its active symptoms, like paranoid delusions, but it also has passive ones, like an inability to experience pleasure. A report published last week in The Journal of the American Medical Association suggested that studying the sense of smell could help shed light on some of the symptoms. Researchers from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics exposed 18 people with schizophrenia and 16 healthy volunteers to a pleasant smell, vanilla, and to an unpleasant smell that Dr. DANIEL S. O'LEARY, an author of the paper, compared to the odor of moldy socks. An imaging device was used to track blood flow to different areas of the brain, and the subjects were asked to rate each smell. The groups ranked the unpleasant smell similarly but differed on the pleasant smell. The people with schizophrenia found the vanilla equally intense but half as pleasing as did the healthy volunteers.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/31/health/psychology/31ODOR.html

ART HISTORY GRADUATE NAMED CURATOR (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, July 31)
Graziella Marchicelli will take over as fine arts curator at the Southern Alleghenies Museum of Art (SAMA) beginning Monday. She comes to SAMA from the Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham, Ala., where she has been curator of education since 1997. Marchicelli was born in Sardinia, Italy, and moved with her family to the United States when she was a teen-ager. She earned a bachelor's degree and doctorate in art history from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.post-gazette.com/ae/20010731sama0731fnp9.asp

STRAUSS COMMENTS ON MONEY FOR BLOOD (Columbus Dispatch, July 31)
A sustained national blood shortage is forcing some hospitals and blood banks to ask: Should we pay our blood donors? Proponents say donors now get "incentives" one way or another, be it paid time off work, tickets to cultural events or smaller gifts, such as ice cream coupons. "The definition of 'paid' is very imprecise and frankly unscientific," said Dr. RON STRAUSS, medical director of the DeGowin Blood Center at the University of Iowa. "How one cash is OK and how one cash is not OK doesn't make any sense to me." It is almost unheard of in the United States for blood banks to pay donors for red blood cells -- but several agencies, including the blood center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; and Sherman Oaks-based HemaCare Corp., say they have safe and successful paid-donor programs for platelets, the cells that cause blood clotting.

STRAUSS COMMENTS ON MONEY FOR BLOOD (Los Angeles Times, July 30)
A sustained national blood shortage is forcing some hospitals and blood banks to ask: Should we pay our blood donors? Proponents say donors now get "incentives" one way or another, be it paid time off work, tickets to cultural events or smaller gifts, such as ice cream coupons. "The definition of 'paid' is very imprecise and frankly unscientific," said Dr. RON STRAUSS, medical director of the DeGowin Blood Center at the University of Iowa. "How one cash is OK and how one cash is not OK doesn't make any sense to me." It is almost unheard of in the United States for blood banks to pay donors for red blood cells -- but several agencies, including the blood center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; and Sherman Oaks-based HemaCare Corp., say they have safe and successful paid-donor programs for platelets, the cells that cause blood clotting.
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-000061982jul30.story

BERGMAN COMMENTS ON HUMAN 'GILL' (Los Angeles Times, July 30)
The author of an article on "spare anatomical parts" queried RONALD BERGMAN, emeritus professor of anatomy at the University of Iowa, about a friend who has a small, gill-like slit in his neck that occasionally exudes "a little gooey fluid." Bergman responded that the friend has something called a branchial cleft cyst or sinus that, in a fish, would have developed into a gill slit.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000061918jul30.story

IRVING ATTENDED WRITERS' WORKSHOP (Kansas City Star, July 29)
A feature story on author John Irving, whose latest novel "The Fourth Hand" is receiving rapturous reviews, says: he never had any expectation of supporting himself as a full-time writer while earning an undergraduate degree from the University of New Hampshire and a master's from the University of Iowa. "The writers I knew taught in colleges."
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,fyi/3accd7c7.724,.html
The article first appeared in the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM.

CEILLEY BEMOANS LACK OF TANNING REGULATIONS (Yahoo! News, July 29)
A story about the risks associated with tanning booths quotes Dr. ROGER CEILLEY, past president of the American Academy of Dermatology and a clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa. The story says that regulation of tanning salons varies from state to state, and about 20 states have no regulations. "With such good evidence that rays from tanning booths can damage your skin and increase your chances of skin cancer, we are quite concerned about that and the fact that [salons] aren't regulated," says Ceilley.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010729/hl/tanning_booths_can_cast_a_deadly_shadow_1.html

REPORTER DIDN’T GIVE FULL I.D. (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 28)
A reporter for the San Jose Mercury News resigned after being criticized for not identifying himself while doing research on a series about orphans who were taught to stutter. Executive Editor David Yarnold said Jim Dyer, who also is a master’s degree candidate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, presented himself only as a graduate student to gain access to an Iowa archive. The archive is not open to journalists. (Versions of this article also appeared in the July 31 FRESNO BEE, and the August 1 SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.)

CRESPO-FACORRO LEADS SCHIZOPHRENIA STUDY (Deseret News, July 27)|
Schizophrenics react strongly to unpleasant odors but often do not appreciate pleasant ones, and their brains' response to smells may provide a clue to their paranoid thoughts, researchers said this week. When schizophrenics in the study were exposed to an unpleasant odor emitted by a type of acid, brain scans showed an increase in blood flow to their prefrontal cortex, a region normally used to recognize pleasant stimuli. The prefrontal cortex was apparently "hijacked" in the brains of schizophrenics to detect a potential threat and was not available to respond when they sniffed a pleasant lemon odor, according to a study by researchers at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City. "The use of . . . (the) prefrontal cortex for such survival tasks may also lead to an aberrant tendency to attribute threatening aspects to stimuli and in turn give rise to paranoid thinking," lead researcher BENEDICTO CRESPO-FACORRO wrote in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0107270005

ONLINE FORUM MAKES REFERENCE TO UI (New York Times, July 25)
In an on-line policy forum hosted July 24 by the New York Times and featuring marijuana legalization activist Renee Boje -- who is fighting extradition from Canada -- someone emailed his or her comments to Boje saying that he or she had attended the April 2000 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA medicinal cannabis conference. The questioner said "a large bit of time was used to discuss the Jamacan [sic] custom of pregnant women using cannabis to reduce morning sickness and help with birth/delivery. Before cannabis was made illegal in 1937 (with NO research about its benefits) DOCTORS used cannabis for this very reason as well as menopausal symptoms -- unless you know women's medical needs, people should not jump to conclusions ( it is sexist. )"
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/25/national/25DPTRAN.html?searchpv=day01

REPORTER USED STUDENT STATUS (San Francisco Chronicle, July 25)
A reporter for the San Jose Mercury News failed to properly identify himself while working on a series about orphans who were taught to stutter at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the newspaper said Wednesday. David Yarnold, executive editor of the Mercury News, said that reporter Jim Dyer presented himself as a graduate student -- instead of identifying himself as a reporter -- to gain access to an Iowa archive. Yarnold said Dyer is a master's degree candidate doing research for his thesis at the UI, a requirement for access to the archive. The archive is not open to journalists.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/07/25/state1942EDT0261.DTL

O'LEARY COAUTHORS SCHIZOPHRENICS STUDY (Yahoo! News, July 25)
Schizophrenics, who often have trouble appreciating pleasant odors, seem to filter smells through the analytic part of the brain rather than the normal "gut reaction" part, suggests a new study. The Iowa researchers say this shift could be the brain's way of making up for the loss of certain emotional aspects of the ability to smell, because recognizing noxious odors is more vital to survival. Such a shift could cause schizophrenics to mistakenly perceive "threatening aspects to stimuli and, in turn, give rise to paranoid thinking," the Iowa researchers add. The findings, which appear in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, offer the most detailed comparison so far of real-time brain differences between healthy people and those with schizophrenic anhedonia in processing the sense of smell, experts say. And although the work doesn't have any immediate implications for treatment, it could help scientists better understand how the debilitating condition affects a sufferer's perception not only of odor but also of the other four senses. DANIEL O'LEARY, a University of Iowa neuroscientist and co-author of the journal article, said the schizophrenic patients were filtering the unpleasant odors through analysis instead of responding to them viscerally.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010724/hl/schizophrenia_undoes_sense_of_smell_1.html
The same Reuters article ran July 24 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010724/16/science-health-schizophrenia-dc

PAPER QUESTIONS REPORTER’S METHODS (San Jose Mercury News, July 25)
The newspaper, which published a two-part investigative report in June about stuttering research conducted in 1939 by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student, acknowledges that its reporter, Jim Dyer, gained access to an Iowa state archive by presenting himself as a graduate student, rather than as a journalist. He did not fully disclose the purpose of his research. Dyer is, in fact, a master's degree candidate doing research for his thesis at the University of Iowa, a requirement for access to the archive. He stipulated that as a graduate student, he wanted access "for the purpose of scholarly research,'' another requirement to get into the archive. The archive, however, is not open to journalists. Dyer did not disclose that he was a reporter on assignment for the Mercury News, or that the research was part of his reporting for the stories. He did not discuss the situation with his editors. The paper says that while the articles were an important investigative story, "we can't endorse some of the methods used to report it."
http://www0.mercurycenter.com/premium/nation/docs/016334.htm

SUBJECTS CAN’T SMELL PLEASANT ODORS (New York Times.com, July 25)
Schizophrenics react strongly to unpleasant odors but often do not appreciate pleasant ones and their brains' response to smells may provide a clue to their paranoid thoughts, researchers said on Tuesday. When schizophrenics in the study were exposed to an unpleasant odor emitted by a type of acid, brain scans showed an increase in blood flow to their prefrontal cortex, a region normally used to recognize pleasant stimuli. The prefrontal cortex was apparently "hijacked'' in the brains of schizophrenics to detect a potential threat, and was not available to respond when they sniffed a pleasant lemon odor, according to a study by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS in Iowa City. The study is published in this week's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/health/science-health-schizo.html?searchpv=reuters

UI CANCER CENTER CONDUCTS PAIN STUDY (Dow Jones Newswire, July 24)
I-Flow Corp. said the results of a clinical study confirmed the efficacy of I-Flow’s ON-Q Pain Management System for post-operative analgesia. The study, which examined the benefits of using the ON-Q Pain Management System to control post-operative pain in patients with gynecologic malignancy, was conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s HOLDEN COMPREHENSIVE CANCER CENTER.

JONES COMMENTS ON ELECTRONIC VOTING (The Age, July 24)
Some groups in Australia are experimenting with online voting and are testing out several types of software to accomplish this. DOUGLAS JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, in testimony in January on voting technology before the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, adopted the axiom, "trust no one". "Classical voting systems, notably the Australian paper ballot, are designed precisely on such anti-trust grounds," Jones said. "We simply assume from the start that each and every participant in the system is a partisan with a vested interest in doing everything possible to help his or her favorite candidates." He said paper and pencil voting systems, such as that first used in Victoria in 1858, meet this test. Electronic voting does not. (This article appeared in the IT News section of The Age, a newspaper in Melbourne, Australia.)
http://it.mycareer.com.au/news/2001/07/24/FFXL76U4HPC.html

CORYELL STUDIES SUICIDE RISK (The Press-Enterprise, July 24)
A new tool called the dexamethasone suppression test gives doctors a better ability to predict which patients are at risk to commit suicide. The test measures activity of three critical glands—the hypothalamus, the pituitary, and the adrenal—known as the HPS axis. A study showed that patients with depression or schizophrenia with low HPA activity had a 26.8 percent risk of suicide during a three-year period compared with a 2.9 percent risk in patience with normal HPA activity, said DR. WILLIAM CORYELL of the University of Iowa College of Medicine.

NEH AWARDS GRANTS TO UI (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 24)
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) has awarded grants for preservation to two University of Iowa staff members. CORNELIA F. MUTEL, was awarded $4,797 for the purchase of archival supplies to rehouse materials documenting the history of technology and water use in the Upper Mississippi Valley, and Julia Golden, was awarded $4,996 for the purchase of storage furniture, equipment, and supplies to rehouse records, photographs, and works-of-art on paper documenting the history and culture of Iowa in the 19th and 20th centuries.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/07/2001072405n.htm

BALDUS STUDIES NEBRASKA DEATH PENALTY (Lincoln Journal Star, July 24)
The debate over the fairness of the state's death penalty could come into sharper focus next week with the release of a $180,000 study of capital punishment in Nebraska. Commissioned by the Nebraska Legislature in 1999, the study already is drawing statewide and national interest. Early last year, the Crime Commission hired the Lincoln law firm Keating, O'Gara, Davis and Nedved and University of Iowa Law School professor DAVID BALDUS to do the study. Jerry Soucie, an attorney with the Nebraska Commission of Public Advocacy, said Baldus is recognized nationally as a leading death penalty researcher who has already done about a half-dozen other studies.
http://www.journalstar.com/nebraska?story_id=3879&date=20010724&past=

GLASS DISCUSSES INEQUALITY (Hudson Valley Business Journal, July 23)
A University of Iowa study says that women who try to balance work and family by taking advantage of employers' family friendly policies end up with lower salaries and smaller raises. "It's really a question of inequality," said JENNIFER GLASS, the Iowa professor who conducted the eight-year study along with Sarah Beth Estes of the University of Cincinnati. "We're not sure why the wage penalty exists." The biweekly Journal is based in Wappingers Falls, N.Y.

UI STUDY: ANKLE REPLACEMENTS SUCCESSFUL (Chicago Sun-Times, July 23)
Ankle replacement surgery, which surgeons abandoned in the mid-1980s because of poor results, is making a comeback with new designs and materials. In the surgery, both sides of the ankle joint are removed and replaced with artificial components. Early results of the Agility ankle, one of three available artificial ankles, are promising, according to a study published in 1998 in the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. Among 82 patients who were followed for an average of 4.8 years, 55 percent said their ankles were pain free and 28 percent reported only mild pain. Ninety-three percent of patients said they were satisfied. The study by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers was funded by DePuy, a Johnson & Johnson company, which manufactures the Agility ankle.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cst-nws-ank23.html

INSURANCE FOR IVF LIMITS MULTIPLES (Washington Post, July 23)
The septuplets born at Georgetown University Hospital on July 12 may have made medical history, but their birth was no medical miracle. In fact, the birth of so many fragile babies at once is a medical debacle. Such births are rarely the result of a whim of nature, but more often the misuse of medical technology. A greater percentage of births in Europe now result from in vitro fertilization (IVF) in other developed countries than in the United States, but there are proportionately fewer multiple births. The lesson for us may lie in the way infertility medicine is financed. In Europe, fertility treatments are generally covered by government health plans. In the United States, most health insurance excludes such services. Couples must pay for treatments out-of-pocket. This puts tremendous pressure on physicians and couples to get pregnant on the first try. The temptation is to transfer a few more embryos to increase the chances of a pregnancy — or notch up the anti-fertility drugs to produce more eggs. Health insurance coverage for infertility treatments would take off some of the pressure. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, whose self-insured health plan offers infertility services, found that costs were relatively low — less than a dollar per month per member, concluded a 1999 report in Fertility and Sterility.
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A40154-2001Jul23.html

UI PHARMACY GRADUATE IS QUOTED (Christian Science Monitor, July 23)
Here's welcome news for millions of current and former college students with government-backed tuition loans: Interest rates on the billions of dollars they've borrowed have hit the lowest level in decades. Early this month, Taffney VandeVoorde consolidated her $22,000 in debt, cutting her monthly bill from $272 to $150, and stretched its 10-year term to 15 years. But the pharmaceuticals saleswoman from Bettendorf, Iowa, plans to extinguish her debt early by paying the original amount. "Now I'm going to whack it out in double time," says Ms. VandeVoorde, a 1997 graduate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/07/23/fp16s1-csm.shtml

UI HELPS DRAW BIOTECH COMPANIES (Seattle Times, July 22)
The world hasn't heard as much about it, but biotechnology companies are being chased by more economic recruiters than protesters. As protesters sweltered in the sun and were intimidated by police guarding the Biotechnology Industry Organization convention in San Diego last month, the recruiters were hustling in the air-conditioned convention center. Bret Weber, marketing manager with the Iowa Department of Economic Development, said his state's aggressive biotech-recruiting efforts are starting to pay off. He said three or four companies in the past few weeks have shown interest in moving to Iowa, and the state is working to help new companies spin out of Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA .
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=biotechhunters220&date=20010722&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (Los Angeles Times, July 20)
Antitrust officials are considering dropping a key part of their lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. in hopes of getting a speedier resolution to the landmark case. Last month, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit agreed with the Justice Department and 18 states that some of Microsoft's practices violated federal antitrust laws, but it threw out the remedy--that Microsoft be split into two companies. The appeals court also sent back to a lower court the question of whether Microsoft's bundling of its Internet Explorer Web browser and its Windows operating system violated an antitrust law that bans some tying of unrelated products. Under the tougher new standard set by the appeals court, the government could have a difficult time proving the tying violation. "The restrictions that the court put on are so severe it would be impossible to win," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor whose work has been cited by the government in the Microsoft case. "The payoff is minimal. So the rational thing is not to pursue it."
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-000059155jul20.story
The same story ran July 20 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/la-000059155jul20.story

CANCER CELLS CAN BE DISGUISED (JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association, July 18)
Like a scurrilous disguise artist, melanoma and ovarian cancer cells can change their clothing to mimic other cell types, reports a team from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the National Institutes of Health. The findings deepen the mystery of the genetic misfirngs in cancer cells, said MARY HENDRIX, president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology and the head of the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology at Iowa. “They’re almost stem cell-like” in their ability to express characteristics of various cell types, Hendrix said. That’s a clinical challenged, she added, because pathologists could misidentify the cells.

UI GRAD WAS DIRECTOR-PROFESSOR (Yahoo! News, July 18)
Lowell Matson, the director-professor who founded the theatre department at Staten Island's Wagner College, a breeding ground for Broadway talent, died June 8 of a brain aneurysm in Valhalla, NY, according to The Staten Island Advance. Dr. Matson, 79, affectionately called Doc, was a director and teacher who created Wagner's Department of Speech and Theater. He retired in 1987 after 19 years with the department. Matson was a Cooperstown, NY, native who held bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees in theatre and speech, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story originated in PLAYBILL.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/playbill/20010718/en/staten_island_theatre_professor_lowell_matson_dead_at_age_79_1.html

PARENTS TESTIFY ABOUT ADOPTING EMBRYOS (Boston Globe, July 18)
John and Lucinda Borden, who adopted two frozen embryos after learning that they could not conceive naturally, took their nine-month-old twin sons to a Congressional hearing on stem cell research. The adoption of the children from excess embryos puts yet another human face on the heated debate surrounding federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, which many scientists say could lead to cures for countless diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and diabetes. The Borden’s sons’ genetic parents donated the embryos to the Snowflakes program, an embryo-adoption program run by Nightlight Children Adoptions of Fullerton, Calif. Other programs, such as one run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CENTER, also arrange embryo adoption.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/199/nation/New_faces_in_stem_cell_debate+.shtml

CHANG COMMENTS ON NEW WOUND TREATMENT (Reuters, July 17)
Tissue engineering firm Ortec International Inc. on Tuesday won a U.S. panel's support for approval of Orcel, a wound dressing made with living skin cells, for treating certain wounds in burn patients. By a unanimous vote, a panel of outside experts advised regulators to approve Orcel for covering donor site wounds in burn patients. Donor sites are areas from which doctors take skin to repair burns elsewhere on the body. The Food and Drug Administration, which makes the final decision, does not have to follow its panels' advice, but it usually does. The panel's support came with some conditions. Members suggested that Orcel's label state that it has not been proven to work better than other treatments or to significantly help patients younger than 12 or with burns on less than 20 percent of the body. "We do need medical products that accelerate wound healing. (Orcel) is deserving of a chance," said panel member Dr. PHYLLIS CHANG, a professor of orthopedic, plastic and reconstructive surgery at The University of Iowa College of Medicine.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/010717/wat024406.html

UI STUDY: ADDICTS ARE POOR DECISION MAKERS (Reuters Health, July 17)
Some people who are addicted to alcohol or drugs may have problems with their decision-making skills, researchers suggest. Their findings give weight to the idea that addiction involves a flaw in the brain's decision-making center. In a study conducted at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, a majority of alcoholics and drug addicts scored as poorly on a test measuring the ability to make decisions as people with damage to a brain region that helps control decision-making. A test called the Iowa Gambling Task, which simulates real-life decisions, can detect malfunctioning in the decision-making in people with this type of brain damage. To see how alcoholics and drug abusers would fare on the test, Dr. ANTOINE BECHARA and colleagues studied 41 substance abusers, 5 patients with VM damage, and 40 healthy people. Considerably more alcoholics and drug abusers than healthy people fared as poorly on the test as those with brain damage, the researchers report in a recent issue of the journal Neuropsychologia.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010717/hl/addiction_1.html

UI SHOWS GRAHAM BOOK AT FESTIVAL (Chicago Tribune, July 17)
A story about the Festival of the Book, sponsored by Columbia College, says that among the presenters was the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S CENTER FOR THE BOOK, which showed off an edition of a work by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and former Writers' Workshop instructor Jorie Graham.

HENDRIX QUOTED ON RESEARCHER LEAVING U.S. (Wall Street Journal, July 16)
One of the nation's leading stem-cell researchers, Roger Pedersen of the University of California, San Francisco, has accepted a faculty position at the University of Cambridge, a leading center for developmental biology. Pedersen's departure comes as U.S. universities face an increasingly murky legal situation. Although dozens of academic scientists have begun studying stem cells using private funds, the National Institutes of Health says these projects may still violate the funding ban in some cases if government grants are being used to pay for lab overhead, such as secretarial support. The rule right now is "if you're in a lab that has even a dollar of federal funding, you can't conduct this type of research," says MARY HENDRIX, the former president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology and head of anatomy and cell biology at the UI.
http://interactive.wsj.com/articles/SB995232102935923565.htm (subscription required)

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON ANTITRUST LAWSUITS (New York Times, July 16)
In an article about consumer antitrust lawsuits in the wake of the recent court decision against Microsoft, experts say that even if some of these suits prevail, it is far from certain that Microsoft will end up facing the kind of huge judgments that could shape its future behavior. "There's a robust history of private plaintiffs successfully suing cartels involved in price fixing," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school. But there is no such track record for suits against a single monopolist, especially in situations like this one, in which most of those complaining that they have been overcharged or otherwise injured are consumers who did not buy directly from Microsoft. "It's not nearly as easy," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/16/technology/ebusiness/16SOFT.html (registration required)

UI STUDENT’S ART CALLED NUISANCE (USA Today, July 16)
City officials in Oskaloosa have ordered Elaine Beck to remove a display of chairs from her front lawn. She defends the exhibit as an art project she began for a class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. City officials first cited the chairs as an unsightly nuisance. Now they have dropped that complaint but say she lacked a permit for an outdoor art show.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20010716/3484304s.htm

PARENTS TESTIFY ABOUT ADOPTING EMBRYOS (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 15)
John and Lucinda Borden, who adopted two frozen embryos after learning that they could not conceive naturally, took their nine-month-old twin sons to a Congressional hearing on stem cell research. The adoption of the children from excess embryos puts yet another human face on the heated debate surrounding federal funding of embryonic stem cell research, which many scientists say could lead to cures for countless diseases, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and diabetes. The Borden’s sons’ genetic parents donated the embryos to the Snowflakes program, an embryo-adoption program run by Nightlight Children Adoptions of Fullerton, Calif. Other programs, such as one run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CENTER, also arrange embryo adoption.

GENE LINKED TO GI CANCER (Family Practice News, July 15)
Bone morphogenetic protein receptor 1A is the second gene to be linked to juvenile polyposis, a condition in which patients develop gastrointestinal polyps that increase their risk of GI cancer later in life, said Dr. JAMES R. HOWE and his associates at the University of Iowa.

UI PRESS BOOK LISTED (Urban Latino News, July 15)
A list of recommended books includes “American Diaspora: Poetry of Displacement,” published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT REMEDY (Chicago Sun-Times, July 15)
Antitrust enforcers might have trouble keeping Microsoft Corp. from integrating new features into Windows XP when the next version of its operating system goes on sale Oct. 25, antitrust experts say. Windows XP is likely to be the next battleground now that a U.S. appeals court has ordered a new hearing on remedies to be imposed on the software giant for illegally defending its Windows monopoly. The task is to craft a remedy that will prevent Microsoft from perpetuating its control of the market for personal computer operating systems. "The remedy is forward-looking; it is supposed to solve the problem" of a market dominated by a monopolist, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school.

GABLE'S POLITICAL ASPIRATIONS NOTED (New York Times, July 15)
A roundup of political news includes information on former UI wrestling coach DAN GABLE’s possible run for Iowa Governor. Gable, who has never run for public office, says he is in a "learning" stage and does not yet know if he will run. But this much he has already learned: Politics is a contact sport, too. Those who would have him stick with wrestling, not just Democrats but also some Republicans, have gotten their hands on a tape of an interview he recently gave to KCJJ, a sports radio station in Iowa. It is making the rounds. Why is he thinking about running? the interviewer asks. "Why?" Mr. Gable replies. "Well, that's what I'd like to know. That's what I'm hoping to find out." What would be his top priorities and issues? "You're way ahead of me," he replies. "That is somewhere down the road where I would speak of those type of qualities. Right now, I am trying to make a decision whether I should be a candidate."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/15/national/15POLI.html

MCGEHEE COMMENTS ON CAR SAFETY (Kansas City Star, July 15)
New technologies to make cars safer have their benefits, but there are some hurdles that manufacturers must overcome to make the systems more reliable. DANIEL V. MCGEHEE, director of the Human Factors Research Program at the University of Iowa's Public Policy Center, said one of the challenges that manufacturers of adaptive cruise control systems face is how much control the systems have over the vehicle. Control is easy when the difference of speeds between two vehicles is not great, McGehee said. Easing off the throttle or even applying the brakes a little normally will keep the two vehicles at safe distances. But manufacturers are struggling to address those situations in which there is a sudden need to dramatically reduce a vehicle's speed. "That raises the question of whether the systems should alert the driver that additional braking is required or if the system should take active control of the car," McGehee said. He said manufacturers have a difference of opinion, but most do not see adaptive cruise control as a collision avoidance system that would apply the brakes aggressively.
http://www.kcstar.com/item/pages/printer.pat,local/3accd288.715,.html

UI EMBRYO DONATION RESEARCH CITED (Philadelphia Inquirer, July 15)
In light of recent debate about stem cell research, some parents are faced with a new dilemma -- whether to donate surplus frozen embryos for research, donate them to infertile couples, or discard them. A study at the University of Iowa College of Medicine's in vitro fertilization clinic -- one of the few that arranges anonymous embryo donation -- found that about 90 percent of couples won't even consider it. Some are put off by required counseling and health tests. Many find creepy the idea that they might have unknown genetic offspring -- children their own biological children might someday meet and even marry. "Embryo donation is certainly one solution, but it's not going to be the whole answer" to the surplus embryo problem, said Dr. BRADLEY VAN VOORHIS, who set up the University of Iowa's program.
http://inq.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2001/07/15/front_page/STEMBUSH15.htm

GABLE COMMENTS ON POSSIBLE CANDIDACY (Washington Post, July 15)
In a roundup of political news, former University of Iowa wrestling coach and Olympic gold medalist DAN GABLE, is mentioned as a possible challenger to Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack (D.) next year. According to the political newsletter Hotline, Gable had this to say when asked during a radio interview why he is thinking of running: "Why? Well, that's what I'd like to know. ... That's what I'm hoping to find out. ... I obviously know, you know, what the reason I'm getting pushed to do this. It's whether or not I would want to get involved with this and that's when I can answer the reason why."
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/politics/fedpage/A62743-2001Jul14.html

UI STUDY: ONLINE INFORMATION TOO COMPLICATED (Newsbytes.com, July 13)
About half the surfers seeking health care information on the Web find it written in a language too difficult to understand, a study has found. The readability of patient education materials on the Internet is too high for average adults, said the study published in the current issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine. The study was done by DONNA M. D'ALESSANDRO, MD, PEGGY KINGSLEY, B.A., and JILL JOHNSON-WEST, MSW, at the Children's Hospital at the UI. (NEWSBYTES News Network, a division of The Washington Post Company, is an independent news service focusing on information technology.)
http://www.newsbytes.com/news/01/167924.html

CORYELL, NOYES, HOUSE CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 13)
A column about student anxieties says high levels of anxiety are linked to suicide attempts, and that suicide is now the second leading cause of death -- after accidents -- among college students. Sometimes those students were depressed, but often they were simply filled with anxiety about their academic performance and other aspects of their lives. WILLIAM CORYELL, RUSSELL NOYES, and J. DANIEL HOUSE of the University of Iowa School of Medicine reported in the April 1986 issue of The American Journal of Psychiatry that patients treated for anxiety were just as likely to commit suicide as were those treated for depression.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i44/44b01401.htm

D'ALESSANDRO STUDIES WEB HEALTH ADVICE (Globe & Mail, July 13)
About half of American adults seeking information about their children's health cannot grasp the information available on the Internet, researchers say. While about 50 percent of Americans read at a Grade 8 level or below, many of the Web sites devoted to children's health issues that were evaluated were written near a Grade 12 level, said DONNA D'ALESSANDRO of the Children's Hospital at the University of Iowa and author of the study published in this month's issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine.

UI FINDS GUM-CHEWING LOWERS MOUTH ACID (Business Journal, July 13)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY
researchers found that people who chewed sugarless gum after eating sweets lowered the amount of acid in their mouths. The gum stimulates saliva, and clears food particles from the mouth. The Business Journal is based in San Jose, Calif.

CRETH CO-AUTHORS CRITICAL REPORT (Albuquerque Journal, July 12)
University of New Mexico officials announced in July that Robert Migneault, longtime dean of library services, will step down after the 2001-02 academic year. The announcement follows the release last week of a sharply worded report criticizing Migneault's handling of the library system. The report, written by two out-of-state library officials, cites low employee morale and faculty distrust of Migneault's policies for discarding library materials. The report was prepared by Nancy L. Eaton, dean of University Libraries at Pennsylvania State University, and SHEILA D. CRETH, a consultant and former librarian at the University of Iowa.

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON CASE (Las Vegas Review-Journal, July 12)
Microsoft Corp. said it will make concessions and change its new Windows XP operating system to more easily accommodate services from technology rivals, bowing to an appeals court ruling that the company violated antitrust laws. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller said Microsoft's concession is a small step without much practical significance. Legal experts also were skeptical. "I don't know how that addressed the problem" of Microsoft's misuse of its monopoly, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school. "The remedy is not just supposed to look back and say, 'Don't do this again.' [It must] solve the problem of the monopolistic structure of the Windows market."

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (Los Angeles Times, July 12)
Microsoft Corp. said it will make concessions and change its new Windows XP operating system to more easily accommodate services from technology rivals, bowing to an appeals court ruling that the company violated antitrust laws. Iowa Attorney General Tom Miller said Microsoft's concession is a small step without much practical significance. Legal experts also were skeptical. "I don't know how that addressed the problem" of Microsoft's misuse of its monopoly, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa law school. "The remedy is not just supposed to look back and say, 'Don't do this again.' [It must] solve the problem of the monopolistic structure of the Windows market."
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-000057037jul12.story

HOVENKAMP: MICROSOFT ACTION WON’T APPEASE STATES (Baltimore Sun, July 11)
In a retreat from a long-held insistence on dictating the content of customers' computer desktops, Microsoft Corp. announced Wednesday that it will allow computer makers to remove the shortcut to the company's Internet Explorer browser. The decision, made in response to a recent appeals court ruling that Microsoft violated antitrust laws, appears to be aimed at smoothing the way to a negotiated settlement of the bitterly fought case. Although much of the publicity about the court of appeals decision focused on anti-Microsoft comments by the trial judge, the decision gave the government a relatively strong hand to play in negotiating a remedy with Microsoft, said HERB HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. He is also a former adviser to the government side of the case. "I'd be pretty disappointed if the Justice Department settled for something this wussy, and I know the states won't," Hovenkamp said.

ENGEN PRODUCES ONLINE COURSE (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 11)
A new course at the University of Iowa taught by HAROLD ENGEN, professor emeritus of counseling, rehabilitation and student development in the College of Education, teaches the fine points of counseling. The course is offered both online and in a traditional format. One unusual feature of the course is that Engen recruited actors and actresses from the fine-arts department to portray clients in a video he created. The scenes were unscripted, with the counselor demonstrating different counseling techniques as the characters improvised through the interview process. In the past, students viewed this on videotapes, but the university is on its way to digitizing that content for online access.
http://chronicle.com/free/2001/07/2001071101u.htm

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (Washington Post, July 11)
A federal appeals court's recent decision branding Microsoft Corp. a monopolist removes one of the key hurdles facing plaintiffs in more than 100 private lawsuits against the software giant. Those bringing the suits no longer have to prove the Redmond, Wash., firm wields monopoly power. In seeking damages, they now can focus their legal action on how that dominance actually harmed them. "The heart of the case has been taken care of," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust scholar at the University of Iowa law school.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/nation/states/ia/A42977-2001Jul10.html

UI IS A HIGHLIGHT OF TRIP TO IOWA CITY (Baltimore Sun, July 10)
A travelogue article on Iowa City makes several references to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The author writes: "Though Garrison Keillor's fictional Lake Wobegon, where it is always 'a quiet week,' is slightly further north, it was something like that larger rhythm feeling that we were seeking on our weekend adventure, a place where the natural forces of the planet can be appreciated, in an era when news is everywhere but understanding often seems sadly lacking. Such a place is Iowa City, a town that has a major university, the nation's largest teaching hospital, rich surrounding farmland and the best-known workshop for writers in the country." http://www.sunspot.net/travel/sns-iowacity.story
This article originally appeared July 8 in the Chicago Tribune: http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-0107080002,00.html

UI AIDS CDC WITH DRUG SHORTAGE (USA Today, July 10)
In the past few months, doctors and patients have faced shortages of more than a dozen medications, including snakebite treatment, surgical anesthetics, tetanus vaccine, steroids for premature infants, and antibiotics. And in late June, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) said that for the second-consecutive year, the flu vaccine may be delayed and supplies inadequate as the winter influenza season approaches. In another example, production of a drug known as DEC, which treats a parasite that can cause elephantiasis, was halted. Wanting a supply, the CDC contracted with the college of pharmacy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to produce the drug, an example of what may be one solution to the current drug shortage.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20010711/3471647s.htm

HOVENKAMP: MICROSOFT STRATEGY NEEDS LOOK (CNN Interactive, July 10)
The recent U.S. Court of Appeals decision in the Microsoft antitrust case could ultimately give corporate end users the ability to pick and choose among some Windows applications that the company plans to integrate with future versions of the operating system, say some legal and industry analysts. "Just think about the extent to which future Microsoft planning includes writing software code for collaborative applications into the Windows [operating system] itself," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "I think Microsoft is going to have to rethink that whole strategy."
http://www.cnn.com/2001/TECH/ptech/07/10/microsoft.options.idg/index.html

BLOOM'S 'POSTVILLE' RAISES IRE OF JEWS (Baltimore Sun, July 10)
A story about Postville says the town, which has been struggling with diversity for several years, is coping under more scrutiny than a town of its size and relative obscurity would expect to receive -- from the governor of Iowa, who has made it a priority to attract immigrants to this largely white and aging state, to a recently published book by a University of Iowa professor, STEPHEN G. BLOOM. Bloom's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" was published last year. Orthodox Jews in Postville say they were angered by how Bloom, a Reform Jew, portrayed them -- as arrogant and unfriendly to the locals, haggling over prices in stores, and passing them on the streets without so much as a "good morning" or a nod of the head.
http://www.sunspot.net/bal-te.iowa10jul10.story

UI DRIVING SIMULATOR COST CITED (USA Today, July 9)
Some members of Congress say the cost of the advanced driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has soared past $80 million, nearly twice the amount expected. Officials say once complete it will be rented to the auto industry, scientists and the government to study driving habits and car safety.

HOVENKAMP: MICROSOFT NEEDS NEW APPROACH (Computerworld, July 9)
The recent U.S. Court of Appeals decision in the Microsoft antitrust case could ultimately give corporate end users the ability to pick and choose among some Windows applications that the company plans to integrate with future versions of the operating system, say some legal and industrial analysts. "Just think about the extent to which future Microsoft planning includes writing software code for collaborative applications into the Windows (operating system) itself," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa. "I think Microsoft is going to have to rethink that whole strategy."

HOVENKAMP ASSESSES RULING (New York Times, July 9)
In its ruling on Microsoft, a federal appeals court wrote in regards to the company's practice of bundling some products with Windows that the software giant "failed to meet its burden of showing that its conduct serves a purpose other than protecting its operating system monopoly." The same principles, antitrust experts say, should apply to new kinds of software in markets that have the potential of eroding the grip that Microsoft's operating system monopoly exerts on computing. "Unless you're really myopic, that applies to future products as well as the browser," observed HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/09/technology/09SOFT.html
The same New York Times article ran July 9 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010709/tc/microsoft_sees_clear_victory_on_bundling__1.html

BROWN STUDIED INTERNET-BASED TRAINING (Salt Lake Tribune, July 9)
KEN BROWN
, a University of Iowa assistant professor, studied 78 employees who took Internet-based training. Some breezed through the course but didn't retain much. "People will finish as soon as they can and run out the door, and those people learn a lot less," says Brown, whose study appears in the latest edition of the journal Personnel Psychology.
http://www.sltrib.com:80/07092001/business/112084.htm

WORKSHOP ORGANIZER EARNED DEGREES AT UI (Sacramento Bee, July 8)
A story about the Sacramento Youth Symphony's Chamber Music Workshop says cellist Susan Lamb Cook, who was first asked to organize the event in 1990, earned two degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sacbee.com:80/lifestyle/news/lifestyle03_20010708.html

UI CITED IN TRAVELOGUE ARTICLE (Chicago Tribune, July 8)
A travelogue article on Iowa City makes several references to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The author writes: "'There's always something going on,' notes Barbie Mann, a friend that my girlfriend and I set out to visit on a recent weekend, spending two days at the Iowa House hotel on the banks of the Iowa River on the University of Iowa Campus. She was right. I took in a weekend course at the Iowa Summer Writing Festival (open to anyone in June and July) and spent a lot of time simply walking around, taking in the campus atmosphere."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-0107080002,00.html

UI ART GRADUATE PUTS CHAIRS IN YARD (Chicago Tribune, July 8)
An Oskaloosa resident named Elaine Beck erected a massive display of chairs in her front yard. There are upholstered chairs and folding chairs, wicker chairs and floating pool chairs, even a wheelchair, giving the whole thing what Beck has called "a PC look." Beck, a graduate student of art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is using the chairs as her graduate art project and has encouraged the 10,989 people of Oskaloosa to get involved. They can dump chairs there; they can rearrange chairs there; they can sit on the chairs there. Somebody even sneaked onto her property one night and wrapped all the chairs in plastic, an act of creative vandalism Beck laughingly has called "collaborative intervention."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/perspective/article/0,2669,SAV-0107080045,FF.html

IEM IS CITED IN STORY (International Herald Tribune, July 7)
The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS is mentioned in an article about NewsFutures, a French Web site that poses questions about future events — whether sporting, financial or political -- and enables the ongoing trading of "shares" on the outcomes. The site also provides chat rooms and forums, much like Yahoo Finance message boards, where players can discuss each day's events and their impact on share prices. The story says NewsFutures resembles the IEM, a real-money futures market run by the University of Iowa business school as a teaching tool, and focuses on economic and political events.
http://www.iht.com/articles/25380.htm

HOVENKAMP IS QUOTED ON MICROSOFT (Industry Standard, July 6)
The recent U.S. Court of Appeals decision in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case could ultimately give corporate end users the ability to pick and choose among some Windows applications that the company plans to integrate with future versions of the operating system, say some legal and industry analysts. "Just think about the extent to which future Microsoft planning includes writing software code for collaborative applications into the Windows [operating system] itself," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. "I think Microsoft is going to have to rethink that whole strategy."
http://biz.yahoo.com/st/010706/27740.html

UI IN DISTANCE EDUCATION GROUP (Chronicle of Higher Education, July 6)
The U.S. Department of Education last week announced the selection of 10 new projects for the Distance Education Demonstration Program. The program was begun in 1998, and this is the second and final group of projects selected to participate. Many of the projects involve more than one institution. The projects are sponsored by, among others, the Iowa Regents Consortium, based in Iowa City and made up of Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Missouri at Columbia, and the University of Northern Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i43/43a03103.htm

IEM CITED IN STORY ON 'VIRTUAL' MARKETS (New York Times, July 5)
The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS is mentioned in an article about NewsFutures, a French Web site that poses questions about future events – whether sporting, financial or political – and enables the ongoing trading of "shares" on the outcomes. The site also provides chat rooms and forums, much like Yahoo Finance message boards, where players can discuss each day's events and their impact on share prices. The story says NewsFutures resembles the IEM, a real-money futures market run by the University of Iowa business school as a teaching tool, and focuses on economic and political events.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/07/05/technology/05FRAN.html

HOVENKAMP: COURT BACKED GOVERNMENT (Chicago Tribune, July 5)

Although it didn't require Microsoft to be broken up, last week's ruling by the federal appeals court for the District of Columbia maintained that the software giant is a monopoly -- a ruling that could have grave consequences for the company. At a minimum, experts say, the decision provides support for a settlement or new court order that would: require Microsoft to adopt uniform pricing of its flagship Windows software; bar exclusive or discriminatory contracts between Microsoft and Internet content and service providers; and restrict Microsoft's ability to prevent PC makers from modifying the appearance of the Windows "desktop" and substituting other software applications such as Web browsers. "I think the court has backed the government on these issues," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,2669,SAV-0107050282,FF.html

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON 4TH AMENDMENT CASE (Wired, July 3)
It will be up to the U.S. Supreme Court justices to decide whether the court's recent decision in the Kyllo case should have broad or narrow application as it applies to future cases dealing with technology and Fourth Amendment privacy violations. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a law professor at the University of Iowa who helped Kyllo make his case before the Supreme Court, thinks it could go either way. "It's hard to know what they'll do with equivalent technology outside the home," he said. The court ruled last month that when technology reveals "intimate details" about an area the Fourth Amendment protects, that constitutes a search and should require a warrant. "I don't think you'll have trouble getting the court to regulate that kind of information," Tomkovicz said. But, he added, "I wouldn't be surprised to see (Justices) Scalia or Thomas change their minds" and return to a more narrow interpretation.
http://www.wired.com/news/privacy/0,1848,44785,00.html

O'HARA SUGGESTS POST-PARTUM REGIMEN (Minneapolis Star Tribune, July 3)
A story about the Houston woman accused of drowning her five children says that guidelines developed by Dr. MICHAEL O'HARA, a University of Iowa expert on postpartum depression, call for women to be treated with antidepressants (such as Prozac or Zoloft) and psychotherapy. Other types of medications, such as Haldol, an antipsychotic, may be used for postpartum psychosis.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BURC03&date=03-Jul-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

JAZZ SINGER JARREAU HAS DEGREE FROM UI (Los Angeles Times, July 3)
A story about jazz singer Al Jarreau, host of a 13-hour radio series from Smithsonian Productions titled "The Jazz Singers," says that in addition to five vocal Grammy Awards, Jarreau has a master's degree in vocational rehabilitation from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.latimes.com/print/calendar/20010703/t000054756.html

HOVENKAMP: COURT BACKED GOVERNMENT (Los Angeles Times, July 3)
Although it didn't require Microsoft to be broken up, last week's ruling by the federal appeals court for the District of Columbia maintained that the software giant is a monopoly -- a ruling that could have grave consequences for the company. At a minimum, experts say, the decision provides support for a settlement or new court order that would: require Microsoft to adopt uniform pricing of its flagship Windows software; bar exclusive or discriminatory contracts between Microsoft and Internet content and service providers; and restrict Microsoft's ability to prevent PC makers from modifying the appearance of the Windows "desktop" and substituting other software applications such as Web browsers. "I think the court has backed the government on these issues," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor.
http://www.latimes.com/business/20010703/t000054777.html

BROWN: LOW RETENTION IN WEB COURSES (Wall Street Journal, July 3)
Ken Brown, a University of Iowa assistant professor, studied 78 employees who took Internet-based training. Some breezed through the course but didn't retain much. "People will finish as soon as they can and run out the door, and those people learn a lot less," says Mr. Brown, whose study appears in the latest edition of the journal Personnel Psychology. So-called e-learning in the corporate sector is projected to grow to $14.5 billion in 2004 revenue from last year's $2.2 billion, says International Data Corp., Framingham, Mass. But the American Society for Training & Development, Alexandria, Va., found in its annual survey of 365 companies that overall computer usage has flattened as some companies report bad experiences.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB99410669439739171.djm
The same Wall Street Journal article ran July 3 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/07/03/financial1119EDT0082.DTL

HOVENKAMP QUOTED ON MICROSOFT CASE (USA Today, July 2)
A torrent of new civil lawsuits may drown Microsoft in the wake of last week's appeals court ruling that upheld an earlier finding that the software colossus is an illegal monopoly. It was a huge win for consumers and rivals of Microsoft. Their attorneys now need not spend thousands of hours and millions of dollars trying to prove Microsoft broke federal antitrust law. "All (consumers and businesses) have to do now is show causation -- or how they were injured by the violation -- and prove damages," says leading antitrust expert HERBERT HOVENKAMP of the University of Iowa.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010702/3449251s.htm

HOVENKAMP: 'ALL BETS OFF' IN ANTITRUST CASE (The Record, July 1)
The mixed ruling in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case puts Attorney General John D. Ashcroft and the Bush administration in a difficult position, forcing them to navigate treacherous legal and political terrain in deciding whether to settle the case or continue to fight in court. The Justice Department must choose whether to press the case with a new trial judge, who will reconsider the remedy for Microsoft's antitrust violations. The government lawyers could push for a breakup of the company and aggressive limits on its business practices as they successfully proposed last year, or they could scale back their objectives to address only controls on Microsoft's illegal conduct. HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa antitrust professor who has advised the government in the case, said that "all bets are off as to what's going to happen in the next couple of months. You are going to see a widening rift between the [Justice Department's] antitrust division and the states. I expect the antitrust division to throw in the towel on the structural remedy and the states are going to disagree." The Record is based in Hackensack, N.J. The same Washington Post Service story ran June 28 in the INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE.

COUPLE MOVING TO UI CITED IN STORY (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 1)
A story about people who decide to return to the Midwest after living elsewhere cites the case of Claire Fox and Peter Balestrieri, who are moving to Iowa. The couple, who have roots in Wisconsin, are leaving comfortable but ultra-pricey Palo Alto this summer to live in Iowa City, where Fox will start a tenured job at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Fox, 36, is leaving Stanford University after six years, where she was an assistant professor in the department of Spanish and Portuguese. Her specialty is the emerging field of inter-American studies, which explores the border culture of the United States and Mexico. She believes that Iowa, where she received her doctoral degree, is more devoted to the subject. Fox, who has written one book and is working on a second, also was troubled by Stanford's hectic work culture, which she believes is prevalent across Silicon Valley.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/bym/news/jun01/iowa01063001.asp

UI LICENSE DENIAL CONCERNS INDUSTRY (The Counselor, July 2001)
Distributors and suppliers are worried about the negative publicity that could result for their clients if promotional apparel products manufactured in sweatshop conditions were exposed after a company investigation of quality standards. The issue is affecting not just promotional but licensed apparel as well. Recently The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA revoked 176 apparel licenses because the companies concerned either failed to sign the school’s code of conduct or to disclose their factory locations. The University adopted the code last year after students protested against sweatshop labor.

DAMASIO STUDIES EMOTION (Public Relations Tactics, July 2001)
An advice article for public relations professionals urges them not to overlook the age-old power of emotion in conveying messages and affecting viewer behaviors and opinions. The way we feel is interdependent with our thought process and behaviors. Dr. ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, a leading researcher in neuroscience and head of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, draws an intimate connection between emotion and comprehension. His research with “somatic markers” has focused on explaining how emotions are biologically indispensable to our ability to make decisions.

UI CANCELES LICENSES (License!, July 2001)
The UNIVESITY OF IOWA has gotten tough about the human rights and labor issues behind its licensed merchandise. The school has canceled licenses with more than 175 apparel companies that either failed to disclose the location of their factories or sign the school’s code of conduct. The code of conduct, which was adopted in conjunction with the campus group Students Against Sweatshops, outlines standards for wages, overtime, benefits, and discrimination policies.

UI STUDY LINKS ROOT CANAL, VIRUS (Dentistry Today, July 2001)
In a study reported in the current issue of “Psychosomatic Medicine,” researchers from the University of Florida and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that short-term immune changes associated with root canal treatment were linked with the development of cold symptoms after the procedure. Those who had reported especially high levels of pain and stress were the ones most likely to become sick later.

MARSH DESIGNS NEW TREATMENT (Orthopedics Today, July 2001)
A team of surgeons has developed a new fixator designed for the treatment of complex elbow injuries. “This elbow fixator is a possibility to brace the elbow in a skeletally fixed way,” said J. LAWRENCE MARSH, professor of orthopedics at the University of Iowa, and one of the developers of the OptiROM fixator.

GRABER ADVISES ENCRYPTION (Skin and Allergy News, July 2001)
At the annual meeting of the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine, Dr. MARK A. GRABER urged physicians who exchange email with patients or other physicians to use an encryption service to prevent outside parties from tracking their movements online. This is especially important for physicians who use interactive Web sites to communicate with patients and colleagues.

UI STUDY: ATHLETES LEAK URINE (Total Health Care for Longevity, July 2001)
Bladder control problems are not only found in the elderly, One third of young female soldiers have urinary leakage during field exercises. In a report from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, one third of the elite athletes studied leaked urine during their sport. Many women have symptoms of urgency, frequency, and leakage during pregnancy and after child birth.

MALE EATING DISORDERS ARE COMMON (Clinical Psychiatry News, July 2001)
Eating disorders in men are much more prominent than is generally appreciated Dr. ARNOLD ANDERSON of the University of Iowa said at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. Although there are significant barriers to diagnosis and treatment, the treatment does appear to respond well to appropriate therapy, he said. To maximize treatment effectiveness, however, gender differences in psychodynamics must be considered.

TREVOR'S 'ST. FRANCIS' PUBLISHED (Paris Review, Spring/Summer 2001)
DOUG TREVOR
, an assistant professor of English at the University of Iowa, contributed a short story titled "St. Francis in Flint" to the publication.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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