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UI in the News

January 2001

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GRAHAM'S WORKSHOP CONNECTION CITED (Harvard Magazine, January/February 2001)
Poet JORIE GRAHAM is featured in the magazine's cover article. The story says that Graham was a professor of English at the University of Iowa from 1983 to 2000, and directed the poetry program for her last five years at the UI. It also sings the praises of the Iowa Writers' Workshop, saying the workshop "is to American literature what Harvard Law School is to the U.S. Supreme Court: the launching pad for a disproportionate number of those who 'make it.' Founded in 1936 at the University of Iowa, the Workshop is the most famous writing school in the world: the M.F.A. program in poetry admits only about 4 percent of its applicants and can override university admissions requirements in favor of a gifted applicant with a dicey transcript."

UI GRADUATE STUDENT AUCTIONS LIFE ONLINE (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 31)
It was only a matter of time: The arrival of the online garage sale, moving sale, yard sale, et al, is upon us. Now you can browse through people’s used and discarded stuff at any hour of the day, and not just on Saturday mornings. Early bird rules be damned! Take Allmylifeforsale.com,for example, launched last month by aspiring online publisher John D. Freyer of Iowa City, Iowa. This quirky website is in the process of supposedly auctioning off all of the most meaningful items from Freyer’s "modest Midwestern apartment" while he was a grad student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/realestate/story?section=classified-realestate&pagename=story&storyid=1150540214795

VIJH, BILLETT: TRACKING STOCKS LAG OTHERS (SmartMoney.Com, Jan. 31)
ANAND VIJH
and MATTHEW BILLETT of the University of Iowa performed a study of 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999 and found that on average they trailed both their peers and the broader market. These issues earned 11.7 percent a year during the first three years of existence, compared with an 18.1 percent return by a benchmark portfolio of their industry rivals. The overall market, meanwhile, tallied a 21 percent annual gain.

UI STUDIES DRIVER DISTRACTION (Investor's Business Daily, Jan. 30) As the number of in-car gadgets grows, so does the number of driver distractions -- and traffic accidents caused by them, observers say. This month, Ford announced plans to study the danger of electronics in cars. Ford is not the first to study the issue. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in late 2000 began studying the danger of in-vehicle gadgets. Their work continues.

KURTH RECORDS SPACE SOUNDS (San Jose, Calif., Business Journal, Jan. 29) Imagine crickets chirping or nestlings crying out for food near Jupiter. Probably not what you'd expect to hear in deep space. Yet those earthly sounds are reminiscent of noises heard on an audio clip made from radio waves detected by the unmanned Cassini spacecraft passing by Jupiter on its way to Saturn. The audio clip was developed by University of Iowa scientists studying radio and plasma waves in space. "At the time these sounds were taken, the spacecraft was in what we call the solar wind," explains BILL KURTH, deputy principal investigator for the radio and plasma wave science investigation on the Cassini mission. "The solar wind is a very hot gas which originates at the sun and blows outwards at a speed of roughly a million miles per hour, past all the planets." http://sanjose.bcentral.com/sanjose/stories/2001/01/29/newscolumn3.html

O'CONNOR'S TIME AT WRITERS' WORKSHOP CITED (New Yorker, Jan. 29) A feature on the writer Flannery O'Connor's views on race and religion makes several mentions of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and in particular the WRITERS' WORKSHOP. It says O'Connor was admitted to the UI with a scholarship in journalism. In a letter to the editor Robert Giroux, Paul Engle, then director of the Workshop, recalled meeting O'Connor that fall and being unable to understand her speech: "Embarrassed, I asked her to write down what she had just said on a pad. She wrote: 'My name is Flannery O'Connor. I am not a journalist. Can I come to the Writers' Workshop?'"

UI's WORLEY NOT AFRAID TO FLY (FoxSports.com, Jan. 29)
The University of Iowa's GLEN WORLEY hops on a lot of airplanes during the Big Ten basketball season and never gives it a thought. Although he feels badly for the two reserve Oklahoma State players and eight others who died in a plane crash in Colorado, Worley still feels safe. "Their plane was a little different than ours. We're not really concerned,'' he said Monday, two days after the crash. "I have no problem with flying.''
http://www.foxsports.com/wires/pages/33/spt118133.sml

PORTMAN WANTS MARKERS IN HOLOCAUST BOOKS (USA Today, Jan. 29)
Rabbi Jeff Portman wants UNIVERSITY OF IOWA librarians to put a memorial marker in the 171 books and 14 pamphlets it has received from Holocaust victims. The books date to 1700 and are in Hebrew, Yiddish and Russian.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010129/3024563s.htm

UI STUDENT CREATED ONLINE SPORTS MAGAZINE (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 29)
In 1998, Royce Webb took a break from his graduate studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and decided to create an online sports magazine. The result, www.sportsjones.com, is one of the few sports web sites that has remained viable in this age of dot-com collapses. "I compare the Internet to the auto industry," Webb said. "I think the auto industry is alive and well, but a lot of companies died along the way. And all of this will leave a void for Sportsjones." http://www.latimes.com/sports/times/20010129/t000008608.html

UI ART STUDENT SELLS ALL (FoxNews.com, Jan. 27)
JOHN FREYER
, a graduate student in photography at the University of Iowa, has begun an art project in which he is auctioning off his most personal items on eBay and through his web site www.allmylifeforsale.com. "The fact that all the objects themselves bring up the idea of what has value and what doesn't have valueÉthe project makes you question the value of art," said KATHLEEN EDWARDS, a curator at the UI MUSEUM OF ART who is an acquaintance of Freyer's.
http://www.foxnews.com/etcetera/012901/allmylife.sml

DUNBAR COMMENTS ON GRADUATION TEST (Arizona Republic, Jan. 27)
STEVE DUNBAR
, a University of Iowa professor of measurement and statistics and one of the principal authors of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills, is quoted in a story about the AIMS -- a high school graduation test in Arizona. Critics of the test say the math section is too difficult as a measure of basic high school math skills. But Dunbar disagrees: "There's nothing that I've seen that's not high school math," he said.

UI STUDY FINDS VOICE E-MAIL DISTRACTS DRIVERS (Atlanta Journal, Jan. 26)
Ford Motor Co. has built a driving simulator to study how drivers can get distracted by cell phones and other gadgets. The problem is a major concern for an industry hot on selling in-car Internet access and other similar services. One experiment conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed that when e-mail was read to drivers electronically, their response time to brake lights from a vehicle in front of them increased 30 percent.

MUSEUM BUYS SCHAPIRO’S PAINTINGS (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jan. 26)
The Minnesota Museum of American Art has bought a collection of four paintings by Miriam Schapiro for its permanent collection. "Cabinet For All Seasons," painted in 1974, had been part of Schapiro's personal collection, and is on display at the museum as part of a Schapiro retrospective. The exhibit is here, though, only through Sunday. Then "Cabinet For All Seasons" will travel with the exhibit to Miami and San Diego before returning in September to its St. Paul home. A Canadian by birth, Schapiro was educated in New York and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and began painting professionally in the early 1950s.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=JOE26E&date=26-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

UI HOSPITAL STAFF TO GET PAY RAISE (USA Today, Jan. 25)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS
staff who work unpopular weekend shifts will be offered incentives, such as 36 hours of pay for 24 hours of work, under an agreement between the hospital and the workers' union.

GURNETT: NO SPARKS OVER VENUS (International Herald Tribune, Jan. 25)
In their latest looks at the planet Venus, scientists saw no signs of lightning. DONALD GURNETT, a professor of physics at the University of Iowa, reports that the Cassini probe, which swung by Venus twice, in 1998 and 1999, heard no lightning induced static at all. "If lightning exists at Venus, it's either extremely rare or much different than Earth lightning," Gurnett said. Writing in the current issue of Nature, Gurnett and his collaborators say the new negative result is more persuasive than the earlier Galileo data. Cassini came within 200 miles (320 kilometers) of the surface -- "We were just skimming over the atmosphere, practically," Gurnett said -- while Galileo was, at its closest, 10,000 miles from Venus.
http://www.iht.com:80/articles/8564.htm

HENDRIX COMMENTS ON NIH FUNDING (Reuters, Jan. 24)
The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) has called on federal lawmakers to boost funding to the National Institutes of Health by 15 percent to $23.7 billion in fiscal year 2002. The group also asked for additional funding for six other federal agencies that are major sponsors of life sciences research. Although it is too soon to say how the Bush administration may react to the proposed increase in appropriations, FASEB President Dr. MARY J.C. HENDRIX says that she is encouraged. "At this point we think we’ll be successful in attaining our goal of doubling NIH funding in 5 years," she said.
http://www.medscape.com/reuters/prof/2001/01/01.25/20010124plcy002.html

UI MAY HOLD HOLOCAUST VICTIMS' BOOKS (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 24)
Thousands of rare, centuries-old books looted from Holocaust victims and captured by the U.S. Army after World War II have been gathering dust in several university libraries across the United States, a long-awaited report by a presidential commission revealed last week. Harvard, Brandeis and Yale universities alone received more than 10,000 books, periodicals, and newspapers whose rightful owners may never be found. A list at the end of the article says the Army sent "IOWA UNIVERSITY" 185 such books. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/01/24/MN95341.DTL

GURNETT COMMENTS ON VENUS LIGHTNING STUDY (New York Times, Jan. 23)
When NASA's Galileo spacecraft swung by Venus in February 1990 en route to Jupiter, it recorded bursts of static similar to what is heard on an AM radio during a thunderstorm. Now, however, Dr. DONALD A. GURNETT, a professor of physics at the University of Iowa, reports that the Cassini probe, which swung by Venus twice, in 1998 and 1999, heard no lightning-induced static at all. "If lightning exists at Venus, it's either extremely rare or much different than Earth lightning," Dr. Gurnett said. Writing in the current issue of Nature, Dr. Gurnett and his collaborators say the new negative result is more persuasive than the earlier Galileo data. Cassini came within 200 miles of the surface -- "We were just skimming over the atmosphere, practically," Dr. Gurnett said -- while Galileo was, at its closest, 10,000 miles from the Venus. http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/23/science/23VENU.html

SPREEN GIVES TIP TO BIZ SCHOOL APPLICANTS (College Journal, Jan. 23)
Before you're accepted to your chosen master's of business administration program, you'll need to jump through multiple hoops. For many applicants, b-school interviews are the most stressful leap of all. Typically, these sessions last 30 minutes to an hour and are designed to assess qualities that aren't easily detected on your written application. "We're using the interview to get a better feel for some of the more subjective elements of the applicants that are pretty difficult to get just by looking at the paper application," says MARY SPREEN, director of M.B.A. admissions and financial aid at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. College Journal is an online publication produced by the publishers of the Wall Street Journal.
http://www.collegejournal.com/n/SB980189290738916557-main.html

UI GRAD FEATURED IN ARTICLE (National Enquirer, Jan. 23)
A feature about Jeff Norman, who claims to make $60,000 a year delivering newspapers, says he received his bachelor's degree in sociology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It also says his wife, Julie, works at the UI.

WOOD TAUGHT ART AT UI (Omaha World Herald, Jan. 22)
A story about a Cedar Rapids couple who donated a Grant Wood mural with an estimated value of $1.5 million to a Cedar Rapids school says Wood once taught art at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF ART.

NEW ROAD TAX COLLECTION SYSTEM PROPOSED (Fox News, Jan. 22)
Nine states and the Federal Highway Administration are studying a plan using Global Positioning Technology that would eliminate toll roads and gas taxes. The Global Positioning System would track how often the driver uses the road and impose a monthly tax. DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the UI, said the system operators don't need to know exactly where and when drivers are on the move.

BERTHIAUME RESPONDS TO BUSH STORY (BBC News, Jan. 22)
A follow-up to a story that aired exploring the question of whether, and how, America's foreign policy will change with George W. Bush in the White House includes summaries of e-mails sent from around the world, in response to the main topic and related issues. Kenneth Berthiaume, a graduate teaching assistant in the POLITICAL SCIENCE department of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Liberal Arts, wrote: "It is not surprising that the comments appearing here reflect a widespread ignorance of the American electoral system and the principles of justice established in our Constitution. What astonishes me is the extent to which Gore's cleverly orchestrated campaign to undermine confidence in Bush's abilities to lead appears to have succeeded overseas. Everyone, in America and around the world, would be best served if we drop the partisan rhetoric and extend a hand of welcome to the new leader."
http://newsvote.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/talking_point/newsid_1061000/1061733.stm

GURNETT FINDS NO EVIDENCE OF LIGHTNING ON VENUS (Space.com, Jan. 22)
For two decades, scientists have argued about whether the atmosphere of Venus produces lightning. During two flybys, the Cassini spacecraft detected no signatures of Earth-like electrical discharges. "If lightning exists at Venus, it is either extremely rare, or much different than terrestrial lightning," said University of Iowa physicist DONALD GURNETT. Missions in the 1970s found low-frequency electrical activity in the clouds of Venus, but Gurnett suspects the activity represents something like "sprites" discovered recently above Earth's clouds. Gurnett didn't zap all hopes for lightning on Venus. He said there might be some cloud-to-cloud lightning, which is weaker than the typical bolts that strike the ground in a terrestrial thunderstorm. http://www.space.com:80/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/venus_lights_010122.html

WALZ COMMENTS ON HOME HEALTH CARE (Dow Jones Newswire, Jan. 22)
A story about home health care says one drawback is that the industry has trouble getting, and keeping, employees. THOMAS WALZ, a gerontologist and social-work professor at the University of Iowa, says there's a bias in the care-giving industry against working with the elderly. That means the real talent is stretched thin, forcing many agencies to scrape up who they can and give them minimal training.

BRINIG: EASING DIVORCES IMPACT ON KIDS (CBS News, Jan. 22)
In West Virginia, and in a handful of other states, a new approach is underway to help solve the most contentious issue in a divorce: Who gets the kids? In West Virginia, and elsewhere, it is now required that husband and wife -- either through mutual agreement or by court order -- share childcare in a manner that reflects family life before the divorce. Some wives might now have second thoughts about filing, some judges say. And divorce rates are actually declining in the few places now requiring childcare be shared after breakup. University of Iowa law professor MARGARET BRINIG says a mutual or required focus on the kids might "mean that people would focus a little bit more carefully on the financial issues than they do, and try to be a little fairer and not be trading time with kids for money."
http://cbsnews.com/now/story/0,1597,266192-412,00.shtml

UI PRESS BOOK NOMINATED FOR AWARD (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Jan. 21)
Among 45 books written, illustrated or edited by Minnesotans, published in 2000, and nominated for Minnesota Book Awards is "Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickenson," published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 21)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/environ/20010121/t000005848.html

UI RECEIVES SOFTWARE DONATION (Omaha World-Herald, Jan. 21)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has received a donation of more than $760,000 in software from Diversified Software Industries Inc. in Coralville. The software will help students and researchers design cars with easier-to-read information displays.

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Kansas City Star, Jan. 20)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.

UI TESTS COAL ALTERNATIVE (The International Herald Tribune, Jan. 20)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a coal-fired facility near the Missouri border, has been adapted to burn ordinary grass, along with its primary fuel, as part of a major test project. The idea has been embraced warmly by the 100 farmers growing switchgrass for the plant, and they say money is not the sole attraction. Plant officials are gradually increasing the grass-to-coal ratio in search of an efficient balance, with a goal of replacing up to 5 percent of the coal with grass. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers have concluded that a 5 percent mixture would cut emissions of carbon dioxide at the plant by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide, the precursor to acid rain, by up to 113 tons per year. http://www.iht.com:80/articles/8186.htm

UI PRESS BOOK AMONG MINN. FINALISTS (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Jan. 20)
A list of final nominees for the Minnesota Book Awards, in the category of anthology and collections, includes "Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickinson," edited by Sheila Coghill and Thom Tammaro and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BKX21&date=20-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

BAKER CRITICIZES PRODUCT PITCHES (Rocky Mountain News, Jan. 20)
KAREN BAKER
, a nationally recognized clinical pharmacist and associated professor of oral pathology at the University of Iowa, said she is appalled at some of the "outrageous" testimonials used to peddle oral hygiene products on Web sites. "Patients and consumers have to realize there is no regulation or objective evaluation of those sites," says Baker.

UI ALUMNA IS NAMED TO ILLINOIS HIGH COURT (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 19)
When Rita B. Garman went to law school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1965, a professor asked why she was taking a slot in her class that could have gone to a man. "I was told, 'You'll never practice law. You're just here to catch a husband,'" she recalled. On Wednesday, Garman was appointed to fill the vacancy on the seven-member Illinois Supreme Court, becoming only the second woman on the high court. "I hope that my life is a testament to the evil of making stereotypes, that people shouldn't assign stereotypical roles to individuals, but should allow them to prove themselves, prove their abilities and give them a fair opportunity," Garman said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0101180374,FF.html

GRADUATE HELPS CHILDREN SPIN TALES (San Francisco Chronicle, Jan. 19)
A story about Streetside Stories, a San Francisco nonprofit literary arts program that helps San Francisco school kids develop reading, writing and oral-communication skills, quotes instructor Christine Young, a Princeton graduate who earned a master's degree in fine arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and is in her first year with Streetside Stories. Young said she believes that the tales spun by the children play a role in helping them figure out their place in the world. "I think storytelling gives kids a sense of ownership and value that their experience is important," she says.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/01/19/WB175935.DTL

HARTZLER'S 'GRADE A' TO BE PERFORMED (Washington Post, Jan. 19)
Arena Stage, at Sixth and M streets SW, is presenting readings of new plays by graduate playwriting students Friday and Sunday in its Old Vat Theater. "Grade A," Friday at 8, is a comedy about thirty-something womanhood written by KARA HARTZLER of the University of Iowa and directed by Delia Taylor of Source Theatre.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A10069-2001Jan17.html

BAND'S LEAD SINGER ATTENDED UI (Metroactive, Jan. 18-24)
A feature on the country music band Red Meat, several of whose members hail from Iowa, focuses on singer Jill Olson, who moved to San Francisco in the early '80s after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Metroactive is the online version of Metro, a Silicon Valley, Calif., weekly newspaper.
http://www.metroactive.com:80/metro/red-meat-0103.html

NEW MEXICO HOSPITAL NAMES VP (Albuquerque Journal, Jan. 18)
Presbyterian Hospital has hired Eddie Benge, a rheumatologist and currently St. Joseph Healthcare System chief medical officer, as its medical staff affairs vice president. Benge will move from St. Joseph to Presbyterian in February. Benge attended the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and completed his internal medicine residency at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.abqjournal.com:80/biz/227721biz01-18-01.htm

BEZANSON COMMENTS ON LIDDY CASE (Washington Post, Jan. 17)
Convicted Watergate conspirator turned radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy told a group at James Madison University in 1996 and another on a Mediterranean cruise in 1997 that he now believes the Watergate burglars were searching for photos of scantily clad women in an attempt to conceal the fact that John Dean's then-girlfriend was working for a prostitution ring run from Democratic National Committee headquarters. Testimony is to begin today in U.S. District Court in Baltimore in a $5 million defamation lawsuit filed against Liddy by Ida Maxwell "Maxie" Wells, a former secretary at the DNC in whose desk Liddy has said photos of the call girls were kept. Simply winning the right to present her case to a jury is a major victory for Wells, said RANDALL BEZANSON, a defamation expert at the University of Iowa law school. "A jury in most cases is going to be inclined to be sympathetic to plaintiffs in defamation cases; they can almost relate to this person. They say to themselves, 'What if this was me?'" Bezanson said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A3710-2001Jan16.html

GRANT HEADS NCAA COMMITTEE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 16)
The National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I members met last week to discuss ways to update the association's concept of amateurism. In contrast to Division II, which passed its own new rules on amateurism by an overwhelming majority at the meeting. Institutions at the NCAA's top competitive level seemed skittish about allowing athletes with professional experience to compete in college alongside lifelong "amateurs." A committee led by CHRISTINE A. GRANT, the retired director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa, has proposed sweeping revisions to the NCAA's amateurism guidelines. The new rules would allow colleges to recruit athletes who accept prize money, sign contracts with professional teams or leagues, enter rookie drafts, or accept money for playing sports. At present, athletes who do any of those things are banned permanently from competing in the NCAA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i19/19a03801.htm

HARTZLER'S 'GRADE A' TO BE PERFORMED (Washington Post, Jan. 16)
You can hear three new plays by students from some of the top graduate playwriting programs in the country this week at Arena Stage's Old Vat Room. On Friday, it's "Grade A," by KARA HARTZLER of the University of Iowa, a comedy about thirty-something women, directed by Source's Delia Taylor.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A145-2001Jan16.html

FIELD COMMENTS ON GERMAN SPAS, RADON RISKS (Reuters, Jan. 16)
As NATO's Balkans veterans fret about health risks from uranium munitions, a generation old enough to remember the last great European war is happily paying for a bit of extra radiation exposure. Every day hundreds of elderly Germans splash around in the spa waters at Schlema, which contain low levels of radon, a radioactive gas generated from the decay of uranium, with the conviction it can cure a variety of ailments like rheumatism. WILLIAM FIELD of the University of Iowa's College of Public Health points out that patients suffering from arthritis may feel better after any regular hot water bath. Yet he says there are health risks from radon. "Numerous epidemiological studies of radon-exposed underground miners and the recent residential epidemiologic study we performed in the United States indicate that radon gas exposure causes lung cancer,'' he said.
http://live.altavista.com/scripts/editorial.dll?ei=2360546&ern=y

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Newsday, Jan. 16)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment'' by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.

WHITMORE CANDIDATE FOR UK PRESIDENT (Courier-Journal, Jan. 16)
University of Iowa Provost JON WHITMORE was one of three finalists for the University of Kentucky's presidency. The Courier-Journal is based in Louisville, Ky. The same article ran Jan. 11 in the LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER in Kentucky.

MCCARTHY LEADS STUDY OF SCHOOL NURSES (The Record, Jan. 15)
With more kids than ever taking medicine at school for chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a new study is raising questions about just how well they're being served. Half the school nurses who responded to a nationwide survey reported medication errors in the past year--most commonly missed doses, but also too-large doses or the wrong medicine. "The incidence of medication errors is not acceptable," the study concludes. "Ongoing efforts to develop national guidelines must continue." The University of Iowa nurses and pharmacists who conducted the study in the summer of 1999 sought to determine how often medication errors arise and who's administering those medications. "It's a huge issue. The school nurses are out there almost on their own," said lead author ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, an associate nursing professor at the Iowa College of Nursing. The Record is based in Hackensack, N.J.

PUBLIC HEALTH COLLEGE TO COMB RECORDS (Army Times, Jan. 15)
Researchers in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF PUBLIC HEALTH plan a four-week stay in Middletown, Va., to find former employees of the Iowa Army Ammunition Plant who were involved in nuclear weapons work. Researchers will comb records to locate those who worked at the facility when it assembled and disassembled nuclear weapons and test-fired components from the late 1940s to the mid-1970s.

SCHMIDT COMMENTS ON RECRUITMENT (Employment Review, Jan. 15)
A story about pre-employment tests used in the recruitment process quotes FRANK SCHMIDT, a human resources professor in the COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Schmidt says evaluations may help employers ensure better productivity, reduce absenteeism and fight high turnover rates.

SCHNOOR STUDIES FUEL ALTERNATIVE (Philadelphia Inquirer, Jan. 15)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.
This ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the Jan. 16 ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS.

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Deseret News, Utah, Jan. 15)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment'' by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0101150572

BOOK FEATURES WORK BY UI WRITERS (Deseret News, Utah, Jan. 15)
A list of books recommended for leisure reading includes "Best New American Voices 2000," edited by Tobias Wolff. This paperback collection includes 20 short stories by the newest American writers who have recently produced their best work at various writers conferences like Bread Loaf, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the Sewannee Conference and the PEN/Prison Writing Committee, as nominated by the directors of those programs. The result is a diverse collection of voices that are considered to be cutting-edge.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0101050001

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (New York Times, Jan. 15)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/01/15/science/AP-Switchgrass-Power.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Jan. 14 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010114/us/exp_switchgrass_power_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 14 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0114AP-EXP-SWITCHGRA&date=14-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 14 on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL. The URL for this story is not available.

MAN WHO MET KING COACHED AT UI (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 14)
A story about Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech in Washington reports that as King finished, a young man standing to King's left, who was serving as volunteer security for the event, approached him. "I said, 'Dr. King, could I have that copy?'" recalled George Raveling, who went on to become basketball coach at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Southern California. "And he turned and handed it to me." Raveling kept the speech tucked inside a book for years. It is now in a bank vault and will eventually be passed on to his son.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150540204042

NOONAN COMMENTS ON 'TEMPTATION ISLAND' (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 14)
A story about the Fox network's controversial "reality show" Temptation Island -- in which allegedly committed couples are tempted by a variety of attractive men and women into committing infidelity -- quotes RITA NOONAN, a sociologist at the University of Iowa who likens the show's attraction to a "Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky kind of bad." "Every single thing is sexualized," said Noonan. "Yes, it's voyeuristic, but it also panders to, really, kind of the easy grab, the sexualized nature."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0101140429,FF.html

MCCARTHY STUDIES SCHOOL MEDICATION (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Jan. 14)
Half of the school nurses who responded to a nationwide survey reported medication errors in the past year -- primarily missed doses, but also too-large doses or the wrong medicine. University of Iowa nurses and pharmacists who conducted the study in 1999 sought to determine how often medication errors arise and who's administering medications. "It's a huge issue. The school nurses are out there almost on their own," said lead author ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, an associate nursing professor at the Iowa College of Nursing.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=NURVAR&date=14-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT (Los Angeles Times, Jan. 13)
Microsoft Corp. won a major legal victory Friday when a federal judge threw out 38 private antitrust cases that accused the software giant of overcharging customers for its flagship Windows operating system. "Indirect purchasers under federal law are going to have a hard time winning," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor whose treatise on antitrust law is frequently cited in litigation. "And Microsoft has been very successful in getting most states" whose laws are silent on the question "to follow the federal law."
http://www.latimes.com/business/20010113/t000003479.html

LINN COMMENTS ON PROPOSED HIKE (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 13)
University of Iowa students may face an increase in fees and three new ones if the Iowa Board of Regents approves a fee hike on Wednesday. University officials said the fees are necessary to cover increasing costs. University student government leaders say they aren't alarmed about the proposals to increase 12 different fees and make three others, even though the board agreed to raise tuition and fees by an estimated 10 percent a few months ago. "As always, when we are looking at fee increases, our motto is 'Be reasonable,'" said CHRIS LINN, vice president of student government.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/9960865D6C3F7BE4862569D3005BD75E?OpenDocument

HOLDENS GIVE $25 MILLION TO UI (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 12)
The paper's Gifts and Bequests section reports that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received $25 million for cancer research from the family of Roland Holden.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i18/18a03005.htm

CAMPBELL LEADS MD STUDY (YAHOO! NEWS, Jan. 12)
Patients with weakening hearts linked to muscular dystrophy may benefit from a drug that helps keep blood vessels from contracting. University of Iowa scientists say they've found that mice engineered to mimic one form of muscular dystrophy (MD) don't get cardiomyopathy, a deadly deterioration of the heart muscle, when given the anti-constricting medication. Dr. KEVIN CAMPBELL and his colleagues at the University of Iowa altered genes in mice to have the rodent version of limb-girdle MD. Animals lacking good copies of these genes, known as the sarcoglycan complex, develop severe cardiomyopathy. "When it's not there contraction damages the muscle membrane and causes death," Campbell says. This was a HealthScout story.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010113/hl/drug_protects_hearts_of_mice_with_md_1.html

UI STUDY FINDS VOICE E-MAIL DISTRACTS DRIVERS (Associated Press, Jan. 11) Ford Motor Co. has built a driving simulator to study how drivers can get distracted by cell phones and other gadgets. The problem is a major concern for an industry hot on selling in-car Internet access and other similar services. One experiment conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed that when e-mail was read to drivers electronically, their response time to brake lights from a vehicle in front of them increased 30 percent. This article appeared in the Jan. 11 AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, the Jan. 11 INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the Jan. 11 ORLANDO SENTINEL, the Jan. 11 KANSAS CITY STAR, and the Jan. 11 MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL.

CONROY COMMENTS ON MOVIES ABOUT WRITERS (USA Today, Jan. 11)
USA TODAY, Jan. 11
-- A story about the number of films this year in which writers are the main characters includes comments by FRANK CONROY, novelist (Body & Soul) and director of the esteemed Iowa Writers' Workshop at the University of Iowa. Those who write and teach writing may have mixed feelings about these portraits, Conroy says. Still, "Literature is being marginalized like jazz is. It is being thought of as an exotic thing. Anything that increases the awareness of authentic literary culture is good." He says that some plot details, such as the mentoring that goes on in "Almost Famous," "Wonder Boys" and "Finding Forrester," reflect the truth. "When I began writing as a young man, I was astonished by the generosity of older writers. Only so much writing can be taught. It's more like coaching."
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/movies/flick026.htm

GUY TO PERFORM IN CHICAGO (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 11)
The Arts Alive Series, sponsored by the Friends of the Rolling Meadows Library, opens with a "Light and Lively" concert Sunday with viola player Henrietta Neeley and pianist ROBIN GUY. Guy is an associate professor of piano at the University of Iowa and has a doctorate in musical arts and piano. She has played worldwide, including recently on Garrison Keillor's radio show, "A Prairie Home Companion."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/northwest/article/0,2669,SAV-0101110376,FF.html

UI STUDY FINDS VOICE E-MAIL DISTRACTS DRIVERS (Associated Press, Jan. 10)
Ford Motor Co. has built a driving simulator to study how drivers can get distracted by cell phones and other gadgets. The problem is a major concern for an industry hot on selling in-car Internet access and other similar services. One experiment conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed that when e-mail was read to drivers electronically, their response time to brake lights from a vehicle in front of them increased 30 percent.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010110/bs/ford_driver_distraction_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 11 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=driver11&date=20010111&query=University+of+Iowa
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 10 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0110AP-FORD-DRIVER-D&date=10-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 10 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/business/AP-Ford-Driver-Distraction.html
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 10 on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL (no link available.)
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 10 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/01/10/national1411EST0633.DTL

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (MSNBC, Jan. 10)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment'' by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.

GOLDMAN TO STUDY MARROW TRANSPLANTS (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 10)
A University of Iowa Health Care researcher is one of the scientists working on a national study of a common complication of bone-marrow transplants. FREDERICK GOLDMAN, an associate professor of pediatrics and the director of the university's Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Unit, received $460,000 of a $2.3 million, five-year National Institutes of Health grant. Goldman will study Graft Versus Host Disease. The common and life-threatening complication leads to immune system abnormalities and susceptibility to infection.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/News/wires.nsf/StateRegion/82F6207AD71D5B28862569D10000E583?OpenDocument

HUNSICKER LEADS LIVER STUDY (Rocky Mountain News, Denver, Colo. Jan. 9)
Authors of a study published last year in The New England Journal of Medicine study analyzed all cadaver liver transplants in the United States, focusing on the period from Jan. 1, 1992, to April 30, 1994. They found that low-volume centers (performing fewer than 20 transplants a year) had an average one-year mortality, or death, rate of 25.9 percent. For high-volume centers (more than 20), the mortality rate was 20 percent. An association between a low volume of some complex surgical procedures and patient death rates has long been recognized, said LAWRENCE HUNSICKER of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, an author of the journal study.
http://insidedenver.com:80/health/0109fit.shtml

UI TREATS FIRE VICTIM (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 9)
A volunteer firefighter saw smoke Monday afternoon, then pulled a neighbor from his burning home. Craig Thomas of rural Independence was in serious condition Monday night at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City. Quasqueton Fire Chief Erwin Kress said firefighter Tony Rouse rescued Thomas, then helped fight the blaze at Thomas' home.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/6FA03A6A92664501862569CF002CC51A?OpenDocument

KURTH TO STUDY JUPITER'S MAGNETIC FIELD (USA Today, Jan. 9)
University of Iowa scientists have an opportunity to study the magnetic field around Jupiter. The Galileo spacecraft, launched in 1989, has been orbiting the planet and will be joined by the Cassini spacecraft. Scientist WILLIAM KURTH and his colleagues will test the belief that Jupiter's massive magnetosphere is strongly influenced by solar wind.

UI CONVERTS SOUNDS OF JUPITER (Science Daily, Jan. 8)
One audio clip produced from radio waves that NASA's Cassini spacecraft detected near Jupiter was described last week by the Los Angeles Times as sounding "like a troop of howler monkeys battling underwater." A new audio clip is available online today from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, at: http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/cassini/acoustic/index.html. Cassini's radio and plasma wave science instrument detected the waves at low radio frequencies, which UNIVERSITY OF IOWA scientists have converted to sound waves to make the patterns audible. The waves from which the new audio clip was developed were in the thin solar wind of charged particles that fills the space between the Sun and its planets.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/01/010108073050.htm

BARR, STUMBO OFFER ADVICE FOR HEALTH (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 7)
A story about establishing a health eating and exercise routine quotes two University of Iowa faculty. RHONDA BARR, a University of Iowa Health Care physical therapist, suggests scheduling a regular snow date with a friend who enjoys winter activities. "I work with people in the hospital who worry they'll get sick if they go outside, but they're more likely to catch the flu if they stay cooped up in the house," she said. "Winter sports like hiking, cross-country skiing and snow shoeing are all low-impact activities that require no special technique." Have a salad after your entree, suggested PHYLLIS STUMBO, dietitian in the Clinical Research Center of the University of Iowa's College of Medicine. "A salad not only helps fulfill the daily requirements for fruits and vegetables, but it can often satisfy the desire to eat more, and to eat something sweet," she said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0101070406,FF.html

UI WRITING PROGRAM CITED (New York Times, Jan. 7)
An essay by a novelist who teaches creative writing at M.I.T. says that "what makes the writing program at a tech school very different from the famed writing schools of such universities as Stanford and IOWA is that even students who eventually take their degrees in writing arrive with the aim of making a career in science or engineering."

STUMBO SUGGESTS HEALTHY COOKING SHORTCUTS (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 7)
PHYLLIS STUMBO
, research dietitian in the Clinical Research Center of the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, makes a habit of washing and chopping all her salad ingredients once a week during the evening news to save time in preparing healthy meals during the week.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0101070407,FF.html

BLOOM'S BOOK 'POSTVILLE' IS REVIEWED (Baltimore Sun, Jan. 6)
The paper reviews a new book by University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." A former San Francisco-based journalist who moved to Iowa in the early '90s, Bloom writes about his experience feeling like a stranger in a strange land. Then he stumbled upon a magazine article about a sect of Hasidic Jews called the Lubavitchers, who in 1987 moved from the Crown Heights neighborhood in Brooklyn to a tiny Iowa town called Postville to start a kosher slaughterhouse. Bloom knew "in his bones" it was a good story. He immediately knew he had to get to Postville.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150520223960

JONES TO TESTIFY ON VOTING PROBLEMS (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 5)
Installing identical voting machines at polling places across the country in an effort to avoid a repeat of the problems that plagued the 2000 presidential election could create more problems than it would solve, according to a University of Iowa expert. DOUGLAS W. JONES, associate professor of computer science in the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts, is scheduled to testify Thursday at U.S. Civil Rights Commission hearings in Tallahassee, Fla. on voting machine technology and whether the rights of voters were violated during the 2000 election. Jones says that he was invited by the Commission to testify at the Jan. 11-12 hearings, in part, because he chairs the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/News/wires.nsf/StateRegion/700D4FE0A22C1FC9862569CB00726C8D?OpenDocument

UI LANGUAGE FACULTY PAY CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Jan. 5)
A story about a survey that found wide discrepancies in the pay of part-time faculty members in English and foreign languages includes a chart showing that such faculty at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA earn $7,200 per course -- at the high end of the pay range. The survey results, released in December by the Modern Language Association, listed at the other end of the spectrum institutions such as City University of New York's Kingsborough Community College, where part-time faculty members in the English department earn an average of just $450 per course. The UI was listed among doctorate-granting institutions that pay an average of $5,000 or more per course and offer at least some health benefits or life insurance to part-timers in the English department.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i17/17a01501.htm

UI STUDY: VIAGRA MAY IMPACT CARDIO SYSTEM (Science Daily, Jan. 3)
The drug sildenafil citrate -- better known as Viagra -- causes a dramatic increase in the nerve activity associated with cardiovascular function, especially during physical and mental stress, bolstering recommendations that men with severe cardiovascular disease use caution when taking the drug. This finding comes from researchers at University of Iowa Cardiovascular Research Center who studied the effect of Viagra on the cardiovascular system at rest and during stressful conditions. The results are published in the Dec. 19 issue of the journal Circulation. "Little is known about Viagra's effect on the cardiovascular system, particularly during situations when the cardiovascular system is under stress, as it is during sexual activity," said BRADLEY G. PHILLIPS, Pharm.D., assistant professor in the UI College of Pharmacy. Phillips and other investigators, including VIREND SOMERS, M.D., Ph.D., and CATHERINE PESEK, D.O., from the UI Department of Internal Medicine, conducted the study. Somers is now a researcher at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/01/010103073203.htm

PHILLIPS: VIAGRA UPS NERVE ACTIVITY (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Jan. 3)
The drug sildenafil citrate -- better known as Viagra -- causes a dramatic increase in the nerve activity associated with cardiovascular function, especially during physical and mental stress, bolstering recommendations that men with severe cardiovascular disease use caution when taking the drug. This finding comes from researchers at University of Iowa Cardiovascular Research Center who studied the effect of Viagra on the cardiovascular system at rest and during stressful conditions. The results are published in the Dec. 19 issue of the journal Circulation. "Little is known about Viagra's effect on the cardiovascular system, particularly during situations when the cardiovascular system is under stress, as it is during sexual activity," said BRADLEY G. PHILLIPS, Pharm.D., assistant professor in the UI College of Pharmacy. "Recent concern and reports of heart attacks, arrhythmias and even deaths temporally related to Viagra use in patients with heart failure initially raised questions about the drug's effect on the cardiovascular system." Phillips and other investigators, including VIREND SOMERS, M.D., Ph.D., and CATHERINE PESEK, D.O., from the UI department of internal medicine, conducted the study.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/3A4D8778BD0ACB7C862569C90061B9EB?OpenDocument

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER 'BUBBLE ' (SPACE.COM, Jan. 3)
Recent images and data from a pair of robotic explorers are beginning to show how small storms well up from below Jupiter's omnipresent clouds, feeding energy into larger storms that can last hundreds of years. Researchers say the new information from the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft is confirming emerging ideas about Jupiter's weather, and will eventually improve understanding of terrestrial storms, as well. Among the latest findings: the planet's magnetosphere -- a bubble of charged particles trapped by the jovian magnetic field -- was seen to grow and shrink in size. Shortly after Galileo entered Jupiter's magnetosphere last fall, the boundary moved closer to the planet, leaving the craft outside the bubble once again, said WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa. Kurth said that while researchers expected the magnetosphere to vary in size, the new evidence will improve understanding of the phenomenon.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/space/20010103/sc/cassini_snaps_earth-like_weather_at_jupiter_1.html

VAN VOORHIS IS QUOTED ABOUT EMBRYO ADOPTIONS (Chicago Tribune, Jan. 3)
A story about embryo adoptions quotes Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Iowa, as saying that Florida and Texas have statutes recognizing embryo donations and making the recipient couple the parents. Van Voorhis' clinic in Iowa is among those in the United States with the most experience with embryo adoption and has set its own guidelines. His practice started offering embryo adoption in the mid-1990s in response to a need from couples who felt uncomfortable destroying their embryos. The donated embryos are offered only to other infertile patients. Preference is given to couples who have never had a baby, and about 15 couples are on the clinic's year-plus waiting list to receive embryos.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/womannews/article/0,2669,SAV-0101030027,FF.html

UI SUMMER WRITING PROGRAM IS CITED (Washington Post, Jan. 3)
At 89, Henry J. Magaziner has just published his first book. Appropriately, it is about iron. Magaziner, a native Philadelphian and noted architect, is an ironman himself. He didn't start the project until he was 81, and he spent the next eight years researching and writing his coffee-table book, "The Golden Age of Ironwork," published by Skipjack Press. Every summer, he attends a writers' seminar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, staying with his daughter.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A11473-2001Jan2.html

ZIMMERMAN DECRIES ARTIFACT MARKET (Devil's Lake Journal, Jan. 2)
LARRY ZIMMERMAN
, a former University of South Dakota professor who now chairs American Indian and Native Studies at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about the black market sales of Native American artifacts. "When artifacts are sold, it creates a market," Zimmerman says. "When it creates a market, people go out to try to find artifacts to sell. So it becomes an ever-increasing cycle, and many sites get destroyed in that search. This certainly is the case all up and down the Missouri River." The Devil's Lake Journal is based in North Dakota.

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER WEATHER (YAHOO! NEWS, Jan. 2)
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has swung through its closest approach to Jupiter, capturing dramatic movies of the birth and death of the fierce storms that rage across the planet's surface, scientists say. Scientists are also using data from it and Galileo, another NASA craft orbiting Jupiter, to study how the solar wind of particles speeding away from the sun affects the huge magnetic region surrounding Jupiter. "For the first time we have the opportunity to have a weather station in the solar wind," said WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010102/sc/space_jupiter_dc_2.html

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER WEATHER (New York Times, Jan. 2)
NASA's Cassini spacecraft has swung through its closest approach to Jupiter, capturing dramatic movies of the birth and death of the fierce storms that rage across the planet's surface, scientists say. Scientists are also using data from it and Galileo, another NASA craft orbiting Jupiter, to study how the solar wind of particles speeding away from the sun affects the huge magnetic region surrounding Jupiter. "For the first time we have the opportunity to have a weather station in the solar wind," said WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/science/science-space-jupiter.html

UI IS MENTIONED IN PROFILE OF SCIENTIST (Scientific American, Jan. 1)
A lengthy profile of Thomas R. Cech, who last January became president of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, says Cech was a science prodigy from an early age, although his first abiding interest was geology, not biology. He recalls that he began collecting rocks and minerals in the fourth grade and that by the time he was in junior high school in Iowa City, where he grew up, he was knocking on the doors of geology professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, pestering them with questions about meteorites and fossils.
http://www.sciam.com:80/2001/0101issue/0101profile.html

JOHNSON SAYS HORMONES CAN BE RISKY (Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Jan. 1)
Women who opt for hormone replacement therapy have to weigh the various treatments to prevent osteoporosis and heart disease that could increase their risk of breast cancer. The jury is still out on whether hormone replacement therapy heightens the risk. "We're left with this dilemma: What should doctors tell women?" said SUSAN R. JOHNSON, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and an expert on menopause. "Many of us think the prudent thing to do is say that with long-term use, there may be as much as a 30 percent increase in breast cancer risk. You're left with uncertainties."
http://www.azcentral.com/health/0101hormones01.html

KURTH RECORDS SOUNDS OF SOLAR WIND (Science Daily, Jan. 1)
Two NASA spacecraft, Cassini and Galileo, have recently returned evidence of the variability in size of Jupiter's magnetosphere, a bubble of charged particles trapped within Jupiter's magnetic field. The bubble is so big that if it were visible to the eye, it would appear bigger to viewers on Earth than our own Moon does, despite its much greater distance. While Galileo was moving toward Jupiter this fall, it passed the magnetosphere boundary, but then the boundary moved inward toward Jupiter even faster than the spacecraft was moving, temporarily putting Galileo back outside the magnetosphere, said Dr. WILLIAM KURTH of the University of Iowa. Kurth played a sound recording based on natural radio emissions created by the energy of the area where the solar wind hits Jupiter's magnetosphere. The emissions were detected on an instrument onboard Cassini, which encountered the boundary this week much farther out from Jupiter than expected.
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2001/01/010101103713.htm

JOHNSON COMMENTS ON BREAST CANCER (Arizona Republic, Jan. 1)
DR. SUSAN R. JOHNSON, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says in an article on the risks and benefits of hormone treatment that "Women in this country tend to overestimate their personal risk of getting breast cancer by about tenfold. We're left with this dilemma: What should doctors tell women?"

HAMMOND RECEIVES FELLOWSHIP (Computers In Libraries, January 2001)
The University of Iowa has announced that ELLEN HAMMOND, Japanese studies librarian at the University of Iowa Libraries, is one of three recipients of the Japan Foundation-National Diet Library Training Program Fellowships. Hammond will attend a three-week program in Tokyo to learn facets of advanced Japanese librarianship and new and emerging technologies for information sharing.

BLOOM'S 'POSTVILLE' IS REVIEWED (Jerusalem Report, Jan. 2001)
STEPHEN G. BLOOM
, a UI journalism professor, spent four years visiting Postville, Iowa to chronicle the story of what happened when a group of ultra-Orthodox Jews opened a kosher slaughterhouse there. A reviewer writes, "His engrossing book, 'Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America,' [is the] tale of how instead of learning to live together, the two communities came to despise one another."
http://www.jrep.com/Books/Article-0.html

INGRAM, NEUMANN CITED (Southeast Texas Business Monthly, January 2001)
A story exploring the value of a college education asks what has caused the emergence of both educated "haves" and educated "have nots." A recent study by two University of Iowa economists sheds some light on the question. Professors BETH INGRAM and GEORGE NEUMANN studied a sample of job skills and education data for workers employed between 1970 and 1997. Their strongest and most unsurprising conclusion, according to the article, is that workers with high mathematical and communication ability earned by far the highest premium in the workplace. Unskilled college-education workers reaped some benefits from their degrees, but their incomes stagnated.

ROBINSON: DRUG MAY HELP STROKE VICTIMS (Prevention, January 2001)
A story about a study that suggests the antidepressant nortriptyline improved the cognitive abilities of some stroke victims quotes ROBERT G. ROBINSON, M.D., head of the department of psychiatry at the University of Iowa. "Now we're seeing that some patients have cognitive impairment caused by both brain damage and poststroke depression, and an antidepressant can help," Robinson said. "Family members should insist on an evaluation and treatment if depression is found."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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