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UI in the News

February 2001

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GURNETT'S ÔSOUNDS OF SPACEÕ IS FEATURED (CBS Radio, Feb. 28)
UI Space Physicist DONALD GURNETT's sounds of space (gathered some 20 years ago by the Voyager spacecraft at Jupiter) being the inspiration for a musical composition for string quartet were the subject of a story on the CBS Radio Network "The Osgood Files," with Charles Osgood. The story mentioned that the piece was commissioned by NASA and that the Kronos Quartet will work with a composer to complete the piece.

GRANT LEADS NCAA COMMITTEE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 28)
Amateurism has been a hot issue in the National Collegiate Athletic Association for the past couple of years. However, it may cool off quickly after last week's meeting of the Division I Academics/Eligibility/Compliance Cabinet. Led by CHRISTINE A. GRANT, the retired women's athletics director at the University of Iowa, the cabinet has been considering major changes in the way the NCAA determines whether an athlete's status is amateur or professional. The committee had proposed radical changes that would have given many professional athletes the opportunity to compete in college sports, but scaled back its recommendations significantly last week, after many college presidents and athletics officials voiced concerns about the proposals. http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/02/2001022803n.htm

UI PRESS BOOK SHOWCASES FAMILIES (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Feb. 28)
Mixed-race families are the subject of a new book, "Love in a Global Village: A Celebration of Intercultural Families in the Midwest" published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. Authors Jessie Carroll Grearson and Lauren B. Smith spent time with 15 intercultural and inter- racial families in heartland states including Ohio, Illinois, Indiana and Michigan to record their lives. The authors let the families recount courtships, difficulties and triumphs in their own voices. http://www.cleveland.com/living/index.ssf?/living/pd/l28globa.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'LOVE IN A GLOBAL VILLAGE' (Plain Dealer, Feb. 28)
"Love in a Global Village: A Celebration of Intercultural Families in the Midwest," by Jessie Carroll Grearson and Lauren B. Smith (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $19.95) tells the stories of 15 intercultural couples, many with children, who live in cities and rural areas throughout the Midwestern U.S.

UI STUDENTS IN PHOTO (International Herald Tribune, Feb. 27)
A photo that accompanies a story on reality TV show identifies UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students waiting to audition in Iowa City for MTV's "The Real World."

UI STUDENT'S WEB SITE OFFERS BABY NAMES (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Feb. 27)
Michael Thomas Witry, 19, a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA history major, has created the Institute for Naming Children Humanely, found on the Web at inch.stormpages.com/. It's for fun, but he justifies the creation this way: "Parents who choose names poorly create misleading labels for their children. These labels can cause their children to be mocked, stereotyped or ostracized. Mocked, stereotyped and ostracized children grow to become demented adults." http://www.cleveland.com/living/index.ssf?/living/pd/l27namet.html

GREENBERG DISCUSSES BACTERIA (New York Times, Feb. 27)
Scientists have found that many types of marine bacteria that produce light do not glow unless there is a cluster of microbes. This indicates that bacteria, long thought to be lone operators, have a communication system that lets them determine how many of them are there. The system has been dubbed quorum sensing because it allows the bacteria to determine whether enough of them are present to get down to business. Quorum sensing is forcing scientists to recognize that bacteria are more sophisticated than once thought. "For the longest time nearly every single biologist thought that cell-to-cell signaling was in the domain of higher organisms and that most bacteria were designed just to multiply," said Dr. E. PETER GREENBERG, a professor of microbiology at the University of Iowa and a founder of Quorum Sciences. It turns out, he said, that bacteria "are organizing societies that can do things that are more than the sum of the parts." http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/27/science/27BACT.html

FORMER U. OF ALASKA PRESIDENT DIES
(Anchorage Daily News, Feb. 26)
William Wood, who was the fourth president of the University of Alaska and is credited with turning a single-campus school into a major university, died Sunday. Wood served as university president from 1960 to 1973. During his tenure the university expanded from College Hill in Fairbanks to communities across Alaska, including Anchorage and Juneau. He was a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he earned a doctorate in 1939. http://www.adn.com/metro/story/0,2633,243081,00.html

UI, OTHERS BAN INDIAN MASCOTS (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 26)
Last week, after a year of debate, the Sequoia Union High School District board retired the controversial Cherokee Indian mascot at the behest of a group of students. Several school districts in California have changed mascots for this reason in recent years. On a broader level, states, universities and newspapers have taken a stand against representations of Native Americans that they consider demeaning. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA does not allow mascots that depict American Indians at its athletic events in Iowa City. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/02/26/MN73668.DTL

LEE: E-MAIL IN CARS REDUCES BRAKE REACTION TIME (Denver Post, Feb. 26)
JOHN D. LEE
, an associate professor of industrial engineering at the University of Iowa, studies voice-activated e-mail usage using driving simulators. Preliminary results show a 30 percent reduction in braking reaction times for people using these devices compared to those who don't.

LEWIS-BECK CITED (Florida Times-Union, Feb. 26)
A story about the predictions political scientists made about the outcome of the 2000 presidential election quotes MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK at the University of Iowa as predicting that Vice President Al Gore would win 56.2 percent of the vote. Said Lewis-Beck: "It's not even going to be close."

BAYNTON SPOKE AT FREE LECUTRE (Rocky Mountain News, Feb. 25)
Disabilities scholar and University of Iowa professor DOUGLAS BAYNTON was scheduled to speak March 6 at the University of Colorado on the effects of disability on slavery, women's suffrage and immigration restriction.

WRITER ATTENDED UI WORKSHOP (Charlotte Observer, Feb. 25)
After graduating from UNC Chapel Hill, novelist Gail Godwin became a reporter for the Miami Herald. She was fired when her stories began to contain more fantasy than facts. Fleeing to London, she went to work for a travel service and wrote fiction at night. "I was taking writing classes and I decided to get serious," she says, "so I applied to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP." While earning a doctorate, Godwin published her first novel, "The Perfectionists." Like her subsequent ones, it was loosely autobiographical. Her latest book is the nonfiction "Heart: A Personal Journey Through Its Myths and Meanings." http://www.charlotte.com/services/books/

BALDUS TESTIFIES ON DEATH PENALTY (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 25)
DAVID BALDUS
, a law professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, testified before a Maryland state senate committee about the death penalty. In a review of 346 Maryland cases in which defendants were eligible for the death penalty, he said, the killers of white victims were more likely to get the death penalty than were the killers of blacks. And black defendants were more likely than whites to get the death penalty. It's a bloodless kind of debate for the most bloody of all decisions. But those arguing that racism plays a role offer more numbers -- jury selection, for example. Baldus pointed to the racial composition of juries. In Baltimore County, he said, blacks make up 12 percent of the adult population but only 5 percent of the pool of jurors. And, he said, "The prosecution is about twice as likely to strike an African-American as a white" during jury selection. http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/bal-md.olesker25feb25.story

UI STUDENT COMMENTS ON NURSING SHORTAGE (Seattle Times, Feb. 25)
An article about the national nursing shortage quotes Larry Schumacher, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Mercy Medical Center in Des Moines, Iowa, who, since 1995 has been working on a doctorate at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. One reason for the shortage is that fewer women are going into nursing, and men aren't entering the profession in great numbers, either. But Schumacher says that is changing. "We have more men in nursing today than when I started 20 years ago," he said. "More men who go into the profession are earning higher degrees." http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=nursejobs25&date=20010225

UI COLLABORATES ON BRAIN WORK (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel Feb. 25)
Researchers at the Medical College of Wisconsin have identified the part of the brain involved in hitting a baseball or playing a piano, giving insight to how humans perceive time, according to a study in the journal Nature Neuroscience. They found that the basal ganglia, a group of nuclei located deep within the base of the brain, and the parietal lobe, located on the surface of the right side of the brain, are both needed to make accurate decisions about timing and produce a coordinated response. The basal ganglia contain nerve cells that contain dopamine, a neurotransmitter that affects brain processes that control movement, emotional response and ability to experience pleasure. The Wisconsin researchers are testing patients with Parkinson's and ADHD to determine how dopamine replacement drugs and Ritalin restore time perception. They are also working in collaboration with researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, who will study brain patterns in the early stages of development of Huntington's disease, before patients have movement problems. http://www.jsonline.com/alive/news/feb01/brain26022501.asp

PLAYWRIGHT BLESSING IS UI GRAD (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 25)
With a combination of resignation and pride, Lee Blessing says he has not had a regular paycheck since 1973. He is, in short, a playwright, and one who has had a long and checkered run in what he calls "my buffet-style career." In the two decades since he had his first play produced, Blessing, 51, a native of Minneapolis and an alumnus of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Graduate Writers' Workshop, has been on Broadway, off-Broadway and across the country in theaters of all shapes and sizes. He is currently in Chicago for his latest play, "Rewrites," which is to have its premiere March 19 at the off-Loop Dolphinback Theatre Company. http://chicagotribune.com/leisure/columnists/christiansen/article/0,1122,SAV-0102250542,00.html

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT APPEAL (Boston Globe, Feb. 25)
Applying a 111-year-old antitrust law to the high-tech world of the personal computer, the US Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington opens a momentous two-day hearing Monday to consider the legal fate of Microsoft Corp., one of the new economy's best, and most controversial, performers. "The principal importance will be its impact on whether a portion of our information technologies will be open or closed," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust professor at the University of Iowa, who served briefly as a Justice Department consultant on the case. "My personal view is that the rate of innovation is much greater when you have open architecture in the market than when one firm has a lock." Hovenkamp says a breakup is justified both because of Microsoft's tactics to block competition and because it is the only remedy "that has a high probability of success within three to five years" of opening up the software market. http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/056/business/The_next_round_Microsoft_awaits_its_fate+.shtml

STANFORD MUSIC PROF, UI ALUM, DIES (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 25)
William Loran Crosten, a onetime child prodigy on the piano who later established Stanford University's music department in the 1940s and served as its chairman for 26 years, died Monday at his home on campus. He was 91. Born in Des Moines, Iowa, Mr. Crosten performed at the age of 10 for famed evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson at a series of her Midwest revivals and later as a teenager with the St. Louis Symphony. He graduated from Drake University in Des Moines in 1930, earning a bachelor's degree in music, and went on to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was awarded a master's degree in 1936, the year he married Mary Elizabeth Perry, his wife of 64 years. http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/02/25/MN185029.DTL

ADA'S FUTURE (National Public Radio, Feb. 24)

This past week, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states are not obliged to pay damages to disabled state employees under federal law. Lisa Simeone talks to Deborah Kaplan, executive director of the World Institute on Disability, based in Oakland, California, and PETER BLANCK, director of the Law, Health Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa, in Iowa City. http://search.npr.org/cf/cmn/cmnpd01fm.cfm?PrgDate=02%2F24%2F2001&PrgID=6

WALLACE CALLS FOR MORE TOBACCO REGULATION (HealthScout, Feb. 23)

Modified tobacco products that go easy on tar and nicotine might sound like a good middle ground for smokers who want to reduce their risk of cancer and other illnesses. But there's no evidence any of these products offer a safer alternative to smoking. That's the conclusion of a panel of smoking experts convened by the Institute of Medicine (IOM), who called for more regulation of, and research into, products promoted as being able to reduce the health damage from cigarettes. "Unregulated claims may lead people to use them thinking they're safe. The net effect might in fact be adverse," says DR. ROBERT WALLACE, an epidemiologist at the University of Iowa and a member of the panel. "We're very worried about that." http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010223/hl/jury_still_out_on_safe_tobacco_1.html

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT APPEAL (Yahoo!News, Feb. 23)
As Microsoft Corp. and the Department of Justice prepare to present oral arguments to the U.S. Court of Appeals in Washington next week, legal experts are divided over the approach the justices may take to the matter. HERB HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa and an antitrust expert, said he expects the hearings to concentrate on the definition of monopolistic conduct and whether Windows and IE (Internet Explorer) are legally separate products for tying purposes.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/zd/20010222/tc/all_eyes_on_microsoft_as_it_heads_back_to_court_1.html
The story appeared also appeared in ZDNET TECHNOLOGY NEWS. http://www4.zdnet.com:80/intweek/stories/news/0,4164,2688855,00.html

BALDUS TESTIFIES ON DEATH PENALTY (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 23)
DAVID C. BALDUS
, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law was one of several researches who testified before a Maryland state senate committee. Legislators there are considering a moratorium on executions until a study by the University of Maryland, College Park is completed on whether the death penalty is unfairly imposed on African-Americans. "If the legislature was to be confident of knowing whether race affects the imposition of death sentences, it would be prudent to wait until you see the results," said Baldus. To bolster the case for the moratorium, Baldus and Howard University political science professor Richard Seltzer presented results from their studies on juries and on the race of victims and defendants in Maryland death penalty cases. In a review of 346 Maryland cases in which defendants were eligible for the death penalty, Baldus found that killers of white victims were more likely to receive it than killers of nonwhite victims, and black defendants were more likely to receive it than white defendants.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/bal-md.penalty23feb23.story?coll=bal%2Dlocal%2Dheadlines

UI RESEARCHER STUDIES FUSSY BABIES (USA Today, Feb. 23)
A University of Iowa researcher studying the behavior of fussy babies wants to find the best way to eliminate stress for both parent and child. Many parents believe a baby who is picked up too much can become spoiled. But researcher BETH TROUTMAN, an assistant clinical professor in the UI department of psychiatry, says parents forced to listen to a crying child also suffer.
http://www.usatoday.com/usatonline/20010223/3091158s.htm

UI STUDENT TESTIFIES IN SENATE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 23)
The chairman of the Senate Finance Committee said last week that he is optimistic that a number of tax proposals that would help students and parents pay for college will become law this session of Congress. Sen. Charles E. Grassley, Republican of Iowa, also said at a hearing of the committee he would make such tax legislation a priority for the panel. Those measures include bills that would expand the deduction of interest on student loans, extend benefits for students with employer-provided education assistance, and increase the limit on annual contributions to education savings accounts. Eight senators -- an unusually high number -- testified at the hearing. A panel assembled by the committee -- which included financial experts, a teacher, and a dental student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- also spoke in favor of the plans.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i24/24a03301.htm

UI LIFTS LYRIC BAN ON BEER SONG (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 23)
A beer song is back on tap at the University of Iowa. University officials had told the Hawkeye Marching Band last month to put a lid on the lyrics of "In Heaven There Is No Beer" after a local resident, Tom Aunan, complained that the song promotes drinking. Mr. Aunan did not return telephone calls seeking comment. In his e-mail message to MARY SUE COLEMAN, the university's president, he had complained that the song sends "mixed messages" to today's youth. KEVIN KASTENS, the band's director, concedes that while alcohol abuse is an important issue, the song is relatively harmless, merely "an informal student tradition." As a member of the band, Matt Hektoen, puts it, "The beer song doesn't promote drinking any more than the fight song promotes fighting."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i24/24a00801.htm

BLOOM COMMENTS ON POSTVILLE DISPUTE (Detroit News, Feb. 23)
A story about rising tensions in Postville quotes University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who studied the town for five years to write "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Focusing on old-timers' relationships with the Jews, Bloom says that "the two communities are at war" -- and he blames the Hasidim for refusing to adapt even to such small but symbolic local customs as keeping lawns trimmed with military precision. "The [Jews] have kept up walls and become a separate entity," Bloom said. "That works quite well in Los Angeles, where there are myriad separate communities. It doesn't work at all in a tiny, cohesive town of 1,500 where people depend on one another to survive."

WORKSHOP GRADUATE STUDIES MEDICINE, WRITES NOVEL (AP, Feb. 22)
Chris Adrian, author of the new novel "Gob's Grief," about a 19th century man who tries to build a machine to resurrect his brother, as well as everyone else killed in the Civil War, planned to go to medical school, but a professor encouraged him to first go to graduate school to hone his writing. He was accepted into the highly regarded writers' program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. For three years after that, he worked on his novel between midnight and 4 a.m. and attended medical school during the day -- although he admits sleeping through some of his morning classes.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010221/12/wkd-a-brothers-story
This ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site Feb. 22
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-WKD-A-Brothers-Story.html

NEW NEWSPAPER VP IS UI GRADUATE (St. Petersburg Times, Feb. 22)
Neil Brown, managing editor of the St. Petersburg Times, was elected a vice president of the newspaper's parent, Times Publishing Co., by the company's board Wednesday. Paul C. Tash, the Times' editor and president, said the appointment reflects "the great confidence that Neil has earned" in directing the paper's news report. Brown, 42, came to the Times as world editor in 1993 after serving as managing editor of its Washington affiliate, Congressional Quarterly. A native of Chicago, he is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a former reporter and editor at the Miami Herald.
http://www.sptimes.com/News/022201/Business/Business_today.shtml

WATERS FILM 'WHIPPED' (Boston Globe, Feb. 22)
SASHA WATERS
is producing "Whipped," which she describes as "a documentary portrait of three New York women who work as professional dominatrixes It's a behind-the-scenes look at their work and their personal lives." Waters, a new York native and recent transplant to Iowa, where she is an associate professor of film at the University of Iowa, began "Whipped" in the mid-'90s with co-director Iana Porter.

UI STUDENT COMMENTS ON BEER SONG (Denver Post, Feb. 21)
After the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA reversed its decision to ban its Hawkeye band from playing "In Heaven There Is No Beer," one band member, Jason Peterson, said the song will be more popular than ever. "Students and supporters will probably sing even louder now," he said. The same article ran Feb. 8 in the Toronto Sun.

TOMKOVICZ: TECHNOLOGY THREATENS PRIVACY (Daily Territorial, Feb. 21)
A story about the constitutionality of using high-tech measures to scan homes for signs of illegal activity quotes JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a constitutional law professor at the University of Iowa. "Anyone who cares about privacy ought to be concerned about the advance of technology," he says. The Daily Territorial is based in Tucson, Ariz.

NEGOTIATION STUDY IS NOTED (Gannett News Service, Feb. 21)
TERRY BOLES
, professor of management and organizations in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, recently co-authored a paper titled "Deception and Retribution in Repeated Ultimatum Bargaining." Her bottom line: If you lie during business negotiations, you'll likely pay a price if you ever have to negotiate with that same person again.

STATE SPENDING CUTS AFFECT UI (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Feb. 21)
Iowa's Republican legislative leaders proposed $40 million in spending cuts to this year's budget on Wednesday, saying a weakening economy is draining the state's treasury. Major components of the plan include slashing $12.2 million in education funding, including $3.9 million at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, $3.3 million at Iowa State University and $1 million at the University of Northern Iowa. Community colleges would lose $1.7 million. The Associated Press filed this story.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/FA1121A971BBA33B862569FA0081A90E?OpenDocument

EMERITUS PROFESSOR STUDIED HIBERNATING BEARS (ABCNews.com, Feb. 21)
In a story about how bears hibernate, the research of retired UI physiologist EDGAR FOLK is noted. Folk and his colleagues determined hibernating bears reduce their sleeping heart rates from about 50 beats per minute to as low as six beats per minute in winter. He also found the animals recycle their urea, a poisonous substance that's normally excreted in urine. The bears' livers reprocess the urea and squeeze extra proteins from the recycled fluid.
http://more.abcnews.go.com/sections/scitech/DailyNews/bears010221.html

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON COURT CASE (Wisconsin Public Radio, Feb. 21)
JAMES TOMKOVICZ
, criminal law professor, University of Iowa College of Law, says the Supreme Court needs to draw the line on the use of technology in police investigations. Tomkovicz, made the comment as the featured guest for WPR's "Public Conversation," a one-hour call-in show. The show aired hours after the Supreme Court held arguments in "Kyllo v. the United States," a Fourth Amendment case questioning the law enforcement official's authority to use thermal imaging to search a person’s house without a warrant.

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON PRIVACY CASE (CBC Radio, Canada, Feb. 20)
It started as a simple arrest involving a marijuana grower but it has grown into a test case to determine what kinds of technology police can use to spy on people. Danny Kyllo made a habit of growing marijuana in his home in Oregon. Police--without a search warrant--used a special device to detect the amount of heat emanating from the walls in his house. Kyllo's lawyer argued before the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday that the search violated Kyllo's 4th Amendment right to privacy. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a constitutional law professor at the University of Iowa, wrote a friend of the court brief on behalf of Kyllo. "I don't believe how much heat I'm generating in my home or the degree to which I'm producing that heat or what words I'm saying in my home is actually being projected to the public. Even though there are devices that can pickup the heat I'm generating or what words I'm saying, I am taking precautions to protect my privacy and those things that I do inside my home," he said.
http://radio.cbc.ca/insite/AS_IT_HAPPENS_TORONTO/2001/2/20.html

UI GRADUATE STUDENTS PROTEST (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 20)
An Associated Press photo shows UI teaching and research assistants picketing on campus. The students' union is negotiating a contract with the Board of Regents.

TOMKOVICZ IS QUOTED ON SURVEILLANCE (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 20)
Today the U.S. Supreme Court is being asked to decide to what extent that Colonial standard of privacy still applies in a world where high-tech cops are increasingly able to peer without detection into the most private aspects of American life. While law-enforcement agents are able to quickly and efficiently investigate a wide range of suspects, privacy advocates say the high court must draw a clear line to prevent modern-day sleuths from becoming Big Brother with a badge. "Anyone who cares about privacy ought to be concerned about the advance of technology," says JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a constitutional law professor at the University of Iowa.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/02/20/fp2s1-csm.shtml

TOMKOVICZ COMMENTS ON OREGON PRIVACY CASE (The Oregonian, Feb. 20)
Portland attorney Kenneth Lerner will ask the U.S. Supreme Court today to overturn a decision about an early morning investigation on the Oregon coast in 1992 that approved the use of thermal imaging -- which reads reflected heat to detect what is beyond a wall -- to examine the home of a drug suspect. Kyllo v. the United States has attracted the attention of search and seizure legal scholars across the country. "The court has the opportunity in this case to create general Fourth Amendment doctrine with implications for all sorts of technology of the future," said JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, a criminal law professor at the University of Iowa who wrote a friend of the court brief in the case. Lerner, in a petition to the court, said the case is about a "fundamental question of whether the Fourth Amendment's guarantee of personal security in one's home must yield to scientific advances that render our traditional barriers of privacy obsolete."
http://www.oregonlive.com/printer2.ssf?/news/oregonian/01/02/lc_31ther20.frame

BLACK COMMENTS ON SAMSON DIAGNOSIS (New York Times, Feb. 20)
Children are taught that Samson was a hero who fought the Philistines and fell victim to Delilah's wily charms. But writing in a psychiatric journal, four physicians offer slightly different interpretations. They argue that the son of Manoah -- who lied to his parents, stole from his neighbors, brawled with regularity and killed with abandon -- is a classic example of someone suffering from antisocial personality disorder. Dr. DONALD W. BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and an expert on antisocial personality disorder, said the researchers have made "an interesting case" for their diagnosis. "I think the evidence they give is certainly suggestive," Black said. http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/20/health/20SAMP.html?printpage=yes

FORKENBROCK COMMENTS ON ROAD USE (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Feb. 19)
Missouri legislators are considering a sponsored bill that would increase the diesel fuel tax by 3 cents a gallon, increase license and registration fees for trucks and lower the speed limit for certain trucks by 5 mph. "As a general rule, heavy vehicles underpay for the use of roads relative to lighter vehicles, particularly automobiles and light trucks," said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the UI. Heavy vehicles do the most damage, especially on roads that aren't built to handle the weight, Forkenbrock said. Cost studies also fail to take into account air pollution, noise and other "external costs" from heavy trucks, he said.

BROWN DEVELOPS LITERACY SOFTWARE (St. Petersburg Times, Feb. 19)
A new reading software program called "Breakthrough to Literacy," which offers a mix of conventional reading lessons and computer-driven word games that emphasize basic phonics skills, was developed in the mid-1990s by a speech pathologist at the University of Iowa. After years of research, CAROLYN BROWN (an adjunct associated professor) began seeing similarities in how disadvantaged students struggled to develop their language skills. But while she saw common threads throughout many of their efforts, each child needed individualized lessons, Brown said. "We began very slowly and very deliberately," Brown said. "We wanted to create a program that gave children the ability to break up the language into units that they could perceive."
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/021901/Pasco/Software_helping_chil.shtml

BLOOM'S POSTVILLE REVIEWED (Dallas Morning News, Feb. 18)
University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" is reviewed. The book is about Postville, "a farm town of 1,500 in northeastern Iowa where pigs far outnumber people. In what sounds like a scene from an early Woody Allen movie, he found Hasidic Jews from Brooklyn prosperous and haughty thanks to the kosher slaughterhouse they founded in the late 1980s."
http://www.dallasnews.com/lifestyles/books/290160_bk3_postville_.html

PETERS QUOTED ON BUSH VOCABULARY (Chicago Tribune Magazine, Feb. 18)
A story about President Bush's speech patterns says he has at least three verbal habits that leap out at any listener, among them his continual deployment of the adjective "interesting" as a euphemism. JOHN DURHAM PETERS, a communications professor at the University of Iowa and author of "Speaking Into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication," says Bush may be avoiding the use of more incendiary, divisive or emotionally revealing words when he calls upon the old reliable "interesting." "That word," Peters says with a chuckle, "is the one we always said to my mother when she made something really weird for dinner and we didn't want to tell her. 'Interesting' is one of those notoriously weaselly words." Yet weaselly words -- the bland, slippery, catch-me-if-you-can evasions that politicians seem to favor -- are not altogether bad, Peters adds. "Vagueness is not always a crime. Language, in fact, needs to be vague, or else we wouldn't be able to use words for many different things. A lot of what happens in politics is strategic vagueness, in which you have enough wiggle room so people aren't pinned down. It can be weaselly, but it can also be emancipatory.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/tribunemagazine/article/0,2669,SAV-0102180501,FF.html

RICHENBACHER QUOTED ON HEART LASER (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Feb. 18)
A story about the debate over the effectiveness of using laser surgery to zap holes in hearts and, ostensibly, relieve otherwise unmanageable angina, says the procedure has its skeptics, including Dr. WAYNE RICHENBACHER of the University of Iowa. While some say the holes cause inflammation that in turn triggers the heart to grow more tiny blood vessels, a process called angiogenesis, Richenbacher and others say that often patients feel better the very next day -- too soon for new blood vessels, which take a month or more to sprout. "They come out of the operating room in pain, or they come out and say, 'I feel great,' " says Richenbacher. "That makes absolutely no sense if you think angiogenesis is the effect."
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0218BC-MN--HEARTLASE&date=18-Feb-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Feb. 17 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/02/17/national1639EST0561.DTL

UI FUNDING IS LOW AMONG BIG 10 (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Feb. 18)
A story about state funding cuts faced by the University of Minnesota says that according to Illinois State University researchers who track educational funding, the University of Minnesota's 2000-01 funding increased by 3.7 percent. The only Big Ten schools to receive less were the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Indiana University and Purdue. Five Big Ten schools received funding boosts of 5 to 8 percent. The University of Wisconsin got a 9.4 percent increase.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=UNIV18&date=18-Feb-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WORKSHOP ALUMNUS IS OBSESSED WITH POETRY (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 18)
Since he was 15, Dan Beachy-Quick, 27, poetry has been his obsession. He attended the University of Denver, where he established himself as an "extraordinary" talent, and received his master's from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. By the age of 20, the Iowa City resident had two poems published in the prestigious Paris Review. His poetry also has been accepted by the Colorado Review, Denver Quarterly, Nimrod, Ploughshares and the Western Humanities Review. To make money, Beachy-Quick teaches poetry at Grinnell College and works at the Prairie Lights bookstore in Iowa City.
http://www.latimes.com:80/business/columns/careermake/20010218/t000014717.html

UI GRADUATE IS PROFILED (Atlanta Journal Constitution, Feb. 18)
A business profile on Blake Whitney, who in 1988 founded MedStar -- a distributor of pacemakers and other medical technology -- and later joined the Internet-based medical company WebMD Corp., says Whitney has a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.accessatlanta.com:80/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/sunday/business_a3f876a8b39b80990087.html

ST. PAUL CHEF ATTENDED UI (St. Paul Pioneer Press, Feb. 16)
A list of St. Paul, Minn.-area chefs gives their educational backgrounds, including that of David Parson-Capaccioli, chef at cafe un deux trois: "I started cooking in college. I was going to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and was in a band and cooking allowed me a flexible schedule. My bass player got me my first cooking job at a steakhouse. I realized I liked cooking a lot more than college and went to the New England Culinary Institute in Vermont.''
http://www.pioneerplanet.com:80/seven-days/fri/justgo/docs/031780.htm

YOUNG INVESTOR EYES UI (SmartMoney, Feb. 16)
A story about smart investments by young people features Des Moines resident Marc Galeazzi, who began saving at 14, after his dad, Dennis, a financial officer for a property company, put him on a weekly budget of $25 and he started working at Kinley's Golf & Sport, cleaning up and fixing displays. While he has already been accepted at three of the four colleges to which he applied (including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA), he isn't sure which to attend. It depends on the career path he chooses. When he contacted SmartMoney Makeovers in January, he said he wanted to become a certified financial planner. Since then, his thinking has shifted a bit. "Right now I'm kind of on the dentistry thing, not so much the business thing anymore," Marc says. "I'm thinking of doing the pre-dentistry/orthodontistry-type deal. I don't know -- it changes a lot." The SmartMoney article appeared on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=BT-CO-20010216-006961.djml

ART BY FORMER UI STUDENT IS ON DISPLAY (New York Times, Feb. 16) A listing of shows at New York art galleries includes a show of Vito Acconci and Ana Mendieta's 'A Relationship Study, 1969-1976,' at the Galerie Lelong. This exhibition offers a case study of Acconci's early work and its purported influence on the young Cuban ŽmigrŽ Ana Mendieta during her student days at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1970's. Before she died from a fall out a window in New York in 1985, Mendieta created performances and installations based on her own female form; these expressed the adoration, vulnerability and rage she felt at her embodiment as a woman. Appalled by a brutal rape and murder at the university, Mendieta smeared herself with blood and had herself tied to a table in 1973, inviting an audience in to bear witness. Acconci was a visiting artist at the University of Iowa in 1974 and again in 1976, and his work was shown and discussed in art classes as early as 1970, according to a Ph.D. thesis by the art historian Julia Herzberg.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/16/arts/16GALL.html?pagewanted=all

BLOOM COMMENTS ON POSTVILLE DISPUTE (San Francisco Chronicle, Feb. 16)
A story about rising tensions in Postville quotes University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who studied the town for five years to write "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Focusing on old-timers' relationships with the Jews, Bloom says that "the two communities are at war" -- and he blames the Hasidim for refusing to adapt even to such small but symbolic local customs as keeping lawns trimmed with military precision. "The [Jews] have kept up walls and become a separate entity," Bloom said. "That works quite well in Los Angeles, where there are myriad separate communities. It doesn't work at all in a tiny, cohesive town of 1,500 where people depend on one another to survive." http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/02/16/MN142184.DTL


WORKSHOP GRADUATE IS PROFILED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 16)
A story about James Hynes, whose novel A Lecturer's Tale was recently published, says he received an M.A. at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, and has taught writing at Michigan and at the University of Texas at Austin, where he now lives. As the title suggests, his novel is about the pilgrimage of a lowly lecturer, Nelson Humboldt, through the University of the Midwest in Hamilton Groves, Minn. http://chronicle.com/free/v47/i23/23b01101.htm

EDWARDS COMMENTS ON TEETH BUY (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 16)
JOHN FREYER
's false teeth, kidney-shaped ashtray, and can of Campbell's soup have already sold, but there's plenty more where they came from. The University of Iowa graduate student is selling 600 items he's amassed in his 28 years -- part of a performance-art project that seeks, he says, "to discover what happens when the things that define you are no longer yours, and whether or not those things start to shape their new owners." He has posted pictures and descriptions of each item on his Web site (http://www.allmylifeforsale.com). The University of Iowa Art Museum bid $27 for a set of false teeth that Freyer wore for a time at the age of 7, after he tripped over a wire and lost his own teeth. KATHLEEN EDWARDS, a museum curator, says, "It's a project that has obvious humor in it, it's also a serious work of art. Not only is he questioning the value of art, but how we as a society deal with things that have value on multiple levels." The curators haven't yet decided whether to display Freyer's teeth, but they say anyone who wants to see them can make an appointment. So far, no one has asked.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i23/23a01002.htm

MADISON ON UI MATH EFFORTS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 16)
Black Americans -- and black women in particular -- are not well represented in graduate education; in mathematics, their numbers are particularly dismal. Out of 1,085 math Ph.D.s conferred nationally in 1999, only 10 went to black Americans. Of those 10, 6 were women. In 1998, 7 of 12 were women. As a result, a number of universities around the country are launching math program diversity initiatives. Five years ago, the University of Iowa program had no minority students and only a few women; today, more than a quarter of the students are from underrepresented minority groups. The Iowa faculty members became proactive. The professors now recruit at minority-focused math festivals across the country, and go as far as the University of Puerto Rico to attract students. "The whole atmosphere seems to have changed in the last two to three years," says EUGENE MADISON, a professor. "Some jokingly refer to our program as having transformed from ruralism to pluralism."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i23/23a01401.htm

CAIN COMMENTS ON BUSH TAX CUT (Washington Blade, Feb. 16)
A story about President George W. Bush's proposed 10-year, $1.6 trillion tax cut, quotes PATRICIA CAIN, an openly lesbian law professor at the University of Iowa and an expert on taxation. "There is clearly nothing in Bush's plan that was intended to hurt or help gay people," Cain says. "We're invisible to him and his policy people."

SCHNEIDER PENS LETTER (Journal of Dental Technology, Feb. 15)
ROBERT L. SCHNEIDER
, DDS, MS, clinical director of the Oral and Maxillofacial Implant Center at the University of Iowa, writes in praise of an article that: "It is critical for the success of the restoration of the patient that the dental technologist be involved at the initial diagnostic appointment of the patient."

HOVENKAMP IS QUOTED ON MICROSOFT, COREL UNION (Yahoo! News, Feb. 15)
Legal experts are lauding the U.S. Department of Justice's investigation of Microsoft Corp.'s $135 million investment in rival Corel Corp., saying the union is "dangerous" in its own right. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, law professor at the University of Iowa and an antitrust expert, said this was a standard merger investigation to examine whether competition in the industry would be stifled by the investment of a dominant industry player (in this case, Microsoft) in its most substantial rival (Corel). "I think the Microsoft/Corel union is a dangerous one in its own right," Hovenkamp said. Microsoft is the dominant producer of multifunction office productivity software -- with more than 90 percent of that market -- while Corel is its lagging rival. "While Corel has previously proved a vigorous competitor with its WordPerfect Office suite and CorelDraw graphics application, this deal cuts the competitive edge in that industry," he added. http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/zd/20010215/tc/legal_experts_microsoft_s_corel_stake_dangerous__1.html

STORY PROVIDES UI LINK ON AFRICA (HealthScout, Feb. 14)
A link to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Art & Life in Africa page is included at the end of a story about a study of black people over 65 in Indiana and Nigeria which found that while both Africans and African-Americans are more likely than whites to become demented as they age, Alzheimer's disease and mental decay are much more common among blacks in the United States. The study also found that China and Africa are ill-equipped to provide care for such patients. In the city of Ibadan, for example, home to the Yoruba people the Indiana University team studied, there are no nursing homes. The UI link is offered for readers interested in finding out more about the Yoruba people. http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010214/hl/alzheimer_s_curse_of_the_good_life__1.html

UI PRESS: 'LOVE IN GLOBAL VILLAGE' (Christian Science Monitor, Feb. 14)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has recently published "Love in a Global Village: A Celebration of Intercultural Families in the Midwest." The book includes interviews with more than a dozen couples in intercultural marriages.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/02/14/fp14s1-csm.shtml

JONES COMMENTS ON STUDENT DRINKING (Omaha World-Herald, Feb. 14)
University of Iowa Student Services Vice President PHILLIP JONES discusses the UI's idea for an alcohol-free performance spot for music students as one alternative to drinking. "It was a separate idea that it could really be a workshop for performing artists, particularly in jazz, to 'jam,' as they say, in public so the musicians could have a live audience."

FRY USED PINK TO LULL OPPONENTS (Pharos Tribune, Feb. 13)
Former University of Iowa football coach HAYDEN FRY employed a novel approach in throwing opponents off their train of thought when they visited Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. Fry had the visitor locker room painted in a bright Pepto Bismol pink, a color that tends to soften the heart and mind, distracting human beings from the humdrum day-to-day challenges of life. The Pharos Tribune is based in Logansport, Ind.

BLOOM COMMENTS ON POSTVILLE DISPUTE (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 13)
A story about rising tensions in Postville quotes University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who studied the town for five years to write "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Focusing on old-timers' relationships with the Jews, Bloom says that "the two communities are at war" -- and he blames the Hasidim for refusing to adapt even to such small but symbolic local customs as keeping lawns trimmed with military precision. "The [Jews] have kept up walls and become a separate entity," Bloom said. "That works quite well in Los Angeles, where there are myriad separate communities. It doesn't work at all in a tiny, cohesive town of 1,500 where people depend on one another to survive."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0102130188,FF.html

REDLAWSK COMMENTS ON BUSH GOVERNING STYLE (Insight, Feb. 12)
DAVID REDLAWSK, an assistant professor of political psychology at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story on how President George W. Bush's business background might influence how he runs the country. Redlawsk, who has an M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University, says: "The thing that strikes me is M.B.A. programs focus on the big picture." Business students typically are taught using a case-study approach; they evaluate a company's decision-making process and determine which strategies were good and which were bad. É And that has potential consequences for governance, Redlawsk suggests.

TUCKER COMMENTS ON PROSTATE STUDY (BBC News, Feb. 12)
Implanted magnetic rods could be a new treatment for prostate cancer, say U.S. researchers. Dr ROBERT TUCKER of the University of Iowa said: "Our results, and those of our international collaborators, suggest that these rods could be extremely effective in treating the cancer with potentially fewer side-effects. We think this approach could be useful against other localized tumors."
http://news6.thdo.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid%5F1166000/1166141.stm

FINALIST TAUGHT LAW AT UI (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, Feb. 12)
A regent for the University of Minnesota has been named a finalist for the chancellor's position at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, along with a longtime administrator at the Lincoln campus. Minnesota regent William Hogan and Acting Chancellor Harvey Perlman were named Monday as the top two contenders to lead the school. Perlman has served in numerous administrative positions during 25 years at the school. He also taught law at the University of Virginia Law School and was a visiting professor at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0212BC-MN--UNLCHANCE&date=12-Feb-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

FLORIDA HOSPITAL HIRES UI FELLOW (St. Petersburg Times, Feb. 12)
Seven Rivers Community Hospital has announced the appointment of three doctors to its medical staff, including Ravi Kondapalli, who specializes in gastroenterology and who completed a fellowship in gastrointestinal motility at THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL. The St. Petersburg Times is based in Florida.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/021201/Citrus/Business_digest_.shtml

SMITH COMMENTS ON HUMAN GENOME PROJECT (Detroit News, Feb. 11)
Even before the map of the human genome was completed, scientists around the world scooped up the data, using it to pinpoint disease genes, better explain human biology and shave years off the time they take to do their jobs. Without the genome data "we'd be two or three years behind where we are now," said Dr. RICHARD SMITH, whose lab at the University of Iowa was one that used information from the Internet to locate a gene for congenital deafness. The location was published in 1999 in the journal Nature Genetics. "This is probably like the Renaissance, when they were discovering all the different aspects of the human body," he said. "We're discovering all the aspects of molecular biology."
http://detnews.com:80/2001/health/0102/11/a04-186546.htm

SCHOENBAUM PENS HISTORY OF VIOLIN TRADE (New York Times, Feb. 11)
DAVID SCHOENBAUM
, who teaches history at the University of Iowa and is writing a social history of the violin, is the author of a feature article on the history of the violin trade. He writes: "For about 150 years, the upper-end violin trade has not only connected the rich and famous with old, mostly Italian instruments, by such iconic makers as Antonio Stradivari and Giuseppe Guarneri. It has also issued and controlled the certificates of authenticity that ultimately establish their market value. The business is rich in story lines, including power, sex, even murder. But at most times and places – including Court 51 of the High Court of Justice in London only last week – the prime mover has been money.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/11/arts/11SCHO.html?pagewanted=all

LEWIS-BECK EXPLAINS MODEL FAILURE (Int'l Herald Tribune, Feb. 10)
Political scientists whose 2000 election forecasts all predicted an easy victory for Al Gore have offered explanations for why their elaborate mathematical models were wrong. In new academic articles to be published this spring, the authors of seven different forecasts reflected on why their mathematical models -- mostly based on economic conditions and opinion poll results -- failed to predict the 2000 result accurately. MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and his forecasting partner, Charles Tien of Hunter College, offered a defiant postmortem. "Gore's vote total should have been much higher than it was," they wrote. "The Gore outcome is clearly on the fringe of our known world, the world of post-World War II elections." They described the 2000 result as a "stochastic [random] shock." Their model had foreseen Gore winning 56.9 percent of the two-party vote. "It's not even going to be close," Lewis-Beck said last May.
http://www.iht.com/articles/10218.htm

SCHNOOR STUDIES SWITCHGRASS AS FUEL (Washington Post, Feb. 10)
The Ottumwa Generating Plant, a 650-megawatt, coal-fired facility, has been retrofitted to burn switchgrass along with its primary fuel as part of a test project. Burning switchgrass in place of some of the coal could "provide very positive results for the environment" by reducing harmful emissions, says JERRY SCHNOOR, a University of Iowa professor who studied the issue. Schnoor, co-director of the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, said in a 1999 report that carbon dioxide emissions could be cut by nearly 177,000 tons per year and emissions of sulfur dioxide -- the precursor to acid rain -- by up to 113 tons per year if 5 percent of the coal were replaced with switchgrass.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A52640-2001Feb10.html

LEWIS-BECK EXPLAINS WHY MODEL FAILED (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 10)
Political scientists whose 2000 election forecasts all predicted an easy victory for Al Gore have offered explanations for why their elaborate mathematical models were wrong. In new academic articles to be published this spring, the authors of seven different forecasts reflected on why their mathematical models -- mostly based on economic conditions and opinion poll results -- failed to predict the 2000 result accurately. MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and his forecasting partner, Charles Tien of Hunter College, offered a defiant postmortem. "Gore's vote total should have been much higher than it was," they wrote. "The Gore outcome is clearly on the fringe of our known world, the world of post-World War II elections." They described the 2000 result as a "stochastic [random] shock." Their model had foreseen Gore winning 56.9 percent of the two-party vote. "It's not even going to be close," Lewis-Beck said last May.
http://www.latimes.com/editions/orange/ocnews/20010210/t000012134.html

LEWIS-BECK EXPLAINS WHY MODEL FAILED (Washington Post, Feb. 9)
Political scientists whose 2000 election forecasts all predicted an easy victory for Al Gore have offered explanations for why their elaborate mathematical models were wrong. In new academic articles to be published this spring, the authors of seven different forecasts reflected on why their mathematical models -- mostly based on economic conditions and opinion poll results -- failed to predict the 2000 result accurately. MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa and his forecasting partner, Charles Tien of Hunter College, offered a defiant postmortem. "Gore's vote total should have been much higher than it was," they wrote. "The Gore outcome is clearly on the fringe of our known world, the world of post-World War II elections." They described the 2000 result as a "stochastic [random] shock." Their model had foreseen Gore winning 56.9 percent of the two-party vote. "It's not even going to be close," Lewis-Beck said last May.
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46849-2001Feb8.html

EX-IOWANS NOT INTERESTED IN RETURNING (Arizona Republic, Feb. 9)
A reporter writes about attending a reception hosted by Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack, who is trying to persuade UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alumni to return to work in Iowa.
http://www.azcentral.com/news/0209letter09.html

ZUKIN QUESTIONS CHRISTMAS ESSAY (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 9)
JANE ZUKIN
, an associate editor in the University of Iowa's Joint Office for Planning, Marketing and Communications, is the author of a letter to the editor regarding an essay by Karal Ann Marling ("Comfort and Joy: the Material Culture of Christmas," The Review, Dec. 15). Zukin calls the essay "a testament to the historical divisiveness and prejudice that higher education is trying so desperately to overcome. Christmas memories are nice, but certainly anything but universal."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i22/22b01802.htm

GRADUATE SAYS NIGHTLIFE LURED HIM TO SCHOOL (Arizona Republic, Feb. 9)
In a letter to readers, reporter Daniel Gonzalez comments on Iowa Gov. Tom Vilsack's efforts to lure Iowans back to the state. Gonzalez, a Chicago native, says he was drawn to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after tagging along with a friend who was visiting the campus. "We took the official college tour, but my friend's 21-year-old cousin introduced us to the Iowa City nightlife," he says. "While sitting in the Field House bar drinking $1 pitchers of beer, I thought, this is the place for me. I wouldn't recommend this now. And of course, I told my parents I chose Iowa because of the great academic programs."

UI IS PARTNER IN TESTING PROJECT (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 9)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is among nine institutions participating in the Standards for Success project, a nationwide effort to involve research universities in policy discussions about mandatory state tests for students graduating from high school. The project will develop a common set of academic expectations for college freshmen at selective institutions and will produce a user's guide to help colleges make sense of the various student assessments required by states.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i22/22a02301.htm

UI CITED IN STORY ON REC OFFERINGS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 9)
A story about the move of some schools -- including the University of Northern Iowa with its $18.7-million, 225,000-square-foot Wellness/Recreation Center — quotes student Eric Harlan, who says the recreational facilities at UNI persuaded him to enroll there instead of other institutions he considered, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA .
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i22/22a03801.htm

KASTENS: UI FANS CAN SING BEER SONG (Orange County Register, Feb. 8)
The University of Iowa marching band once more can celebrate Hawkeye basketball victories by singing the polka song "In Heaven There Is No Beer." Band director L. KEVIN KASTENS told his musicians of the decision by e-mail Tuesday. The band members had stopped singing the song's lyrics this semester because a parent complained about the words: "In heaven, there is no beer. That's why we drink it here. And when we're gone from here, all our friends will be drinkin' all the beer." Tom Aunan, an Iowa City parent and teacher, had questioned the appropriateness of the song, given the efforts of the university and the city to stem underage and binge drinking.
http://www.ocregister.com/sports/college/8beersongcci.shtml

UI STUDIES DRIVERS READING EMAIL (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 8)
A story about Ford Motor Co.'s new driving simulator, with which it plans to study the ways drivers get distracted, says that an experiment conducted at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed that when e-mail was read to drivers, their response time to brake lights from a vehicle in front of them rose 30 percent.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-0102080012,00.html

CASE COULD TEST DISABILITIES ACT (Ft. Worth Star-Telegram, Feb. 8)
David Gray never got back on the street with the Southlake Department of Public Safety. The former officer says the city should have done more to accommodate him after he was injured, and he is contemplating filing a lawsuit that legal experts say could test the boundaries of the Americans with Disabilities Act. There have been few court cases dealing with an inability to read or write, and almost none dealing with cognitive problems of police officers, say attorneys and other legal experts involved with the case. (UI law professor) PETER BLANCK said there are precedents for accommodating people with learning disabilities, and voice-activated computers are helping people return to the work force. He said it might be worth letting Gray have a chance. "The ADA specifically says each case is to be determined on a case-by-case basis," he said. "What's the cost of not hiring this guy? You might have a really good officer here." This story is not available on the Web.

UI REVERSES POSITION ON BEER SONG (Evansville, Ind., Courier Press, Feb. 8)
The University of Iowa marching band can again celebrate Hawkeye basketball victories by singing the polka song "In heaven there is no beer." Band director L. KEVIN KASTENS told his musicians of the decision by e-mail Tuesday. The band members had stopped singing the song's lyrics this semester because a parent complained about the words: "In heaven, there is no beer. That's why we drink it here. And when we're gone from here, our friends will be drinkin' all the beer." Tom Aunan, an Iowa City parent and teacher, questioned the appropriateness of the song, given the university and city's efforts to stem underage and binge drinking. But athletic director BOB BOWLSBY called it "a real stretch" to link the song to binge drinking. Band member Jason Peterson said the temporary ban probably made the song even more popular. "Students and supporters will probably sing even louder now." The Evansville Courier Press is based in Indiana.
http://www.courierpress.com/cgi-bin/view.cgi?/200102/08+iowa020801_news.html+20010208+news
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 in the online newspaper SALON.
http://www.salon.com/mwt/wire/2001/02/07/beer_song/index.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010207/us/beer_song_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/national/020701/beer_song.sml
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010207/aponline102937_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0207AP-BEER-SONG&date=07-Feb-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Beer-Song.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010131/15/beer-song

SURVEY: UI STUDENTS WANT OPTIONS TO DRINKING (USA Today, Feb. 7)
A survey shows students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA think the city council is using the wrong approach in efforts to cut down on underage being drinking. Instead of passing ordinances that restrict drink specials or fine businesses that sell to underage drinkers, they say the city should help create late-night, nonalcoholic options.

GRANT WOOD'S UI CONNECTION IS CITED (New York Times, Feb. 7)
The stern-faced farmer and his dour daughter have appeared on corn flake boxes, a postage stamp, and in countless parodies. Even Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy have paid tribute to the pair portrayed by Grant Wood in the painting "American Gothic." Now the city of Cedar Rapids wants to bring the two to life, pitchfork and all. The city plans to display life-size figures of the father and daughter on city streets, and eventually sell them to tourists and other fans of Wood to raise money for local arts. Born on a farm near Anamosa, Iowa, Wood spent much of his life in Cedar Rapids. His career included teaching in Cedar Rapids schools and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-American-Gothic.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Feb. 7 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010207/us/american_gothic_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010207/aponline025625_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0207AP-AMERICAN-GOTH&date=07-Feb-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the Web site of THE INTELLIGENCER, located in Wheeling, W.V., and part of OGDEN NEWSPAPERS, INC.
http://www.oweb.com/newslink/national/AmericanGothicP0205.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on EXCITE News.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010207/02/american-gothic
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 7 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/02/07/national0128EST0429.DTL

UI ART STUDENT PUTS HIS 'LIFE' FOR SALE ON WEB (New York Times, Feb. 5)
A story about how young artists are using the Internet as a new medium for exploring familiar aesthetic issues cites the case of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student John Freyer, 28, who says he intends to sell most of his belongings through eBay in the coming year, and is documenting the process on his Web site, AllMyLifeForSale.com. He said he is committed to conveying his identity as accurately as possible. To that end, each item is accompanied by a personal history. "People are the objects that surround them," Freyer said. "The question this raises is, what happens to the goods and services that define who you are when they are no longer yours?"
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/02/05/technology/05ARTS.html?pagewanted=all

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'LOVE IN A GLOBAL VILLAGE' (Chicago Tribune, Feb. 5)
While difficult moments can arise in any relationship, partners with different cultural backgrounds face an additional set of challenges. "Love in a Global Village: A Celebration of Intercultural Families in the Midwest," by Jessie Carroll Grearson and Lauren B. Smith (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, $19.95) tells the stories of 15 intercultural couples, many with children, who live in cities and rural areas throughout the Midwestern U.S. The authors, both of whom are married to men from other countries, interviewed people who were at different points in their relationships. Some are just starting out; some are at turning points, having to make hard decisions about where to live and how to interact with each other's extended families; still others reflect on their experience from the standpoint of having spent many years together. http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0102040102,FF.html

UI ART STUDENT PUTS HIS 'LIFE' FOR SALE ON WEB (Daily Globe, Feb. 5)
A story about how young artists are using the Internet as a new medium for exploring familiar aesthetic issues cites the case of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate student John Freyer, 28, who says he intends to sell most of his belongings through eBay in the coming year, and is documenting the process on his Web site, AllMyLifeForSale.com. He said he is committed to conveying his identity as accurately as possible. To that end, each item is accompanied by a personal history. "People are the objects that surround them," Freyer said. "The question this raises is, what happens to the goods and services that define who you are when they are no longer yours?" The Daily Globe is based in Worthington, Minn.

GATEWAY COFOUNDER WAITT ATTENDED UI (New York Post, Feb. 4)
A story about the recent trials and tribulations of computer-maker Gateway and its CEO, Ted Waitt, says Waitt studied finance at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA but dropped out to work at the local PC retailer. Figuring he could do better, he borrowed $10,000 from his grandmother and formed Gateway with a buddy. They worked above a barn, often being roused to help drive the family cattle.
http://www.nypost.com:80/02042001/business/23048.htm

STORY ON EFFORT TO UNIONIZE CITES UI (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Feb. 4)
A story about efforts by Penn State University graduate assistants to unionize says that at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, graduate assistants are now affiliated with the United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America.
http://www.post-gazette.com/regionstate/20010204gradunion4.asp

GREEN REVIEWS ARCHAEOLOGY BOOK (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 4)
PETER GREEN
, the author of numerous books, including "Alexander to Actium," and an adjunct professor of classics at the University of Iowa, reviews the book, Minotaur: Sir Arthur Evans and the Archaeology of the Minoan Myth, by Joseph Alexander.
http://www.latimes.com/print/books/20010203/t000010366.html

UI STUDIES TERMITE DIGESTIVE PROCESS (Financial Times, Feb. 1)
A story about an increasingly serious, international effort to reduce the methane produced from the mouths of cud-chewing animals such as cattle, sheep and goats cites a study by a team of researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that has been drawing inspiration from the digestive processes of termites. Collectively, termites produce large amounts of methane. Nonetheless, mouthful-for-mouthful, they produce proportionately less than cows because of some nifty bacteria in their guts which turn hydrogen into vinegar instead of methane. Now, the scientists are studying whether the termite bacteria could help them solve the methane problem in cows.
http://news.ft.com/ft/gx.cgi/ftc?pagename=View&c=Article&cid=FT3NP1QMOIC&live=true&useoverridetemplate=IXLZHNNP94C

STEENLAGE QUOTED ON BEER SONG (Evansville Courier & Press, Ind., Feb. 1)
The University of Iowa has imposed oral prohibition on the Hawkeye band, which will still be allowed to play one of its favorites -- "In Heaven, There Ain't No Beer" -- but will not be allowed to sing the words in between instrumental serenades. The Hawkeye athletic department stuck a cork in the revelry because a parent, Tom Aunan, wrote in an e-mail to university administrators that "the message is excessive drinking. I don't think it's right for our band to be promoting that kind of a message to our fans, especially our young fans." LES STEENLAGE, an administrative associate in the athletic department, said the tune-but-no-words compromise was a good one. "I think fans react more to the polka style and upbeat tempo," he said. "To us, it isn't sending a message and it isn't meant to send a message, either. It's just a celebration song."
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200102/01+iowa0201010_news.html+20010201
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 1 on the Web site of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150540215231

BLOOM COMMENTS ON POSTVILLE DISPUTE (Los Angeles Times, Feb. 1)
A story about rising tensions in Postville quotes University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM, who studied the town for five years to write "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Focusing on old-timers' relationships with the Jews, Bloom says that "the two communities are at war" -- and he blames the Hasidim for refusing to adapt even to such small but symbolic local customs as keeping lawns trimmed with military precision. "The [Jews] have kept up walls and become a separate entity," Bloom said. "That works quite well in Los Angeles, where there are myriad separate communities. It doesn't work at all in a tiny, cohesive town of 1,500 where people depend on one another to survive."
http://www.latimes.com:80/news/nation/20010201/t000009544.html

VAN ALLEN HOPES FOR LAST WORD WITH PIONEER 10 (Space.Com, Feb. 1)
Among those who hope for at least one more successful session with the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, launched in 1972 and now 7.1 billion miles from Earth, is the University of Iowa's JAMES VAN ALLEN, after whom the Van Allen Belts (Earth-encircling regions of high-energy particles trapped in the Earth's magnetic field) are named. He is the principal investigator on Pioneer's Geiger Tube Telescope and is interested in follow-up data to the successful July 8 session. Van Allen wants to determine whether cosmic ray intensity is decreasing while the Sun's influence on Pioneer 10 is increasing, due to the delayed effect of high solar activity reaching the spacecraft. Said Van Allen, "We await further data from Pioneer 10 with keen interest." http://www.space.com:80/missionlaunches/missions/pioneer10_010201.html

STEENLAGE COMMENTS ON BEER TUNE PROHIBITION (Seattle Times, Feb. 1)
The University of Iowa has imposed oral prohibition on the Hawkeye band, which will still be allowed to play one of its favorites -- "In Heaven, There Ain't No Beer" -- but will not be allowed to sing the words in between instrumental serenades. The Hawkeye athletic department stuck a cork in the revelry because a parent, Tom Aunan, wrote in an e-mail to university administrators that "the message is excessive drinking. I don't think it's right for our band to be promoting that kind of a message to our fans, especially our young fans." LES STEENLAGE, an administrative associate in the athletic department, said the tune-but-no-words compromise was a good one. "I think fans react more to the polka style and upbeat tempo," he said. "To us, it isn't sending a message and it isn't meant to send a message, either. It's just a celebration song."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=chat01&date=20010201
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0131AP-BEER-SONG&date=31-Jan-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Beer-Song.html
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on EXCITE!NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010131/15/beer-song
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/01/31/sports1518EST0408.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010131/us/beer_song_1.html

DISASTER PLANNING IS ESSENTIAL (CBS Healthwatch.com, February 2001)
In a story about persons with disabilities planning for their safety during a natural disaster, PETER BLANCK, University of Iowa law professor and director of the university's Law, Health Policy & Disability Center, said there is a chance that persons arriving at protective shelters might find that they aren't accessible. Blanck also is cited about his recommendations to the new administration on how the government can better serve the disabled persons in time of need. "I believe that proper help in a disaster is a civil right for the disabled," comments Blanck. Blanck crusades for better federal disaster planning that includes the disabled. "For that matter," he says, "these same needs are experienced by the elderly and families with young children."
http://healthwatch.medscape.com/medscape/p/G_Library/Library_print.asp?RecID=234873&Channel=nan&ContentType=Library

GRUCA IS QUOTED IN NEW MAGAZINE (MBA Jungle, February 2001)
THOMAS GRUCA
, an associate professor of marketing at the University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business, is quoted in this new business magazine. "The hardest thing for my students to grasp is that they are not the target market. Too often, people in business evaluate everything as if they were the consumer," says Gruca, who was rated an outstanding professor by Business Week's Guide to the Best Business Schools in 1993, 1995 and 1999. "My American MBAs couldn't come up with good ideas for selling tofu because they couldn't imagine that anyone actually eats the stuff. What's the answer? Spend time with the consumers of a particular product. Go to their homes; follow them around to the grocery story."

DUNCAN, MOON CREATE SKULL CD (Chronicle of Higher Education, Feb. 2)
When cadavers are in short supply, virtual anatomy is the new next best thing. Bones of the Skull, a tutorial created at the University of Iowa, combines interactive text with virtual three-dimensional models of the human skull. The tutorial consists of an interactive textbook and QuickTime VR movies that students can use on their own or together. "If you just have models, what's the motivation for students to explore beyond the 'gee whiz' factor?" asks JAMES M. DUNCAN, who is coordinator of electronic services at the university's Hardin Library and was a developer of the program. The project is a collaboration between library and faculty researchers. JERALD MOON, an associate professor of speech pathology and audiology who is also the content specialist for the tutorial, approached Mr. Duncan in 1998 with the idea for developing an interactive, computer-based tool for learning the anatomy of the human skull. http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i21/21a03301.htm

UI PROHIBITED BEER TUNE LYRICS (Baltimore Sun, Feb. 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA had imposed oral prohibition on the Hawkeye band, which will still be allowed to play one of its favorites -- "In Heaven, There is No Beer" -- but for a brief time was not allowed to sing the words in between instrumental serenades. The Hawkeye athletic department made the decision after a parent, Tom Aunan, wrote an e-mail to university administrators complaining about the words.

RAO COMMENTS ON BIOFEEDBACK (Internal Medicine News, Feb. 1)
Dr. SATISH S.C. RAO, a gastroenterologist at the University of Iowa, reported at the annual meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology that biofeedback is effective long-term therapy for the most common cause of chronic constipation.

STEENLAGE COMMENTS ON BEER TUNE (Omaha World Herald, Feb. 1)
The University of Iowa has imposed oral prohibition on the Hawkeye band, which will still be allowed to play one of its favorites -- "In Heaven, There Is No Beer" -- but will not be allowed to sing the words in between instrumental serenades. The Hawkeye athletic department stuck a cork in the revelry because a parent, Tom Aunan, wrote in an e-mail to university administrators that "the message is excessive drinking. I don't think it's right for our band to be promoting that kind of a message to our fans, especially our young fans." LES STEENLAGE, an administrative associate in the athletic department, said the tune-but-no-words compromise was a good one. "I think fans react more to the polka style and upbeat tempo," he said. "To us, it isn't sending a message and it isn't meant to send a message, either. It's just a celebration song." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Feb. 8 in the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER in Santa Ana, Calif., and the MORNING CALL in Allentown, Penn.

COMPANY BUILDS PARKING STRUCTURES FOR UI (Architecture, February 2001)
A story about parking structures says that one company, Herbert Lewis Kruse Blunck Architecture, has built three such structures in the past 10 years for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UI STUDIES ANTIHISTAMINES (Vitality, February 2001)
Research at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has found that many over-the-counter antihistamines and allergy medications contain an ingredient that can cause more driving impairment than being legally drunk. One study found the performance of drivers given medications containing diphendydramine was poorer than those drivers who were legally drunk.

COLEMAN ON STUDY GROUP (Mississippi Medical News, February 2001)
MARY SUE COLEMAN, University of Iowa president, is co-chair of a panel that is studying the impact of the uninsured on the healthcare system. The study is being conducted by the National Academy of Sciences-Institute of Medicine and is titled: "Surveying the Consequences of Uninsurance."

UI PUBLISHES DICKINSON BOOK (Bloomsbury Review, February 2001)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has published Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickinson, edited by Sheila Coghill and Thom Tammaro, with a foreword by Robert Bly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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