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UI in the News

December 2001

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MED GRAD HEADS EMERGENCY CENTER (U.S. News & World Report, Dec. 31)
A story about Michael Pietrzak, M.D., director of Project ER One -- a federally funded attempt to design what he calls "the first all-risks emergency center" -- at Washington Hospital Center in D.C., says he received his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Planning, which began a year before the Sept. 11 attacks, should be completed in 2002 and the hospital will then have to build the facility, which would be designed to handle any kind of medical emergencies -- including chemical, biological or nuclear attacks.

JONES POSITS THEORY ON DIMPLED CHADS (Palm Beach Post, Dec. 31)
What if they held the most talked-about election in American history and a year later, when no one seemed to care anymore, you thought you had found the smoking gun? ... Well, you'd put it on a Web site. That's just what University of Iowa Associate Professor DOUGLAS JONES did after he began tinkering with the famous Votomatic machines used in Florida and throughout the country to cast votes on Election Day. ... Jones' eureka moment came when he took the back off a Votomatic punch-card voting machine and saw two braces ... What if, he thought, chad got jammed behind those braces? Would that be enough to explain the rash of dimpled chad ... ? Jones found he could create an impenetrable jam with just 317 punches on a Votomatic. It took him longer, 668 punches, to create a logjam on the Data Punch machine, the king of under-votes in Palm Beach County.
http://www.gopbi.com/partners/pbpost/epaper/editions/monday/news_c3f28f826428e1390015.html

SIMMONS WAS FIRST BLACK ALL-AMERICAN PLAYER (Seattle Times, Dec. 30)
A list of notable people who died in 2001 includes OZZIE SIMMONS, 87. As a halfback for the University of Iowa in 1934-36, he became one of the first black All-American college football players. He died Sept. 26.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis.cgi/web/vortex/display?slug=passagesye30&date=20011230&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22
The CHICAGO TRIBUNE's Web site carried a similar list Dec. 30.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/nation/chi-0112300179dec30.story

ENGELHARDT HEADS CYSTIC FIBROSIS RESEARCH (Yahoo! News, Dec. 29)
Throwing a genetic bridge across a potholed cellular transport system may balance the way salt is used in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) sufferers, allowing bacteria to be cleared normally and preventing infection, says new research. In a laboratory experiment, scientists at the University of Iowa fixed a flawed protein that normally carries chloride ions through cells. This is the most common genetic defect for people with CF, and the technique someday could translate to a new treatment for this disease that kills people at an average age of 30, say the researchers. Shuttling the ions through the cells balances their fluids and electrolytes and prevents infections by clearing bacteria from cell surfaces. For the lab experiment, the scientists used a cell model from airways that resemble the airways of CF patients, says a report in the January 2002 issue of Nature Biotechnology. Using a technique called spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing, (SMaRT), lead investigator JOHN ENGELHARDT and his colleagues used a crippled cold virus to deliver a pre-therapeutic molecule (PTM) -- the missing genetic information -- to the defective protein.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011228/hl/bridging_genetic_gap_in_cystic_fibrosis_1.html

WARREN: THUMB-SUCKING CAN LEAD TO DENTIST (Yahoo! News, Dec. 28)
Kids who continue to suck their fingers or use a pacifier after the age of 2 may be more likely to end up in the orthodontist's office by the time they reach adolescence, a team of dentists reports. Their study found that kids who used a pacifier or sucked their fingers or thumb by the age of 4 to 5 were more likely to develop protruding front teeth and an irregular bite, compared with their peers who gave up the habit at an earlier age. While it is known that longer, ``nonnutritive sucking'' can affect the development of the jaw and influence the placement of developing teeth, the current report suggests that even shorter-term sucking can have a notable impact. At present, some dental organizations recommend that kids stop this type of sucking by the age of 5 to 8 years, note researchers in the December issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association. "Previously, sucking habits were not thought to be very important until children reached the age where their permanent teeth began to come in, as it was believed that once a habit was stopped, the conditions (crossbite, protrusive upper front teeth) resolved by themselves as long as the permanent teeth weren't involved,'' the University of Iowa's Dr. JOHN WARREN, the study's lead author, told Reuters Health. "What our study found is that for many children, the aforementioned conditions do not resolve by themselves, even 2 to 3 years after ahabit is stopped.''
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011228/hl/thumb_bite_1.html

BLACK EXPLAINS SHOPLIFTING MOTIVATIONS (Seattle Times, Dec. 27)
A story that explores the motivation behind minor thefts by celebrities --  including, most recently, actress Winona Ryder's alleged shoplifting earlier this month of a bagful of clothing and hair accessories -- quotes DONALD BLACK, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine who treats and studies compulsive shoppers, gamblers and shoplifters. "They come up with all kinds of excuses: 'It made me feel better'; 'It relieved my mood'; 'I felt good, and I was celebrating,'" Black said. Black has one patient, a woman in her early 80s, who has been nabbing cheap jewelry, key chains and other trinkets without apparent motive for 60 years. "Every once in a while she's caught, her name gets in the papers, and she's terribly embarrassed; this is a small town," Black said. "When I ask why, she simply says, 'Oh, I can't explain it, Dr. Black. I just have to take things.'" Black believes that kleptomania is related to compulsive shopping, habitual gambling and other so-called impulse-control disorders. In an ongoing study comparing 30 problem gamblers with 30 non-gamblers of similar age and education, he's finding evidence that impulse problems often run in families. "I expect to find kleptomania is more common in this group as well," he said. "My own view is that there's a tendency toward impulsive behavior that is inherited and expresses in different ways; one of those may be kleptomania."
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/northwestlife/134383110_kleptomania27.html

ORLANDO NEWS ANCHOR ATTENDED UI (Orlando Sentinel, Dec. 26)
Jaqueline London says the grammar and spelling lessons of her UNIVERSITY OF IOWA journalism professors still guide her in her job as the news anchor of WKMG-TV in Orlando, Fla. In a profile of London, the first African-American since 1989 to anchor weeknight newscasts on the Central Florida affiliate, adds that her father and grandfather attended the UI.

STUDENTS SELLING BUTTONS FOR DOME REPAIRS (Associated Press, Dec. 26)
The University of Iowa Student Government is stepping in to help raise money to rebuild the gold dome on the Old Capitol building. The dome was destroyed by fire in November. The students are sponsoring a button campaign, "Dollars for the Dome," to raise awareness and funding for future restoration projects. KARA WESTERCAMP, undergraduate collegiate senate executive, said the group concluded that a memorial button would be an appropriate way to recognize the structure and support restoration of the capitol and museum. "The buttons are free, but we're asking for a suggested donation of $3," she said. "We're stressing the fact that the Old Capitol is always going to need restoration and renovation funds." The 2-inch-square black and gold buttons, designed by the Iowa Memorial Union marketing and graphics department, have a picture of the Old Capitol with the campaign slogan, "Dollars for the Dome," printed in large, capital letters. Each button also has the date of the fire, "11.20.01." A campaign kickoff is being planned for the beginning of the spring semester, but a few buttons have been requested by the UI Alumni Foundation for distribution at the Alamo Bowl. Westercamp said about 5,000 buttons have been made and will be available at the Iowa Memorial Union and several restaurants.

UI GETS $800,000 TO TRAIN NURSE ANESTHETISTS (New York Times, Dec. 25)
Pork barrel spending used to mean roads and bridges and dams. Now it also means hospitals, medical schools and local health care projects singled out by Congress to receive tens of millions of federal dollars. In one of its last actions before adjourning for the year, Congress last week specified more than 600 health care providers that will receive federal largess in the coming year. The number of such directed expenditures, known as earmarks for their obvious links to the members promoting them far exceeds the items in previous years. Congress designated hardly any health care projects in 1996, and since then the number has been well below 100. Congress specified significant sums for some recipients, including $800,000 for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to train nurse anesthetists.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/25/politics/25SPEN.html

UI MENTIONED IN STORY ON NATIONAL GUARD (Washington Post, Dec. 24)
Sudden call-ups are part of what every National Guard soldier signs on for, and Maj. Gen. David Harris said his Illinois troops are ready for the challenge -- even if some aren't eager. Lloyd Howen Jr., a 21-year-old Lake of the Woods police officer, was called to duty just as his fiancé was preparing to transfer from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to Northern Illinois University to be closer to him. "You got to do what you got to do," is all he says of the deployment. "I'm just glad we're getting to be home for the holidays."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A20067-2001Dec24.html

The same Associated Press article also ran Dec. 24 on the website of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/919381.html

The same Associated Press article also ran Dec. 24 on the website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/12/24/national0449EST0452.DTL

The same Associated Press article also ran Dec. 24 on the website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-guard-holidays1224dec24.story

The same Associated Press article also ran Dec. 24 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011224/us/guard_holidays_1.html

SCHOENBAUM PROFILES HEIFETZ (New York Times, Dec. 24)
DAVID SCHOENBAUM, who teaches history at the University of Iowa and is working on a social history of the violin, is the author of an article on Jascha Heifetz, who was born 100 -- or just possibly, 101 -- years ago and was "a minimalist by temperament, was never a likely candidate for a memoir or an easy one for a biography. 'Keep it short,' he once told an interviewer. 'Born in Russia, first lessons at 3, debut in Russia at 7, debut in America in 1917. That's all there is to say, really.'" "But of course it's not," writes Schoenbaum. "What distinguished Paganini, according to one contemporary, was the unconventional way he tuned the instrument, an idiosyncratic bowing technique, the combination of bow and left-hand pizzicato, a weakness for harmonics and a general standard of virtuosity that left all other players in the dust. What distinguished Heifetz, by comparison, was a command of the fundamentals as perfect as Joe DiMaggio's swing or the form of an egg. The perfection began with the happy accident of birth that endowed Heifetz with reflexes and small-muscle coordination 'faster and more responsive than those of any other famous violinist,' according to the critic Henry Roth."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/23/arts/music/23SCHO.html

GANTZ: LIMBAUGH LIKELY TO REGAIN HEARING (Yahoo! News, Dec. 21)
Radio host Rush Limbaugh, who had surgery to implant a cochlear device in his ear, should soon be hearing the voices of conservative talk-show callers again. The 50-year-old Limbaugh underwent the two-hour procedure on Wednesday at St. Vincent Medical Center in Los Angeles. Doctors said the surgery was successful. Limbaugh revealed in October that he began losing his hearing in the spring due to an auto-immune disease that caused his body's immune system to attack his inner ear. At the time, he said he had lost all hearing in his left ear. After the surgery, Limbaugh released a statement saying, "I feel great." According to Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, director of the Cochlear Implant Clinical Research Center at the University of Iowa, the procedure has proven to be "quite successful" in the past. "The best performance with these devices is up to 80 percent single word understanding and 100 percent of words in sentences," Gantz said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/abc/20011221/hl/limbaughsurgery011221_1.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'HIVE' (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 21)
Cristopher Hollingsworth has brought new meaning to "buzz" about books. His Poetics of the Hive: The Insect Metaphor in Literature (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS) mines literary versions of a primal act: the human contemplation of insect life. But he goes beyond authors' peerings at anthills or beehives. The Hive, he uppercases, is a mental structure rooted in everyday visual experience. It's a habit of seeing and thinking that colors any representation of an individual's link to a collective. Imagine a city or a crowd from above and in creep the insect metaphors.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i17/17a01401.htm

FORMER UI PROF WRITES ON TERROR (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 21)
Margaret Scanlan, chair of the English department at Indiana University at South Bend and the author of Plotting Terror: Novelists and Terrorists in Contemporary Fiction, explores in an article the question of how or whether literature helps us face catastrophes such as the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the United States. She writes that "American bombing of Vietnam began shortly before I started graduate school, in March 1965.  During my time in Ann Arbor and, later, in Iowa City teaching at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, I was observing, and to some extent participating in, a revolutionary cycle that the great 19th-century and fin de siècle novelists had written about: the evolution of nonviolent peace marches into protests marked by an increasingly militant rhetoric and then, eventually, by arson and the occasional murder." She writes later, "In the summer of 1966, while I was teaching at the University of Iowa, I gave a D in a British poetry survey to a student from my tiny hometown. He had touched me by observing in one ill-written paper that Wordsworth's Michael seemed too kind for a father, and I was sorry, afterward, to hear that an accumulation of such grades had caused him to lose his student draft deferment. Some two years later, on his 21st birthday, he stepped on a land mine in Vietnam and was instantly killed."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i17/17b01101.htm

BLACK EXPLAINS SHOPLIFTING MOTIVATIONS (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 21)
A story that explores the motivation behind minor thefts by celebrities --  including, most recently, actress Winona Ryder's alleged shoplifting earlier this month of a bagful of clothing and hair accessories -- quotes DONALD BLACK, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine who treats and studies compulsive shoppers, gamblers and shoplifters. "They come up with all kinds of excuses: 'It made me feel better'; 'It relieved my mood'; 'I felt good, and I was celebrating,'" Black said. Black has one patient, a woman in her early 80s, who has been nabbing cheap jewelry, key chains and other trinkets without apparent motive for 60 years. "Every once in a while she's caught, her name gets in the papers, and she's terribly embarrassed; this is a small town," Black said. "When I ask why, she simply says, 'Oh, I can't explain it, Dr. Black. I just have to take things.'" Black believes that kleptomania is related to compulsive shopping, habitual gambling and other so-called impulse-control disorders. In an ongoing study comparing 30 problem gamblers with 30 nongamblers of similar age and education, he's finding evidence that impulse problems often run in families. "I expect to find kleptomania is more common in this group as well," he said. "My own view is that there's a tendency toward impulsive behavior that is inherited and expresses in different ways; one of those may be kleptomania."
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-000100953dec21.story

GRADUATE IS ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 21)
The Golden Gate Philharmonic, San Francisco's all-city youth orchestra, has a new conductor, Geoffrey Gallegos, and a new home, a church hall near Stonestown. Gallegos, 43, a native San Franciscan and graduate of Lowell High and San Francisco State, has a master's degree in conducting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Apart from the orchestra, he is director of musical theater at Riordan High School and on the faculty at the School of the Arts teaching theory and brass ensembles.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/12/21/WB166183.DTL

GRADUATE IS NAMED CEO OF DAVIS HOSPITAL (Standard-Examiner, Dec. 21)
Davis Hospital and Medical Center in Utah, which two weeks ago announced a $23.5 million expansion project, is getting a new chief executive officer. Michael Jensen, who previously served as chief operating officer at Palm   Beach Gardens Medical Center in Palm Beach, Fla., will head the Layton  hospital, which is owned by Tennessee-based Iasis Healthcare Corp. Jensen, a San Diego native, received a bachelor's degree from Brigham Young University and dual master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Standard-Examiner is based in Ogden, Utah.

UI JUDGE HEARS FRANK PETITION (Associated Press, Dec. 21)
A District Court judge will rule in coming weeks whether the University of Iowa acted fairly in punishing a professor for violating the university's ethics policy. Sixth District Judge Kristin L. Hibbs heard arguments Thursday from Robert Downer, who represents physics researcher LOUIS FRANK, and MARK SCHANTZ, the university's general counsel. Frank filed a petition in June in Johnson County District Court disputing sanctions recommended by a university judicial panel to withhold financial support totaling $13,516 because of comments Frank made about two physics colleagues in 1999. "The decision by the panel, and affirmed by the president and the Board of Regents, is not supported by substantial evidence," Downer told Hibbs. The case arose from findings reported by a fellow UI physics professor ROBERT MUTEL at an academic conference in San Francisco in December 1999. Mutel reported that telescopic photographs disproved a theory Frank has worked on for 15 years that ice comets the size of houses bombard the Earth's atmosphere. In a telephone interview with the Iowa City Gazette, Frank accused Mutel of doctoring photographs to avenge LARRY MOLNAR, a former UI physics professor, whom Frank had vetoed for tenure. Downer said Frank's comments that Mutel and JOHN FIX, a former UI researcher, were angry at him for voting against Molnar's tenure did not mean Frank was accusing them of fraud. Schantz argued that saying scientists altered data is equal to accusing them of research misconduct. Hibbs said she will rule on the case after reviewing the supplementary materials, which include copies of UI policies, newspaper clippings and videotapes. She is on vacation next week.

KUPERMAN STUDIES TEEN DRINKING (Yahoo! News, Dec. 20)
People diagnosed with behavior problems during their early elementary school years may have a higher risk of becoming dependent on alcohol during adolescence, new study results suggest. "Certain behavior problems in childhood such as conduct disorder, whose symptoms are best characterized by violation of societal rules along with being aggressive, may increase the risk of developing significant problems with adolescent alcohol use," Dr. SAMUEL KUPERMAN, of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, told Reuters Health. Using data from an ongoing study on the genetics of alcoholism, Kuperman and his colleagues investigated the relationship between behavior problems and later alcohol dependence in 54 teenagers. Nearly three quarters of the teens, all of whom had been diagnosed with alcohol dependence at age 14, had been diagnosed earlier in life with conduct disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or both, Kuperman and his colleagues report in the December issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20011220/hl/conduct_1.htm

COLLEGE OF MEDICINE SHUFFLES STAFF (Associated Press, Dec. 20)
The University of Iowa College of Medicine is shuffling staff to fill the leadership gap left by the death of the college's dean last week. RICHARD NELSON, dean since 1994, died Dec. 12 at St. Luke's Hospital in Cedar Rapids from a stab wound to the chest. Nelson's funeral was Monday in Iowa City. His wife, Phyllis, was charged with first-degree murder in connection with his death. ALLYN MARK, the college's associate dean for research and graduate programs, will take over as interim executive dean. He will also keep his current job. ROBERT KELCH, college dean and vice president for statewide health services, made the announcement Tuesday. The college of medicine is shuffling leadership responsibilities with the departure of hospital director R. EDWARD HOWELL. Kelch will step up to fill the top leadership role for University of Iowa Health Care while keeping his vice presidency. However, he will step down as dean when a replacement is found. In addition, FRANCOIS ABBOUD announced earlier this month that he will step down as head of the internal medicine department, a position he has held since 1976. He will remain director of the Cardiovascular Research Center. PETER DENSEN, the college's associate dean for student affairs and curriculum, will become interim head of internal medicine Jan. 1, but will not keep his current post.

UI GRAD QUESTIONED BY FBI, RELEASED (Hartford Courant, Dec. 19)
Days before the anthrax attacks became known, Dr. Ayaad Assaad sat terrified in a vault-like room at an FBI field office in Washington, D.C. The walls were gray and windowless. The door was locked. It was Oct. 3. Assaad, an Egyptian-born research scientist laid off in 1997 from the Army's biodefense lab at Fort Detrick, Md., was handed an anonymous letter describing him as "a potential terrorist" with a grudge against the United States and the knowledge to wage biological warfare against his adopted country. After a brief interview, the FBI let Assaad go and assured him that they believed the letter was a cruel hoax. But for Assaad, the incident was another in a series of humiliations he traces to a decade-long workplace dispute at the Fort Detrick lab. Assaad had come to the United States 25 years earlier, obtained graduate degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, became a citizen in 1986, married a woman from Nebraska and has two young sons. He spent nine years researching biological and chemical agents at high-security U.S. Army laboratories, including Fort Detrick, where he was working on a vaccine against ricin, a cellular poison.
http://www.ctnow.com/hc-detrick1219.artdec19.story
A version of the article also ran Dec. 19 on the SEATTLE TIMES web site.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=detrick19&date=20011219&query=University+of+Iowa
A version of the article also ran Dec. 19 on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE web site.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0112190179dec19.story

WARREN STUDY SHOWS THUMB-SUCKING, PACIFIER RISKS (UPI, Dec. 19)
Children who use a pacifier or suck their thumb after the age of 2 have an increased risk of developing protruding front teeth and other bite problems. JOHN J. WARREN, DDS, MS, and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry studied 372 children who sucked a thumb, finger, or pacifier from birth through age 4. Models made of the children's teeth revealed a steadily increasing prevalence of bite abnormalities, depending on the age at which the child stopped sucking the thumb, finger, or pacifier, from 5.8 percent if the child stopped by age 1, to more than 20 percent if the child was still doing it by age 4. Sucking is a natural reflex in young children, and attempts to get them to stop before age 2 are probably unrealistic, Dr. Warren says. However, the habit should be discouraged in 3-, 4-, or 5-year-olds.

FORMER UI SURGEON NAMED CEO OF AMA (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Dec. 18)
Michael D. Maves is a former cancer surgeon who boasts of deft administrative skills that resuscitate ailing medical institutions. He cites turnaround successes with a crippled academic medical department and a stagnant national association of ear, nose and throat specialists. But now Maves, 53, faces a challenge that dwarfs anything in his past. He was hired last month to revive the struggling American Medical Association. As the chief executive of the group, he will need every bit of what he learned in business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he earned an M.B.A.; his self-professed talent in conciliation and activism in medical politics will also be essential. Previously, Maves was on the staff of the formal investigation into Sunbeam, and he had been a member of an important AMA committee on Medicare payments to doctors. Before that Maves had been an active cancer surgeon and chairman of otolaryngology at Saint Louis University and the University of Iowa.

UI: OLD CAP BELL MUST BE REPLACED (Associated Press, Dec. 18)
The Old Capitol's damaged bell will have to be replaced, University of Iowa officials said Monday. The bell fell from the dome during the Old Capitol blaze on Nov. 20 and now has a hole in its top. "I would think the one in there is damaged beyond repair," said GEORGE HOLLINS, university director of design and construction services. Fire investigators have determined that workers for the asbestos removal company, Enviro Safe Air of North Sioux City, S.D., started the fire while using open-flame torches and a heat gun in the dome to remove asbestos from the building. Enviro Safe Air representatives did not return phone calls Monday. The Old Capitol donation fund has received $29,000, including a $5,000 gift from University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN.

NELSON REMEMBERED AT FUNERAL (Associated Press, Dec. 18)
Hundreds of relatives and friends filled Zion Lutheran Church in Iowa City Monday to mourn RICHARD NELSON, the executive dean of the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Nelson, 54, was stabbed to death Dec. 12 in his Cedar Rapids apartment. His 54-year-old wife, Phyllis, has admitted she did it and is being held in Linn County Jail on first-degree murder in lieu of a $250,000 cash bail. Kevin Hansen said at the funeral that Nelson was a wonderful father, grandfather and physician. "He will be impossible to replace," said Hansen, Nelson's son-in-law. Rev. Dwight DuBois read a poem Nelson wrote for his only grandchild, 1-year-old Catherine Grace Winger. Colleagues who attended another memorial service Monday afternoon at University Hospitals spoke fondly of Nelson. "I know he's mentored many of us," said Dr. JEFFREY LOBAS, director of the Regional Child Health Specialty Clinics. Nelson preceded Lobas in the job. Nelson and Dean ROBERT KELCH were a great team for the college, said Dr. ALLYN MARK, associate dean for research and graduate programs in the university's College of Medicine. Nelson was the "rock-ribbed realist" who put into practice Kelch's vision. He likened the pair to James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, who as architects of America were the nation's realist and visionary, respectively.

UI BUYS ROBOT TO FILL PRESCRIPTIONS (Associated Press, Dec. 18)
The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics will be the third hospital in the nation to implement a robotic arm to fill prescriptions. Hospital records indicate the university paid $434,000 for the robot, which was received on Dec. 7. The 6,000-pound machine is made by Pyxis Corp., an Italian company. "By using the robotics arm for selecting medications, we can improve the accuracy of the dispensing process," said STEVEN NELSON, associate director of Pharmaceutical Care at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. "Right now, we do everything possible to avoid mistakes, but humans do make mistakes," Nelson said. "This robot can make over 1 million selections without making one error -- they are very accurate." University of Iowa hospital employees have made dosage errors in the past. In 1997, David McElVogue, 6, received an adult dosage of a wrong medication, complicating the effects of his rare blood-disease. His family was awarded $550,000 in a settlement in December 1999. He died last spring.

UI VOWS TO PROTECT GRADUATION CONTRACTS (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 17)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
officials are promising to protect the school's four-year graduation contract from the state's budget ax. The contract is responsible for the increase in students who were able to graduate on time in the past three years, officials say. Since 1998, the UI's four-year graduation rate has increased 3 percent, from 34.3 percent to 37.3 percent.

UI-BOUGHT PLANET X PASSES SELLING SLOWLY (USA Today, Dec. 17)
Hoping to offer students an alternative to bar-hopping, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA bought discounted passes from Planet X using revenues from student fees. Officials said the university committed $50,000 to buy the passes from the laser tag and miniature golf business, but so far students have purchased only 900 of the 6,000 passes.

UI PROVIDES BUDGETING INFO TO SITE (Kansas City Star, Dec. 16)
An article offering several Internet sites that could help readers better budget their money gives five stars (its top rating) to http://www.hbcollege.com/finance/students/personal_bgt.htm, an online site of Harcourt College Publishers. The site includes information titled "A Budget for College Spending," which the story says comes from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

UI VIDEO STAFF DOCUMENT 'CHECKER KING' (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 16)
KEVIN KELLEY, who is on the staff of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA VIDEO CENTER, and documentary filmmaking partner DAVID GOULD, an instructor at the university and a video producer-writer with his own company, Shadow Bird Productions, decided to help Kelley's ailing and elderly uncle, Harold O'Brien, get to a national checkers tournament and film the journey. They had no idea of the remarkable trip they and their video would take, far beyond Ohio and back. The journey would tug O'Brien from life's sidelines and give him a certain celebrity status. The 39-minute documentary would be considered for an Academy Award nomination, putting Gould and Kelley in the big leagues of filmmaking. KATHLEEN BUCKWALTER, associate provost for health sciences at the University of Iowa, says the film would be instructive to college classes on gerontology. It shows that aging does not destroy a person's inherent worth or potential "to re-engage with life and reconnect with people," she says. "I thought Harold's phone call to his nephew was remarkable because many of the infirm, and their caregivers, are afraid to ask for help. Harold shows it's never too late. He is leaving a legacy." RICHARD MACNEIL, professor of health, leisure and sports studies at the University of Iowa, notes that, "Prior to 'The Checker King' -- the name of the documentary -- the people in Harold's life, such as caregivers and servers, never heard him talk about anything but his wife and his health. He suffered from low self-esteem; checkers was his psychological salvation."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0112160380dec16.story

LEVY: GREEN TEA FLUORIDE RISK MINIMAL (Health, Dec. 15)
University of Iowa professor STEVEN LEVY, D.D.S., who has studied the health effects of fluoride for more than 10 years, responds to a reader's question whether she should stop drinking green tea because of concerns the tea's fluoride content could affect her thyroid problem. Levy says evidence that common exposure to fluoride poses a health risk is not sufficient to warrant a ban on tea drinking. He says an adult would have to drink several gallons of tea daily to experience any negative effects -- and these effects would likely be on bones.

GLASS COMMENTS ON PROPOSAL (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 14)
In a letter to the editor, JENNIFER GLASS, chair of the University of Iowa Department of Sociology, said she supports a proposal by leaders of the American Association of University Professors recommending that universities lighten the teaching load for men and women who are caring for newborns, and give such professors up to two years longer to prepare for tenure. Writes Glass: "Not only is the AAUP proposal fair, but it is vital to ensuring equity for anyone with caregiving responsibilities in the academy. Contrary to the peculiar American rhetoric that childbearing is a choice that should be expected to entail career sacrifice, our European counterparts understand that bearing and rearing children are crucial obligations of citizenship, and that all citizens should be obliged to support parents in this task, both economically and socially. ... I am not suggesting that all people should have children, or that bearing children is the only valuable form of caregiving that should be supported institutionally. But it is certainly true that everyone in our society benefits from the unpaid and underappreciated labor of those who raise the next generation of healthy, responsible adults. Indeed, as academics, we would be out of a job without them!"
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i16/16b00401.htm
The article to which Glass is referring is available at:
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i11/11a01001.htm

FBI INTERVIEWED THREE UI STUDENTS (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 14)
A month after the Justice Department announced its plan to question 5,000 men ages 18 to 33 who arrived in this country over the last two years from nations suspected of links to terrorism, the canvass is just beginning in much of the nation. In San Francisco, the United States attorney announced today that local and federal officers would fan out across Northern California this week to find 85 people on the Justice Department's list. In Chicago, the authorities just met on Tuesday with Arab and Muslim leaders to discuss how they will proceed. Local and federal officers have already started knocking on doors in Florida, Texas and Los Angeles, among other places. There are six people on the list from Utah, three at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. No one, according to immigration lawyers and the Justice Department, has been detained or deported as a result of the interviews.
http://www.iht.com/articles/41915.htm

UI GRAD NAMED TOWN PLANNER (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 13)
Shawn P. Siders, Westminster, Md., assistant town planner since July last year, has been promoted to town planner, replacing Katrina L. Tucker, who resigned in October. A native of Webster City, Iowa, Siders, 25, has a master's degree in urban and regional planning from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "He brings a lot of different experiences to the city as well as having an understanding of how the city works," said Thomas B. Beyard, Westminster's director of planning and public works. Siders will be paid $38,000 a year, Beyard said. The city hopes to fill the assistant town planner post after Jan. 1, he said. Tucker, Westminster's town planner for almost a decade, left to work for Rockville in Montgomery County.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/carroll/bal-ca.planner13dec13.story

UI ART MUSEUM BUYS WEB SITE (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec. 13)
John Freyer sold 27 spoons on eBay. He sold a belt buckle, T-shirts and lots of LPs. Freyer even sold his Hamilton College thesis, "Information Technologies and Their Role in Surveillance Societies," earning $20.50 for it. A year ago, the 28-year-old Freyer decided to sell everything he owned, or close to it, through his website: http://www.allmylifeforsale.com At the heart of the concept was an idea about how to use eBay for a purpose not entirely in line with the Web site's intentions. A 28-year-old graduate photography student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Freyer essentially used eBay as a "free publishing system" to display (and, yes, sell) the artifacts of his life. If you post an item for sale at eBay, Freyer reasoned, someone is bound to look at it -- and maybe even bid on it. And that's just what happened, providing Freyer with a decidedly wacky forum for self-expression. Perhaps even stranger, Freyer sold his Web site on Aug. 11. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART bought the Internet domain name for something like $1,100. The museum will take possession of it Jan. 1.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/389/892812.html

FBI INTERVIEWED THREE UI STUDENTS (New York Times, Dec. 13)
A month after the Justice Department announced its plan to question 5,000 men ages 18 to 33 who arrived in this country over the last two years from nations suspected of links to terrorism, the canvass is just beginning in much of the nation. In San Francisco, the United States attorney announced today that local and federal officers would fan out across Northern California this week to find 85 people on the Justice Department's list. In Chicago, the authorities just met on Tuesday with Arab and Muslim leaders to discuss how they will proceed. Local and federal officers have already started knocking on doors in Florida, Texas and Los Angeles, among other places. There are six people on the list from Utah, three at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. No one, according to immigration lawyers and the Justice Department, has been detained or deported as a result of the interviews.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/13/national/13MUSL.html

UI MULLS ARMING SECURITY OFFICERS (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 13)
The Board of Regents will likely consider a proposal to arm public university security officers with stun guns in January or March, a board member said. Regent David Fisher said the proposal is likely to come up at a board meeting in January or March. University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN said she would not discuss her options on the proposal until she submits information to the Regents. "I am not sure when we will be presenting the Regents and I cannot have any public comment until that time," Coleman said. The University of Iowa Student Government and the staff counsel support the use of Air Taser-brand stun guns, which are not considered lethal weapons.

CRITICS WANT FOUNDATION RECORDS OPEN (Omaha World-Herald, Dec. 12)
Unlocking the records of private foundations that raise money for Iowa's three state-run universities would help monitor administrative use of money and prevent mishandled donations, critics say. Foundations raise millions each year for Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa. The foundations operate as nonprofit groups separate from the Board of Regents and the universities.

GURNETT HELPS TRANSLATE IO NOISE (Science Daily, Dec. 12)
A great roar of acoustic waves near the north and south poles of Jupiter's moon Io shouts about the power of the volcanic moon. The wave data, new pictures and other information collected recently by NASA's Galileo spacecraft provide insight into what happens above Io's surface, at its colorful volcanoes and inside its hot belly. Scientists presented the findings Monday at a meeting of the American Geophysical Union in San Francisco. Galileo, managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., has been orbiting Jupiter for six years. As it flew near Io's poles in August and October, the density of charged particles it was passing through suddenly increased about tenfold when the spacecraft crossed the path of a magnetic-field connection between Io and Jupiter, reported Dr. DONALD GURNETT of the University of Iowa. The waves, indicating the density, travel in a plasma of charged particles, and would be silent to the ear, but Iowa researchers converted them to sound waves to make the patterns audible. Audio clips are available online at http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/videos/io. "You hear a whistling sound from Jupiter's radio emissions, then, just when you go over the pole, you hear a tremendous roar that starts abruptly, then stops abruptly," Gurnett said. "It's like the noise from a huge electrical power generator." http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/12/011211080022.htm

UI GRADUATE WORKS IN STATISTICS (Kansas City Star, Dec. 12)
An article about "hot jobs" features statisticians, who play a crucial role when researchers need to know whether they can trust the results of their work. They help decide what information to gather and how to gather it. They make sure researchers follow the right procedures in collecting and analyzing data. Then they interpret the information and present it in a useful, understandable form to the people who need it. Steve Simon, research biostatistician at Children's Mercy Hospital, always enjoyed math classes and majored in math at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He focused on statistics for his master's and doctoral degrees because he liked applying math to real-world situations, and because he saw more job opportunities in statistics than in pure math.
http://web.lexis-nexis.com/universe/document?_m=2d1147ede8bf5a3da4793f04919188dd&_docnum=2&wchp=dGLSlV-lSlAl&_md5=7949e94be199e1df02c4c1f3ad21bc4c

ALTHEN: THREE STUDENTS QUESTIONED IN PROBE (Deseret News, Dec. 11)
The U.S. Justice Department announced in mid-November that it wanted to talk to about 5,000 young men, ages 18-33, who had entered the United States from countries where terrorists are known to operate. The names, compiled from immigration and State Department records, were sent to federal prosecutors, who were told to interview the men. The Justice Department said that the men weren't suspects but that they could be helpful in the investigation into the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. No national deadline was released for the interviews, described as voluntary. Nationally, civil rights groups have questioned the government's decision to cast such a wide net, saying innocent people could be harmed. The interviews have been taking place across the country. GARY ALTHEN, director of the University of Iowa's Office of International Students and Scholars, said Monday that at least three students there had been questioned and others were nervous about what the interviews could mean for their futures. The Deseret News is based in Salt Lake City, Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0112110244

ALTHEN: THREE STUDENTS QUESTIONED IN PROBE (New York Times, Dec. 11)
The U.S. Justice Department announced in mid-November that it wanted to talk to about 5,000 young men, ages 18-33, who had entered the United States from countries where terrorists are known to operate. The names, compiled from immigration and State Department records, were sent to federal prosecutors, who were told to interview the men. The Justice Department said that the men weren't suspects but that they could be helpful in the investigation into the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. No national deadline was released for the interviews, described as voluntary. Nationally, civil rights groups have questioned the government's decision to cast such a wide net, saying innocent people could be harmed. The interviews have been taking place across the country. GARY ALTHEN, director of the University of Iowa's Office of International Students and Scholars, said Monday that at least three students there had been questioned and others were nervous about what the interviews could mean for their futures.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Attacks-Interviews.html?searchpv=aponline
A version of the story also ran Dec. 11 on the Website of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A24042-2001Dec11.html
A version of the story also ran Dec. 11 on the Website of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-interviews1211dec11.story
A version of the story also ran Dec. 11 on the Website of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/12/11/national0424EST0473.DTL
A version of the story also ran Dec. 11 on the Website of the BALTIMORE SUN.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-attacks-interviews1211dec11.story
A version of the story also ran Dec. 11 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011211/us/attacks_interviews_3.html

UI ACCEPTS CONNECTICUT STUDENT (Hartford Courant, Dec. 11)
Three Suffield High seniors were among the first members of the Class of 2002 to receive acceptance letters to colleges, including Greg Sorvig, who was accepted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.ctnow.com/news/local/nc/hc-3face1211.artdec11.story

WING NAMED BESSIE DUTTON MURRAY PROFESSOR (Jet, Dec. 10)
A "people" column features ADRIEN KATHERINE WING, a University of Iowa College of Law professor since 1987 who has been named the Bessie Dutton Murray Distinguished Professor of Law. Wing, author of more than 60 publications, is the first black woman to be awarded an endowed chair in the 154-year history of the university. She also is the chair-elect of the 900-member Association of American Law Schools Minority Professor Section.

UI TO CUT SOME BENEFITS FOR SUMMER TEACHERS (USA Today, Dec. 10)
Employers, battling recession, are saving millions of dollars by slashing employee benefits such as life insurance and retirement plans. For example, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City will no longer make contributions to disability and life insurance plans for summer teachers. That will save about half-a-million dollars and affect more than 1,000 instructors.
http://careers.usatoday.com/service/usa/national/content/news/onthejob/2001-12-10-401k-cuts

ANNAPOLIS COUNCILWOMAN WAS DENTISTRY DEAN (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 10)
A story providing background on members of the new Annapolis, Md., City Council says CLASSIE G. HOYLE was an educator, but her specialty was science education. She received her bachelor's degree in science education and her master's in biology from Morgan State University. She taught science in junior high school before receiving a grant from Morgan to earn her doctorate in science education and higher education administration. She moved to Iowa with her husband and children to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for what she thought would be a three-year degree program. Three years turned into 17 at the school, and she left Iowa as the university's assistant dean of the COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY. She took a leave of absence to take a two-year grant with the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda and realized how much she missed home.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/local/annearundel/bal-ar.sue10dec10.story

BLANCK COMMENTS ON AMA CASES (Newsday.com, Dec. 9)
The U.S. Supreme Court's decisions regarding the Americans with Disabilities Act could etch into law books the future scope of the landmark 1990 law that forbids job discrimination against the disabled and requires employers to offer reasonable accommodations to disabled people who are otherwise qualified to perform jobs. As the law moves into its second decade, its impact in the workplace has become one of the most litigated issues in America. The court's narrow interpretation of the law has caused dismay among some scholars. The law "really was intended to enhance the opportunity for people to work," said PETER BLANCK, law professor at the University of Iowa and member of the American Bar Association's Commission on Mental and Physical Disability Law.
http://www.newsday.com/news/nationworld/nation/ny-uscort092503199dec09.story

JONES COMMENTS ON VOTING MACHINE TESTS (Palm Beach Post, Dec. 9)
In tests of voting machines Nov. 7, 2000, Palm Beach County poll workers struggled to punch chads and had other problems with the machines. And yet, they did nothing about it, letting voters cast ballots all day on those same machines. In the county's 531 polling places, 261 had machines that registered errors on the tests conducted before the polls opened at 7 a.m. If that happens, poll workers are supposed to seek a replacement machine. None did. "That's cute. They didn't even notice?" said University of Iowa Associate Professor DOUG JONES, an election equipment expert. "In the morning test, if they have a machine that leads them to a dimple, then they were plain careless." ... The errors indicate a problem with training, which will be important no matter what kind of machines voters use, said Jones, the Iowa elections expert. "If you train that this is a ritual, it becomes a formality," Jones said. "If they followed the procedure as they were trained to follow it, then the question is, what exactly is the procedure they were trained to do and how much purpose were they told?"
http://www.gopbi.com/partners/pbpost/epaper/editions/sunday/news_c321bf0ac448f00c0015.html

UI PRESS-PUBLISHED BOOK IS SUGGESTED READING (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 9)
A list of recommended books from the year includes "City Watch: Discovering the Uncommon Chicago," written by Jon Anderson and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. The book is described as a collection of columns by Tribune staff reporter Jon Anderson that "reflect daily slice-of-life Americana with a Chicago bent."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/books/chi-0112080006dec09.story

ATKINS PRAISES NEW CHILD HEART PATCH (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec. 8)
Children born with a severe hole in the heart won a breakthrough treatment yesterday: the first patches that can seal those holes without open-heart surgery. The CardioSeal and Amplatzer patches can be threaded into the heart through tiny incisions in the groin, a far easier therapy than the grueling surgery many toddlers and young children have faced. "It's pretty remarkable to see just how this works," said Dr. Stuart Portnoy of the Food and Drug Administration, which approved the patches yesterday. Portnoy called the patches a breakthrough that could help hundreds of children a year. "This is a big deal," agreed Dr. DIANNE ATKINS of the University of Iowa, who chairs the American Heart Association's council on pediatric heart disease. Up to 17,000 children are born in the United States each year with a septal defect, a hole between heart chambers that short-circuits how the heart pumps.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/670/884793.html
A version of the story also ran Dec. 8 on the website of NEWSDAY.
http://www.newsday.com/news/health/sns-health-heartsealant.story
A version of the story also ran Dec. 7 on CNN INTERACTIVE.
http://www.cnn.com/2001/HEALTH/12/07/heart.sealer.ap/index.html

ATKINS PRAISES NEW CHILD HEART PATCH (Chicago Sun-Times, Dec. 7)
Children born with a severe hole in the heart won a breakthrough treatment yesterday: the first patches that can seal those holes without open-heart surgery. The CardioSeal and Amplatzer patches can be threaded into the heart through tiny incisions in the groin, a far easier therapy than the grueling surgery many toddlers and young children have faced. "It's pretty remarkable to see just how this works," said Dr. Stuart Portnoy of the Food and Drug Administration, which approved the patches yesterday. Portnoy called the patches a breakthrough that could help hundreds of children a year. "This is a big deal," agreed Dr. DIANNE ATKINS of the University of Iowa, who chairs the American Heart Association's council on pediatric heart disease. Up to 17,000 children are born in the United States each year with a septal defect, a hole between heart chambers that short-circuits how the heart pumps.

ATKINS PRAISES NEW CHILD HEART PATCH (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 7)
Children born with a severe hole in the heart won a breakthrough treatment yesterday: the first patches that can seal those holes without open-heart surgery. The CardioSeal and Amplatzer patches can be threaded into the heart through tiny incisions in the groin, a far easier therapy than the grueling surgery many toddlers and young children have faced. "It's pretty remarkable to see just how this works," said Dr. Stuart Portnoy of the Food and Drug Administration, which approved the patches yesterday. Portnoy called the patches a breakthrough that could help hundreds of children a year. "This is a big deal," agreed Dr. DIANNE ATKINS of the University of Iowa, who chairs the American Heart Association's council on pediatric heart disease. Up to 17,000 children are born in the United States each year with a septal defect, a hole between heart chambers that short-circuits how the heart pumps.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/health/bal-te.heart07dec07.story

A version of the story also ran Dec. 7 on the web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/12/07/financial0729EST0015.DTL

A version of the story also ran Dec. 7 on the web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-000097350dec07.story

A version of the story also ran Dec. 6 on the web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A4626-2001Dec6.html

A version of the story also ran Dec. 6 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20011206/hl/heart_sealer_3.html

ST. PAUL MAYOR HAS UI LAW DEGREE (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec. 7)
St. Paul Mayor Norm Coleman will join the Twin Cities law firm of Winthrop & Weinstine when he steps down as mayor on Jan. 2. Coleman is planning a campaign against U.S. Sen. Paul Wellstone next year. But in the meantime he will join more than 70 attorneys at the St. Paul-based firm, which is known for its practice in the banking, corporate and legislative areas. Coleman, 52, received a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1976 but has never practiced law in the private sector. http://www.startribune.com/stories/462/881111.html

FORMER HERKY SUES OHIO STATE (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 7)
Showing school spirit is getting expensive. Buy pompoms, organize a band, retain counsel? If two pending lawsuits are any indication, litigiousness is not just spreading through college sports, but enveloping the bands, mascots, and paraphernalia that surround them. In one case, a former inhabitant of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Herky the Hawk mascot costume, Angela Anderson, is suing Ohio State University because of injuries she says she suffered after its band members beaned her with a banana. Tom Riley, one of Ms. Anderson's lawyers, contends that Ohio State band members hit his client with a large, hard-foam banana at a 1999 football game, fracturing a neck vertebra. She has suffered neck pain ever since, Mr. Riley says. "I go to a lot of football games, and mascots will wrestle each other, but usually they're playing at the attack," he says. "This time, they hit her from behind, hard." Ms. Anderson, who graduated in May, is suing in state court for damages in excess of $25,000. Ohio State declined to comment on the matter.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i15/15a00603.htm

PAPER CORRECTS TUITION FIGURES (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 6)
The paper ran a correction on a Page 1 story Monday, Dec. 3 that incorrectly reported Iowa State University's tuition next fall. Tuition and fees will total $4,110. The paper originally reported the total would be $3,442. The original story also reported that tuition and fees for in-state students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will increase to $4,100.
The correction is available here:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/corrections/chi-0112060193dec06.story
The original story can be viewed here:
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0112030154dec03.story

STUDENT BOUND FOR UI GETS SCHOLARSHIP (Omaha World Herald, Dec. 5)
During the 10th annual Excellence Through Education night, sponsored by the Omaha Men's Chapter of The American GI Forum, eight students were honored with scholarships totaling $ 2,600. The recipients included Nicole P. Salvo, who plans to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The American GI Forum is a national network that was started to represent Hispanic military veterans. It has evolved into an organization that also promotes education, employment and the well-being of families.

FEINGOLD SPEAKS AT UI (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 5)
Since Sept. 11 and President Bush's declaration of war on terrorism, a Democratic senator from the Midwest is out beating the campus bushes to generate greater concern for the maintenance of constitutional civil liberties as the war is being waged. Sen. Russell Feingold of Wisconsin, like Mr. McCarthy one of his party's old-fashioned liberals, began his campus tour about a month ago with a long speech at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor. He delivered it again about a week later at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City and then at the University of Texas in Austin, to unexpectedly large crowds for such a relatively unknown senator. He is to resume the tour at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill soon after the year-end holidays.
http://www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.witcover05dec05.story

UI GAME SECURITY SAYS 'TERRORISTS WON'? (Newsweek, Dec. 4)
If you don't read every single word of this story, then the terrorists have won. That might sound preposterous, but compared to some of the other "terrorists have won" pronouncements buzzing around, it's relatively sane. For example, Martha Stewart recently asked her underlings to forgo a big company Christmas party in favor of hosting small soirees for 10 in their own homes. She promised each volunteer $300 to cover costs, but said they wouldn't be able to choose their guests, according to a report in the New York Post. When employees balked, Stewart fired off a memo: "To me, the terrorists have certainly succeeded if so few of you participate in a companywide effort to 'get together.'" Likewise, in Iowa, a letter to the (Iowa City) Press-Citizen newspaper complained that heavy security at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game would create long waits to enter the stadium and thus reduce time for pregame tailgate parties: "Tight security takes fun away from the game. We are letting the terrorists win!"
http://www.newsday.com/features/printedition/ny-p2bottom22496510dec04.story

FORMER UI SURGEON NAMED CEO OF AMA (New York Times, Dec. 4)
Michael D. Maves is a former cancer surgeon who boasts of deft administrative skills that resuscitate ailing medical institutions. He cites turnaround successes with a crippled academic medical department and a stagnant national association of ear, nose and throat specialists. But now Maves, 53, faces a challenge that dwarfs anything in his past. He was hired last month to revive the struggling American Medical Association. As the chief executive of the group, he will need every bit of what he learned in business school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he earned an M.B.A.; his self-professed talent in conciliation and activism in medical politics will also be essential. Previously, Maves was on the staff of the formal investigation into Sunbeam, and he had been a member of an important AMA committee on Medicare payments to doctors. Before that Maves had been an active cancer surgeon and chairman of otolaryngology at Saint Louis University and the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/12/04/health/policy/04AMA.html

AMA NEW EXECUTIVE HAS UI MBA (Crain's Chicago Business, Dec. 3)
As the American Medical Association's new executive vice president and CEO, Michael D. Maves must deal with declining membership at a time when doctors say the association has lost sight of their concerns. Maves, who has an MBA from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, says he also hopes to stabilize the AMA's financial results, which have fluctuated between losses and gains in recent years.

CHICAGO ATTORNEY GRADUATED FROM UI (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 3)
Attorneys Thomas Needham and Callie Baird still remember the battle: He was prosecuting a man in a sniper attack on the West Side and she was the public defender. She won the 1993 attempted murder case with a not-guilty verdict. "Mostly, I would win, though," Needham shot back with a laugh. Five years later, they found themselves on the same team when Chicago police Supt. Terry Hillard picked them for high-level positions in the department. Now they're planning to leave to start their own law practice and could find themselves defending criminal suspects, cops accused of misconduct or police departments being sued. Needham, who started as Hillard's general counsel in 1998 before becoming chief of staff in the newly created position last year, will leave behind a $115,000-a-year salary. Baird, who heads the Office of Professional Standards that investigates complaints of police brutality, is paid $109,000 a year. The Office of Professional Standards was embattled when Baird, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL, took over from Gayle Shines, who resigned in 1998 after eight years in the job. Nineteen employees were fired, resigned or retired under Baird.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/cst-nws-law03.html

UI NETS THREE NEH FELLOWSHIPS (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 3)
The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) announced Friday more than $21-million in grants that will support the research of over 170 scholars and provide funds for humanities programs at colleges, research centers, museums, and other nonprofit institutions. Nearly $14-million was awarded in 26 challenge grants to colleges and other nonprofit institutions. The grants must be matched by three or four to one by the institutions themselves or other nonfederal sources of money. More than $6-million went to research fellowships. The full-term fellowships, of 9 to 12 months, are for $40,000 each, although recipients may choose $24,000 fellowships for shorter terms of 6 to 8 months. Three research fellowships went to people at the University of Iowa, including RICHARD DE PUMA, ELIZABETH HEINEMAN and ADRIANA MENDEZ RODENAS.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i15/15a00603.htm

TRANEL QUOTED IN STORY ON BRAIN STUDY (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 3)
A story about the use of brain imaging to track the brain's decision-making processes cites the case of Vermont railroad worker Phineas Gage. In 1848, an explosion shot a tamping bar (used to pack gunpowder) right through his head. Gage lived through the experience--never even lost consciousness. But the bolt impaled a part of his brain called the "ventromedial prefrontal cortex"--and he was never the same again. "This formerly very intact and upstanding worker turned into a kind of drifter, a psychopathic type of guy," says Dr. DANIEL TRANEL, professor of neurology at the University of Iowa and one of a team of scientists investigating modern-day brain injuries like these. People with such lesions in their brains--generally from strokes--go through a Jekyll-Hyde personality change and start making lousy life decisions, just like Gage. The Iowa scientists have even devised a test that shows how bad such folks are at learning from experiences. Patients pick from two piles of cards, one giving high short-term rewards but steep penalties over time; another giving lower short-term gains but better gains overall. Normally, people quickly learn to pick from the pile with the best overall gains: One can even detect emotional responses (using polygraph-like tests) as they choose. But those with the brain lesions never learn and never develop physiological responses.
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-000096080dec03.story

SETTLEMENT REACHED IN UI STUDENT'S DEATH (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 3)
A settlement has been reached in a wrongful-death case involving a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Elgin who died after a night of heavy drinking at a fraternity house party. Matthew Garofalo, 19, was a pledge with Lambda Chi Alpha when he died in 1995. The Garofalo family reached a settlement against a former student who was assigned to help their son adjust to campus life, said attorney Thomas Verhulst of Waterloo, Iowa, the Garofalo family's representative. Details of the settlement were not released. The case was to go to trial Monday.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/mchenry/chi-0112030041dec03.story
A version of the story ran Dec. 1 on the website of the CHICAGO SUN TIMES.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/cst-nws-metro01.html

IOWA EDUCATION BUDGETS FACE CRUNCH (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 3)
Faced with a faltering economy that has worsened since Sept. 11, states are slashing education budgets for the first time in years, threatening reform efforts in public schools and enhancing the likelihood of sharp tuition increases for public colleges next fall. Perhaps nowhere are the pressures on higher education more acute than in Iowa, where state revenues are far below expectations. The state's Board of Regents in mid-November approved the increase in tuition for public colleges and universities to offset a 4.3 percent cut in state funds to higher education early that month. That followed a 7 percent drop in operating funds for colleges and universities at the beginning of the fiscal year. Next fall, tuition and fees for in-state students will rise to $4,100 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and $3,442 at Iowa State University, officials said.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-0112030154dec03.story

UI GAME SECURITY SAYS 'TERRORISTS WON' (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Dec. 3)
If you don't read every single word of this story, then the terrorists have won. That might sound preposterous, but compared to some of the other "terrorists have won" pronouncements buzzing around, it's relatively sane. For example, Martha Stewart recently asked her underlings to forgo a big company Christmas party in favor of hosting small soirees for 10 in their own homes. She promised each volunteer $300 to cover costs, but said they wouldn't be able to choose their guests, according to a report in the New York Post. When employees balked, Stewart fired off a memo: "To me, the terrorists have certainly succeeded if so few of you participate in a companywide effort to 'get together.'" Likewise, in Iowa, a letter to the (Iowa City) Press-Citizen newspaper complained that heavy security at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game would create long waits to enter the stadium and thus reduce time for pregame tailgate parties: "Tight security takes fun away from the game. We are letting the terrorists win!"
http://www.post-gazette.com/lifestyle/20011203life5.asp

WEILER COMMENTS ON DRUG LABEL RULES (Amednews.com, Dec. 3)
The Food and Drug Administration is considering new label requirements that would address possible sedation or impairment caused by over-the-counter and prescription drugs. The FDA held a joint meeting with the National Transportation Safety Board to consider the issue. The NTSB has recorded thousands of car, bus, boat and airplane accidents resulting in at least 100 deaths -- all linked to legal medications such as antihistamines, muscle relaxants, painkillers, anti-anxiety drugs and anti-depressants. Physicians, who will be expected to provide some of the consumer education about this issue when they write prescriptions, reacted positively. "It's important not to trivialize this," said JOHN WEILER, MD, professor of internal medicine with the University of Iowa, who testified at the meeting. He also has published research on the impact of several allergy medications on a person's ability to drive. "There are drugs that are relatively safe in certain circumstances, and there are drugs that are relatively dangerous in those same circumstances. We have to have some way we can let people know which is which," Weiler said. Amednews.com is the web site of the American Medical Association publication American Medical News.
http://www.ama-assn.org/sci-pubs/amnews/pick_01/hlsb1203.htm

UI MAY SEEK STATE HELP WITH OLD CAP REPAIRS (Rock Island Argus, Dec. 2)
Officials at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are leaving open the possibility of asking the state Executive Council to help pay the cost of restoring the fire-damaged Old Capitol building. A letter sent to the state Board of Regents estimates that the university will spend $670,000 on things such as cleanup, building stabilization and security in the wake of the Nov. 20 fire that destroyed the dome and cupola of the building. The Rock Island Argus is based in Illinois.

POET BLY ATTENDED UI (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dec. 2)
A feature on the nearly 75-year-old poet Robert Bly, whose most recent work is a collection of Middle Eastern form of love-poems titled "The Night Abraham Called to the Stars," says that after graduating from Harvard magna cum laude Bly spent a year at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. St. Paul, Minn., poet Patricia Kirkpatrick, who is curating a small exhibit of Bly memorabilia at the Open Book and who grew up in Iowa, said about Bly's first poetry collection, "Silence in the Snowy Fields," that "I had always looked at those cows and those roads and those fence posts and they meant something to me, but I didn't know you could make poetry out of them."
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/862392.html
A biography of Bly run as a companion to the story says that Bly received a master's degree in English from University of Iowa.
http://www.startribune.com/stories/384/859740.html

ASLAN'S CLASSES FULL SINCE SEPT. 11 (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Dec. 2)
Osama bin Laden drove home to Americans how little they know about a faraway part of the world. On college campuses, that realization is transforming sleeper subjects into hot new areas of study. At the University of Iowa, REZA ASLAN now has a following other professors would envy. Even those who have not enrolled in his classes want to sit in, making things cramped for students who have registered for "Introduction to Islam" and "Religion and Politics in the Middle East."
http://www.post-gazette.com/headlines/20011202islamstudies1202p5.asp

COMPOSER TAUGHT AT UI (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 1)
Composer Jeremy Beck slipped a compliment into his "Spark, and Flame (Ash)," which will be given its West Coast premiere today by the Cal State Fullerton University Orchestra. He was teaching at the University of Northern Iowa when he wrote the piece for the university chamber orchestra's tour of Russia in 1997. "There's a small interlude that incorporates the Shostakovich motive--D-S-C-H [D-E-flat, C and B]--which he used in much of his music [as shorthand for his name]," Beck said in a recent phone interview from his Cal State Fullerton office. "It's a gentle greeting for the Russian audiences." Conceived as an overture or concert opener, the title came to him as he was writing the work. "As I was coming up with ideas for the piece, I came up with these opening sputtering, nervous ostinatos, surrounded by short chords. They reminded me of sparks, and that led to the title and the unfolding of the composition." Born in 1960 near Cleveland, Beck grew up in Quincy, Ill., and moved to New York to study at the Mannes College of Music. He earned his master's degree from Duke University and his doctorate from Yale. After Yale, he taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Chatham College in Pittsburgh, Pa., before coming to Cal State Fullerton in 1999.
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/printedition/calendar/la-000095471dec01.story

NERAD OFFERS TIPS ON EYELID SURGERY (Dermatology Times, Dec. 2001)
When performing cosmetic blepharoplasty, surgeons should always remember it is an elective procedure and its results will be judged by how well they meet the patient's expectations, JEFFREY A. NERAD, M.D., said at the annual meeting of the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery/American College of Mohs Micrographic Surgery and Cutaneous Oncology. Nerad, professor of ophthalmology and director of oculoplastic and orbital surgery at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, outlined an approach to preoperative evaluation of the cosmetic procedure, which reshapes the flesh around the eyes in part to eliminate the tired look caused by sagging or puffy lids.

BUTTERWORTH IS QUOTED (Primary Care Optometry News, Dec. 2001)
SARA BUTTERWORTH, a practitioner who has privileges both at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and the Iowa City Veterans Administration Medical Center, is quoted in a story which states that obtaining hospital privileges is easier for optometrists today than it once was. The story says that in addition to the obvious advantages in terms of the ability to order tests, provide preoperative and follow-up examinations and emergency care, an increased awareness is fostered when optometrists can work together with medical doctors in a hospital setting. "I think it is a good education for other practitioners," Butterworth said.

 

 

 

 

 

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