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UI in the News

August, 2001

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UI STUDENT REACTS TO FERTILITY ADS (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 31)
Starting Tuesday, a national group of fertility doctors is launching an ad  campaign to remind women -- whether they have a psychological Timex, or a wall-mounted cuckoo clock that sends out a screaming bird ever hour to signify the relentless passage of time -- that time is running out to have a baby. Thirty-five-year-old Colette Sartor, who is just starting a two-year writers program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was sitting in her Los Angeles gynecologist's waiting room when she first saw the Aug. 13 Newsweek cover story on the campaign. She freaked out. After her appointment she rushed out and bought a copy. She waited a day to say anything to her boyfriend. But the next morning, as they were making the bed, she said, "Bob, this is the situation  .... "
http://www.latimes.com/features/lifestyle/la-083101baby.story

MACKEY COMMENTS ON CANCER GENE STUDY (Yahoo! News, Aug. 30)
A technique that uses viruses to halt cell division shows promise for the treatment of a wide range of cancers, new research says. Swiss scientists say they've shown that a modified, inactivated adeno-associated virus (AAV) can selectively kill cancerous cells that have a faulty gene. If the gene worked properly, it would keep the cells from dividing unchecked.  Mutations in the gene, called p53, are present in nearly every form of tumor, so a successful method of selectively destroying cells with the malignant errors would be a valuable addition to the anti-cancer armory, experts say. MICHAEL MACKEY, a biophysicist at the University of Iowa who studies p53, says the Swiss research could be an important finding for cancer patients. But he says it's crucial to find out precisely how the p53 gene operates during cell growth and division and how many, if any, mutant cells would be left over from a viral treatment that targets the gene. "It only takes one cell in a billion to transform and form a tumor," Mackey says.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010829/hl/a_potential_cancer_killer__1.html

UI PART OF AMA BINGE-DRINKING INITIATIVE (Chicago Sun Times, Aug. 30)
A nationwide survey by the American Medical Association (AMA) released Wednesday shows college binge drinking is among parents' top concerns. To combat the problem, 10 colleges nationwide are participating in an AMA-led initiative to curb binge drinking, defined as five or more drinks in one sitting. The $17.5 million AMA program started in 1996 with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to address a problem that affects about 44 percent of U.S. college students. Among participants in the AMA-led initiative are the University of Delaware, Florida State, Georgia Institute of Technology, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Lehigh University, Louisiana State University, University of Nebraska and University of Vermont.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/cst-nws-bing30.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Aug. 29 on Arizona Central, the Web site of the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/offbeat/articles/0829BingeDrinking-ON.html
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 29 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010829/aponline132208_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 29 on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=DI-CO-20010829-005303.djm

VAN VOORHIS KEEPING DONATED EMBRYOS FROZEN (USA Today, Aug. 30)
Embryos are one of the main sources of stem cells, which hold promise in treating many diseases. But most couples interested in donating embryos for stem-cell research -- and their numbers appear to be growing -- are likely to be disappointed, at least for now. President Bush has banned using taxpayers' money to extract stem cells from embryos, so any such research must be privately funded, making it unlikely that many more clinics will soon begin collecting embryos for that purpose. In a survey of his patients published in 1999, BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Iowa, found that 10 percent said they would prefer to donate any unused embryos for research. So far, Van Voorhis says, 44 couples treated at his center have donated 246 embryos for research. They've remained frozen, Van Voorhis says, because his center has not yet decided how to use them. Once there is a specific research project, he says his center will inform donors, who have the right to ask that their embryos not be used.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010830/3589730s.htm

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'BOOMER GIRLS' (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, July 29)
A list of authors with Wisconsin ties lists Paula Sergi, coeditor of the 1999 "Boomer Girls: Poems by Women from the Baby Boom Generation," which was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS. Sergi's poems have appeared or are about to appear in several reviews, among them Spoon River Poetry Review, Primavera and Slipstream. A former poetry teacher at Ripon College in Wisconsin, she will teach at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh this fall.

UI RANKED 55 AMONG RESEARCH UNIVERSITIES (Deseret News, Aug. 28)
The University of Utah is ranked 22nd in the nation among public research universities in five measures of performance included in a report issued by the Lombardi Program on Measuring University Performance. The University of Florida-based program uses nine criteria to compare performance at 106 public and 48 private universities that spend more than $20 million annually in federal research funds. When all nine of the criteria used by the program to measure research institutions are included, the University of Utah ranked 55, tied with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Deseret News is based in Utah.
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn01&0108280927

UI GRADUATE/AUTHOR NAMED WORLD EDITOR (St. Petersburg Times, Aug. 28)
Tom Drury, an award-winning novelist, freelance journalist and writing teacher, has been named the St. Petersburg Times world editor. Drury, 44, spent the first 10 years of his career working at newspapers in New England, including the Providence Journal in Rhode Island. He then turned to fiction writing and has published three critically acclaimed novels. Last year, Drury won a fellowship from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation. He received a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a master's degree in fiction writing from Brown University.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/082801/TampaBay/Times_announces_three.shtml

UI LAW JOURNAL PUBLISHES FEE STUDY (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 27)
Mutual-fund investors who fear they've been paying far too much in investment-management fees aren't paranoid. They're right. At least that's what a newly published study suggests. The new fee study, Mutual-Fund Advisory Fees: The Cost of Conflicts of Interest, was published in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S JOURNAL OF CORPORATION LAW.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/08/27/financial1058EDT0054.DTL

HOVENKAMP DISSECTS MICROSOFT RULING (Washington Post, Aug. 27)
HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa antitrust scholar who has consulted for the government, offers a gloomy picture for Microsoft, drawn from a recent appeals court opinion. He points in particular to a section he calls a "time bomb." The district court now must hold remedy hearings, and Hovenkamp notes that the direction from the appeals court is harsh. Quoting the Supreme Court, the appeals court said "an antitrust case must seek to 'unfetter a market from anticompetitive conduct,' to 'terminate the illegal monopoly, deny to the defendant the fruits of its statutory violation, and ensure that there remain no practices likely to result in monopolization in the future.' " Hovenkamp said that, with a breakup virtually ruled out, the statement calls for such drastic measures as forced open licensing of Windows XP. "This is the most pregnant paragraph in this opinion in terms of what the district court is supposed to do once it is handed this case. If I were the government, and I were interested in
taking this case to the conclusion, I think this is the only thing I would put in my brief."
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A715-2001Aug26.html

GAZETTE: UI COVERAGE WILL BE WEB DRAW (New York Times, Aug. 27)
A story about how national newspapers are filling the huge demand for content on the Internet says few papers have followed the Wall Street Journal's decision to charge for online subscriptions. But the daily Cedar Rapids, Iowa, newspaper, The Gazette (daily circulation 66,000), owned by Gazette Communications, plans this fall to begin charging some users of Gazetteonline.com, whose most popular offerings outside the political season are coverage of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sports, local news and obituaries. Terry Bergen, The Gazette's director of marketing and Internet services, said that Web users who wanted more than a headline service would pay $8 a month or $60 a year — unless they already subscribed to the paper, in which case they would pay nothing. The site's advertising revenue alone does not support the two people who work at the site, Mr. Bergen explained.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/27/business/media/27WEB.html?pagewanted=print
The same story ran Aug. 27 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010827/bs/growing_audience_is_turning_to_established_news_media_online_1.html

HUNNICUTT: PEOPLE CAN'T RELAX (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 27)
It's increasingly difficult for people to find time for rest on Sundays, and that having too much time to sit around and think about jobs or relationships can be overwhelming for people. "We fill our lives with busy work and buying things to desperately avoid coming to grips with the burning questions of life,'' said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa and author of Work Without End.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0108250312aug26.story
The same article ran Aug. 26 in the BERGEN RECORD in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com:80/home/sundays26200108261.htm

AUTHOR MOSS RECOUNTS WORKSHOP REJECTION (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 26)
In a Q&A interview with Barbara Robinette Moss, author of Change Me Into Zeus's Daughter, the report asks if she used any books as models for her memoir. Moss responded: "Oh, well, sure like Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird. When I decided that I was going to learn to write, and that I was going to finish this book, I applied to the WRITERS' WORKSHOP at the University of Iowa and I got rejected. And I got rejected with the exact same story that won the Faulkner Award. But I was devastated. . . . And so I thought: 'Well, OK, what can I do? Somebody out there knows how to write. Who knows how to write?' So I thought about it, and I thought, 'OK, I'll take the top 10 writers that I like best that I think really did what I want to do and I'll transpose their books onto my computer.' And so I started with To Kill a Mockingbird, and I transposed 10 books word for word all to my computer."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/books/chi-0108250014aug26.story

DESJARDINS: GRAD ECONOMIC IMPACT BIG (Minneapolis Star Tribune, Aug. 26)
An editorial about a debate on whether the University of Minnesota is contributing all it can to the area's economic vitality quoted STEPHEN DESJARDINS from the University of Iowa as saying that Minnesota taxpayers get a return of hundreds of millions of dollars from the university because college graduates earn higher incomes and pay higher taxes than people without degrees.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=ED26&date=26-Aug-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON JUDGE (Los Angeles Times, Aug. 25)
A U.S. District Court judge was named Friday to preside over the Microsoft antitrust lawsuit, putting her in a position to determine the fate of one of America's richest, most powerful corporations. Colleen Kollar-Kotelly, a respected jurist, takes the helm of one of the most bitterly contested antitrust battles in U.S. history with a scant record on the topic. She has spent most of her 35-year career handling criminal cases in the nation's capital, and as a chief attorney for a government-owned psychiatric hospital. "It looks like she has virtually no antitrust experience on the bench," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor whose work has been cited in the case. He said a computerized search of her rulings yielded only two routine approvals of antitrust settlements between companies and the government.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/wire/sns-microsoft.story
The same story ran Aug. 25 on the Web site of the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/sns-microsoft.story

RETIRING TUBA PLAYER ATTENDED UI (Boston Globe, Aug. 24)
A story about the recent retirement from the Boston Symphony Orchestra of tuba player Chester Schmitz says Schmitz "is a proud Iowan, a Hawkeye, as he likes to say." Schmitz was ''steeped'' in the band world of the Midwest. ''I never heard an orchestra until I went to college at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. That was my first exposure to a new kind of music that I really learned to love - music by men with strange names like Berlioz and Mahler which made demands on the tuba far beyond anything I'd ever seen in band music.'' The composer and conductor Gunther Schuller provided valuable encouragement and support. Schuller had guest-conducted at Iowa and was impressed by the sounds he heard coming from Schmitz's tuba.
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/236/living/Schmitz_leaves_the_BSO_for_divine_intervention+.shtml

FIELD RESEARCH ON RADON CITED (Northwest Herald, Aug. 22)
A story about radon, a potentially deadly radioactive gas that can seep into homes, quotes BILL FIELD, a University of Iowa professor of epidemiology, who in 2000 published the results of the most detailed radon study ever. The study examined 1,000 Iowa women who had lived in the same home for an average of 20 years. He found high concentrations of radon increase the risk of lung cancer by about 50 percent. "Radon gas itself is not dangerous," Field said. "But it decays into particles which are carcinogenic." The Northwest Herald is based in Crystal Lake, Ill.
http://ww2.nwherald.com/news/272879446136726.bsp

FIELD: RADON TO BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY (Ocala Star Banner, Aug. 22)
As a radioactive gas in the soil, radon rises into buildings through small foundation openings. Four walls and a roof hold radon like smoke under glass. And the experts say radon is not to be taken lightly. "Because of the prevalence of lung cancer and its poor survival rates (50 percent one year survival), even secondary causes of lung cancer (such as radon) are very important. About 18,000 people die each year from residential radon exposure," said BILL FIELD, cancer epidemiologist, College of Public Health, University of Iowa. Field was the lead author of the Iowa Radon Lung Cancer Study, released in 2000. The Ocala Star Banner is in Florida.

EX-UI ENGINEERING DEAN HEADS NEW COLLEGE (Boston Globe, Aug. 22)
Tomorrow, 30 students, all awarded full scholarships, will start classes at the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, the first private, four-year college to open in the Boston area since Brandeis University in 1948. With one of the largest founding endowments in the history of higher education -- a commitment of $500 million from the F.W. Olin Foundation to build the school and cover scholarships for all its students -- Olin is poised to become a small, elite college that generates a new breed of "Renaissance engineers," said president Richard K. Miller. Like most of the faculty and administrators at the fledgling Needham campus, Miller left a perfectly good job -- he was dean of engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA until 1999 -- to pursue something of a utopian vision.
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/234/metro/Recruited_elite_will_engineer_a_new_school+.shtml

RUBINSTEIN: DEVICE MAY CALM TINNITUS (New York Times, Aug. 21)
In a story about tinnitus -- so-called "phantom noises" that plague people, like ringing, whistling, pinging or roaring -- an experimental approach being investigated at the University of Iowa may help quiet the noises. The new method uses an electrode implanted in the inner ear to stimulate a structure called the cochlea, which turns mechanical vibrations into a signal that the auditory nerve conveys to the brain. In healthy people, the auditory nerve fires constantly, even when there is no sound, but it has a distinctive firing pattern when sound is absent. "When you are in a quiet room, your ear is chattering away like crazy," said Dr. JAY RUBINSTEIN, an associate professor of otolaryngology and biomedical engineering at the University of Iowa. Dr. Rubinstein and his colleagues suspect that when the ear is damaged and the "chatter" stops, the brain interprets the lack of activity as noise. The electrode in their experiment mimics the normal firing pattern of the auditory nerve when there is no sound. "In theory, this is the code for the sound of silence," Dr. Rubinstein said. His experimental implant for tinnitus is not the same as the cochlear implant, a device that is not experimental and that is used to help deaf people hear. But cochlear implants for the deaf can also help with tinnitus.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/21/health/anatomy/21TINN.html?pagewanted=1

MARSHALL STUDIES ELDERLY NUTRITION (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 21)
Too many older people may be accepting a cognitive and immunological decline as a normal part of aging, when it may reflect a deficiency in nutrients such as vitamins and minerals. A simple one-a-day supplement may be all that is needed to slow that decline, recent studies show. A new study by TERESA A. MARSHALL and her colleagues at the University of Iowa looked at more than 400 Iowans age 79 and older living independently in rural areas and found that 80 percent reported consuming inadequate amounts of four or more nutrients. In findings important to disease prevention, 75 percent of those people consumed too little folate, a B vitamin that helps prevent heart disease and stroke. And, 83 percent did not get enough vitamin D and 63 percent got too little calcium, both essential to preventing osteoporosis and fractures.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/scitech/docs/brody21.htm
Another version of this story ran Aug. 21 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/21/health/aging/21BROD.html?pagewanted=print

SOY MILK STUDY BASED ON UI RESEARCH (Washington Post, Aug. 21)
In a Q&A column, the question was posed: Does soy-based baby formula do long-term damage to the 750,000 American infants who receive this nutrition every year? The response is that past studies have not addressed concerns that the phytoestrogens in this formula might eventually cause reproductive or other health problems. For the most recent study, researchers interviewed more than 800 young adults who had participated as infants in research on formulas at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA between 1965 and 1978. Based on these reports and a review of some of the respondents' medical records, the researchers found no significant differences between those who were fed soy formula and those who were fed cow's milk formula. Among the 30 outcomes they examined were height, weight and factors related to puberty and fertility.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/health/print/A38436-2001Aug20.html

KLETZING: ELECTRONS SOURCE OF CHIRPING (Space.Com, Aug. 20)
The vacuum of space is hardly a suitable habitat for birds, but someone tuning in to the signals detected by the Wide Band Data (WBD) experiment on the European Space Agency's Cluster spacecraft might be forgiven for thinking that this was not the case. During the first few months of Cluster operations, WBD scientists have been analyzing radio signals which consist of narrowband tones that rise in frequency over a period of a few seconds. This 'dawn chorus' resembles the sound of a rookery heard from a distance and is thought to be generated by high-energy electrons (atomic particles that have a negative electric charge) trapped in the Earth's radiation belts. "The chorus is detected most on the Earth's morning side, but it's not clear why," said CRAIG KLETZING of the University of Iowa, a co-investigator on the WBD team. "It appears to be generated at the magnetic equator, and it usually occurs just outside the region of near-Earth space known as the plasmasphere."
http://www.space.com:80/scienceastronomy/planetearth/cluster_annivesary_010820.html

CMIEL PENS ARTICLE ON PRESIDENTIAL SPEECHES (New York Times, Aug. 19)
KENNETH CMIEL
, a history professor at the University of Iowa and author of Democratic Eloquence: The Fight Over Popular Speech in 19th Century America, is the author of an article putting President George W. Bush's national address on stem cell research in historic context. He writes: When George W. Bush took to the airwaves to speak about stem cell research, he performed a presidential duty with a long, hoary tradition behind it: urging the nation to confront a moral issue fundamental to its future. But how he spoke says a great deal about the means Americans use to persuade each other at the opening of the 21st century."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/19/weekinreview/19CMIE.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'PENULTIMATE SUITOR' (New York Times, Aug. 19)
A new book of poems, "The Penultimate Suitor," by Mary Leader was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/19/books/review/19brleade.html

NADS COST IS NEARLY DOUBLE ESTIMATE (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 19)
The cost of a federal driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is nearly twice the amount expected, according to a preliminary report. The National Advanced Driving Simulator's price tag has grown to $80.5 million, up from the original estimate of $45 million. Revisions or additions to the original plans have accounted for nearly $17 million in additional expenses, officials said. The 3-ton simulator is scheduled to open for business this month at the University of Iowa's Oakdale campus, said Tim Hurd of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. The auto industry, scientists and the government are expected to rent the National Advanced Simulator to study driving habits and safety for new cars.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/classified/automotive/chi-0108180299aug19.story

IOWA TRIES TO KEEP STUDENTS LIKE UI GRAD (The Economist, Aug. 18)
A story about Iowa's efforts to keep Iowans in the state uses as an illustration in the case of Julie Whipple, who was born in Iowa, attended high school in Nashua and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before moving to Chicago.

UI STUDENT FEATURED ON 'WEEKEND EDITION' (NPR, Aug. 18)
The turning point in John Freyer's life came just as he was about to hit the "submit" button on eBay. He hesitated. He was about to offer all his worldly goods for sale to the highest bidder, and to start over with nothing but the meager auction proceeds. On eBay, "it says, 'do you really want to do this?'" Freyer told Sasha Waters for her story on Weekend Edition Saturday. He wasn't sure, but he hit the button anyway. A few months earlier, Freyer was tooling his way to Iowa City from New York with his car full of his possessions when, he says, he realized "the contents of my trunk were the same as the contents of my trunk the last time I moved." Something about that caused him to reflect on the value of possessions. "I decided that I was surrounded by more stuff than I need." By the time he got to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he was returning to continue his graduate studies in fine arts, he decided he needed to gauge the effect that his possessions were having upon his life -- by getting rid of them. Waters' report traces Freyer's life over several months late last year, as his idea evolved from a personal-enrichment exercise to a full-blown art project and psychosocial experiment.
http://www.npr.org/programs/wesat/features/2001/freyer/freyer.html

KLETZING COMMENTS ON SPACE 'SONGS' (CNN Interactive, Aug. 17)
On Earth, tuneful chirps and peeps announce the beginning of each day. In nearby space, an uncannily similar chorus erupts each dawn, expressed by electrons instead of birds. Of course, space is a vacuum in which nothing can be heard. But scientists, analyzing radio signals from a fleet of satellites, have picked up tones in the mornings that resemble the sounds of songbirds. "The chorus is detected most on the Earth's morning side, but it's not clear why," said CRAIG KLETZING, a University of Iowa researcher who tuned in with the Cluster fleet, four European Space Agency satellites studying the Earth's magnetic fields.
http://sci2.esa.int/cluster/sounds/chorus.wav

UI STUDENT WRITES ABOUT ART (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 17)
PATRICK MULLER
, a doctoral student in higher education at the University of Iowa, is the author of an article on his exhibition "Tiles of Paradox on the Wall of Possibilities in Adrian's Garden," on display at the Iowa Advanced Technology Laboratories through May 14, 2002. Muller, who also goes by Copernicus again, has posted his entire iconography on a Web site at http://bailiwick.lib.uiowa.edu/tilesofparadox
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i49/49b02301.htm

BIBAS COMMENTS ON DISPOSABLE CELL PHONES (New York Times, Aug. 16)
In a letter to the editor, STEPHANOS BIBAS, an associate professor specializing in criminal law at the University of Iowa College of Law, writes in response to an Aug. 2 article on disposable cellular phones titled "Talk Is Cheap. But Is It Disposable?" that the piece "overlooked the single biggest danger of these phones: They will be a boon to criminals. Right now, organized-crime syndicates and drug dealers often use cell phones to arrange deals, but law enforcement agents can get court approval to listen in. These wiretaps are often the only ways to break criminal rings. Soon, however, criminals will buy disposable phones anonymously with cash, use them for a few weeks and then switch to new phones to avoid detection. These phones, in short, are crime disasters waiting to happen."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/16/technology/circuits/16LETT.html?searchpv=nytToday

WESTON PIECE PLAGIARIZED? (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 16)
The dean of a California law school suspended last month over allegations that he plagiarized from the Encyclopedia Britannica now faces an accusation that he also plagiarized from an article by a former president of the American Bar Association. Winston L. Frost, the dean of Trinity International University's law school, was first accused in early July of lifting significant portions of "The Developing of Human Rights Discourse: A History of the Human Rights Movement" -- which appeared in the fall 2000 issue of Trinity Law Review -- from the encyclopedia. Questions about Mr. Frost's article's sources first came to light last month, when the provost of the university, which is based in Deerfield, Ill., heard from individuals both inside and outside the university about similarities between Mr. Frost's article and the 1990 encyclopedia entry, which was written by BURNS H. WESTON, a University of Iowa law professor. Mr. Weston had not heard about the allegations against Mr. Frost until he was contacted Wednesday by The Chronicle. In an e-mail message, he wrote: "Considering the vast extent to which Dean Frost has literally copied, transposed, and paraphrased my writing, I suppose I should feel flattered." However, Mr. Weston added, "all this appears to have been done by a law dean who is supposed to set an ethical example and by a representative of a law school that invokes the Father, Son and Holy Ghost implicitly in its name. ... I hope that Dean Frost, as the 'founding director' of a 'Center for Human Rights and Freedoms,' is aware that human rights can involve legal rights."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2001/08/2001081602n.htm

UI STUDY LINKS NITRATES TO CANCER (Scuttlebutt, August 15)
A study conducted by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination has linked elevated levels of nitrates in Iowa drinking water to increased rates of bladder cancer in women. (Scuttlebutt is a magazine published in Blue Earth, Minn.)

SOY STUDY BASED ON UI DATA (Environmental News Network, Aug. 15)
Soy-based baby formula does not lead to more sexual anomalies or general health problems later in life than milk-based formula, researchers said Tuesday. "The good news is that, for children that need formula, soy formula is as safe as cow milk-based formula," said Brian Strom of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, chief author of the report. He and colleagues reached the conclusion after looking at 811 adults between the ages of 20 and 34 who participated in studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1965 to 1978. Some of the then infants were fed soy formula, others milk-based formula.
http://www.enn.com:80/news/wire-stories/2001/08/08152001/reu_soybaby_44642.asp

O'LEARY STUDIES SCHIZOPHRENIA (Baltimore Sun, Aug. 15)
The inability to experience pleasure is a hallmark of schizophrenia, and scientists have now captured this event on a brain scan. The scan shows not only dulled responses to pleasurable events, but also the recruitment of other areas of the brain to process the experience. The findings, reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association, are a step in understanding the severe mental illness that affects one in every 100 people. "It looks like there may be fundamental differences in the processing of pleasant stimuli" between schizophrenics and people without the disorder, said one of the researchers, DANIEL S. O'LEARY, a scientist at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
http://www.sunspot.net/features/health/sns-health-schizophrenia.story

COLUMNIST ADMITS ERROR IN STORY (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 15)
A columnist says that in writing last week about former San Jose Mercury News reporter Jim Dyer's dispatch on the stuttering research conducted on orphans at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1930s his sources got one key fact wrong. "When Dyer conducted his research last November at the state archives in Iowa -- an archive open only to students, not to reporters -- he was already working for the Mercury News. He joined the staff in October, and the paper sent him to Iowa (where he was also a graduate student) to do the research," the columnist writes.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/08/15/BU181225.DTL

SOY STUDY BASED ON UI DATA (Yahoo! News, Aug. 14)
Soy-based baby formula does not lead to more sexual anomalies or general health problems later in life than milk-based formula, researchers said Tuesday. "The good news is that, for children that need formula, soy formula is as safe as cow milk-based formula," said Brian Strom of the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia, chief author of the report. He and colleagues reached the conclusion after looking at 811 adults between the ages of 20 and 34 who participated in studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1965 to 1978. Some of the then infants were fed soy formula, others milk-based formula.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010814/sc/health_formula_dc_1.html
The same Reuters article ran Aug. 14 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010814/16/science-health-formula-dc

UI STUDENT SELLS LAST OF HIS 'LIFE' (International Herald Tribune, Aug. 14)
University of Iowa graduate student John Freyer has been selling all his possessions on eBay and documenting where they go on his Web site at allmylifeforsale.com. The gavel fell Aug. 12 on Freyer's final four items, including his toothbrush and a can of Pomade hair gel. "I want to figure out what happens to me when I no longer have all these items that supposedly define us," Freyer said. "I also want to know what happens to the people who buy them. I'm going on a road trip to find out." The University of Iowa's Museum of Art liked his idea so much that it bought Freyer's two false front teeth for $27 and plans to build an exhibit around the yucky-looking dentures that Freyer wore after losing his real front teeth at age 7. "John is doing what great art does, which is explore the world around us and help us think differently about it," said museum director HOWARD COLLINSON. "I find it intriguing how he's using eBay to create community and explore the way things work in people's lives."
http://www.iht.com/articles/29285.htm

UI GRAD CONSOLIDATES DEBT (Bergen Record, Aug. 14)
A story about how low interest rates are allowing college students to consolidate their debt says that last month, Taffney VandeVoorde consolidated her $22,000 debt, cutting her monthly bill from $272 to $150, and stretched its 10-year term to 15 years. But the pharmaceuticals saleswoman from Bettendorf, Iowa, plans to extinguish her debt early by paying the original amount. "Now I'm going to whack it out in double time," says VandeVoorde, a 1997 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Bergen Record is based in New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com:80/ed/bak2220010814.htm

UI CONDUCTS EATING DISORDER STUDY (Boston Globe, Aug. 14)
A story about eating disorders among males says that anorexia causes more severe complications in men than in women, including severe bone marrow deficiencies that could lead to osteoporosis, according to a study from researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA released in June.
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/226/science/Eating_disorders_emerge_as_problem_among_US_males+.shtml

NEW AUTHOR CREDITS MCPHERSON (Kansas City Star, Aug. 12)
A story about Whitney Terrell, a 33-year-old Kansas City native whose first novel, "The Huntsman," is described as a stalwart inquiry into racism and classism, says that after graduating from Princeton in 1991 Terrell did a reporting internship at The Kansas City Star and soon moved on to study at the University of Iowa's famed writers' workshop. It was there that "The Huntsman" really began. "I was studying with a guy named JAMES MCPHERSON. McPherson talked as a matter of everyday discourse about race in literature and in American society....He teaches every student who takes his seminars to talk about race and not be afraid." Black writers such as McPherson have been writing about race for decades. With few exceptions, whites have not. "I was embarrassed talking about it," Terrell says. "I had a black roommate in college at Princeton who's still one of my best friends; he's a surgeon at Johns Hopkins. But we never once talked openly about race stuff."
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,fyi/3acce0a9.807,.html

BODY FAT MEASUREMENT DISCUSSED (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 12)
A proliferation of new technologies has been created all designed to give people the "most accurate" determination of body-fat percentage, but the accuracy still can vary. "If I give you a number today, and you come back tomorrow, it might be different by 1 or 2 percentage points, depending on how good I am at making my measurement," said Dr. OBERT OPPLIGER, a research scientist at the UI and spokesman for the American College of Sports Medicine. "What's important," Oppliger said, "is that you look more at the change (over time) than at the actual number. The number is something I try to keep people from focusing on because really, it is an indirect measurement." http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/health/chi-0108120350aug12.story?coll=chi%2Dleisurefamily%2Dhed

UI ART MUSEUM BUYS ITEM FROM GRAD WHO SOLD 'LIFE' (Washington Post, Aug. 11)
University of Iowa graduate student John Freyer has been selling all his possessions on eBay and documenting where they go on his Web site at allmylifeforsale.com. The gavel fell Aug. 12 on Freyer's final four items, including his toothbrush and a can of Pomade hair gel. "I want to figure out what happens to me when I no longer have all these items that supposedly define us," Freyer said. "I also want to know what happens to the people who buy them. I'm going on a road trip to find out." The University of Iowa's Museum of Art liked his idea so much that it bought Freyer's two false front teeth for $27 and plans to build an exhibit around the yucky-looking dentures that Freyer wore after losing his real front teeth at age 7. "John is doing what great art does, which is explore the world around us and help us think differently about it," said museum director HOWARD COLLINSON. "I find it intriguing how he's using eBay to create community and explore the way things work in people's lives."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A62046-2001Aug10.html

O'HARA COMMENTS ON POST-PARTUM DEPRESSION (MSNBC.com, Aug. 11)
Up to 10 percent of women giving birth suffer from so-called postpartum depression, or PPD, a condition characterized by depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, sleeping problems, fatigue and guilt, says psychologist MICHAEL O'HARA, associate dean of research and development at the UI, and a leading authority on the disorder. Sometimes, the PPD trigger is an emotional issue, such as disappointment with the birth experience, or ordinary stressors like job loss or marital problems. "You see women who are troubled by not going back to work and those troubled by going back," says O'Hara. "Or they go back, but they find the work not as satisfying."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/400762.asp?0cb=-2129370

GATEWAY FOUNDER'S TIE TO UI CITED (Irish Times, Aug. 10)
A story about Gateway's struggle to lure European customers says the company's founder, Ted Waitt came up with the idea for Gateway with his brother Norm while staying in an Iowa farmhouse. "He was all of 22, and twice a college drop-out (once from the University of Colorado, once from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA)," the article says.
http://www.ireland.com:80/newspaper/finance/2001/0810/fin8.htm

SULS QUOTED ON FRAUD STORY (Chronicle of Higher Education, Aug. 10)
A psychology professor recruited by the University of Texas at Austin last year has resigned amid charges that she faked research data at her former institution, Harvard University. Karen M. Ruggiero also asked two journals that published her research about discrimination to retract the articles. The journals that published her research, the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, have acknowledged receiving letters from Ms. Ruggiero requesting retractions. JERRY M. SULS, a professor of psychology at the University of Iowa and editor of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, said he had received three letters, two in June and one last month, from Ms. Ruggiero, asking him to print a retraction for "Why Did I Get a D? The Effects of Social Comparisons on Women's Attributions to Discrimination," a paper that appeared in the publication in October. In the last letter, Mr. Suls said, Ms. Ruggiero had explained that the paper's data were invalid and that the problem lay with her and not with her three colleagues, "whose sole role was to edit multiple drafts" of her work. Mr. Suls said he would print a retraction in the bulletin's September issue.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i48/48a01003.htm

STRAUSS COMMENTS ON MONEY FOR BLOOD (Detroit News, Aug. 9)
A sustained national blood shortage is forcing some hospitals and blood banks to ask: Should we pay our blood donors? Proponents say donors now get "incentives" one way or another, be it paid time off work, tickets to cultural events or smaller gifts, such as ice cream coupons. "The definition of 'paid' is very imprecise and frankly unscientific," said Dr. RON STRAUSS, medical director of the DeGowin Blood Center at the University of Iowa. "How one cash is OK and how one cash is not OK doesn't make any sense to me." It is almost unheard of in the United States for blood banks to pay donors for red blood cells -- but several agencies, including the blood center at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA; the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn.; and Sherman Oaks-based HemaCare Corp., say they have safe and successful paid-donor programs for platelets, the cells that cause blood clotting.
http://detnews.com:80/2001/health/0108/09/a09-264847.htm

GURNETT CAPTURES 'SOUNDS OF SPACE' (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 8)
A story about how NASA is struggling to rekindle support among the masses for the space agency by plugging into everything from video games to movie scripts says that music may offer NASA its chance to reach the broadest audience. In addition to commissioning a song called "Down to Earth" from the boy band, Natural, NASA has commissioned a "sounds of space" symphony. For decades, University of Iowa space physicist DONALD GURNETT has collected noises gathered by satellites. Thunderstorms on Earth, picked up as electromagnetic waves 1,000 miles into space, become whistling sounds. Radio signals near Jupiter sound like a crowded bird sanctuary. Alaska's Northern Lights sound like squeaky voices. Soon, these noises will highlight a new composition by Terry Riley for the renowned Kronos Quartet.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/08/08/financial1041EDT0054.DTL

GURNETT CAPTURES 'SOUNDS OF SPACE' (Wall Street Journal, Aug. 8)
A story about how NASA is struggling to rekindle support among the masses for the space agency by plugging into everything from video games to movie scripts says that music may offer NASA its chance to reach the broadest audience. In addition to commissioning a song called "Down to Earth" from the boy band, Natural, NASA has commissioned a "sounds of space" symphony. For decades, University of Iowa space physicist DONALD GURNETT has collected noises gathered by satellites. Thunderstorms on Earth, picked up as electromagnetic waves 1,000 miles into space, become whistling sounds. Radio signals near Jupiter sound like a crowded bird sanctuary. Alaska's Northern Lights sound like squeaky voices. Soon, these noises will highlight a new composition by Terry Riley for the renowned Kronos Quartet.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB997216451927256340.djm

COLUMN: SHOULD REPORTERS DECEIVE? (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 8)
A columnist asks the question "When is it OK for a journalist to deceive a source?" in reference to the methods used by San Jose Mercury News reporter Jim Dyer to obtain documents from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA regarding the controversial stuttering research conducted in the 1930s. The columnist writes: " The issue has come to the fore in the wake of reporter Jim Dyer's resignation from the San Jose Mercury News. Dyer wrote a compelling series for the Merc in June about what some called 'the monster study' -- an experiment at the University of Iowa in the 1930s in which researchers took children from a state orphanage and turned them into stutterers. Dyer apparently received some of the information from state archives that he had access to only because he is a graduate student at the University of Iowa, and had promised to use the information only for scholarly research. In the aftermath of the story's publishing, Dyer was castigated in print by his editor for his methods and quit shortly thereafter."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/08/08/BU33181.DTL

BALDUS SAYS STUDY TAKEN OUT OF CONTEXT (Washington Post, Aug. 7)
The author of a study on Nebraska's death penalty said Tuesday that top state officials have taken his work out of context to support their pro-death penalty views. Nebraska Gov. Mike Johanns and Attorney General Don Stenberg have used the two-year study, released last week, to defend the state's death penalty, saying it shows execution is reserved for the state's worst criminals. There are seven men on death row. "It's certainly an overstatement to say this study proves the death penalty is reserved for the worst of the worst," said University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS. Baldus said death penalty advocates and opponents alike would find aspects of the report that supported their arguments. Released by the state Crime Commission, the study said there was no evidence that minority offenders were more likely to receive the death penalty than whites. It also found that prosecutors are more likely to seek the death penalty in cases where the murder victim is socially prominent or wealthy.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010807/aponline235415_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Death-Penalty.html?searchpv=aponline
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/wire/sns-ap-death-penalty0807aug07.story
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/08/07/national2325EDT0760.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0807AP-DEATH-PENALTY&date=07-Aug-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010807/us/death_penalty_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Aug. 7 on EXCITE NEWS.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010807/23/death-penalty

O'LEARY STUDIES SCHIZOPHRENIA (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 7)
Schizophrenia is best known by its active symptoms, like paranoid delusions, but it also has passive ones, like an inability to experience pleasure. A report published in July in the Journal of the American Medical Association suggested that studying the sense of smell could help shed light on some of the symptoms. Researchers from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics exposed 18 people with schizophrenia and 16 healthy volunteers to a pleasant smell, vanilla, and to an unpleasant smell that Dr. DANIEL S. O'LEARY, an author of the paper, compared to the odor of moldy socks. An imaging device was used to track blood flow to different areas of the brain, and the subjects were asked to rate each smell. The people with schizophrenia found the vanilla equally intense but half as pleasing as did the healthy volunteers. The brain images, however, showed big differences in mental processing only with the unpleasant smells.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/scitech/docs/vitalsigns07.htm

'STUTTERING STORY' REPORTER RESIGNED (Washington Post, Aug. 6)
In a column, reporter Howard Kurtz reports how San Jose Mercury News reporter Jim Dyer resigned after the paper's editor criticized him in print for his research methods. For a story about a 1930s UNIVERSITY OF IOWA experiment on children and stuttering, Dyer used his status as a graduate student at the school to gain access to nonpublic files. Executive Editor David Yarnold wrote in a note to readers that he could not endorse Dyer's tactic of not identifying himself as a reporter.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/politics/fedpage/A36217-2001Aug5.html

UI RESEARCHERS STUDY SCHIZOPHRENIA (Orlando Sentinel, August 5)
Schizophrenics react strongly to unpleasant odors but often do not appreciate pleasant ones, and their brains’ response to smells may provide a clue to their paranoid thoughts, according to a study by researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. (This article also appeared in the August 7 issue of NEWSDAY.)

SAMUELS PENS ARTICLE ON HONORS PROGRAMS (New York Times, Aug. 5)
SAM SAMUELS
is the author of an article on honors programs at universities, colleges and community colleges, and the perks they offer to lure top students. Samuels is identified in a biographical note at the end of the article as an editor in university relations at the University of Iowa, where he has taught writing and public speaking to honors and non-honors students.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/05/education/05ED8T.html?pagewanted=1

HUNNICUTT: PEOPLE CAN'T RELAX (San Jose Mercury News, Aug. 5)
A story that ran Aug. 5 in the San Jose Mercury News said it's increasingly difficult for people to find time for rest on Sundays, and that having too much time to sit around and think about jobs or relationships can be overwhelming for people. "We fill our lives with busy work and buying things to desperately avoid coming to grips with the burning questions of life,'' said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa and author of Work Without End.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/front/docs/sundays05.htm

UI'S LINDQUIST CODEVELOPED GED (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 5)
A story about the General Education Development, or GED, test says it was developed in the 1940s by EVERETT F. LINDQUIST and Ralph Tyler, two giants in the testing field. Lindquist created both the Iowa Tests and the American College Testing Program, or ACT, and Tyler developed the National Assessment of Educational Progress. At the time they created the GED, Lindquist worked at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Tyler was at the University of Chicago, where he ran the education department and was perhaps the most influential thinker in America on testing and evaluation. The two professors were progressive educators and harshly critical of traditional teaching. Tyler and Lindquist opposed the idea behind the Carnegie Unit, which awards credits based on "seat time" -- giving, for example, one credit of English for one-hour of study each school day.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/features/magazine/chi-0108050437aug05.story

UI LABOR CENTER PICKS 'UNION SONG' (Chicago Sun-Times, Aug. 3)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S LABOR CENTER named "Union Song," by Jim Pilcher, a Machinists union member, as winner of its union song contest.

BALDUS STUDY DRAWS COMMENTS (Lincoln Journal Star, Aug. 3)
A researcher's conclusion that Nebraska justice is not always blind when it comes to crime victims' social class drew varied reactions. University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, in a study of the state's death penalty released Wednesday, said first-degree murderers whose victims are high in socioeconomic status were nearly four times more likely to receive death sentences as defendants whose victims are poor. "Well, I'm not surprised," said Sam Walker, a University of Nebraska at Omaha criminal justice professor. "I'm pretty concerned that they found these problems, (yet) everybody seems to be saying everything's OK... It's really offensive because it says that some people's lives are more important than other people's lives." But Sarpy County Attorney L. Kenneth Polikov said attempting to find sociological patterns in criminal cases is tricky business. "No two cases are the same," he said. "The law operates on a case-by-case basis."
http://www.journalstar.com:80/local?story_id=4236&date=20010803&past=

BROCHU: DINOSAUR THEORY MAY BE RIGHT ON NOSE (Yahoo! News, Aug. 2)
Turning up his nose at a century of conventional wisdom, a scientist studying dinosaur fossils and the physiology of their closest living relatives has determined the creatures' nostrils were perched near the end of their snouts and not toward the top of their heads. The research published on Thursday in the journal Science represents a fundamental change in the way scientists view dinosaurs -- not only in their outward appearance but in several important traits. "It's a powerful example of how our underlying assumptions may not fit with the actual evidence if simply looked at through the glasses of common sense and hypothesis testing," University of Iowa paleontologist CHRISTOPHER BROCHU said in praising the research.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010802/sc/science_dinosaur_nostrils_dc_1.html

BROCHU LAUDS RESEARCH ON DINOSAUR NOSTRILS (Science, Aug. 2)
Lawrence Witmer of Ohio University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Athens has been studying animal noses of all kinds for several years, as part of his DinoNose project. Witmer first looked at the location of the fleshy nostril in birds and crocodiles -- the closest living relatives of dinosaurs -- as well as other animals. The challenge was to find the relationship between the position of the fleshy nostril, which is not preserved in dinosaurs, and the nasal opening in the bone. When Witmer checked dinosaur skulls of many kinds, he found traces of blood vessels similar to those near the front of the bony nostril in living animals. His conclusion: Dinosaur nostrils were "pretty much like everybody else's, parked out in front." "He's looking at something that a lot of us took for granted and applying some common sense to it," says paleontologist CHRISTOPHER BROCHU of the University of Iowa.

BROCHU TALKS ON DINOSAUR NOSTRILS (All Things Considered, NPR, Aug. 2)
An Aug. 3 article in Science magazine promises to put dinosaur noses on the map -- or, more specifically, in front of their long-gone faces, and not closer to the top of their heads. A scientist at Ohio University theorizes that dinosaur nostrils were located right on the tip of the snout, just above the upper lip. And the issue is more important that mere aesthetics -- there's some serious physiology at stake. CHRIS BROCHU, an assistant professor of geoscience at the University of Iowa, says with all that airflow, dinosaurs may have been able to use their noses to do more than just smell -- it may have helped air-condition the animal. "This has some interesting implications because there's been recent work on how the anatomy of the snout was related to whether these animals were generating internal body heat or not -- so called warm blooded animals," he said. "Well a big part of that is where the nostril is located."
http://www.npr.org/programs/atc/features/2001/aug/dinonose/010802.dinosaur.noses.html

UI STUDENT OUT OF THINGS TO SELL ON EBAY (New York Post, Aug. 2)
John Freyer, a 28-year-old graduate student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is selling all of his possessions on the Web. He sold a salt shaker to a woman in Maine, a jar of sauerkraut to a road technician in Washington state and a canned ham -- a leftover Y2K ration -- to a buyer in Belmont, Calif. for $2.50. Today, the last thing he will list on eBay is the domain name allmylifeforsale.com.

BALDUS RELEASES NEW DEATH PENALTY STUDY (New York Times, Aug. 2)
A new study of capital punishment suggests that it is applied unequally in rural and urban areas and that defendants whose victims are affluent are more likely to get the death penalty. National experts on both sides of the capital punishment debate said the most significant finding was that prosecutors were more likely to seek the death penalty and judges more likely to impose it in cases where the victim was well-off. The study's authors, led by DAVID C. BALDUS, a law professor at the University of Iowa, wrote that this might be because "press coverage and manifestations of community concern" are greater when the victim is wealthy or prominent or that prosecutors and judges may unconsciously identify more with the victim.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/02/national/02NEBR.html

BALDUS STUDY STIRS DEBATE (Lincoln Journal Star, Aug. 2)
The battle lines dividing both sides of the death penalty debate came into sharp focus with Wednesday's release of a comprehensive study examining the fairness of capital punishment in Nebraska. On the one side, death penalty proponents trumpeted the study's conclusions that race appeared to have an insignificant role and that, generally, the state has been consistent in handing out the death penalty. But on the other side, opponents cited the findings that the socioeconomic status of homicide victims and geography specifically, whether cases are handled by rural or urban judges and prosecutors -- can determine whether convicted murderers receive death or life in prison. In January 2000, the state Crime Commission hired the Lincoln law firm Keating, O'Gara, Davis and Nedved, and University of Iowa law professor DAVID BALDUS, a nationally recognized death penalty researcher, to do the study.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=3956&date=20010802&past=

BALDUS LEAD RESEARCHER ON STUDY (Chicago Tribune, Aug. 2)
Nebraska's system for administering the death penalty shows no evidence of racial discrimination and appears to limit capital punishment to the worst offenders, according to a major report released Wednesday. Greeted with relief by Nebraska officials, the study had been eagerly awaited. With more national attention on capital punishment, this is the first major report on fairness in the death penalty published by any state over the past year. Its lead author, researcher DAVID BALDUS of the University of Iowa, is nationally known for a study two decades ago in Georgia that found significant racial bias in that state's imposition of the death penalty.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/chi-0108020305aug02.story

POGUE: PRISONS CAN BOOST TOWNS' ECONOMIES (New York Times, Aug. 1)
According to the 2000 census, prisons have been helping to revive large stretches of rural America. More than a Wal-Mart or a meat-packing plant, state, federal and private prisons, typically housing 1,000 inmates and providing 300 jobs, can put a town on solid economic footing. As communities become more and more familiar with the benefits that prisons bring, they are also becoming increasingly adept at maximizing their windfall through collecting taxes and healthy public service fees. Opening a prison is a natural option for down-and-out towns, said THOMAS F. POGUE, economics professor at the University of Iowa. "It's a more stable industry for a town than a manufacturing plant," Pogue said. "The wage level is a problem, but these prisons are being located where people don't have much of a choice."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/01/national/01PRIS.html
The same story also ran Aug. 1 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010801/ts/rural_towns_turn_to_prisons_to_reignite_their_economies_1.html

UI ALUMNUS TO HEAD JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER (New York Times, Aug. 1)
After a seven-month search, Jazz at Lincoln Center announced yesterday the appointment of Bruce MacCombie, dean of the School for the Arts at Boston University, as its new executive director. MacCombie came to Boston University in 1992 after being the dean of the Juilliard School of Music from 1986 to 1992. He is also a composer, who earned a doctorate in music from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and studied at the Freiburg Conservatory in Germany.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/08/01/arts/music/01JAZZ.html
The same story also ran Aug. 1 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010801/en/lincoln_center_gets_new_jazz_director_1.html

ACCUSED RAPIST TO FACE MORE TRIALS (Lincoln Journal Star, Aug. 1)
A former "Star Search" comedian accused in a string of rapes at Midwest colleges can be transferred from Nebraska for trial in two Iowa counties, the Nebraska Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday. Vinson Champ, 39, of Los Angeles is serving a 30- to 40-year prison sentence in Nebraska after being convicted of raping a student at Union College, a small Seventh-day Adventist school in Lincoln. Champ faces two potential life sentences in Iowa. Authorities in Johnson County, Iowa, charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping and rape in a September 1996 attack of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/nebraska?story_id=3946&date=20010801&past=

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'DINNER ROLES' (Columbus Dispatch, Aug. 1)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS has published "Dinner Roles: American Women and the Culinary Culture," by Sherrie A. Inness, an adjunct professor at Miami of Ohio University's Hamilton campus who has spent much of her adult life scouring cookbooks, magazines and advertisements in search of gender identity in the kitchen. The Columbus Dispatch is based in Ohio.

UI PRESS BOOKS REVIEWED (Kirkus Reviews, August 1)
Two books by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS are reviewed: “Fire Road,” by Donald Anderson, and “Ticket to Minto: Stories of India and America,” by Sohrab Homi Fracis.

WEINGEIST WRITES ON EXPERT TESTIMONY (Eyenet Magazine, August 2001)
THOMAS WEINGEIST, a UIprofessor of ophthalmology writes about serving as an expert medical witness. “Physicians interested in participating in a medicolegal capacity should consult books on the subject, talk with knowledgeable colleagues and seek advice from an attorney before becoming involved in something they may later wish they had avoided,” he writes.

HANCHER WINS AWARD FOR PROGRAMMING (Chambermusic, Aug. 2001)
First prize for the 2000 CMA/ASCAP Awards For Adventurous Programming, in the category of presenters with nine or fewer concerts per season, went to HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the University of Iowa.

UI AMONG USERS OF SITESEARCH SOFTWARE (Information Today, August 2001)
In a surprise announcement, OCLC said on June 8 that it plans to discontinue development of its SiteSearch suite of products. The Committee for Institutional Cooperation (CIC) uses SiteSearch for its Virtual Electronic Catalog. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is among the participating institutions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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