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UI in the News

April 2001

See UI in the New Archive Index

 

WORKSHOP PROFESSOR YATES REMEMBERED (Boston Review, April/May 2001)
James Crumley -- author of many novels, including "One Count to Cadence," "The Wrong Case," and "The Last Good Kiss" -- writes about befriending the late author and University of Iowa Writers' Workshop teacher RICHARD YATES while Crumley attended the workshop. The story says Holt was scheduled to publish Yates's "Collected Stories" in May 2001.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu/BR26.2/crumley.html

UI INCLUDED IN 'GLOBAL TALENT' RANKING (Wall Street Journal, April 30)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ranked 20th among 20 U.S. business schools included in a Wall Street Journal/Harris Interactive survey that reported the highest percentage of foreign nationals in their full-time MBA programs. The UI reported that 41 percent of its full-time MBA students are foreign nationals. A story accompanying the ranking says that while foreign students are pouring into U.S. business schools in steadily increasing numbers to earn a prized American MBA degree and the big salary it usually fetches, many recruiters that visit their campuses flatly refuse to meet international students -- often because they lack language skills and familiarity with American culture.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB988149963531631877.djm

MCCARTHY QUOTED ON NURSE SHORTAGE (San Francisco Chronicle, April 30)
A story about a nationwide shortage of nurses that is afflicting schools as well as hospitals and nursing homes says the problem raises the risk of children getting the wrong medicine or missing doses completely. Almost half of school nurses reported errors when dispensing medication, most often missing a dosage, said ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, who led the University of Iowa study. "The trouble is there's no single answer to this," McCarthy said. "You have to hand it to these school nurses ... They're trying very hard, and they're asking for help. It can be overwhelming, all the things they do."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/30/national0107EDT0408.DTL
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 29 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-School-Nurses.html?searchpv=aponline
The same Associated Press article ran April 29 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010429/us/school_nurses_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 29 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010429/aponline173735_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 29 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0429AP-SCHOOL-NURSES&date=29-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran April 27 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010427/12/biz-campus-organizing

NADS NEARS COMPLETION (Excite News, April 30)
A state-of-the-art driving simulator for U.S. government and industry auto safety experts has almost been completed, years behind schedule and millions of dollars over budget. The NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR has been praised as a premier research tool to help save lives and criticized as a waste of money and a misplaced priority. A report due soon from the inspector general of the Transportation Department concludes that the project's cost has ballooned to $80.5 million, more than twice the initial estimate. According to figures from that investigation provided to Congress, the $63 million federal share went beyond the mandate that it not exceed two-thirds of the total cost. The University of Iowa is making up the difference. "Some costs were anticipated, some were not," said Keith Brewer, a former simulator project manager who now directs NHTSA's office of human-centered research. "A fair amount of cost growth is fundamentally due to the complexity of this device."
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010430/17/autos-simulator

HURST: GRADUATES IN DEMAND, BUT PEAK GONE (News Tribune, April 30)
College grads are still in demand, but the peak seems over. "It's a little softer market this spring," says DEANNA HURST, director of business and liberal-arts placement at the University of Iowa. Other college placement officials say the soon-to-be-graduating class of 2001 won't have it as good as last year's class. At Iowa, demand from businesses for retail, consulting and some banking jobs has declined a bit, though tech jobs and finance are still hot. The News Tribune is based in Tacoma, Wash. The same Wall Street Journal article ran April 30 in the POST AND COURIER of Charleston, S.C.

UI GRADUATE UNION BROUGHT RAISE (Houston Chronicle, April 29)
College campuses are fertile ground for unions trying to recharge the labor movement. Union membership is at a six-decade low, and labor leaders view younger, part-time workers as a way to reverse that decline. United Auto Workers and the American Federation of Teachers are among those courting students. There were 26 recognized graduate student unions in the United States on 62 campuses last year. The first teaching assistants' union was formed in 1969 at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, but the movement really began to spread only in the last decade. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's union got graduate assistants a 19 percent raise in minimum salary and cost-of-living increases.

MASK: UI FACES DIVERSITY CHALLENGES (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, April 29)
A story about demands made recently by black students at Penn State University to improve diversity on campus says some schools are in predominantly white states far from major metropolitan areas, which can be a disincentive for minorities to attend there. "One of the problems is that Iowa City, as lovely as it is and as nice as it is, in many ways, is not a major metropolitan area," said SUSAN MASK, assistant to the president and director of affirmative action at the University of Iowa. "I don't want to for a minute give Iowa a pass on diversity because of where we're located," she continued. "What it does is tell us we've got to be that much more determined and committed to attracting people from a wide range of places to consider Iowa who might otherwise not do so." Iowa ranks among the lowest of Big Ten schools in terms of its black population, 2.4 percent of students and 2 percent of faculty.
http://www.post-gazette.com/regionstate/20010429minoritiespsusidereg9.asp

OLD PUBLIC LIBRARY SET FOR DEMOLITION (Omaha World-Herald, April 28)
A prominent landlord plans to tear down the old public library in downtown Iowa City to make way for an apartment and office complex with underground parking -- a plan some local historians would like to block. The plan already has displaced some UNIVERSITY OF IOWA offices and a nonprofit toy-lending library.

UI GRADUATE UNION BROUGHT RAISE (Akron Beacon Journal, April 28)
College campuses are fertile ground for unions trying to recharge the labor movement. Union membership is at a six-decade low, and labor leaders view younger, part-time workers as a way to reverse that decline. United Auto Workers and the American Federation of Teachers are among those courting students. There were 26 recognized graduate student unions in the United States on 62 campuses last year. The first teaching assistants' union was formed in 1969 at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, but the movement really began to spread only in the last decade. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's union got graduate assistants a 19 percent raise in minimum salary and cost-of-living increases.
http://www.ohio.com:80/bj/business/docs/004473.htm
The same Associated Press story appeared April 27 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/010427/12/biz-campus-organizing
The same Associated Press article ran April 27 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010427/aponline124816_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 27 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.
http://www.sunspot.net/business/nationworld/sns-labor.story

TRIMPE COMMENTS ON 'LURE OF WEST' (News Tribune, April 27)
It has been more than a year since the Smithsonian American Art Museum closed at the old Patent Building in downtown Washington for a four-year, $211 million renovation. The museum has been using its homelessness to take to the road with eight simultaneous traveling exhibitions featuring 514 of its most acclaimed works, from a 10-foot-wide landscape of the Sierra Nevadas by Albert Bierstadt to a portrait by John Singer Sargent. University of Iowa Museum of Art, in Iowa City, said its attendance more than doubled this year when it presented "Lure of the West," a "Treasures to Go" exhibition dedicated to Western art. "Wintertime in Iowa, snowstorms, ice storms and more than 1,000 visitors on a single weekend," said PAMELA TRIMPE, curator of paintings and culture. "It was something fantastic." The News Tribune is based in Tacoma, Wash.

PARROTT WRITES LETTER (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 27)
STEVE PARROTT
, the University of Iowa's director of University Relations, is the author of a letter to the editor calling for a correction of E.F. Lindquist's name, which was misspelled in a March 23 article titled "Get Rid of the SAT? What Would We Use Instead?" Parrott writes that the article "incorrectly spells Lindquist's last name and places him at another fine state university in Iowa, which shall remain nameless in this letter -- only to avoid confusion, of course."

UI GRADUATE UNION BROUGHT BIG RAISE (New York Times, April 27)
College campuses are fertile ground for unions trying to recharge the labor movement. Union membership is at a six-decade low, and labor leaders view younger, part-time workers as a way to reverse that decline. United Auto Workers and the American Federation of Teachers are among those courting students. There were 26 recognized graduate student unions in the United States on 62 campuses last year. The first teaching assistants' union was formed in 1969 at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, but the movement really began to spread only in the last decade. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's union got graduate assistants a 19 percent raise in minimum salary and cost-of-living increases.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Campus-Organizing.html?searchpv=aponline
This Associated Press article also appeared April 27 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web page
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/27/national0232EDT0428.DTL
This Associated Press article also appeared April 27 on the YAHOO NEWS page
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010427/us/campus_organizing_1.html
This Associated Press article also appeared April 27 in the LAS VEGAS SUN
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2001/apr/27/042706010.html
This Associated Press article also appeared April 27 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=84058497

UI STUDENT FOUNDED 'ENABLE' (Los Angeles Times, April 27)
A growing number of college undergraduates are establishing philanthropic foundations. Often on a shoestring and increasingly aided by the wide reach of the Internet, these students are breaking ground as social entrepreneurs. The efforts are as diverse as the students who launch them. NICOLE KIRKWOOD, a senior at the University of Iowa, has established enABLE to assist people with mental health problems.
http://www.latimes.com/news/columns/colone/20010426/t000035545.html

MARKOVSKY COMMENTS ON NEW CITY (BBC, April 26)
BARRY MARKOVSKY
, a UI sociology professor, was interviewed for "The World Today" radio news program about the plans to create a new city, called Vedic City, near Fairfield. Those working to build the new city are associated with Maharishi University. Markovsky gave a critical assessment of the "so-called science" behind the activities of the Transcendental Meditation movement.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/audio_news/world_today.shtml

WEYER FINDS NITRATE, CANCER LINK (Yahoo! News, April 24)
The limit set for a cancer-causing compound found in tap water may be too high, putting women at increased risk for bladder cancer, results of a study suggest. According to the report, women who drank tap water that contained levels of nitrates below the maximum level of 10 milligrams (mg) per liter set by the US Environmental Protection Agency were still nearly three times more likely to develop bladder cancer compared with women who consumed much lower levels of the contaminate. The study in the May issue of Epidemiology also found a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer associated with nitrate-contaminated water and lower risks of uterine and rectal cancers. "Our study suggests that nitrate levels much less than (the EPA's maximum limit) could be a serious health concern,'' Dr. PETER J. WEYER of the University of Iowa, said in a prepared statement.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010424/hl/bladder_1.html
The same Reuters article ran April 24 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com/news/r/010424/13/health-bladder

HURST: GRADS IN DEMAND, BUT PEAK GONE (Wall Street Journal, April 24)
"It's a little softer market this spring," says DEANNA HURST, director of business and liberal-arts placement at the University of Iowa. Other college placement officials say the soon-to-be-graduating class of 2001 won't have it as good as last year's class. At Iowa, demand from businesses for retail, consulting and some banking jobs has declined a bit, though tech jobs and finance are still hot.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB988057158512803549.djm

UI THEATER PROFESSOR SIMON SELLS SCREENPLAY (Yahoo! News, April 24)
Playwright and actor LEVY LEE SIMON has sold a screenplay based on his play "The Bow Wow Club" to Fox Searchlight for Forest Whitaker and Tajamika Paxton to produce via their Spirit Dance Entertainment shingle. "Bow Wow," which nabbed the 1998-99 Lorraine Hansberry Award, depicts the reunion of several men who were friends as inner-city teenagers but who have drifted apart over the years. It's being billed as an African-American "Big Chill." Simon appeared on Broadway in "Miss Evers' Boys" and teaches playwriting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Bow Wow'' is the first screenplay for the scribe, whose other plays include "For the Love of Freedom," an epic about the revolution in Haiti commissioned by the Robey Theater in Burbank, Calif. The article originally appeared in Variety.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20010424/en/film-scripts_4.html

BLOOM DISCUSSES POSTVILLE, HASIDIC JEWS (CNN, April 23)
University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM was interviewed on "Inside Politics" for a story about the Iowa town of Postville, where longtime residents have clashed with some relatively recent transplants to the town -- a group of ultra-Orthodox Jews who moved there to take over a meat packing plant and turn it into a kosher plant. Bloom wrote about the conflict in his book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." He said before the Hasidim arrived, "no newcomer had ever come into Postville and simply said, 'We don't want to be like you. Stay away from us.' " Many of the Jews believe the conflict is the result of anti-Semitism on the part of Postville natives, but Bloom, who spent five years researching his book, said this is not the case. Any group that came into town with an attitude so "condescending toward the locals" would not have been welcomed there, Bloom said.

HUNNICUTT INTERVIEWED ON WPR (Wisconsin Public Radio, April 23)
BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT
, University of Iowa professor of health, leisure and sports studies, was interviewed on Kathleen Dunn's live call-in program, which airs on Wisconsin Public Radio. During the interview, Hunnicutt posited that a shorter work week would boost people's quality of life and perhaps save the economy.
http://www.wpr.org:80/ideas/notes/in010423.htm

UI ORTHODONTIST GRADUATE CERTIFIED (Anchorage Daily News, April 23)
Curtis Menard of Valley Orthodontics announced his certification as a diplomate of The American Board of Orthodontics. Certification involves a two-year residency, an exam and a case review. Menard attended the University of the Pacific dental school, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for orthodontics training. He has practiced in Wasilla for 10 years.
http://www.adn.com:80/business/story/0,2641,260102,00.html

UI PONDERS STAFF LAYOFFS (Kansas City Star, April 22)
A story about how states are dealing with budget shortfalls this year says that in Iowa, state officials recently ordered a cutback in energy use and Iowa State University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA may lay off staff.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,local/3acc9ccb.422,.html

BERKEY'S SENTINEL PREMIERS IN KANSAS CITY (KCAlive.com, April 22)
The Kansas City Ballet's spring performance in April included the premiere of DAVID BERKEY's Sentinel. Sentinel is David Berkey's lyrical men's quartet and is the second Company Premiere of the Spring Performance of the Kansas City Ballet. Choreographed to the music of Brahm's Concerto for Violin and Orchestra in D Major, this ballet explores camaraderies through a changing of the guards-type ritual and the passing of knowledge from one generation to the next. The national American College Dance Festival has selected Sentinel for its Outstanding Choreography Award. Berkey is Chair of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DEPARTMENT OF DANCE. He performed with Staatstheater Kassel Ballett in Germany and has been on dance faculties at the University of Oregon, and University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point.
http://www.kcalive.com/event.php?eventid=4636

STUDENT IS INVOLVED IN CONFRONTATION (Asbury Park Press, April 22)
A story about the growing number of encounters on U.S. college campuses between abortion rights advocates and opponents says one organization, Missionaries for the Preborn, has been exhibiting pictures of aborted fetuses on campuses. One anti-abortion activist was sprayed with red paint by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student during a confrontation April 6. The Asbury Park Press is located in Neptune, N.J.

PLAYWRIGHT ATTENDED UI (Los Angeles Times, April 22)
A story about Robert Lindsey Nassif, who wrote the music and lyrics for "The Flight of the Lawnchair Man," and Peter Ullian, who wrote the book, says Ullian, 34, attended the Iowa Playwrights Workshop at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.latimes.com:80/news/asection/20010422/t000034223.html

POEM FROM UI BOOK REPRINTED (Los Angeles Times, April 22)
The poem "In Memory of Dennis Turner, 1946 -1984," from "Motion: American Sports Poems," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is reprinted at length in a section called Fast Break.
http://www.latimes.com:80/print/books/20010422/t000033856.html

GRADUATE IS POWER COMPANY CEO (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, April 22)
A feature on Gary Wolter, the new chief executive officer of Madison Gas & Electric Co., attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW SCHOOL, and after graduation, accepted a job with O'Connor, Thomas, Hammer, Bertsch and Norby, a Dubuque law firm.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/bym/news/apr01/wolter23042201a.asp

STUDENT IS INVOLVED IN CONFRONTATION (San Jose Mercury News, April 22)
A story about the growing number of encounters on U.S. college campuses between abortion rights advocates and opponents says one organization, Missionaries for the Preborn, has been exhibiting pictures of aborted fetuses on campuses. One anti-abortion activist was sprayed with red paint by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student during a confrontation April 6.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/nation/docs/abortion22.htm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 21 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/21/national0056EDT0409.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran April 20 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010420/aponline134016_001.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 20 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010420/us/abortion_campuses_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 20 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0420AP-ABORTION-CAMP&date=20-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

'LURE OF WEST' DREW CROWDS (International Herald Tribune, April 21)
It has been more than a year since the Smithsonian American Art Museum closed at the old Patent Building in downtown Washington for a four-year, $211 million renovation. The museum has been using its homelessness to take to the road with eight simultaneous traveling exhibitions featuring 514 of its most acclaimed works, from a 10-foot-wide landscape of the Sierra Nevadas by Albert Bierstadt to a portrait by John Singer Sargent. University of Iowa Museum of Art, in Iowa City, said its attendance more than doubled this year when it presented "Lure of the West," a "Treasures to Go" exhibition dedicated to Western art. "Wintertime in Iowa, snowstorms, ice storms and more than 1,000 visitors on a single weekend," said PAMELA TRIMPE, curator of paintings and culture. "It was something fantastic."
http://www.iht.com:80/articles/17533.htm

UI PRESS BOOK HONORED (Minneapolis Star Tribune, April 21)
Among the writers, artists and works honored Friday at the 13th annual Minnesota Book Awards program at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, in the category of Anthology and Collections, was "Visiting Emily: Poems Inspired by the Life and Work of Emily Dickinson," edited by Sheila Coghill and Thom Tammaro and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0421BC-MN--BOOKAWARD&date=21-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

CIOCHON STUDY TRACKS EARLY HUMANS (Albuquerque Journal, April 20)
Human ancestors had a sort of long-legged wanderlust that took them from Africa to the Indonesian archipelago at least 1.5 million years ago, new research suggests. The research, published Tuesday, adds to a growing body of evidence that Homo erectus spread rapidly through Asia and possibly eastern Europe soon after wandering north out of Africa. "Humans spread early to Asia," said University of Iowa anthropologist RUSSELL CIOCHON, who co-published the study with colleagues.
http://www.abqjournal.com:80/scitech/310956scitech04-20-01.htm

BLOOM'S 'POSTVILLE' REVIEWED (Boston Globe, April 20)
University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" was reviewed by the paper, which called it a "thought-provoking book in this, a nation of immigrants. The American melting pot has always remained an ethnic stew, with people clinging to their identities. Most immigrant families gradually change their dress and customs, however, and this is where the Hasidim balk. Religion and daily life are inseparable. To them, to assimilate is to disappear."

JONES COMMENTS ON VOTING (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 20)
A story about efforts underway to make sure the next presidential election isn't as fraught with problems as the 2000 election says some academics maintain that state agencies responsible for elections rely too heavily on the manufacturers of electronic-voting systems for assurances that their equipment will count every vote accurately. One of those critics is DOUGLAS W. JONES, an associate professor of computer science at the University of Iowa, who is chairman of the Iowa Board of Examiners for Voting Machines and Electronic Voting Systems. Jones, who testified on voting irregularities in January before the U.S. Civil Rights Commission in Tallahassee, Fla., calls for greater scrutiny of voting systems by the Federal Election Commission and state-election officials. Voting machines approved for use in many states are "utterly unacceptable," he says, "and are only approved because the agencies that regulate voting machines in those states are fundamentally naive about the vulnerabilities of the technologies they have chosen."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i32/32a05101.htm

UI SHARES IN GENOME RESEARCH (Chicago Sun-Times, April 19)
Northwestern University won a $17 million, five-year federal grant to study genetics and the human genome. The research grant from the National Institutes of Health is among the largest in the university's history. Researchers hope their work will lead to a better understanding of the human nervous system, including Alzheimer's disease, addiction, blindness and sleep disorders. The research will be done at the National Institutes of Health's new Neurogenomics Center at Northwestern, in collaboration with Columbia University, Duke University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/news/metro19.html

BALDUS COMMENTS ON DEATH PENALTY STUDY (New York Times, April 19)
A study of death penalty cases in North Carolina in the 1990's has found that the odds of getting a death sentence increased three and a half times if the victim was white rather than black. Jack Boger, a professor at the University of North Carolina School of Law and the main author of the study, released his findings Monday. DAVID BALDUS, a professor of law at the University of Iowa, said the significance of the new study was that racial disparities found in the South by studies more than two decades ago still existed. Baldus studied racial disparities in death penalty cases in Georgia from 1973 to 1979. He found that the odds of being sentenced to death increased 4.3 times when the victim was white, a statistic that he said was very close to the new study's findings.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/19/national/19DEAT.html?searchpv=nytToday

UI WRITING PROGRAM CALLED 'POWERHOUSE' (Los Angeles Times, April 18)
Following in the footsteps of author Michael Chabon, who on Monday received the Pulitzer Prize for fiction for his novel "The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay," aspiring author Glen David Gold applied to UC Irvine's creative writing program. "I applied because of Michael," said Gold, whose first novel will be published in the fall. Gold is one of the few who are accepted to UCI's creative writing program. While UCI is more celebrated for its science and engineering programs, it has established a reputation as one of the top creative writing programs in the country, ranking close to traditional powerhouse UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.latimes.com/editions/valley/sfnews/20010418/t000032775.html

TRIMPE: 'LURE OF WEST' EXHIBIT DREW CROWDS (New York Times, April 18)
It has been more than a year since the Smithsonian American Art Museum closed at the old Patent Building in downtown Washington for a four-year, $211 million renovation. The museum has been using its homelessness to take to the road with eight simultaneous traveling exhibitions featuring 514 of its most acclaimed works, from a 10-foot-wide landscape of the Sierra Nevadas by Albert Bierstadt to a portrait by John Singer Sargent. University of Iowa Museum of Art, in Iowa City, said its attendance more than doubled this year when it presented "Lure of the West," a "Treasures to Go" exhibition dedicated to Western art. "Wintertime in Iowa, snowstorms, ice storms and more than 1,000 visitors on a single weekend," said PAMELA TRIMPE, curator of paintings and culture. "It was something fantastic."
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/18/arts/18ARTS.html
The same New York Times article ran April 18 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nyt/20010418/en/smithsonian_shows_are_making_friends_on_the_road_1.html

UI STUDY FINDS NITRATE-CANCER LINK (Science Daily, April 17)
Nitrate in drinking water is associated with an increased risk for bladder cancer, according to a University of Iowa study that looked at cancer incidence among nearly 22,000 Iowa women. The study results suggest that even low level exposures to nitrate over many years could be problematic in terms of certain types of cancer, said PETER WEYER, Ph.D., associate director of the UI Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination (CHEEC) and one of the study's lead authors. The study will be published in the May issue of the journal Epidemiology. Weyer co-authored the article with James R. Cerhan, M.D., Ph.D., an investigator with the Department of Health Sciences Research at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Additional study authors include: BURTON KROSS, Ph.D., UI adjunct associate professor of epidemiology; JIJI KANTAMNENI, a senior systems analyst at CHEEC; George Breuer, Ph.D., associate director of the UI Hygienic Laboratory; MICHAEL JONES, Ph.D., UI professor of biostatistics; and CHARLES LYNCH, M.D., Ph.D., UI professor of epidemiology.
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2001/04/010417075147.htm

WEYER FINDS NITRATE, CANCER LINK (Yahoo! News, April 17)
Drinking water contaminated with nitrates from fertilizers or human and animal waste may cause bladder cancer in women -- even at levels far below government ceilings, says a new study. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) says nitrate levels are safe below 10 parts per million, the study shows that levels as low as 2.46 parts per million may nearly triple the risk for bladder cancer. Nitrates also are a by-product of municipal waste treatment. "There have been a few studies that have looked at nitrate in drinking water and a variety of cancers," says study author PETER WEYER, associate director of the University of Iowa's Center of the Health Effects of Environmental Contamination. "And while some have found an association with such diseases as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, there has only been one study done in Spain, published in 1993, that showed an association between nitrate, a municipal water supply and an increased risk for bladder cancer." The story was written by HealthScout.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010417/hl/water_waste_not_want_not_1.html

UI COLLEGE OF MEDICINE GAVE BONUSES (Modern Healthcare, April 16)
A story about nationwide efforts by hospitals and health care systems to retain physicians says that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE, concerned last year that physician salaries were not competitive, awarded nearly $2 million in bonuses to 496 faculty members. The bonuses ranged from $1,400 to $9,300.
http://www.modernhealthcare.com:80/currentissue/topten.php3?refid=7027&db=mh99up&published=20010416

HUNNICUTT DISCUSSES WORK WEEK (Christian Science Monitor, April 16)
Some American workplace experts are now casting an eye across the Atlantic for confirmation that a shorter workweek -- as mandated in 1998 by the Socialist-led French government in Paris -- can boost productivity and employee quality of life. The last time such a shortening was implemented in the United States was the 1930s, says BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a labor historian at the University of Iowa and a longtime advocate of slashing the workweek. At the start of the Great Depression, says Hunnicutt, W.K. Kellogg's voluntary six-hour day created 30 percent more jobs, winning strong support from businessmen and labor leaders.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/04/16/fp15s1-csm.shtml

FORMER UI ART DIRECTOR PROKOPOFF DIES (New York Times, April 16)
Stephen Prokopoff, a museum director and curator, died on March 28 in Iowa City. Prokopoff, who began his career as a painter, was known for his attention to emerging or neglected artists and to genres like comics, folk and outsider art, graphic design and photography. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART, where he was director from 1992 to 1999, he worked on the first survey of Victorian fairy painting (organized with the Royal Academy of Arts in London), an exhibition that went to the Frick Collection in scaled-back form in 1998. He also worked on the 1996 retrospective of the outsider artist Henry Darger that traveled to the Museum of American Folk Art in Manhattan. Over the years he taught art at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Chicago, Boston University, the University of Illinois and the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2001/04/16/obituaries/16PROK.html
A brief version of the same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 16 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=NOTE16&date=16-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

EDITORIAL CITES UI STUDENT PROTEST (Lincoln Business Journal, April 15)
Some University of Nebraska regents and other officials, not to mention parents, are worried over the prospect that ever-rising tuition could price students out of an education, says an editorial in the Nebraska-based paper. That's a legitimate concern if it's applied to students who need, want and deserve a university education. It's a spurious consideration if applied to young people who, for academic or other reasons, don't belong there. This thought was triggered by the recent news of a protest by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students at an Iowa City city council meeting over proposals to tighten liquor regulations in the city. The case can be made that "students who find liquor laws to be an intolerable impediment to their lifestyles probably belong somewhere else .." the editorial writer concludes.

UI CITED (Techtrends for Leaders in Education & Training, April 15)
A story about the PsychExperiments project, in which psychology experiments are delivered over the Internet, says that a mirror site will soon be available at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SCHOEN: NORTH CAROLINA OK'D STERILIZATIONS (News & Observer, April 15)
In 1929, North Carolina adopted a law creating a state Eugenics Board empowered to approve sterilization of people deemed "mentally diseased, feebleminded, or epileptic." Board members reasoned that curtailing the fertility of society's "undesirables" would reduce dependency on welfare. Their main goal, however, was to halt the transmission of mental illness and retardation. "The idea was if you can control the reproduction of people with those problems, you can eliminate those problems," said JOHANNA SCHOEN, an assistant professor of history and women's studies at the University of Iowa who wrote her doctoral dissertation on eugenics in North Carolina. The News & Observer is based in Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.newsobserver.com/sunday/news/q/Story/422132p-417261c.html

VIJH, BILLETT STUDY CITED (International Herald Tribune, April 14)
A story about the pitfalls of tracking stocks says that in a study conducted by MATTHEW BILLETT and ANAND VIJH, professors at the University of Iowa, tracking stocks were found to have worse performance than Wall Street in general and competitors in their own industries. The research found that 28 tracking stocks issued in the United States from 1984 to 1998 returned on average 7.3 percent a year, compared with 19.3 percent for the overall market.
http://www.iht.com/articles/16886.htm

TRACKING STOCKS ARE UNRELIABLE (International Herald Tribune, April 14)
Japan has been a major importer of Western financial concepts in recent years. Long shielded from advanced financial technology by tight regulation, the hunger for new tools has been fanned by an acute need to reallocate resources to increase economic efficiency. Now, naturally, Western investment professionals have been eyeing Japan as a target for financial gimmicks such as tracking stocks, which could seem exciting to the uninitiated. But tracking stocks are often issued in the United States when the general division stock is suffering, according to a study made at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Over the year prior to issuing a tracking stock, the study found, issuing companies, with an average return of 0.67 percent, lagged the overall market by 16.14 percent. "The evidence supports a frequent conjecture that tracking stocks are issued in response to poor stock performance," the study's authors wrote.
http://www.iht.com/articles/16884.htm

UI SUMMER WRITING FESTIVAL FEATURED (Frommer's Online, April 13)
The Iowa Summer Writing Festival is one of the country's most celebrated programs for novices and semi-professionals, and justifiably so. As one of America's largest draws for successful visiting-professor writers, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has the chops to make a summer series worth attending. So if you're a writer who wants to trade the solitary hermitage of the writer's bench for a week in the company of fellow artists, a vacation like this could be both moneywise and nourishing.
http://www.frommers.com:80/newsletters/04-13-01/article4.html

COLEMAN: TAKE YOUNGER PLAYERS (Chronicle of Higher Ed. April 13)
The National Basketball Developmental League, sponsored by the National Basketball Association, begins play this fall in eight Southeastern cities. The developmental league will only accept players age 20 and older, but at a December meeting of the Knight commission, several college presidents encouraged the NBA to reconsider the age restriction. "I want to encourage you to consider lowering the age, because I don't think it really helps us so much to start at 20," said MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa. "We're just going to have a much bigger attrition going, now that they've got two routes to go. I'd much rather have kids who have no interest in college go directly" to the developmental league.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i31/31a05201.htm

MILLER LEADS NEW COLLEGE (Chronicle of Higher Education, April 13)
The Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, which describes itself quite accurately as "The College That Doesn't Exist," has accepted its first 30 students, who were selected last month to help faculty and staff members "invent" a new engineering college over the next academic year. Living in a prefab dormitory while the campus is under construction, they will try out different learning methods, help professors design a curriculum, create a student government, and select a mascot. "Engineering education is not known for being fun," says Olin's first president, Richard K. Miller, the former engineering dean at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Courses are stressful, the delivery is often dry, and students don't get to invent things until they're almost ready to graduate, he says. "It doesn't have to be that way."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i31/31a05001.htm

UI STUDENT'S WEB SITE CITED (Minneapolis Star-Tribune, April 12)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
grad student John Freyer has decided to trim some of the clutter from his life. OK, ALL the clutter from his life. Everything he owns is up for sale online, from his notebook computer to his Ray Charles albums. What makes this more than an eBay-palooza is that he's also tracking the items to see where they go. The student's site is at: http://www.allmylifeforsale.com. The article is at:
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=TECR12&date=12-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

VIRTUAL HOSPITAL HIP SITE SUGGESTED (Detroit News, April 11)
A story about hip replacements suggests readers visit one of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S VIRTUAL HOSPITAL tools, www.vh.org/Patients/IHB/Ortho/HipReplace/HipReplace.html. "A no-nonsense guide to the ins and outs of hip replacement surgery, this site not only offers detailed information about the surgery, it provides helpful exercises to perform pre- and post-surgery to help pave the way to a quick recovery," the story says.
http://detnews.com:80/2001/health/0104/11/h04-210486.htm

HENDRIX: CELL STUDY PROMISING (Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, April 11)
A team of scientists says it has grown everything from human muscle to bone from stem cells taken from fat -- a breakthrough that could eliminate the controversial use of fetal cells in the quest to mend damaged, missing or dead tissue. Researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Pittsburgh isolated the stem cells -- immature cells that can be coaxed into maturing into specific types of tissue -- from ordinary fat removed by liposuction. They then grew the cells into bone, cartilage, muscle and fat. Dr. MARY HENDRIX, head of the department of anatomy and cell biology at the University of Iowa, said the study adds to the growing evidence that adult stem cells can be as easily manipulated as embryonic cells. "This is a very exciting discovery, because it's adding to our knowledge base of the potential of adult cells to provide a stem cell population," said Hendrix, who was not involved with the research.

ANDREASEN IS GUEST ON NPR SHOW (The Infinite Mind, April 11)
Dramatic advances in schizophrenia research are providing new hope for people suffering from the disease. This show explored recent genetic discoveries, as well as new developments in medical and therapeutic treatment. Guests included Dr. NANCY ANDREASEN, the Andrew H. Woods Chair of Psychiatry at The University of Iowa College of Medicine. The Infinite Mind is a program that airs on National Public Radio.
http://www.lcmedia.com/mindprgm.htm

HENDRIX SAYS STEM CELL STUDY IS PROMISING (New York Times, April 10)
A team of scientists says it has grown everything from human muscle to bone from stem cells taken from fat -- a breakthrough that could eliminate the controversial use of fetal cells in the quest to mend damaged, missing or dead tissue. Researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of Pittsburgh isolated the stem cells -- immature cells that can be coaxed into maturing into specific types of tissue -- from ordinary fat removed by liposuction. They then grew the cells into bone, cartilage, muscle and fat. Dr. MARY HENDRIX, head of the department of anatomy and cell biology at the University of Iowa, said the study adds to the growing evidence that adult stem cells can be as easily manipulated as embryonic cells. "This is a very exciting discovery, because it's adding to our knowledge base of the potential of adult cells to provide a stem cell population," said Hendrix, who was not involved with the research.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/health/AP-Fat-Stem-Cells.html?searchpv=aponline
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 10 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
http://www.latimes.com/health/men/menswire/20010410/tCB00V9252.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the WALL STREET JOURNAL Web site.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB986949485368083881.djm
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/10/national1330EDT0604.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20010410/hl/fat_stem_cells_2.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the EXCITE NEWS Web page.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/010410/13/fat-stem-cells
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the WASHINGTON POST Web page.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010410/aponline133102_001.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0410AP-FAT-STEM-CELL&date=10-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

VAN ALLEN PAPER SUPPORTS SOLAR STUDY (USA Today, April 10)
Increasing evidence suggests that the direction of the sun's magnetic field appears to affect how cosmic rays penetrate our solar system, scientists say. They found that at the start of 11-year solar cycles, when the sun's magnetic pole points northward, cosmic rays decrease as sunspots increase. But, when the sun's magnetic pole faces south, the cosmic ray and sunspot variations occur nearly in sync. A paper published last August in Geophysical Research Letters by JAMES VAN ALLEN of the University of Iowa appears to support the finding. It found similar alignments of cosmic rays and so-called coronal mass ejections from the sun, powerful eruptions of the material that makes stars that increase alongside sunspots during the solar cycle. Van Allen is the famed discoverer of the radiation belts, high above Earth, that protect our planet from the worst effects of such blasts, in much the same way as the heliosphere screens cosmic rays.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010410/3218898s.htm

SMILEY ATTENDED WRITERS' WORKSHOP (Lincoln Journal-Star, April 10)
A story about Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley, whose latest book, "Horse Heaven," details the world of horseracing, says Smiley received her Ph.D. from the University of Iowa. "I've been involved with New York publishing people since 1978, when I attended the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP," she said. "I'd rather be around horse people, who are loose canons, challenging and eccentric. Writers are so contained."
http://www.journalstar.com:80/local?story_id=3227&date=20010407&past=

INGRAM COMMENTS ON IOWA ECONOMY (Christian Science Monitor, April 10)
A story about the Iowa town of Pella's recent economic downturn quotes BETH INGRAM, a University of Iowa professor and chair of the state's economic forecast council. "The Iowa economy looks a lot like the national economy," says Ingram. "There's a lot of information technologies, a lot of manufacturing, and less and less farming."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2001/04/10/fp1s4-csm.shtml

SCHNELL COMMENTS ON SLOW VEHICLE SAFETY (Newsday, April 9)
Members of the small, conservative Swartzentruber Amish community in Pennsylvania, refuse to use the standard warning symbol of a bright orange triangle that state law requires on slow-moving vehicles, saying the colorful reflectors violate their belief in plain personal belongings. Instead, they outline the back edges of their buggies with gray reflective tape. Four states -- including Ohio -- permit reflective tape outlining the back of a buggy as a substitute for the orange triangle. Lawyers representing the Amish are working with the ACLU and a state senator to draw up similar legislation for Pennsylvania. One safety researcher argues against an exemption. "That triangle is there for communicating, 'Hey -- I'm moving slowly,' " said TOM SCHNELL, director of the Operator Performance Laboratory at the University of Iowa. "When you see not just a triangle, but an orange triangle, you know there's a slow-moving vehicle ahead."

SCHNELL COMMENTS ON SLOW VEHICLE SAFETY (Bergen Record, April 9)
Members of the small, conservative Swartzentruber Amish community in Pennsylvania, refuse to use the standard warning symbol of a bright orange triangle that state law requires on slow-moving vehicles, saying the colorful reflectors violate their belief in plain personal belongings. Instead, they outline the back edges of their buggies with gray reflective tape. Four states -- including Ohio -- permit reflective tape outlining the back of a buggy as a substitute for the orange triangle. Lawyers representing the Amish are working with the ACLU and a state senator to draw up similar legislation for Pennsylvania. One safety researcher argues against an exemption. "That triangle is there for communicating, 'Hey -- I'm moving slowly,' " said TOM SCHNELL, director of the Operator Performance Laboratory at the University of Iowa. "When you see not just a triangle, but an orange triangle, you know there's a slow-moving vehicle ahead."
http://www.bergen.com/region/amish9200104097.htm
This ASSOCIATED PRESS story also appeared in the April 8 AKRON BEACON-JOURNAL
http://www.ohio.com/bj/news/ohio/docs/002278.htm
This Associated Press story also appeared in the April 8 FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:POLITICS13/1:POLITICS
130408101.html

This Associated Press story also appeared April 8 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/national/AP-Amish-Tickets.html?
searchpv=aponline

This Associated Press story also appeared April 8 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/08/
national1327EDT0476.DTL

MORE WOMEN APPLYING TO LAW SCHOOL (U.S. News & World Report, April 9)
The magazine’s cover story describes the changing face of American law schools, with increasing numbers of women applying and enrolling. This is a dramatic shift from just 30 years ago when more than 90 percent of law students were men. Hannah Arterian, now a dean at Arizona State University, says that whenever female law students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the early 1970s spoke up in class, they were made to feel that they were "representing [their] sex—it was awful."
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/010409/women.htm

SCHNELL COMMENTS ON SLOW VEHICLE SAFETY (Washington Post, April 8)
Members of the small, conservative Swartzentruber Amish community in Pennsylvania, refuse to use the standard warning symbol of a bright orange triangle that state law requires on slow-moving vehicles, saying the colorful reflectors violate their belief in plain personal belongings. Instead, they outline the back edges of their buggies with gray reflective tape. Four states -- including Ohio -- permit reflective tape outlining the back of a buggy as a substitute for the orange triangle. Lawyers representing the Amish are working with the ACLU and a state senator to draw up similar legislation for Pennsylvania. One safety researcher argues against an exemption. "That triangle is there for communicating, 'Hey -- I'm moving slowly,' " said TOM SCHNELL, director of the Operator Performance Laboratory at the University of Iowa. "When you see not just a triangle, but an orange triangle, you know there's a slow-moving vehicle ahead."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/20010408/aponline133644_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 8 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE .
http://webserv0.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0408AP-AMISH-TICKETS&date=08-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

UI GRAD IS CENTER OF CHICAGO "INDIE JAZZ" (Chicago Tribune, April 8)
New York remains the undisputed capital of slick, mainstream forms of jazz, while Los Angeles has a hammerlock on commercial exploitation of jazz in movies and on TV. And New Orleans, the mythic birthplace of the music, now boasts more Louis Armstrong imitators and other retro stylists than perhaps anyplace on the planet. But when it comes to "indie jazz" -- the development of provocative innovations and the nurturing of proudly idiosyncratic talent -- Chicago today is pre-eminent. No one has done more to champion the ruggedly individual spirit of Chicago jazz than Patricia Barber, an introspective, stylistically daring singer-pianist who refused to sign with a major label, opted instead to record for a one-man operation and watched her music ascend the Billboard jazz charts. Barber came to the city nearly two decades ago, having studied classical music at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/tribunemagazine/article/0,2669,SAV-0104080501,FF.html

UI GRAD SMILEY SPEAKS IN NEBRASKA (Lincoln Journal Star, April 7)
An article about Jane Smiley's visit to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln notes that she earned her Ph.D. at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.journalstar.com/local?story_id=3227&date=20010407&past=

UI STUDENT SEEKS MUSIC CAREER (Chicago Tribune, April 6)
Jackie Dustin has been singing and performing most of her life. The 19-year-old Arlington Heights native liked to put on shows for her family as a youngster. For a while, Dustin and two friends at Rolling Meadows High School even had their own trio. But it was when she picked up a guitar in her sophomore year that Dustin's musical career took an important turn: That instrument helped unlock her songwriting talents. Although she's a freshman majoring in pre-veterinary medicine at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Dustin recently decided to set her sights on a music career. "Next year I'm not going to come back to school," Dustin said. "I'm going to try being a musician. That's my dream and my goal. It's a tough business, but it's pretty much what I've wanted to do my whole life."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/northwest/article/0,2669,SAV-0104060216,FF.html

FORMER UI PROFESSOR TO LEAD CUNY (Chronicle of Higher Ed., April 6)
Trustees of the City University of New York voted last week to hire the law-school dean at Ohio State University as the new president of City College, despite objections from some students and faculty members who wanted the search broadened to include other candidates. The Board of Trustees unanimously agreed to hire Gregory H. Williams to lead the Manhattan college, which has been without a permanent president since July 1999. Before becoming dean of Ohio State's College of Law, in 1993, Mr. Williams worked in various positions in higher education, including directing community-outreach and curriculum-development programs at George Washington and leading a program to recruit minority students and professors at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. At Iowa, he also served as associate vice president for academic affairs.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i30/30a02801.htm

LEWIS-BECK TO ADJUST FORECAST MODEL (Chronicle of Higher Ed., April 6)
Most political scientists who handicapped the 2000 election expected the surging economy to propel Al Gore straight to the White House. After he won a mere 50.5 percent of the major-party vote, many scholars defended their models by blaming his campaign strategy. Now the March issue of PS: Political Science & Politics offers some second opinions on Gore's culpability. MICHAEL S. LEWIS-BECK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, and Charles Tien, an assistant professor of political science at City University of New York's Hunter College, confess that they will likely adjust their formula to play down economic factors when no incumbent is running. Had they done so last year, they would have lowered their prediction for Mr. Gore's vote from 56.9 to 54.9 percent.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i30/30a02201.htm

UI MUESUM HOSTS NAKED CAMERA TOSS (Chronicle of Higher Ed., April 6)
Recently at the University of Iowa MUSEUM OF ART, eight local art enthusiasts, some naked and others clad only in underwear, lobbed two video cameras around for half an hour while images from one of the cameras were projected onto a large screen. The performance-art piece, "Naked Camera Toss," which served as part of the preview for the university's three-day Thaw Film Festival, was produced by Habeas Corpus, a local art group that focuses on the human body. HOWARD CREEL COLLINSON, the museum's director, says no one objected to the event, nor would he have canceled it if they had. "The university is very committed to the First Amendment," he says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i30/30a01001.htm

EX-UI ART MUSEUM DIRECTOR PROKOPOFF DIES (Chicago Tribune, April 2)
Stephen S. Prokopoff, 71, the director of Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art from 1971 to 1977, died of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Wednesday, March 28, in the University of Iowa Hospitals. In 1992, Prokopoff took a directorship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART, where he remained until his retirement in 1999. There, his 1996 exhibition "Henry Darger: The Unreality of Being" attracted widespread critical attention to outsider art, which does not fit well in any category.
http://chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/article/0,2669,SAV-0104020230,FF.html (registration required)

CAYNER COMMENTS ON FOX UIHC DONATION (Arizona Republic, April 2)
Ashton Kutcher, one of the stars of Fox's "That '70s Show," hoped to exercise his intellect on another network's game show to win money for a hospital in Iowa City, Iowa, where his twin brother underwent a heart transplant. But Kutcher decided not to compete on ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" because he didn't want to upset Fox. He majored in biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before dropping out to pursue modeling. As a consolation, Fox donated $32,000 -- the minimum amount Kutcher could have won on "Millionaire" -- to the Patient Transplant Support Fund at University Hospitals in Iowa City. Hospital officials said the gift on Kutcher's behalf was one of the largest the fund has ever received. "This is going to help a lot of people," said JAY CAYNER, assistant hospital director. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 2 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, DALLAS MORNING NEWS and CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER.

CAYNER COMMENTS ON FOX UIHC DONATION (USA Today, April 2)
Ashton Kutcher, one of the stars of Fox's "That '70s Show," hoped to exercise his intellect on another network's game show to win money for a hospital in Iowa City, Iowa, where his twin brother underwent a heart transplant. But Kutcher decided not to compete on ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" because he didn't want to upset Fox. He majored in biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before dropping out to pursue modeling. As a consolation, Fox donated $32,000 -- the minimum amount Kutcher could have won on "Millionaire" -- to the Patient Transplant Support Fund at University Hospitals in Iowa City. Hospital officials said the gift on Kutcher's behalf was one of the largest the fund has ever received. "This is going to help a lot of people," said JAY CAYNER, assistant hospital director.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20010402/3195578s.htm
The same story ran April 1 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
http://webserv3.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0401AP-ASHTON-KUTCHE&date=01-Apr-2001&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
A separate story on the same subject appeared March 31 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19688-2001Mar30.html

UI GRAD NAMED TO AP POST (San Francisco Chronicle, April 2)
Mark Mittelstadt, a veteran AP editor and bureau chief, has been named AP/APME projects director, a new position that will help coordinate initiatives of the Associated Press Managing Editors (APME) organization. Mittelstadt is a native of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He previously worked at three Iowa newspapers: The Messenger of Fort Dodge, the Waterloo Courier and The Cedar Falls Record, where he was editor.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2001/04/02/national1643EDT7011.DTL

BALDUS COMMENTS ON JURY SELECTION (Washington Post, April 2)
Attorneys and judges involved in the trials of Corey A. Moore say race played no role in the selection of jurors. But by the time Moore's fourth trial ended last week with yet another hung jury, prosecutors and defense attorneys had fallen into a near-perfect opposing symmetry. Prosecutors struck 21 black and three white potential jurors in Moore's last two trials; defense attorneys struck three blacks and 19 whites. Fifteen years after the U.S. Supreme Court issued the first of several rulings forbidding lawyers to use race-based juror strikes, Moore's case illustrates how the law has been reduced to little more than a symbol, say an array of judges, scholars and lawyers. Because the law is so weak and difficult to enforce, apparent violations are often ignored by both sides, and evasions are rarely challenged by judges, a number of judicial and legal sources say. The trend is most pronounced -- as it is in most areas of law enforcement -- when the defendant is a black male. "When the defendant is black, the prosecution clearly targets black jurors for exclusion and the defense targets whites," said DAVID C. BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who studied the use of more than 11,000 jury strikes in 317 capital murder trials in Philadelphia for an extensive report in the current edition of the Journal of Constitutional Law. "Everybody knows it goes on, but both sides tolerate it because they would both be vulnerable to the same accusation from the other side."
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A23745-2001Apr1.html

CAIN COMMENTS ON JURY INSTRUCTIONS (Boston Globe, April 1)
Susan Muzzy sued her employer claiming sexual harassment, and when the case went to trial, Hampshire County Superior Court Judge Brian McDonald gave jurors an unusual instruction. Since both Muzzy and her boss were lesbians, he told jurors to consider Muzzy's case not just from the typical view of a "reasonable person" -- the Everyman of civil law, a homogenized person who is the model of fairness -- but from the view of "an objectively reasonable woman of lesbian orientation." PATRICIA CAIN, a law professor at the University of Iowa, said that lesbian-specific instructions to jurors could backfire. "I think it's risky to ask a jury that has not been educated about lesbian lifestyles," she said. "Giving that charge to the jury, I do think, invites the jury to say, for instance, 'Lesbians always talk about sex toys.'"
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/091/metro/justice_widens_its_role_models+.shtml

MERRILL WRITES ABOUT POET CELAN (San Francisco Chronicle, April 1)
CHRISTOPHER MERRILL
, director of the University of Iowa’s International Writing Program, writes about the publication of two new volumes of poetry by the late Paul Celan, a Jewish poet who struggled because he wrote in German. "The experience of reading so much of his haunting work, rendered in precise English with facing German texts, is exhilarating and exhausting," he writes.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2001/04/01/RV91439.DTL

FOX DONATES TO UIHC (Salt Lake Tribune, April 1)
Ashton Kutcher, one of the stars of Fox's "That '70s Show," hoped to exercise his intellect on another network's game show to win money for a hospital in Iowa City, Iowa, where his twin brother underwent a heart transplant. But Kutcher decided not to compete on ABC's "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" because he didn't want to upset Fox. He majored in biochemical engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before dropping out to pursue modeling. As a consolation, Fox donated $32,000 -- the minimum amount Kutcher could have won on "Millionaire" -- to the Patient Transplant Support Fund at University Hospitals in Iowa City. Hospital officials said the gift on Kutcher's behalf was one of the largest the fund has ever received. "This is going to help a lot of people," said JAY CAYNER, assistant hospital director.
http://www.sltrib.com/04022001/nation_w/84969.htm
A version of this story appeared in the April 2 BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD http://www.bergen.com/yourtime/peep2200104029.htm
A version of this story appeared in the April 2 PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS
http://dailynews.philly.com/content/daily_news/2001/04/02/features/PEEP02.htm
A version of this story appeared March 31 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/010401/15/ent-ashton-kutcher-millionaire
A version of this story appeared April 1 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/arts/AP-Ashton-Kutcher-Millionaire.html?searchpv=aponline
A version of this story appeared in the April 2 BALTIMORE SUN http://www.sunspot.net/news/printedition/bal-to.people02apr02.story

HUNNICUTT: JOB HAPPINESS A MYTH (Workforce, April 2001)
A story about the myth of job happiness quotes BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. "It's a myth that we can find identity, meaning and community at work," he says. "I call it the Mary Tyler Moore myth. Everyone thinks they will go to work and find a wonderful group of people to serve as family and friends, like Mary Tyler Moore did in the 1970s sitcom. In reality, employees find dullards and irrational bosses."

JOHNSONS CO-AUTHOR EDITORIAL (American Family Physician, April 2001)
BRUCE E. JOHNSON
, M.D., professor of medicine, and CYNDA ANN JOHNSON, M.D., professor of family medicine, at the University of Iowa College of Medicine are co-authors of an editorial on cardiovascular disease and differences between the sexes.

IEM CONSIDERED FOR HEDGING POLITICAL RISK (Risk Magazine, April 2001)
Two Columbia University professors propose that election markets such as the UI's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS could be further developed to construct markets for hedging political risk. Such markets could help investors gauge the impact of an election on the value of their portfolios. Research by IEM faculty in the Tippie College of Business is cited, including references to work by ROBERT FORSYTHE, THOMAS RIETZ, FORREST NELSON, and GEORGE NEUMANN.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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