The University of Iowa
The University of Iowa News Services Home News Releases UI in the News Subscribe to UI News Contact Us

 

CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: April 6, 2001

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

BARRAGAN READS APRIL 17 -- Nina Barragan will read from her new collection of stories, "Losers and Keepers in Argentina," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 17, at the Prairie Lights Bookstore in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

"Losers and Keepers in Argentina" begins with the story of a Russian Jew who emigrated to Argentina at the end of the 19th century. The Argentine-born Barragan's book goes on to consider the experiences of Jewish immigrants during the last hundred years in North America and South America. The book is part of the University of New Mexico Press's Jewish Latin America Series.

Barragan's previous book of fiction, "No Peace at Versailles," earned praise from the New York Times, which said that many of her stories "open suddenly to reveal worlds both bizarre and believable."

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

* * *

KLINK READS APRIL 18 -- Poet Joanna Klink will read from her first book, "They Are Sleeping," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 18, at the Prairie Lights Bookstore in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Klink' s work has appeared in the Antioch Review, Boston Review, Colorado Review, Verse and Prairie Schooner. She teaches at the University of Montana.

"In Joanna Klink's poems the limits of consciousness are constantly tried by the seductive enchantments of lyricism; clarity and mystery are not only brought close to each other, often they seem indistinguishable," wrote Mark Strand, UI Writers' Workshop alumnus and former Poet Laureate of the United States. "Everywhere, a forceful, scrupulous intelligence is active -- a luminous diction, a range of cadences. Everywhere, the burden of feeling is borne with ease."

Susan Stewart says Klink's book is "so rare for a first collection, with a moving and complex tension between its lines and sentences, an engaging kaleidoscopic sense of diction, and a form of sequence to which the reader awakens and re-awakens."

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

* * *

HANSEN READS APRIL 19 -- Novelist Ron Hansen, a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, will read from his new collection of essays on faith and fiction, "A Stay Against Confusion," at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 19, at the Prairie Lights Bookstore in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live from Prairie Lights" series on UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Hansen is the author of "Desperadoes," "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford," "Nebraska," "Mariette in Ecstasy," "Atticus" and "Hitler's Niece." He has also written a children' s book, "The Shadowmaker."

He received the Award in Literature from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters for Nebraska. Hansen was twice a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award, was a finalist for the 1997 National Book Award for "Atticus," and received the fiction prize from the Bay Area Book Reviewers Association and the Gold "Medal" for Excellence in Fiction from the Commonwealth Club California for "Mariette in Ecstasy."

"For me, the process of writing is the joy of writing," Hansen has said. "It's the putting down of individual sentences, making them fit together, making the story interesting. Once you've completed a book, you realize how ramshackle a thing writing a novel is. You've somehow made it seem like it was always coherent. That's the satisfying aspect of writing, the really affirming thing about it."

Hansen is Gerard Manley Hopkins SJ Professor of the Arts and Humanities at Santa Clara University. He earned his Master of Fine Arts degree from the UI and a master's degree in spirituality from Santa Clara.

For more information about this event, call Prairie Lights at 337-2681.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

* * *

LECTURE ON COLLECTING ART APRIL 20 -- The University of Iowa Museum of Art will present "Collecting for the Nation" at 7:30 p.m., Friday, April 20. Kenneth Trapp, curator-in-charge of the Smithsonian American Art Museum's Renwick Gallery, will lecture on how to establish a permanent art or craft collection.

The lecture will be free and open to the public. A reception will be held after the talk.

Trapp will concentrate on the major difference between federally funded art collections and those funded by private institutes. He will also delve into the role a museum must play in the 21st century.

"A museum is meant for education," Trapp said. "It's not just a place to hold a bunch of objects meant to look pretty."

A museum must be diplomatic in its dealings with the public, he added. "Democracy is very difficult," he said. "You don't want to offend people, but you can't be a tool for someone else's agenda."

Trapp has been the curator-in-chief of the Renwick Gallery for six years, and he was the project director of "The Arts and Crafts Movement in California: Living the Good Life," a major exhibition that traveled to the Renwick and Cincinnati Art Museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for events at the UI Museum of Art during the 2000-2001 season, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays during the school year. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

* * *

UI STUDENTS WILL CONDUCT PHILHARMONIA CHAMBER ORCHETRA -- Graduate students in the University of Iowa School of Music will conduct the school's Philharmonia Chamber Orchestra in a free concert at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 22, in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

A portion of the program will be conducted by Jean Montes as a qualifying recital for admission to the doctoral program in orchestral conducting. Montes, a native of Haiti who is studying with William LaRue Jones at the UI School of Music, will conduct two works: an orchestral arrangement by Lucien Cailliet of J.S. Bach's "Sheep may safely graze" from Cantata 208, and Franz Schubert's Symphony no. 2 in B flat major, D. 125.

Lucia Matos will open the concert conducting the Overture to "La Belle Helene" (The Fair Helen) by Jacques Offenbach.

Schubert's first four symphonies, all written while the composer was a teenager, were probably intended for performance by the orchestra of the seminary that he attended, or by an amateur ensemble. None of these works was published until a complete edition of Schubert's works appeared in1884. The Second Symphony was finished March 24, 1815, when the composer was just 18. Like the first symphony, written two years earlier, it is scored for the standard orchestra of the time.

"La Belle Helene" was written as a sly parody the story of Helen of Troy from classic mythology, but it also served as a thinly disguised comment on society life in mid-19th century Paris. Offenbach composed a tale of the cruel machinations of the gods, the noble fumblings of mortals and the storm that swirls around history's most beautiful woman, all set in music of irresistible charm. The sparkling Overture is one of Offenbach's most popular concert openers.

One of two chamber orchestras at the UI School of Music, Philharmonia performs under the supervision of William La Rue Jones, director of orchestras. The School of Music is part of the Division of Performing Arts in the UI College of Liberal Arts.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.