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September 2000

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ARCHAEOLOGY, September/October 2000 -- A story about the use of the Web by archaeologists and archaeology enthusiasts recommends a Web site based at the University of Iowa. "A major appeal of the web is that it's a Wild West of information, and if you stumble across a website that tempts you to further explore the connection between Stonehenge, the hypotenuse of an isosceles triangle, and ancient UFOs, take a reality check and sharpen your critical web-perusing skills at Fantastic Archaeology " The brainchild of two anthropology professors, Richard A. Fox of the University of South Dakota and LARRY J. ZIMMERMAN of the University of Iowa, the website provides nonspecialists with the skills for understanding and evaluating pseudoscientific archaeology, as well as links that either support or debunk various archaeological "theories" (i.e., ancient Egyptians in the Americas, human footprints in billion-year-old coal deposits, and Nazca landing strips).
http://www.archaeology.org:80/curiss/etc/multimedia.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 28 -- A story about the 25 securities and commodities exchanges in North America mentions as one "unique venue" the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, real-money futures markets where contract payoffs depend on economic and political events such as elections. "They're operated by faculty at the University of Iowa Tippie College of Business as a research and educational initiative. But using the university's forum, you can still put funds at risk and thus make -- or lose -- money."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=BT-CO-20000928-005912.djml

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Sept. 28 -- University of Iowa employees will clean up 1,100 human skeletons over the next few years for others to examine. UI anthropology professor BOB FRANCISCUS, 42, brought the unusual collection of human skeletons to Iowa City when he moved from California two years ago. He had rescued the remains from a Stanford University Medical School basement, where the bones had been collecting dust for 70 to 80 years. The U of I has a $105,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to cover the cost of cleaning the skeletons so they can be put to use. "The collection is really valuable to both the teaching and research aspects of the university," state archeologist BILL GREEN said. ROBIN LILLIE, a skeletal biologist with the State Archaeologist office, has helped remove the skeletons from the flour bags, catalog them and put them into boxes. "There are diseases I've never seen before," Lillie said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/09/28/state0150EDT0290.DTL

SALON, Sept. 27 -- Author David Shields, commenting on the firing of Indiana coach Bobby Knight, says he remembers being "simultaneously a graduate student in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and a patient in the university's equally renowned SPEECH CLINIC, and being overwhelmed by the paradox that as an apprentice writer I was learning to manipulate words, but that as a stutterer, was at the mercy of them. How had my life come to this, I wondered, shuttling back and forth between two four-story brick buildings, two houses of language?" Later he adds, " Is it clear how Knight and I are alike? In short, what animates us inevitably ails us. Not only for Knight and me, of course, but for everybody."
http://www.salon.com:80/people/feature/2000/09/27/knight/index.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 27 -- Justin Reschly, a member of the Southwest State men's basketball team from 1998 to 2000, was found dead in his dorm room at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. An autopsy was being performed after a roommate found him Monday. No foul play was suspected, but the cause of his death had not been determined. Reschly, 20, left Southwest State, in Marshall, Minn., after the 1999-2000 season and transferred to the University of Iowa in order to get closer to home. He had talked with the Iowa men's coaching staff about possibly walking on to the team.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=SCEN27&date=27-Sep-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 27 -- In a story about the Supreme Court's decision against taking on the Microsoft antitrust case until a lower court hears the case, University of Iowa law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP comments on speculation the software giant is stalling until the next president is elected with the hope that he will appoint justices sympathetic to the company. "If George W. Bush is elected president, this is a victory for Microsoft," Hovenkamp said. "If Gore is elected president, then all bets are off and it could be a disaster for Microsoft," he said. "I'm not predicting that . . . but whether this is a victory for Microsoft in the long run depends on a lot of uncertainties."
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A22998-2000Sep26.html

TUCSON (Ariz.) WEEKLY, Sept. 27 -- While living in Iowa City, teaching modern dance as a professor at the University of Iowa, CHARLOTTE ADAMS still manages to keep Tenth Street Danceworks going in her hometown, Tucson. While the longtime troupe has been less visible in recent years, it was scheduled to kick off its annual fall concert-in-the-park next weekend.

FINANCE AND COMMERCE, Sept. 26 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is once again sponsoring a futures market on the presidential race, giving investors and students an opportunity to put up to $500 on either of the candidates.

ZDNET, Sept. 26 -- The Supreme Court's decision Tuesday declining to take on the Microsoft antitrust case not only provides the software maker a potentially friendlier court venue, but also adds another possible plus: time. Some observers say the ultimate outcome of the case could hinge on the upcoming presidential election. That's because the incoming president probably will have the authority to appoint at least two Supreme Court Justices. If two conservative judges retire, a Gore Administration would likely replace them with liberal justices more likely to favor strong antitrust laws -- a move that could hurt Microsoft's chances. "If all they have purchased is later reviewed by a significantly more liberal and more pro-plaintiff Supreme Court, then this is not a victory at all," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. On the other hand, there has been some speculation that a Bush Administration would back off the case. But the government has only called off one major antitrust action: the IBM case, which it was losing.
http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/news/0,4586,2633648,00.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 26 -- A story about director David Esbjornson, whose most recent projects are "Hedda Gabler" and "Eliot Ness in Cleveland," says he began working on the latter play with its author, Robert Lindsay Nassif, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 10 years ago, when Esbjornson was a guest director. In those days, however, the play' s title was " In the Shadow of Terminal Tower, " Esbjornson said. Since then, the play has not only undergone a name change, it' s become a musical and been performed in Denver.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0926BC-MN--TOPIC-FAM&date=26-Sep-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

EXCITE NEWS, Sept. 26 -- The Supreme Court's decision Tuesday declining to take on the Microsoft antitrust case not only provides the software maker a potentially friendlier court venue, but also adds another possible plus: time. Some observers say the ultimate outcome of the case could hinge on the upcoming presidential election. That's because the incoming president probably will have the authority to appoint at least two Supreme Court Justices. If two conservative judges retire, a Gore Administration would likely replace them with liberal justices more likely to favor strong antitrust laws -- a move that could hurt Microsoft's chances. "If all they have purchased is later review by a significantly more liberal and more pro-plaintiff Supreme Court, then this is not a victory at all," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. On the other hand, there has been some speculation that a Bush Administration would back off the case. But the government has only called off one major antitrust action: the IBM case, which it was losing.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/zd/000926/19/microsoft-looks-for

ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH, Sept. 26 -- A story about work on the Human Genome Project quotes University of Iowa researcher ROBIN DAVISSON, Ph.D., assistant professor of anatomy and cell biology as saying "Knowledge of the genome sequence is the beginning, but the key is to understand how genes function in the whole organism." Davisson's research group is using a new, emerging technology called functional genomics. By manipulating the genome in very selective ways, researchers can study how those manipulations affect the physiology of the whole organism. The importance of this new branch of research was underlined by MARY J. C. HENDRIX, Ph.D., the Kate Daum Professor of Anatomy and Cell Biology and head of the department. "This represents a brand new field in biomedical research. It has tremendous potential in terms of yielding new information on the structure and function of genes,'' Hendrix said. Also cited in the story are CURT D. SIGMUND, Ph.D., UI associate professor of internal medicine, and physiology and biophysics, and KEVIN P. CAMPBELL, Ph.D., a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator and UI Foundation Distinguished Professor of Physiology and Biophysics.
http://www.stlnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/59DEE61655D884BD862569660063A7DE?OpenDocument

FINANCIAL TIMES, Sept. 25 -- Vice President Al Gore's commanding lead in election opinion polls has disintegrated, leaving him running neck-and-neck with his Republican rival, George W. Bush. Six weeks before the Nov. 7 presidential election, the latest poll results released over the weekend by the Gallup Organization, Newsweek, Fox TV, Voter.com and the IOWA ELECTION FUTURES MARKET, suggest that the race between Mr. Gore and the Texas governor has become a statistical dead heat. Trading on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "vote share" election futures market, where speculators bet on the election's outcome, suggest the gap has been narrowed to a less than 3-point difference - 50.3 per cent for Mr. Gore versus 47.4 per cent for Mr. Bush. Trading in Iowa's "winner-take-all" market suggested the likelihood of a Gore win on election day had slipped to 60 per cent on Sunday from 70 per cent last Monday.
http://news.ft.com/ft/gx.cgi/ftc?pagename=View&c=Article&cid=FT3ZVG45JDC&live=true&tagid=YYY9BSINKTM&useoverridetemplate=IXLZHNNP94C

KATRILLION.COM, Sept. 25 -- From schoolsucks.com to bignerds.com, free term paper sites are popping up all over the web. But experts say you're only hurting yourself -- and some teachers are on to you. Teachers assign papers so students can learn certain skills, TOM ROCKLIN, director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Iowa told Katrillion. "If you download term papers, you don't get any of that practice." Rocklin says the Glatt program, a special test for suspected cheaters, is fine, but "I'm more interested in helping students learn than catching them cheating." Katrillion is a Web magazine based in New Jersey that carries news about world events, popular culture, sports and entertainment.
http://www.katrillion.com/news/newsgrabber.jsp?categoryId=89&newsId=6415

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 25 -- A story about Maxfunds.com, which has created stock indexes based on corporate contributors to Republicans and Democrats, says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA sponsors a futures market on the presidential race, giving investors and students an opportunity to put up to $500 on either of the candidates. The Iowa futures market is showing good signs for Democrat Al Gore. Unlike a presidential poll, the futures market hinges on the participants' beliefs of who will win, not whom they prefer to see win. On Friday, Gore futures were trading on the electronic platform at 51 cents a contract, which means the futures market currently thinks he'll garner 51 percent of the popular vote in November.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB969832584740649646.djm

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 25 -- The Justice Department subpoenaed documents from a former researcher at a New Jersey cancer-research center, a move that comes shortly after regulators suspended clinical trials there. The subpoena was delivered late Friday to researcher Malik Juweid at his Bloomfield, N.J., home. It asks for "all documents and communications" relating to his former employer, the Garden State Cancer Center/Center for Molecular Medicine and Immunology in Belleville, N.J., and Immunomedics Inc., a publicly traded biotech firm based in Morris Plains, N.J. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration temporarily suspended 11 clinical trials the center was conducting dealing with lymphoma, breast, colorectal, pancreatic, lung and other cancers. Dr. Juweid's attorney, Walter Lucas of West Orange, N.J., said that a letter from the U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of New Jersey specifically stated that Dr. Juweid wasn't a target of the investigation. Dr. Juweid, the center's former director of nuclear medicine, left Garden State last month and will take a new position at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB96983152747802020.djm

BALTIMORE SUN, Sept. 25 -- A story about the connection between nitrates and human ailments says that in Iowa, about 40 percent of the state's private wells exceed the standard, according to RICK KELLEY, an environmental program consultant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HYGIENIC LAB, which analyzes water samples for the state.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150470208935

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 25 -- A story about Terry Brands, a former world wrestling champion who is making a last lunge for Olympic gold this week in Sydney, said that prior to preparing for the Olympics the former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wrestler, now 32, retired from competition and took a job as assistant at the University of Nebraska. He also began easing back on a notorious training schedule that once included 4 a.m. workouts, midday wrestling, evening runs and nighttime saunas.
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 25 on the Web site of FOX SPORTS.
http://www.foxsports.com:80/wires/pages/44/spt147144.sml

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Sept. 25 -- STEPHEN BLOOM, who was San Francisco Mayor Frank Jordan's first press secretary -- a 71-day gig -- is out with "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America'' (Harcourt Brace, $25), a book about a group of Hasidic Jews who open a kosher slaughterhouse in Iowa. Bloom was a journalist before his political stint and is now associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/09/25/DD53428.DTL

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Sept. 24 - Geneva Overholser, a Washington Post syndicated columnist and former Des Moines Register editor, writes a column about the unlikely mix of Iowans and Orthodox Jews in Postville, Iowa, as described by STEPHEN BLOOM, a UI journalism professor, in his new book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." Bloom says, "It's a story that pries open the psyche of Christian America: 'Jews are different from us, can we trust them? Will they ever allow us to be trusted?' Postville is a microcosm of the nation at large." If so, Overholser wonders, then what does Postville's experience predict for our fast-changing nation? "Like Bloom at the beginning of his Postville adventure, we can't really foresee how this will all turn out. But, like the book, the journey promises to be interesting."
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=092400&ID=s856728&cat=
This article also appeared in theSept. 27 CHICAGO TRIBUNE
http://chicagotribune.com/news/opinion/commentary/article/0,2669,SAV-0009270401,FF.html)

CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, Sept. 24 -- A story about the musical "Eliot Ness in Cleveland" by playwright Peter Ullian and composer-lyricist Robert Lindsey Nassif says it wasn't until Ullian went to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that he saw a review of "Torso," a 1989 book about the Kingsbury Run killings written by Steven Nickel. He read the book and thought: "This could be a play. My play."
http://www.cleveland.com:80/entertainment/index.ssf?/entertainment/pd/e24ness.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Sept. 24 -- University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America is critiqued by the newspaper. "A livelier and more absorbing work of personal journalism I have not read in years," the reviewer writes.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/kisor/kisor24.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 24 -- A story about Olympic trampolining said 86-year-old George Nissen, "the man most responsible for Olympic trampolining," invented the trampoline while he was a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1930s. Nissen, a former carnival performer, said he drew his inspiration for the trampoline after attending the circus with his brother and watching the trapeze artists bounce off the safety net.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/sports/main/article/0,2669,SAV-0009240384,FF.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Sept. 24 -- Almost 20 years ago, novelist Sandra Cisneros shyly walked the hallways of Josephinum High School in the Wicker Park neighborhood. On Friday, the author of the acclaimed "The House on Mango Street" returned, this time in a two-piece leopard-patterned suit and thin-heeled shoes. Cisneros spoke to students candidly about her lonely teenage years in Wicker Park, her father's death and the importance of reading. "You need to use your library card like a free gymnasium pass for your brain," said Cisneros, whose first dream as a writer was to have her name in the library's card catalog. A graduate of Loyola University and the renowned UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, Cisneros didn't get national recognition as a novelist until she was awarded a MacArthur fellowship in 1995.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/cis24.html

BALTIMORE SUN, Sept. 24 -- An opinion piece about the number of years it takes students to graduate from four-year college and university programs says the Maryland Higher Education Commission's 1996 report on graduation rates included a recommendation for colleges to provide a "four-year graduation guarantee," an arrangement used by institutions including UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Indiana University.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150470205299

ARIZONA DAILY STAR, (Tucson, Ariz.), Sept. 23 -- Three dances for couples and an absurdist ensemble piece that turns skiing into performance art were the highlights of Tenth Street Danceworks' 11th annual -- and highly eclectic -- Fall Concert in Reid Park in Tucson. Most of the dancing was done by guest artists from Dancers in Company, the premiere dance ensemble of the University of Iowa. CHARLOTTE ADAMS, artistic director of Tenth Street, is also professor of dance at the University of Iowa and co-director of Dancers in Company. A preview of the event, which also quotes Adams, ran Sept. 15 in the ARIZONA DAILY STAR.

YAHOO! NEWS, Sept. 22 -- More than one in five U.S. athletes who took part in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, indicated a history of asthma or use of asthma medication, researchers report in the August issue of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. These figures are higher than the prevalence of asthma in the general population. The disorder is estimated to affect between 4 percent to 7 percent of Americans. Dr. JOHN M. WEILER, of the University of Iowa and a colleague report that 44 (22.4 percent) athletes at the Games reported use of an asthma medication, a diagnosis of asthma or both. Altogether, 34 (17.4 percent) were considered to have active asthma. The highest prevalence of asthma-associated responses (60.7 percent) was seen in athletes taking part in Nordic combined, cross-country and short track events. The lowest (2.8 percent) was in the bobsled, biathlon, luge and ski jumping category.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000920/hl/asthma_3.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Sept. 22 -- A story about universities' difficulties drawing minorities to their campuses says recruiters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are targeting children as young as 10 in towns with high minority populations to get them interested in college.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/09/22/national1336EDT0585.DTL

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 22 -- University of Iowa professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" is featured in the paper's Hot Type section. Bloom says the impetus for the book came from a flier he received about a slaughterhouse opened by 125 Lubavitcher Jews in Postville, Iowa, (population 1,472), 100 miles up the road from Iowa City. "Ultra-Orthodox Jews in the middle of the Iowa cornfields?" Bloom wondered. "Where pigs outnumber people 10 to 1? If I feel strange, how do they feel?" And how would the behavior of the Lubavitchers, who generally keep to themselves, go over in small-town Iowa? In any case, he says, "I was lonely. I wanted someone to kibitz with." He started driving regularly up to Postville to talk to people and decided to write a book about what he found: hostility on both sides even as the slaughterhouse revived the economy in a destitute town.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i04/04a02801.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 22 -- Students who wonder if it really matters where they attend college have another reason to be doubtful. A survey by Fortune magazine of the 40 wealthiest Americans under the age of 40 has found that while quite a few went to prestigious institutions, a surprising number attended less-notable colleges and universities, dropped out, or never even set foot on a campus. Ted Waitt, who left the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, went on to become chairman of Gateway Computers and is worth roughly $8.5-billion.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i04/04a01202.htm

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Sept. 22 -- University of Washington Medical Center Executive Director Robert H. Muilenburg, credited with taking a fledgling teaching hospital in existence for less than 20 years and turning it into a nationally rated medical center, died Wednesday of brain cancer at his Seattle home. He was 59. Born April 29, 1941, in Orange City, Iowa, Mr. Muilenburg received his master's degree in hospital and health administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He also completed his undergraduate education in business administration there. (Note: The actual article misspells Muilenburg as Mullenberg.)
http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com:80/local/obit224.shtml

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 22 -- A story about the late Robert Muilenburg, who was executive director of the University of Washington Medical Center, says he received his master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in health and hospital administration. Throughout his education, his wife, Judith, worked at restaurants, washing down tables and wiping off place mats. She paid her husband's tuition in installments of nickel-and-dime tips.
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=obit22m&date=20000922&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

THE CHRONICLE OF PHILANTHROPY, Sept. 21 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has received a gift of $1 million from John Pappajohn of Des Moines, president of Equity Dynamics, a venture-capital company, to further the work of the John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center.

MSNBC, Sept. 21 -- University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in the Heartland" is called one of the season's "brightest prospects for those who prefer their reading to be factual" and also one of the most offbeat books. "The story of a tragicomic clash of cultures is brilliantly told in 'Postville,' to be published in October." The story takes place in a stagnant rural hamlet on the rolling prairies of Iowa, where in 1987 some 200 Lubavitcher Hasids -- perhaps the most zealous of ultra-Orthodox Jews -- emigrated from Crown Heights in Brooklyn to turn an abandoned meat packing plant just outside town into a kosher slaughterhouse. "The author … not only treats both sides with respect and affection but also deftly weavs into his narrative an affecting personal story of his own search for religious identity. The whole is an often funny, frequently dismaying and wholly original take on what it means to be American."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/453235.asp?cp1=1

NBC, Sept. 21 -- George Nissen, who invented the portable trampoline while attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and helped develop trampolining into a recognized sport, was interviewed as part of the network's coverage of the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, Australia. Trampolining is being recognized as an Olympic sport for the first time this year.

FOX NEWS, Sept. 21 -- Researchers say they've found what they believe is a scientific basis for the anatomy of emotion in the brain. Despite the personal nature of emotions, it looks like they're the outcome of shifts in brain activity. "At the very least, the results underscore the close anatomical and physiological connection between emotion and homeostasis," the authors write in the October issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience. Since it is impossible to study the feelings of animal subjects, it has been hard to understand the make-up of emotion, note ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, lead author of the study, and his colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/science/092100/emotion.sml

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 21 -- Because of deletions during editing, an article on Sunday about growing resistance to mandatory overtime work omitted a reference to a new book that directed The Times to some of those interviewed. The book, a history of efforts to regulate the workweek, is "Moments Are the Elements of Profit," by Professor MARC LINDER of the University of Iowa.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/09/21/pageoneplus/corrections.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Sept. 20 -- Feelings, from joy to terror, appear to arise from distinctive measurable patterns of nerve cell activity in several specific regions of the brain, researchers reported. The preliminary findings eventually could put the study of feelings -- traditionally dismissed as too subjective or elusive for rigorous study -- on a firm physiological basis, and usher in a new era in the century-long search for the anatomy of human emotion, according to ANTONIO R. DAMASIO of the University of Iowa, who led the research. "Diseases of the emotions," Damasio said, "are one of the main reasons for human suffering. The more you know about the pathological processes that produce them, the more likely you are to come up with drugs tailored to those processes."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/head20.html
The same Washington Post article ran Sept. 20 on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/nation/docs/brain20.htm

CNN.COM, Sept. 20 -- Scientists have found new evidence that people feel emotions like sadness or anger in much the same way they feel heartburn -- by monitoring what's going on within their bodies. The idea is that an emotion triggers changes in a person's body, including the brain, and that the brain in turn monitors these changes. That monitoring produces the sensation of feeling an emotion. This general idea has been around since the 19th century, and an expanded version is presented in the 1999 book, "The Feeling of What Happens," by Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa College of Medicine. In the October issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, Damasio and colleagues present a brain-scanning study that supports it.
http://www.cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/09/20/brain.emotions.ap/index.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 20 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/09/20/national0711EDT0528.DTL

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Sept. 20 -- A story about universities' difficulties drawing minorities to their campuses says recruiters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA are targeting children as young as 10 in towns with high minority populations to get them interested in college.

BALTIMORE SUN, Sept. 20 -- An editorial about the late judge Joseph C. Howard says that in the days of sometimes violent civil rights protests Howard chose to make "a constructive difference within the system." At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for instance, the editorial says Howard "quit the football team when his coach refused to apologize for using a racial epithet."
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150470205202

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 20 -- Scientists have found new evidence that people feel emotions like sadness or anger in much the same way they feel heartburn -- by monitoring what's going on within their bodies. The idea is that an emotion triggers changes in a person's body, including the brain, and that the brain in turn monitors these changes. That monitoring produces the sensation of feeling an emotion. This general idea has been around since the 19th century, and an expanded version is presented in the 1999 book, "The Feeling of What Happens," by Dr. ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa College of Medicine. In the October issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, Damasio and colleagues present a brain-scanning study that supports it.
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Sept. 20 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE:

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 20 -- Feelings, from joy to terror, appear to arise from distinctive measurable patterns of nerve cell activity in several specific regions of the brain, researchers reported. The preliminary findings eventually could put the study of feelings -- traditionally dismissed as too subjective or elusive for rigorous study -- on a firm physiological basis, and usher in a new era in the century-long search for the anatomy of human emotion, according to ANTONIO R. DAMASIO of the University of Iowa, who led the research. "Diseases of the emotions," Damasio said, "are one of the main reasons for human suffering. The more you know about the pathological processes that produce them, the more likely you are to come up with drugs tailored to those processes."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A36796-2000Sep19.html
This story also appeared in the Sept. 20 LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL-STAR:
http://www.journalstar.com/nation?story_id=1566&date=20000920&past=
This story also appeared in the Sept. 20 SEATTLE TIMES:
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/search?source=search&skip=0&maxReturn=10&section=*&period=weekly&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22&searchType=date

WASHINGTON POST, Sept. 19 -- While the U.S. Supreme Court nears a decision on whether to take up the Microsoft antitrust case, a debate is stirring among court watchers, scholars and lawyers who are in strong disagreement over how many justices it will take to decide whether to hear the expedited appeal. "Virtually every type of review the court makes today to take cases requires four votes," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor. "This debate exists because the expediting act doesn't say how many votes it takes."

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Sept. 18 -- A U.N. refugee worker was killed in a raid Sunday in West Africa, officials said. Mensah Kpognon, 50, of Togo, was slain at his home by unknown gunmen in the southeastern Guinea town of Macenta, near the border with Liberia, the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said. It was unclear what led to the attack that killed Kpognon, who studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1984-85.
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 18 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 18 on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/262/nation/Refugee_worker_is_slain_in_Guinea+.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 18 on the Web site of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION.
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 18 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/09/18/international0004EDT0400.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 18 in the OTTAWA CITIZEN ONLINE.
http://www.southam.com/ottawacitizen/newsnow/cpfs/world/000917/w091741.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 17 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/w-af/2000/sep/17/091800468.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 17 on ABCNEWS.COM.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/world/DailyNews/UNWorkerKilled000917.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 17 on the Web site of the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM.
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:POLITICS15/1:POLITICS150917100.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Sept. 18 -- A story about alcohol-related deaths involving fraternities says that last week the Iowa Supreme Court forced parents suing the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA over one such case to drop the school as a target of its lawsuit.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/09/18/text/p4s1.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 17 -- A story about photographer Wayne Miller, whose most recent collection is titled "Chicago's South Side, 1946-1948," says a recurring theme that runs though the lush black-and-white images in the book is the sense of connection the newly arrived residents -- many of them African-Americans from the South -- have to the traditions of the rural Southern life they had left behind. "There is a feeling of authenticity in the way he (Miller) caught these people giving themselves to their ritual moments," says JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist and professor of literature at the University of Iowa. "For instance, look at the woman sweeping down the steps. That's a Southern custom, a daily ritual. When you are sweeping down the steps, you're supposed to be warding off bad spirits. The Greeks had a similar superstition about doorways."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/tribunemagazine/article/0,2669,SAV-0009170484,FF.html

THE ECONOMIST, Sept. 16 -- A story about the future of immigration in Iowa says that JOHN PAPPAJOHN left his native Greece as a baby, worked in his father's grocery and attended the University of Iowa. After college, he launched his own insurance company and then became a venture capitalist, concentrating on medical-service start-ups. He has donated several million dollars for an ENTREPRENEURIAL CENTER AT THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where students can learn from real businesspeople. The same story mentions Tupar Mirchiandani, a 25-year-old son of Indian immigrants who set up his own Internet company, disabilitycity.com, for the physically handicapped. He credits Iowans for providing start-up capital for his business and his education at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS, Sept. 16 -- A stock market that lets investors bet on political candidates saw an oh-so-slight uptick in wagering on Rick Lazio's Senate dreams following Wednesday night's debate. Still, investors playing the online IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET remain bullish on Hillary Rodham Clinton's prospects. Before the debate, Lazio's stock sold for 42.1 cents -- meaning investors were betting there was a 42.1 percent chance of him winning the race. His stock hit 44.2 cents after the debate, then settled to 43.9 cents Thursday. Clinton's stock sagged to 55.8 cents from a predebate 56.2 cents. University of Iowa Professor FORREST NELSON called the price changes insignificant, reflecting a view that the debate had little impact on the race.
http://www.nydailynews.com/2000-09-16/News_and_Views/Beyond_the_City/a-80292.asp

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 16 -- A story about reclusive artist Henry Darger, who was obsessed with little girls as subjects of his paintings and writings, says his status really soared in 1997, when the Museum of American Folk Art in New York mounted a show put together at the University of Iowa by STEPHEN PROKOPOFF.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 15 -- A story about John R. Locke, University of Arkansas English professor shot to death by a graduate student last month, says he had earned a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Virginia and master's degrees in both creative writing and comparative literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. But he didn't earn his Ph.D. in English from Iowa until six years after landing at Arkansas.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i03/03a01401.htm

LAS VEGAS (Nev.) SUN, Sept. 13 -- University of Nevada-Las Vegas President Carol Harter announced a new partnership Tuesday with casino-giant Mandalay Resort Group to establish a post-graduate creative writing program with a $2 million endowed chair. Wole Soyinka, Nigerian dramatist, poet and essayist, who earlier this year helped designate Las Vegas as an international asylum for oppressed writers, has agreed to serve as the program's first chairman. Glenn Schaeffer, president of Mandalay Resort Group and a 1976 graduate of the prestigious IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, said that a highly regarded liberal arts program is at the core of the reputation of almost every eminent university. While Soyinka was hesitant to agree that his name and the new program would vault UNLV into the company of such writing programs as those at the University of Iowa and Stanford University, he also didn't agree that the program had bloomed from a cultural vacuum.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/lv-ed/2000/sep/13/510760941.html

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, Sept. 12 --Composer Brett Dean, whose 17-minute musical treatise against TV games shows, titled "Game Over," was to be performed by the Australian Chamber Orchestra and New York-based ensemble Bang on a Can All Stars at the Opera House Concert Hall, is featured. The story says "Game Over" was commissioned jointly by the Olympic Arts Festival and the HANCHER AUDITORIUM in Iowa, funded through the US National Endowment of the Arts. The work received its world premiere by the ACO on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in April.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/0009/12/features/features7.html

CNN/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED ONLINE, Sept. 12 -- Amid all the speculation and phone calls, Iowa athletic director BOB BOWLSBY said he never had any doubt about STEVE ALFORD's future as the Hawkeyes' basketball coach. Alford, a former Indiana star starting his second year at Iowa, held a news conference Tuesday to put the rumors to rest: he has not been contacted by the Hoosiers to replace Bob Knight, nor does he want to be. "It's September 12, this is the last time I'm going to talk about it," Alford said. "I'm not going to talk about something that's not going to happen."
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/basketball/college/news/2000/09/12/alford_indiana_ap/

MTV.COM, Sept. 12 -- After announcing their partnership weeks ago, Wyclef Jean, De La Soul, and Black Eyed Peas have hammered out the first stretch of dates for the latest edition of MTV's Campus Invasion tour. After years of rock-heavy Campus Invasion outings, this hip-hop-flavored take on the annual college tour will first touch down on October 3 in Providence, Rhode Island, on the campus of Johnson & Wales University, with more dates lined up through the end of October, including a show Oct. 25 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.mtv.com:80/sendme.tin?page=/news/headlines/000912/story6.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 12 -- In a story about cocktail servers and other women who have complained of physical injury caused by high heels, UI labor law professor MARC LINDER says that the courts haven't been much help for these women. Linder, who has studied the issue, said the best legal argument that can be made, is that forcing women to wear high heels as part of their job is sex discrimination, "because nothing remotely similar is required of men that would injure their health." But the law that addresses sex discrimination in the workplace--Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964--is too ambiguous, he said. The closest a server in high heels has come to prevailing in such a lawsuit occurred in Las Vegas, Linder said. The Rio was sued in 1995 by a female server for establishing a dress code unique to cocktail waitresses that created "an abusive work environment" to which male employees were not subjected, according to federal court documents. The case was settled out of court, and the cocktail waitress, Karla Kwist, was prohibited from speaking about it.

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, Sept. 12 -- The Australian Chamber Orchestra (ACO) and New York-based ensemble Bang on a Can All Stars are performing "Game Over" by composer Brett Dean at the Opera House Concert Hall this week. "Game Over," a 17-minute musical treatise against game shows, Game Over, was commissioned jointly by the Olympic Arts Festival and the HANCHER AUDITORIUM, funded through the US National Endowment of the Arts. The work received its world premiere by the ACO on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in April.
http://www.smh.com.au:80/news/0009/12/text/features7.html

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, Sept. 11 -- A review of John McNally's short-story collection "Troublemakers" says the book was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and that it is this year's winner of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S JOHN SIMMONS SHORT FICTION AWARD.

BUSINESS WEEK, Sept. 11 -- A brief story about the efforts to map the genes of pseudomonas aeruginosa -- a bacterium that can be deadly to immuno-compromised patients, including those with cystic fibrosis or AIDS -- quotes E. PETER GREENBERG, a microbiologist at the University of Iowa. Under the right conditions, Greenberg says, the germ synthesizes special pump proteins to siphon off lethal antibiotics. Find molecules that block these pumps and you might have a new therapy, he says.

USA TODAY, Sept. 11 -- Officials at Iowa State University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Northern Iowa are proposing the largest tuition increase in a decade. The proposed 7.2 percent increase will be debated this week by the board of regents. A vote will come in October.

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 11 -- A National Archives project to build a new set of cases to protect the original United States Constitution and other key national documents is underway. As part of the project, these documents will rest on pieces of pure cellulose paper specially made at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The "Charters of Freedom" documents are the original parchment sheets on which are written the Declaration of Independence, the four pages of the United States Constitution and its first 10 amendments, known as the Bill of Rights. George Washington's transmittal letter for the Constitution will also be re-encased in one of the new enclosures.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/09/12/science/12CONS.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 11 -- The Iowa Supreme Court ruled last week that the parents of a student who died after drinking heavily at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA fraternity house can pursue a suit against the fraternity member who was serving as his "big brother." But the court also ruled that the parents cannot sue the fraternity itself or another student whom the parents considered responsible. The parents of Matthew Garofalo, a pledge of Lambda Chi Alpha who died at that fraternity's chapter house on September 8, 1995, had filed a wrongful death suit against the fraternity, its University of Iowa chapter, and four members. The fraternity chapter at the University of Iowa was closed in1995. Alcohol was banned from fraternity houses on the campus in 1999, although fraternities had already volunteered to go dry in 1998.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2000/09/2000091103n.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 10 -- Megan Elise McFarlane, a Wheaton, Ill. Native and sophomore at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the author of a first-person story about her mother's high school graduate gift to her, a memory quilt. "This wasn't even something you'd find in a store, though Nordstrom's would have been proud to offer it in their catalog. This was a handmade work of art, sewn together not only with thread but also love, time and memories. It was the gift from a mother to her daughter, a memory quilt," McFarlane writes.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0009100046,FF.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Sept. 9 -- The Constitution Party may not have the biggest vote-getters in this year's U.S. Senate primaries, but it's guaranteed to have the tallest. David Swan, the party's endorsed candidate, is 6 feet 7, while his opponent in the primary, Derek Schramm, is 6-8. Having achieved major-party status and full ballot access in Minnesota after the 1998 election, the Constitution Party hangs its hat on God, Christian values and a minimalist federal government that adheres only to mandates specifically outlined in the Constitution. Swan is a journalism graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who after several years in small-town newspaper advertising spent 12 years organizing Christian activities, counseling and leadership training at colleges.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=CAND09&date=09-Sep-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

THESTREET.COM, Sept. 8 -- According to this article by a portfolio manager, the best polls to watch aren't the mainstream media's brand-name surveys, such as Gallup and Harris. The best polling data, in realtime on the Internet and completely free, comes from the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, an online futures market run by the business school of the University of Iowa.
http://www.thestreet.com/comment/openbook/1068536.html

USA TODAY, Sept. 8 -- The State Supreme Court upheld a lower court ruling that said a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA fraternity and one of its former members are not responsible for the alcohol-related death of a pledge in 1995. But the court said the pledge's parents can continue pursuing their wrongful death suit against another member of Lambda Chi Alpha. Matthew Garofalo, 19, passed out and died at a party at the fraternity house.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 8 -- The California Gold Rush has been hailed by a historian of the period as the most significant event of the first half of the 19th century. One culmination of the rush was the admittance of California as the 31st state of the Union on Sept. 9, 1850 -- 150 years ago Saturday. The Gold Rush was about leaving home to seek wealth and adventure. As the University of Iowa's MALCOLM J. ROHRBOUGH -- the historian cited above -- wrote in "Days of Gold," "The search for gold in California became the ultimate example of economic democracy: Anyone with a pick, pan and shovel could participate . . . regardless of wealth, social standing, education or family name."

USA TODAY, Sept. 7 -- The paper corrected a news item it ran Tuesday about the Roland Holden family's $25 million gift to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for cancer research. The paper misspelled the name of Holden, who died of leukemia at age 80 in 1995.

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 7 -- A listing of Webchats mentions that AmericasDoctor.com will host a chat at 10 a.m. Monday featuring Dr. MARK DYKEN, a neurologist and director of the Sleep Disorders Center at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Sept. 6 -- Reproductive health care professionals need to develop better strategies to reduce pregnancy-related deaths among African-American women, according to a study led by a researcher at the University of Iowa College of Public Health. The results were published in the Sept. 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology. According to AUDREY SAFTLAS, Ph.D., UI associate professor of epidemiology and the study's lead author, the study was designed to determine whether the fourfold increased risk of pregnancy-related deaths for black women compared to white women in the United States can be explained by racial differences in sociodemographic and reproductive factors.

SUN-SENTINEL, (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), Sept. 5 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa and author of the new book "Postville: a Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," contributed an article to the paper speculating about the kind of reception Democratic vice presidential candidate Joseph Lieberman -- who is Jewish -- might receive in the Midwest. He uses his own experiences as a springboard. "Will the people of America between the ethnic coasts put aside their preconceived notions of Jews and city slickers? Can they?" Bloom writes. "We've had our share of uncomfortable incidents, but my sense is that they stem not from anti-Semitism but from the insulated nature of the heartland." The column originally appeared in the Los Angeles Times.

USA TODAY, Sept. 5 -- An eastern Iowa family has donated $25 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for cancer research. The gift comes from the family of Rolland Holden, who died of leukemia at age 80 in 1995. Holder founded a corn seed research and genetics company in 1937 in Williamsburg. The gift is the largest ever received for university health-care programs and the second-largest for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA FOUNDATION.

LE MONDE (Paris, France) Sept. 5 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's involvement in the solution of the nug30 problem was mentioned in an article that appeared in France's largest-circulated newspaper.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 4 -- Traffic accidents around Wisconsin over the Labor Day weekend claimed the lives of six people and injured eight, officials said. A two-vehicle collision on U.S. Highway 18 a mile south of Prairie du Chien about 12:15 p.m. Saturday killed three people and injured three others. Authorities said Eric Bohringer, 23, of Bagley, apparently lost control of his car and collided nearly head-on with another car. Bohringer and his passenger, Josiah Bohringer, 16, also of Bagley, were pronounced dead at the scene. Charlotte Jaeger, 75, of Kenosha, a passenger in the other car, also was pronounced dead at the scene. The three injured were Ann Trewartha, 74, Margaret Miller, 61, and Lola Radcliffe, 80, all from Hazel Green. Trewartha and Miller were in stable condition at Prairie Du Chien Memorial Hospital, a spokeswoman said Monday afternoon. Radcliffe was in serious condition Saturday at UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City. A spokesperson at the hospital was unable to immediately give her condition Monday afternoon.

THE (Portland) OREGONIAN, Sept. 3 -- A story on the ability in English of foreign graduate students, and complaints by students taught by them, says that this year, foreign students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA filed a grievance with administrators, complaining that they were being discriminated against based on their national origin and that American graduate students were exempt from the testing.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 3 -- A story about Charles Beck, an artist who produces woodcuts, says that after World War II he studied at Concordia College in Moorhead and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, earning a master's degree in fine arts. He returned to Fergus Falls and "eked out a living" by painting signs and teaching at the community college.

NEW YORK POST, Sept. 3 -- The on-line IOWA POLITICAL FUTURES MARKET -- which lets voters bet their hunches and has a good track record -- yesterday predicted Democrat Al Gore will get 49.3 percent of the vote and Republican George W. Bush 48.8 in the November presidential election.
http://www.nypost.com/news/37203.htm

LIBRARY JOURNAL, Sept. 1 -- The publication reviews University of Iowa professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." "Part cultural history, part search for identity, this book makes for a balanced, interesting and insightful reading," the review says.

PRESS & SUN-BULLETIN, (Binghamton, N.Y.), Sept. 1 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was ranked 20th among the top 25 national public universities in U.S. News & World Report's annual college rankings. The UI's position was included in a list that accompanied a story saying that Binghamton University has dropped out of the top 25 national public universities. The UI tied for 20th with Ohio State University-Columbus, Purdue University-West Lafayette and the University of Georgia.

LINGUA FRANCA, September 2000 -- MALCOLM ROHRBOUGH, professor of history at the University of Iowa and author of "Days of Gold: The Californian Gold Rush and the American Nation," is one of seven historians asked by the magazine to recommend books about the American West. Rohrbough suggests Walter Nugent's "Into the West: The Story of its People," and Linda Gordon's "The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction," a "fascinating account of an incident in a remote Western mining town at the turn of the century."

MEN'S HEALTH, September 2000 -- In the future, asthma inhalers may deliver fake bacterial DNA. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA theorize that giving asthma sufferers a DNA snort will essentially trick their airways into opening.

MEN'S HEALTH, September 2000 -- JOEL KLINE, M.D., a professor of medicine at the University of Iowa, says that coughing up blood can be a sign of cancer or tuberculosis. That's especially true when the cough is accompanied by the chills, fever, weight loss or night sweats.

FINN WRITES ABOUT UI (Limerick Leader Online, September 2000)
Irish playwright and Limerick Leader columnist Mike Finn writes about Iowa City and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where Finn is a writer-in-residence in the INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM. The online edition of the Limerick Leader is a weekly selection of items from the print editions of the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle newspapers, which cover the mid-West of Ireland.
http://www.limerickpost.ie/searchresults.elive?year=2000&month=9&db=36.db&sku=19&keyword=Mike%20Finn

 

 

 

 

 

 

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