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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Sept. 15, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

SHIVAPRAKASH READS SEPT. 24 -- Poet H.S. Shivaprakash, a participant in the University of Iowa International Writing Program, will read from his work at 5 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 24 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading is free and open to the public.

Shivaprakash, from Bangalore, India, is the author of four books of poems in the Kannada language. He also wrote eight plays that were staged and published, two books on literary and theatre criticism and two books of poetry translations. He has taught English in several colleges in Karnataka and is currently English editor for Indian Literature at the Sahitya Akademi in New Delhi.

The productions of several of his plays have received national recognition in India. He has been actively involved in workshops for young playwrights and poetry translation, and his lectures on Indian theater have taken him to Berlin, Cambridge and the Nehru Centre in London.

His most recent works include the play "Shakespeare’s Dream Ship," anthologized in "Same-Sex Love in India." His participation in the IWP is supported by the UI.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Over the years, nearly a thousand writers from more than 115 countries have completed residencies in the program.

This year, the IWP, under new director Christopher Merrill, is hosting 19 writers from 17 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

Jacinda Townsend, a fiction writer in the UI Writers’ Workshop, will also read from her work.

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LIGHTMAN READS SEPT. 26 -- Scientist Alan Lightman, author of "Einstein’s Dreams," will read from his new novel "The Diagnosis" at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 26, at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Annie Proulx wrote, "The Diagnosis is packed with dark power and awful humor. Lightman’s intelligence, imagination and clarity of style mark him as one of the most brilliant contemporary American writers."

Norman Mailer said of "The Diagnosis," "I know of no novel that captures the technological horror and pervasive spiritual poverty of our wildly prosperous land in so powerful a way. . . It is haunting."

Lightman’s previous books also include "Good Benito" and "Dance for Two." He is a professor of humanities and a lecturer in physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Boston.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series‚ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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UI INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM PANEL DISCUSSION SEPT. 27 -- Four participants in the University of Iowa International Writing Program -- Heng Siok Tian of Singapore, Pascal Adyeeri Mugarra of Uganda, Viktoriya Fomina of Russia and Yves-Emmanuel Dogbe of Togo -- will participate in a free panel discussion entitled "Writing in a Non-Native Language" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 27 in the John C. Gerber Lounge, Room 304 of the UI English/Philosophy Building.

Heng Siok Tian, a poet from Singapore, is a media services specialist with the educational technology division of Singapore’s Ministry of Education and teaches English and literature at a leading junior college. She is the author of the poetry collections "My City, My Canvas" and "Crossing the Chopsticks and Other Poems." Her work has appeared in major anthologies of the region, including "New Voices in Southeast Asia" and Cambridge University’s "The Calling of the Kindred." She is the recipient of awards for poetry and short story competitions at the National University of Singapore, and a scholarship for advanced studies from the Ministry of Education. With Anuar Othman, she is a recipient of the Iowa Fellowship awarded by the Singapore National Arts Council.

Pascal Adyeeri Mugarra, a fiction writer and playwright from Uganda, is head of the French department at the Kitante Hill School in Kampala, where he teaches English and French. His first novel, "Cherished Dreams," was published by Macmillan, and he is at work on a second novel, "Prominent Figures." His work is notable for its control of language, its humor and its instinct for dealing with social issues and mores in a manner appealing to Ugandans and other readers in the Great Lakes region of Africa. Two of his plays, written in French, have been performed in Uganda, Burundi, and France. His participation in the IWP is supported by he U.S. Department of State.

Viktoriya Anatolyevna Fomina, a fiction writer from Russia, is considered a rising talent in Moscow literary circles. Her recently published collection of short stories was nominated for one of the "Anti-Booker" awards in 1999 and received critical acclaim. Her stories have received awards in two Internet literary competitions, have been translated into Italian and German and are included in a recent German anthology of the best prose by young Russian writers. Her readings on the radio programs "Liberty" and "Resonance" are popular with Russian audiences. Her work has appeared frequently in prestigious Russian journals. The U.S. Department of State is supporting her participation in the IWP.

Yves-Emmanuel Dogbe, a novelist from Togo, is director of Edition Akpagnon in Lome, and previously served as consultant for the UNESCO in Paris and as professor of sociology at Togo’s Ecole National d’Administration and at the University of Benin. He is the author of 30 books, including the novels "La Victime" and "Le Miroir." After a hiatus due to political problems, Dogbe established a publishing operation, Edition Akagnon, which helps to promote the works of young writers. He is taking part in the IWP through a grant from the U.S. Department of State.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Over the years, nearly a thousand writers from more than 115 countries have completed residencies in the program.

This year, the IWP, under new director Christopher Merrill, is hosting 19 writers from 17 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

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POWELL READS SEPT. 27 -- Poet Doug Powell, a University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop graduate, will read from his new collection "Lunch" at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 27 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is co-sponsored by the UI Writers’ Workshop.

"Tea," Powell’s first book, was a series of small poems that charted a life changed by HIV.It was hailed by Forrest Gander as "formally innovative, disjunctive but tender and always emotionally expressive."

Publishers Weekly called "Tea" "a fine debut. . . Powell’s discoed-out flippancy and attuned formalism are like the kiss of life to that age-old pair of sleeping beauties, sex and death . . . The poems record a fractured existence, full of foreboding desire and disappearance."

Powell has received awards from the Academy of American Poets and the James Michener Foundation. He has taught at University of San Francisco and San Francisco State University.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series‚ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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O’CONNOR READS SEPT. 28 -- Des Moines native Patricia O’Connor, a Grinnell College graduate and a former editor of the New York Times Book Review, will read from "Words Fail Me: What Everyone Who Writes Should Know About Writing" at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

A critic for the New York Times wrote, "The practical and tough-minded O’Connor uses her playful sense of humor to help us swallow with a laugh the rules that schoolmarms once forced down students’ throats." Booklist called "Words Fail Me" a "fun-to-use answer to Strunk and White."

O’Connor was an editor at the New York Times Book Review when she wrote the best-selling "Woe is I."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series‚ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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UNIVERSITY THEATRES GALLERY PRODUCTION SEPT. 28-OCT. 1 -- The University Theatres Gallery series will present "The Secret Rain" by Iowa Playwrights Workshop graduate student Robert Alexander Wray at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, Sept. 28-30, and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 1 in Theatre B of the University of Iowa Theatre Building.

Wray’s play tells the story of a young boy whose loneliness and imagination send him on a quest for love, provoking an obsession with movie star Audrey Hepburn. Along the way, Wray explores how far a family will go in order to transcend the wounds of loss and past heartbreak.

"If any part of you lingers in the realm of fairytales and the romance of long-ago movie stars," Wray asserts, "this play is for you."

The production features direction by William Barbour, set and lighting design by Luke Olson and costume design by Kara Hotchkiss.

Admission will be $5 ($3 for UI students, senior citizens and youth) at the door. Tickets will go on sale one hour before performance time. The production includes cigarette smoking.

The University Theatres Gallery series is a showcase for new plays by student playwrights and small-scale productions by student directors.

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SCAVENGER HUNT AT THE UI MUSEUM OF ART SEPT. 29 -- The University of Iowa Museum of Art will be the location of a scavenger hunt at 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 29. The scavenger hunt, which will be free of charge, is part of a series of public events being held at the museum on Friday evenings through the fall semester.

The scavenger hunt, which is designed for all ages, will take place inside the museum. It will require various types of observation of, and interaction with, the works of art. Participants will be divided into teams and will compete for the grand prize: Four tickets to the Halloween showing of the 1931 film of "Dracula," starring Bela Lugosi, with live music by Philip Glass and the Kronos Quartet. "Dracula: The Music and Film" will be shown and performed at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 31 in the UI Hancher Auditorium.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for events at the UI Museum of Art during the 2000-2001 season, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to
9 p.m. Fridays during the fall semester. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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PERELMAN READS SEPT. 30 -- Poet Bob Perelman, a former faculty member of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from his work at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 30 in Shambaugh Auditorium of the University of Iowa Main Library. The reading, sponsored by the Writers’ Workshop, is free and open to the public.

Perelman recently published his first volume of selected poems, "Ten to One: Selected Poems," which includes work from all of his previously published collections.

Poet and critic John Ashbery wrote, "Most poets define poetry by creating it. Bob Perelman creates it by defining it, and is thus one step ahead of all the poets under the sun, one step closer to colliding with Zeno’s vanishing point, to merging coyote with road runner, to winning the hand."

In response to Perelman’s "Virtual Reality" (1993), Marjorie Perloff wrote, "In a series of stunning and various poems, Bob Perelman provides us with the story of our everyday lives. This is poetry as social text, a lyric at once deeply personal and yet directed outward, as a form of political critique."

Perelman is associate professor of English at the University of Pennsylvania. His other volumes of poetry include "Face Value" (1988) and "Primer" (1981). He has also published critical works, including "The Marginalization of Poetry" (1996) and "The Trouble with Genius: Reading Pound, Joyce, Stein, and Zukofsky" (1994).