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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
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Iowa City IA 52242
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e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Oct. 27, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

DOGBE READS NOV. 5 -- Two participants in the University of Iowa International Writing Program (IWP) -- fiction writer Yves-Emmanuel Dogbe from Togo and poet Hwang JiWoo from Korea will read from their work at 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 5 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading will also feature poet Sarah McCann, a student in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

The event is the final reading in a series featuring fall-2000 IWP participants.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Founded in 1967, the program has played host to nearly a thousand writers from 115 countries.

This year, under new director Christopher Merrill, the IWP is hosting 18 writers from 15 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

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SPERBER READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 6 -- Indiana University professor Murray Sperber, best known for his criticism of former Indiana basketball coach Bob Knight, will read from his new book, "Beer and Circus: How Big-Time College Sports Is Crippling Undergraduate Education," at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 6, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Sperber is chairman of the National Alliance for Collegiate Athletic Reform, an intercollegiate faculty committee advocating reform in athletic policy. A professor of English and American Studies, his previous books include "College Sports, Inc.," "Onward to Victory" and "Shake Down the Thunder: The Creation of Notre Dame Football."

ESPN Magazine’s Allen Barra has called Sperber "the conscience of American sports." Chicago Sun-Times columnist Rick Telander says, "Don’t mess with Sperber -- his research is imposing, his insights dead on, his logic impeccable."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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KEITH READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 7 -- Poet Sally Keith, a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from her collection "Design" at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

"Design," Keith’s first book, won this year’s Colorado Prize for Poetry. Her poems have appeared in numerous journals, including American Letters and Commentary, Colorado Review, Field, Quarterly West and Ohio Review.

Carolyn Forché says "Design" is "an exemplary debut." Allen Grossman says, "This is poetry of a very high order."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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CHAD AND ELIZABETH ONESS READ ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 8 -- Poet Chad Oness and fiction writer Elizabeth Oness, will read from their work at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 8, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Elizabeth Oness will read from her debut collection of stories "Articles of Faith," which won the 2000 Iowa Short Fiction Award.

Chris Offutt, a visiting professor in the UI Writers’ Workshop, says, "Elizabeth Oness has written a terrific collection of stories. In simple spare language she gives us the lushness of lives lived in precarious times."

Chad Oness plans to read from his poetry collection "Water Becomes Bone." Oness’s book is full of "fine wit and striking imagery," according to Maurya Simon.

Chad and Elizabeth Oness are professors of English at the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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ALLEN READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 9 -- Dwight Allen, a graduate of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from his first novel, "The Green Suit," at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 9, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Allen’s stories have been published in the Georgia Review, the Missouri Review, Shenandoah and "New Stories from the South." He has contributed nonfiction to the New Yorker and Wigwag.

T..Coraghessan Boyle says, "I can’t recall a first book of fiction that more precisely captures a time and place since Padgett Powell’s ‘Edisto.’"

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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LOCAL ROCK BAND AT MUSEUM NOV. 10 -- The Iowa City-based rock band 24:7 will perform at the University of Iowa Museum of Art at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10. Their performance is part of a series of public events being held at the museum on Friday evenings through the fall semester. It will be free and open to the public.

24:7 is a rock band that performs original Christian praise music. The group has performed at student worship services, on the downtown pedestrian mall in Iowa City and on parade floats. The past summer, a tour included performances for participants in RAGBRAI.

The group has been performing together for about a year.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for events at the UI Museum of Art during the 2000-2001 season, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays during the fall semester. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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SIMPSON READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 10 -- Mona Simpson, author of the much-praised "Anywhere But Here," will read from her new novel "Off Keck Road" at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Simpson is the author of three previous novels: "A Regular Guy," "The Lost Father" and the acclaimed "Anywhere But Here." She was named one of Granta’s Best Young American Novelists and has won the Whiting Writer’s Award, a Guggenheim grant and the Hodder Fellowship at Princeton University. Since 1988 she has taught at Bard College.

In a New York Times review Michiko Kakutani wrote, "‘Off Keck Road’ showcases the gifts of emotional sympathy and psychological observation that Ms. Simpson used to such enormous effect in ‘Anywhere But Here’ and ‘The Lost Father.’"

LeAnne Schreiber says Simpson is "both a novelist and a poet, and her talents are prodigious."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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WOMEN’S CHORALE SINGS NOV. 10 -- The Women’s Chorale from the University of Iowa School of Music will present "Around the World in Sixty Minutes," a concert featuring music from many different countries and cultures, at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 10. The concert, under the direction of UI doctoral student Robert G. Boer, will be free and open to the public.

Members of the chorale and other students in the UI School of Music will perform as soloists in the concert.

The program will include settings of folk songs from several different countries, in some cases accompanied by folk instruments. For example, the concert will open with the French Canadian folk song "Reel a Bouche," with hammered dulcimer and bodhran -- a single-headed frame drum native to Irish and Celtic music. It will be followed by a Quebec folk song that will use piano and spoons in the accompaniment.

Other folk songs on the program will be the Appalachian songs "He’s Gone Away" and "Barbara Allen," from "Three Mountain Ballads" by Ron Nelson; an arrangement of the familiar Mexican folk song "La Cucaracha’: and an arrangement of a Serbian folk song to end the concert.

Between the folk songs, other compositions from around the world will be performed: selections from "Winter Cantata" by 20th-century American composer Vincent Persichetti; "Te Quiero," a political song by Argentinean composer Alberto Favero, in a version for chorus by fellow Argentinean Lilliana Cangiano; "The Muse" and "The Stove" by Zae Munn; and "Vier Gesaenge fuer Frauenchor" (Four songs for women’s choir) by Johannes Brahms.

Choir members Maria Wilson, Jessica Radke, Phaedra Gay, Anne Cherry and Elizabeth Dierickx will appear as soloists during the concert.

Instrumental soloists will include percussionist Tim Shaw, playing bodhran, spoons and marimba; flutist Lauren Panfili; pianist Michael Porter; horn player Will Wiegard; and pianist Sarah Libert.

Boer is a doctoral student in choral conducting. A native of Simcoe, Ontario, Canada, he received his bachelor’s degree from Redeemer College in Ancaster, Ontario, and a Master of Music degree from Drake University in Des Moines. He is in his second year of the program at the UI, studying with Prof. Timothy Stalter.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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‘BACH AT BERLIN’ CONCERT NOV. 12 -- Baroque flutist Mary Oleskiewicz and harpsichordist David Schulenberg will present "Bach at Berlin," a concert featuring music composed for the court of King Frederick the Great of Prussia, at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 12, in the Old Capitol Senate Chamber on the University of Iowa campus.

The concert, which is presented jointly by the UI School of Music and the Iowa City Early Keyboard Society, will be free and open to the public.

The featured work on the program will be one of J.S. Bach’s last and most compelling works, the Trio Sonata from the "Musical Offering." A unique collection of pieces dedicated to King Frederick the Great of Prussia, the "Musical Offering" was composed in 1747, shortly after Bach made a visit to the Prussian court, during which the King himself played for Bach the royal theme on which each movement of the work is based.

Originally composed for flute, violin and basso continuo, the Trio Sonata will be performed as a duet for flute and harpsichord, following a common 18th-century practice.

Also on the program are flute sonatas by two musicians at King Frederick’s court, the great flutist Johann Joachim Quantz and Bach’s son Carl Philipp Emanuel, the royal Prussian harpsichordist. An extraordinary pre-Romantic flute sonata by the little-known German composer Jacob Friedrich Kleinknecht will also be performed, as will be J.S. Bach's D-major Toccata for solo harpsichord.

Oleskiewicz and Schulenberg have been performing together since 1997. They will soon have a CD recording of flute sonatas by J.J. Quantz issued on the Naxos label.

Oleskiewicz is a musical scholar as well as an internationally known performer on the Baroque flute, and a teacher of historical and modern woodwind instruments. Her performance at the 1997 Boston Early Music Festival was described in Early Music Review as "ravishing," and she was a prizewinner in the National Flute Association's 1998 Baroque Flute Artist competition. Recent performance credits include the Great Performers Series at Lincoln Center, the 1999 Boston Early Music Festival and the Library of Congress.

She is now on the faculty of the University of South Dakota (USD) and curator of musical instruments at America’s Shrine to Music Museum, an internationally recognized collection of historical musical instruments on the USD campus in Vermillion.

Schulenberg is an authority on the music of the Bach family, and an internationally recognized performer on harpsichord and other early keyboard instruments. Author of "The Keyboard Music of J.S. Bach" and "The Instrumental Music of C.P.E. Bach," as well as numerous articles and reviews, he has served on the faculties of Columbia University and the University of North Carolina, and he is currently teaching at the University of Notre Dame.

His textbook and anthology "Music of the Baroque" will be published in 2001 by Oxford University Press. Recent performance credits include solo recitals for the American Bach Project, the Berkeley Music Sources series and the International Bach Harpsichord Festival in Montreal, as well as concerts and lecture-demonstrations at the Library of Congress, the Boston Early Music Festival and the Great Performers at Lincoln Center series.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/.

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JAPANESE KOTOS AT UI MUSEUM OF ART NOV. 12 -- The Augustana Koto Ensemble from Augustana College in Rock Island, Ill., will perform music from Japan at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 12, in the University of Iowa Museum of Art. Admission to the museum and the performance will be free.

The performance is presented in conjunction with two current exhibitions at the museum that present work by Japanese artists: "Kenzo Okada" and "Sharing Traditions: Quilts from Yamanashi." It will take place in the museum’s Elliot Gallery, where the Okada paintings are on display.

The koto is a 13-string Japanese zither, approximately 6 feet long and 13 inches wide, with a convex upper board and a movable bridge under each string. The strings were originally made of silk, but now they are usually made of a synthetic material. The body of the instrument is made of paulownia, a soft, light-colored wood. Although paulownia wood is not indigenous to the United States, it is now grown in southern parts of the country.

The koto is plucked by three tsume (plectra) attached to the thumb and first two fingers of the right hand. The left hand is used to alter the pitch by pressing the string on the left side of the bridge, creating a characteristic raise in the pitch. Other sound effects are also created by using the left hand to bend the pitch.

The Augustana Koto Ensemble is directed by Anne Prescott, a faculty member at Augustana College. It is made up of students who are taking koto lessons through the Augustana College music department. The ensemble plays three concerts on campus each year, tours during spring break and makes other invited off-campus appearances.

The performance at the Museum of Art will feature Prescott and five Augustana students. The program will consist mostly of 20th-century Japanese folk songs, including a flute and koto duet titled "Spring Sea," the best known 20th-century piece for koto. It became very popular in Europe in the 1930s and is still the most popular and recognizable koto song in Japan today.

Koto lessons have been offered at Augustana since 1983. The Koto Ensemble gave its first public concert in the spring of 1984. The ensemble performed in Tokyo in the fall of 1986 and at the Kyoto International Music Festival, Kyoto, Japan in 1987. Since 1987 the Ensemble has toured each spring, playing at colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Prescott was appointed director of the Augustana Koto Ensemble in 1997. She first studied the koto with Jesse Evans at Cornell College in Mt. Vernon, Ia., and in 1982 she toured Japan with the Cornell College Koto Ensemble. In 1990 she received a scholarship from the Japanese Ministry of Education to study koto in the traditional music department at Tokyo Geijutsu Daigaku (Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music).

She studied koto for six years with Masateru Ando, one of the top koto performers. While in Japan Prescott was a member of the Kiso Kai and Group Aya (performing ensembles), and she appeared in many concerts, including a performance for the Empress of Japan.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for events at the UI Museum of Art during the 2000-2001 season, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays during the fall semester. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/uima on the World Wide Web. You can learn more about the Augustana Koto Ensemble at their web page, http://www.augustana.edu/academ/music/Koto/index.htm.

Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.