The University of Iowa
The University of Iowa News Services Home News Releases UI in the News Subscribe to UI News Contact Us

 

CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Oct. 20, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

NOTE TO EDITORS: The following note about the reading by Vietnamese fiction writer
Vo Thi Hao and Burmese novelist Nu Nu Yee, is identical, except for dates, to a note that we sent last week. Due to scheduling conflicts, readers in the International Writing Program switched dates between Oct. 22 and Oct. 29. Therefore, the following note is correct and unfortunately the note we sent last week on the Oct. 22 reading is no longer accurate. We apologize for the confusion.

YEE AND HAO READ OCT. 29 -- Vietnamese fiction writer Vo Thi Hao and Burmese novelist
Nu Nu Yee, both participants in the University of Iowa International Writing Program, will read from their work at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 29 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading will also feature poet David Rosenthal, a student in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Hao, the Hanoi bureau chief of the HCMC Women’s Newspaper, is the author of the short story collections "The Sea-Savior from Idleness," "Selected Collection of Short Stories" and
"Held-Back Laughter." She has also written "The Owl’s Sleep," a collection of short stories for young adults, and "Green Goddess," a collection for children. Hao’s "Selected Collection of Short Stories" earned her the Vietnam Writers’ Union’s Five-Year Hanoi Literary Award. Hao’s stories have been translated into Japanese, French and English. Her participation in the IWP is supported by the U.S. Department of State.

Yee has written more than a dozen novels and four collections of short fiction. Her first novel, "A Timid ‘What Can I Do for You,’" is a study of market vendors in Upper Burma, and her subsequent works have explored the lives of women, children and urban and industrial workers in Myanmar. Her 1993 novel "Emerald Green Blue Kamayut," which depicts the urban poor, received Myanmar’s National Literary Award. Yee’s work has been translated into Japanese and English. She is taking part in the IWP through a grant from the Burma Project of the Open Society Institute. She writes under the name Nu Nu Yiy Inwa.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Founded in 1967, the program has played host to nearly a thousand writers from 115 countries.

This year, under new director Christopher Merrill, the IWP is hosting 18 writers from 15 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

(PRONUNCIATION GUIDE FOR BROADCASTERS: Vo Thi Hao is pronounced voh tee how. Nu Nu Yee is pronounced noo noo yee)

* * *

SOUEIF READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ OCT. 31 -- Egyptian novelist Ahdaf Soueif, author of the novel "The Map of Love," reads from her work at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 31 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Soueif is the author of the fiction collections "Aisha" and "Sandpiper and Other Stories" as well as the novel "In the Eye of the Sun." "A Map of Love" was a finalist for the 1999 Booker Prize. Soueif’s essays have appeared in Cosmopolitan, Granta, The London Magazine, The London Review of Books, New Society, The Sunday Telegraph and a number of well-known Egyptian journals. She divides her time between Cairo and London.

Critic Edward Said says Soueif is "one of the most extraordinary chroniclers of sexual politics now writing." In a recent review of "A Map of Love" in the New York Times, Annette Kobak called the novel "a wonderfully accomplished and mature work of fiction."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu.

* * *

BELL READS NOV. 2 -- Novelist Madison Smartt Bell, a former instructor in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, reads from his new novel "Master of the Crossroads" at 8 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 2 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Bell is the author of two collections of short fiction and10 novels, including "The Washington Square Ensemble," "The Year of Silence" and "Soldier’s Joy," which received the Lillian Smith Award in 1989. Bell’s eighth novel, "All Souls’ Rising," won the 1996 Anisfield-Wolf Award and was a finalist for the 1995 National Book Award and the 1996 PEN/Faulkner Award. "All Soul’s Rising" and "Master of the Crossroads" are the first two novels in a trilogy about the Haitian revolution.

Harold Bloom has called Bell "as remarkable a historical novelist as we have in this country. Robert Stone says "All Souls’ Rising" is "a major work, a triumph of both storytelling and of inspired historical analysis."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu.

* * *

WILLIAMS READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ NOV. 3 -- Joy Williams, a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from her recently published novel "The Quick and the Dead" at
8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 3, at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Williams is the author of three other novels: the National Book Award-nominated "State of Grace," "The Changeling" and "Breaking and Entering." She has also written two collections of short stories. Williams’ stories, essays and articles have appeared in Esquire, the Paris Review and The New Yorker. Her creative nonfiction has appeared in many writing anthologies. Williams has received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. She has taught in a number of creative writing programs, including the UI Writers’ Workshop.

Of "The Quick and the Dead" Don DeLillo says, "Joy Williams has produced a hard, sharp, comic novel about the off-kilter genius of adolescence -- and a work of maverick insight and rash and beautiful bursts of language." Mary Flanagan says Williams’ writing is "not just rooted in real life, but really alive."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu.