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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Oct. 6, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

FOMINA READS OCT. 15 -- Russian fiction writer Viktoriya Anatolyevna Fomina, a participant in the University of Iowa International Writing Program, will read from her work at 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 15 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading will also feature poet Aaron McCollough, a student in the Iowa Writers’ Workshop.

Fomina is considered an emerging talent in Moscow literary circles. Her recently published collection of short stories received critical acclaim and was nominated for an "Anti-Booker" award in 1999. Fomina’s stories have earned awards in two Internet literary competitions, have been translated into Italian and German, and are included in a recent German anthology of the best prose by young Russian writers. Her work has appeared in well-known Russian journals, including Znamya, Druzhba Narodov, Vremya 1 My and Strelets. Her readings on the radio programs "Liberty" and "Resonance" are very popular in Russia.

Fomina was educated at the Moscow Literary University and the Moscow Art Theater School. She is a member of the Union of Writers of Moscow. The U.S. Department of State is supporting her participation in the IWP.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Founded in 1967, the program has played host to nearly a thousand writers from 115 countries.

This year, under new director Christopher Merrill, the IWP is hosting 18 writers from 15 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

(PRONUNCIATION GUIDE FOR BROADCASTERS: Viktoriya Anatolyevna Fomina’s surname is pronounced FOH-mee-nah.)

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GREG BROWN READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ OCT. 16 -- Singer/songwriter Greg Brown, an Iowa City fixture for decades and a recent Grammy Award nominee, will read from his first collection of short fiction, "Watsonville Sonata," at 8 p.m. Monday, Oct. 16 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Critics have long praised Brown’s lyrics for their story-telling power. Rolling Stone called Brown "A wickedly sharp observer of the human condition," and a New York Times review observed, "Mr. Brown has a knowing way with everyday details." With "Watsonville Sonata," Brown employs these narrative skills in prose.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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MIXED CHAMBER ENSEMBLE GUEST CONCERT OCT. 17 -- The Cimarron Ensemble, a mixed chamber group comprising flute, violin, cello and piano, will present a free guest recital on the University of Iowa campus, at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17 in Clapp Recital Hall.

The Cimarron Ensemble consists of four young members of the Oklahoma State University faculty: flutist Jonathan Keeble, violinist Katie Wolfe, cellist Lawrence Stomberg and pianist Thomas Lanners. The ensemble has been playing together since 1998.

The Cimarron Ensemble’s eclectic instrumentation allows it to perform popular works by historical composers including Beethoven, Chopin and Prokofiev, as well as new works by living composers. In addition to their active performance schedule as an ensemble, the members of the ensemble maintain individual careers as performers and teachers.

The Oct. 17 concert at the UI features six works:

-- Passacaglia by George Frideric Handel, arranged for violin and cello;
-- Frederic Chopin’s Ballade No. 4 for solo piano, op. 52;
--"The Jet Whistle" for flute and cello by Heitor Villa-Lobos;
-- Sergei Prokofiev’s Sonata for violin solo, op. 115;
--"Masks" for solo flute by Oliver Knussen; and
-- Variations on ‘Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu" (I am the tailor Kakadu) for piano trio by Ludwig van Beethoven.

Jonathan Keeble has appeared on solo and chamber recitals throughout North and South America, Europe and Asia. He has performed concertos with the Tulsa Philharmonic, the Ecuadorian National Symphony Orchestra, and the wind ensembles at Columbus State University and Oklahoma State University. As a soloist, and as a member of the Chicago based Prairie Winds, he has appeared on concert series around the United States, at the prestigious Ravinia Festival and on WFMT's Fine Arts Radio Network in Chicago. He spends his summers teaching and performing at Wisconsin’s Birch Creek Music Center and Oregon’s Britt Festival.

Currently a member of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic, Katherine Wolfe has served as concertmaster of the Tanglewood Music Center Orchestra. She has received a Fulbright Lecture Award to work in Bolivia, where she was the assistant concertmaster of the National Symphony and a professor at the National Conservatory, and performed numerous public and educational concerts. She has performed in Spain, the Netherlands, Chile, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Malaysia, Korea, Japan and the former Soviet Union. While on the faculty of Hofstra University in New York she performed regularly with the Philharmonia Virtuosi, the Westchester Symphony Orchestra, City Island Baroque Ensemble, Jupiter Symphony and the Manhattan Chamber Orchestra.

Thomas Lanners, was a member of the first graduate student Piano Trio-in-Residence at the Eastman School of Music and was a frequent guest artist on the Chamber Music Society of Ohio concert series while a faculty member at the University of Akron. Lanners adjudicated at the Eastman International Piano Competition for High School Students in July 2000 and has done so at many other Music Teachers Association competitions. In 1998 he recorded a compact disc of solo piano music entitled "Aspects of Romanticism," and his article "Teaching by Example" appeared in the May/June 1999 issue of Clavier magazine.

Lawrence Stomberg has performed as soloist and chamber musician at numerous music festivals, including the Tanglewood Music Center, Sarasota Music Festival, Texas Music Festival, Kneisel Hall Festival, the Banff Centre for the Arts and, most recently, as cello faculty at the Eastern Music Festival. He performs frequently in the Midwest, with recent concerto and chamber music appearances in Illinois, Missouri, Iowa and Oklahoma, and he is a member of the Tulsa Philharmonic. In October of 1999, he made his New York recital debut at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Recital Hall, and his solo recording debut, a CD entitled "The American Cello," is scheduled for release in December.

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BURNARD READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ OCT. 17 -- Canadian author Bonnie Burnard will read from her Giller Prize-winning novel, "A Good House," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 17, in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

The novel, which was a 1999 bestseller in Canada, has recently been published in the United States. Burnard’s narrative focuses on three generations of a Southern Ontario family in the decades after World War II.

A review in BookBrowser commented, "The story line is low keyed, but very insightful into the desires, motives, and even the ‘protective’ lies that provide the audience with a full look (so deep readers will feel voyeuristic) into the heart and soul of the lead cast … Bonnie Burnard writes an intriguing tale that shows when discerning ‘voyeurism’ can be entertaining, realistic and perceptive."

Burnard’s "Casino & Other Stories" won the Saskatchewan Best Book Award and was shortlisted for the Giller Prize. Her first story collection, "Women of Influence," won the Commonwealth Best Book Award. She is also the recipient of the Marian Engel Award, and for two years was on the Giller Prize jury panel.

Burnard’s work has been widely anthologized and dramatized on CBC Radio. She has been a guest lecturer at writing and literary conferences in South Africa, Sweden, Germany and England, and she has taught writing at the University of Western Ontario.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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UI INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM PANEL DISCUSSION OCT. 18 -- Six residents in the University of Iowa International Writing Program -- Abubakar Gimba and Ogaga Ifowodo of Nigeria, Viktoriya Anatolyevna Fomina of Russia, Hwang Jaewoo of Korea, Anuar Othman of Singapore and Nu Nu Yee of Burma -- will take part in a free panel discussion titled "Literature and Politics" at 3 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 18 in the John C. Gerber Lounge, Room 304 of the UI English/Philosophy Building.

Gimba is the national president of the Association of Nigerian Authors and chairman of the Concern Foundation and Savannah Publications Ltd. He is the author of several novels, including "Witness to Tears," "Trail of Sacrifice," "Innocent Victims," "Sunset for a Mandarin" and "Golden Apples." Gimba previously served as executive director of the Union Bank of Nigeria and as permanent secretary in Nigeria’s Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning. He holds a master’s degree in economics from the University of Cincinnati. He is taking part in the IWP on a grant from the U.S. Department of State.

Ifowodo is project director of the Civil Liberties Organization in Lagos and a practicing attorney. His publications include "Homeland and Other Poems," "Selected Poems" and numerous articles, including the Annual Human Rights Report of the Civil Liberties Organization. He was educated at the University of Benin and the Nigerian Law School. Ifowodo is a member of the Nigerian Bar Association and the Association of Nigerian Authors. The U.S. Department of State is supporting his participation in the IWP.

Fomina is considered an emerging talent in Moscow literary circles. Her recently published collection of short stories received critical acclaim and was nominated for an "Anti-Booker" award in 1999. Fomina’s stories have earned awards in two Internet literary competitions, have been translated into Italian and German, and are included in a recent German anthology of the best prose by young Russian writers. Her work has appeared frequently in well-known Russian literary journals and her readings on the radio programs "Liberty" and "Resonance" are very popular in Russia. Fomina was educated at the Moscow Literary University and the Moscow Art Theater School. She is a member of the Union of Writers of Moscow. The U.S. Department of State is supporting her participation in the IWP.

Hwang Jaewoo writes under the pen name Hwang JiWoo. He is professor and chair of the Department of Playwriting at the Korean National University of Arts. In the 1980s he led a new wave of deconstructionist poetry, which was part of the new "rhetoric of resistance" in Korean literature. His subsequent work is described as embodying a native spirit, with its Korean Zen Buddhist traditions interwoven with paradox, vitality and wit. He is the author of six collections of Poetry, including "Even the Birds Leave the Land," "A Lotus in the Crab’s Eye" and "I’ll Sit Alone in a Darkened Pub," and four plays, including "A Diary on the Fat Sofa," "Thirty Days in Prison" and "Brida May." Hwang was educated at Seoul National University. His education was interrupted by a forced enlistment in the army following his imprisonment for protesting the Korean military dictatorship. His work has received numerous national awards, including the Contemporary Literature Prize of 1991 and the DaeSan Foundation Prize in 1999. He is participating in the IWP through joint support from the Korean Culture and Arts Foundation and the UI.

Othman is the author of two short story collections and a selection of short fiction, poetry and essays. A fourth compilation of short fiction is forthcoming this year, along with his first novel. He received Singapore’s Golden Point Award twice, and his work has also received recognition in Singapore’s National Short Story Writing Competition. His stories have been translated into Chinese and English and anthologized in those languages.

Yee made her literary debut in 1984 with the short story "A Little Sarong" and has gone on to write more than a dozen novels and four collections of short fiction. Her first novel, "A Timid ‘What Can I Do for You,’" is a study of market vendors in Upper Burma, and her subsequent works have explored the lives of women, children, and urban and industrial workers in Myanmar. Her 1993 novel "Emerald Green Blue Kamayut," which depicts the urban poor, received Myanmar’s National Literary Award. Yee conducts lecture tours all over Myanmar. Her works have been translated into Japanese and English. She holds degrees from the University of Mandalay and the University of Yangon. She is taking part in the IWP through a grant from the Burma Project of the Open Society Institute. She writes under the name Nu Nu Yiy Inwa.

A unique residency program, the IWP brings established writers of the world to the UI, where they become part of the lively literary community on campus. Founded in 1967, the program has played host to nearly a thousand writers from 115 countries.

This year, under new director Christopher Merrill, the IWP is hosting 18 writers from 15 countries. To learn more about the IWP, visit the program’s site on the World Wide Web: http://www.uiowa.edu/~iwp.

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MORI READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ OCT. 19 -- Kyoko Mori, author of the acclaimed "Shizuko’s Daughter," will read from her new novel, "Stone Field, True Arrow," at 8 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, in the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Mori is the author of two young-adult novels, "Shizuko’s Daughter" and "One Bird"; "Fallout," a collection of poetry; the memoir "The Dream of Water"; and "Polite Lies," a collection of essays. "Stone Field, True Arrow" is her first adult novel.

Born in Kobe, Japan, Mori settled in Wisconsin at the age of 16. She received her bachelor’s degree from Rockford College and master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee. She is currently the Briggs-Copeland Lecturer in creative writing at Harvard University.

The New York Times Book Review calls "Shizuko’s Daughter," Mori’s first novel, "a jewel of a book, one of those rarities that shine out only a few times in a generation." Kirkus Reviews described "The Dream of Water" as "a poetic and emotionally charged account . . . this beautifully written voyage . . . is a trip well worth taking."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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YAU READS AT UI OCT. 20 -- Poet John Yau will read from his work at 8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20, in Room 101, Becker Communication Studies Building on the University of Iowa campus. The reading, which is co-sponsored by the Writers’ Workshop and the UI School of Art and Art History, is free and open to the public.

Yau has published books of poetry, fiction and criticism. His collections of poetry include "Forbidden Entries" and "Edificio Sayonara." His books of criticism include "In the Realm of Appearances: The Art of Andy Warhol" and "The United States of Jasper Johns." Yau also served as editor of "Fetish," an anthology of fiction. He has received awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York Foundation for the Arts, General Electric Foundation and the Academy of American Poets.

MultiCultural Review calls Yau "the most important Chinese-American poet of our time." Edward Foster says, "His ethnic background marks him as an outsider in America, but he is not interested in merely recording the terms of that exclusion. His work examines ways in which language has long been used, quite often subtly, to oppress and exclude."

For more information about the reading, call the Writers’ Workshop at 335-0416. For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT OCT. 22 -- The University of Iowa Chamber Orchestra will present a free public concert, directed by UI doctoral conducting student Lucia Matos, at 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 22, in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The orchestra will perform three works: the Overture to "La gazza ladra" (The thieving magpie) by Gioacchino Rossini; the Ninth Variation, "Nimrod," from Edward Elgar’s "Enigma Variations"; and the Symphony No.95 in C minor by Joseph Haydn.

Rossini was the most important and celebrated Italian composer in the first half of the 19th century. His operas swept across Europe in the 1810s and ‘20s, captivating audiences in virtually every country. His music was marked by wit, brilliant orchestral colors, a distinctive rhythmic drive and, above all, a highly individual use of dynamics which he appears to have invented, with his famous, cleverly orchestrated crescendos.

All of these qualities are evident in Rossini’s overtures, which have long been popular orchestral concert openers. The overture to "La Gazza Ladra," one of Rossini’s most popular, is particularly famous for opening with two drum rolls, an unheard-of innovation at the time.

Elgar’s best known and most popular piece, the "Enigma Variations" of 1899, consists of an original theme and 14 variations, each of which was conceived as a musical portrait of one of the composer’s friends. Since the subjects were only identified by initials or nicknames, his friends had the fun of guessing who each one portrayed.

Variation 9, labeled "Nimrod," is frequently played by itself. A lengthy, slow crescendo leading to a powerful climax, it refers to a conversation between Elgar and his friend Arthur Jaeger. The composer explained, "It is a record of a long summer evening talk when my friend Jaeger grew nobly eloquent . . . on the grandeur of Beethoven and especially of his slow movements."

Haydn’s Symphony 95 was composed for the first of the composer’s two concert tours to London in the years 1791-95. Haydn himself conducted the first performance at the Hanover-Square Concert rooms in London, probably on April 29, 1791. It is the only one of Haydn’s 12 symphonies written for the London tours that is in a minor key.

The trips to London occurred near the end of Haydn’s long and productive life, after his retirement from his job as a court musician to the Esterhazy family of Hungary and Austria. The concert promoter Johann Peter Salomon arranged for the two tours, which capped Haydn’s international fame. The toast of London, Haydn was celebrated as composer, performer and dinner guest during his visits.

Conceived on a grand scale, the symphonies Haydn brought with him on each visit were designed to display the pinnacle of his skill as a composer. Indeed, Haydn knew his audience well, and the 12 symphonies composed for London have remained in the orchestral repertoire ever since, making them the earliest symphonies to have a continuous place in concert programs from the time of their composition.