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November 2000

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TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, November/December 2000 -- For diabetics keeping tabs on their blood sugar level, life is punctuated with painful needle sticks. A study by chemists Gary Small of Ohio University and MARK ARNOLD of the University of Iowa gives the promise of the first noninvasive test. The researchers shined infrared light onto the tongues of volunteers and measured how much came out the other side of this blood-rich appendage, noting a correlation between blood glucose level and the amount of the infrared light absorbed. Developing a practical home instrument is next. Small says a $500 monitor the size of a portable CD player that targets the ear lobe could be available in three to five years.
http://www.techreview.com:80/articles/nov00/prototype.htm

TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, November/December 2000 -- By way of comparison, a story about the debate over whether cell phones can cause brain cancer says that over the years, a dozen studies have failed to show that household levels of radon increase cancer risk. "When the 13th was published claiming the opposite, the newspaper headlines read: UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Study Says Radon Greater Risk Than Thought Before,' the story says. "The Iowa scientists, of course, said they simply used better techniques than their predecessors. They may be right, but the odds are against them."
http://www.techreview.com:80/articles/nov00/taubes.htm

SPOKANE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Nov. 30 -- A story about author Robert Ellis Gordon says that he grew up in Boston, attended Harvard on a partial scholarship and proceeded to the "prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP" before taking up the writer's life in Seattle.
http://www.spokesmanreview.com:80/news-story.asp?date=113000&ID=s886482

DESERET NEWS, Utah, Nov. 30 -- In too many powerhouse university sports programs, coaches and players told a Washington panel Tuesday, the academic goal is not to earn a degree but to stay eligible to play. Joseph Whitt, a former Auburn University wide receiver, says he practiced football four hours a day during college and never had a meaningful conversation with anyone about his studies. Panel members, many of them college presidents, also lamented the public pressure to win and produce future athletic stars. "We shouldn't be in the business of being a farm team for the NFL," said Iowa University (sic) president MARY SUE COLEMAN, who asked Whitt, one of several witnesses, whether he ever sat down with someone at Auburn to chart his academic career. "Have you ever had a conversation about your hopes and dreams, about what you want in life?" she asked. "No," he told her.
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,230012066,00.html?

> CNN.COM, Nov. 30 -- A story announcing that the American Institute of Architects honored Herbert Lewis Kruse Blunck Architecture of Des Moines Thursday with its highest award -- for doing "a common thing uncommonly well" and influencing the quality of architecture in the Midwest -- includes a photo of one of the firm's projects, the Newton Road parking and chilled-water facility at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.cnn.com/2000/STYLE/design/11/30/aia.firm.award/index.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 30 -- Each emotion generates a unique pattern in the brain. ANTONIO DAMASIO at the University of Iowa has identified distinctive, measurable patterns in PET scans of nerve cell activity that appear during each emotional state, including areas not normally associated with feelings. "The pattern can be triggered automatically," Damasio said. "It occurs by the design of our biology."
http://www.latimes.com:80/news/state/20001130/t000114864.html

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Nov. 29 -- University of Iowa Health Care researchers are advancing their study of the use of helminthic therapy -- using specially prepared worm eggs -- to treat patients diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disorders that don't respond to standard treatments. "We are very pleased with the way our research is progressing," said JOEL WEINSTOCK, M.D., UI professor of internal medicine and director of the Digestive Diseases Center at the UI Hospitals and Clinics. ROBERT SUMMERS, M.D., UI professor of internal medicine, organized a clinical study to determine if a helminthic parasite could be given safely to patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/News/wires.nsf/StateRegion/89A42B186486B356862569A6005E88E8?OpenDocument

ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, Nov. 29 -- Wisconsin has joined eight other states and the federal government in paying for an $800,000 feasibility study of a system that would use satellite technology to record every mile driven by someone, who in turn would be taxed based on that figure. Such a system could lower gas prices, eliminate toll booths and allow businesses to build and run highways, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, one of the researchers leading the 2 1/2-year study. People are using GPS (Geographic Positioning System) units now to find their way through unfamiliar cities. But the devices could be modified to collect tax data as well, said Forkenbrock, the director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Nov. 29 -- A listing of alternative music events in the San Francisco area says that on Dec. 6-7, Greg Brown -- one of the scribbling and storytelling musicians who hang around the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP scene -- will make an appearance at St. John's Presbyterian Church. Brown's book, "The Watsonville Sonata," is "full of scrappy fragments of stories to go with his offbeat, finely wrought tunes."
http://www.sfgate.com/cgibin/article.cgi?file=/gate/archive/2000/11/29/kim.DTL

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 28 -- Reuters Health reports that nearly half of all school nurses make mistakes when administrating medication to children, results of a survey suggest. The most common error was missing a dose, but other mistakes included giving a double dose, giving students the wrong medication and administering medication without authorization, according to a report published in the November issue of the Journal of School Health. "Part of the reason more children in schools are taking medication is the improved care and survival of children with significant health problems and the inclusion of these children in the schools," said lead study author Dr. ANN MARIE MCCARTHY of the University of Iowa. "I think the major implication of having children in the schools who require medications during the day is the need for more nurses in the schools," she added.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001128/hl/medicine_students_1.html

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Nov. 27 -- Though the issue of bathroom access is virtually unknown in the white-collar world, it can be a flash point in factories, telephone calling centers, food-processing plants, construction sites, even schoolrooms. When MARC LINDER, a labor historian at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, surveyed a group of grade-school teachers in that state, more than half said they were pinned down in their classrooms for hours at a stretch, unable to relieve themselves. Most coped by avoiding coffee and water, but a few routinely wore sanitary pads to work and "11 percent of elementary schoolteachers brought all the children with them to the bathroom when they were unable to hold it any longer," Linder said.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/business/docs/bathroom27.htm

ARIZONA DAILY STAR, (Tucson, Ariz.), Nov. 27 -- Wisconsin has joined eight other states and the federal government in paying for an $800,000 feasibility study of a system that would use satellite technology to record every mile driven by someone, who in turn would be taxed based on that figure. Such a system could lower gas prices, eliminate toll booths and allow businesses to build and run highways, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, one of the researchers leading the 2 1/2-year study. People are using GPS (Geographic Positioning System) units now to find their way through unfamiliar cities. But the devices could be modified to collect tax data as well, said Forkenbrock, the director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.
The same Scripps-Howard article ran Nov. 23 on the Web site of the BRADENTON HERALD (Manatee County, Fla.)
http://www.bhip.com/news/23f5.htm

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Nov. 24 -- Former Sacramento Bee political reporter STEPHEN G. BLOOM spent exactly 71 turbulent days in early 1992 as press secretary for newly elected San Francisco Mayor Frank Jordan's blunder-ridden administration. He was dismissed from the job, chief of staff Hadley Roff told The Chronicle on March 24 of that year, because of his inexperience and a "lack of chemistry" between him and the mayor. Not to be outdone, Bloom turned around and blasted the mayor in a 2,500-word San Francisco Examiner front-page piece on May 17. Within a year, Bloom and his family moved to Iowa City, where Bloom accepted a job as an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa. Out of the transition came Bloom's new book, "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America." The first-person narrative delineates parallels between Bloom's sense of post-move dislocation and the antagonism that arose when a group of Lubavitcher Hasidim from Brooklyn settled in a small, rural Iowa town full of German Lutherans.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/11/24/WB22598.DTL

ROCKY MOUTAIN NEWS, (Colo.), Nov. 24 -- Ralph Eugene Ellsworth, a former director of the University of Colorado Libraries who was considered the father of modern academic libraries, died Nov. 12 in Laramie, Wyo. He was 93. Ellsworth championed the concept of modular libraries; centralized cataloging; and innovation in college, university and school library planning. His expertise was sought for library planning and building projects worldwide. In 1943, Ellsworth accepted the directorship of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARY, but later returned to Boulder.
http://insidedenver.com:80/obituaries/1124ellsw.shtml

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 22 -- When MARC LINDER, a labor historian at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, surveyed a group of grade-school teachers in that state, more than half said they were pinned down in their classrooms for hours at a stretch, unable to relieve themselves. Most coped by avoiding coffee and water, but a few routinely wore sanitary pads to work and "11 percent of elementary schoolteachers brought all the children with them to the bathroom when they were unable to hold it any longer," Linder said.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 22 -- Though the issue of bathroom access is virtually unknown in the white-collar world, it can be a flash point in factories, telephone calling centers, food-processing plants, construction sites, even schoolrooms. When MARC LINDER, a labor historian at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, surveyed a group of grade-school teachers in that state, more than half said they were pinned down in their classrooms for hours at a stretch, unable to relieve themselves. Most coped by avoiding coffee and water, but a few routinely wore sanitary pads to work and "11 percent of elementary schoolteachers brought all the children with them to the bathroom when they were unable to hold it any longer," Mr. Linder said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/22/business/22BATH.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 21 -- Judith Daykin, president of New York's City Center -- the domed complex of theaters, rehearsal rooms and offices that was home to "Your Show of Shows" in the 1950s -- discovered a closet full of scripts from the show and has taken efforts to preserve them. Daykin studied the 1950s extensively in preparing "Encores! Great American Musicals in Concert," the critically acclaimed revivals she has produced at City Center since 1994. She grew up in Princeton, Ill., trained as an actress at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and performed in shows across the country. For eight years until 1974, she was a manager at the Paul Taylor Dance Company.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/21/nyregion/21PROF.html

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 21 -- Prolonged postpartum depression creates a strain on the mother's relationship with her new baby, spouse, the baby's older siblings, friends and co-workers. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied the effects of psychotherapy on 99 postpartum women with major depression. These women were predominantly white, well-educated and in stable marital relationships. The researchers randomly assigned the women either to 12 weeks of psychotherapy or to a waiting list for psychotherapy. About 40 percent of the women who received psychotherapy recovered from their depression by the end of the 12 weeks, compared to only about 14 percent of those on the waiting list.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A47119-2000Nov21.html

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER, Nov. 20 -- The recent sale of The Daily Nonpareil in Council Bluffs, Iowa, was unusual in a few ways. One aspect of the Oct. 31 deal that raised eyebrows in the journalism community was the paper's partial purchase by the Iowa West Foundation, which is indirectly funded by casino gambling. "Anytime you have a business relationship with someone, there are going to be questions about the coverage," said GILBERT CRANBERG, journalism professor emeritus at the University of Iowa.
http://www.mediainfo.com:80/ephome/news/newshtm/stories/112000n10.htm

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Nov. 20 -- Tooth decay remains prevalent among the very old, according to university researchers in a study of Iowans 79 years or older. The study appears in the November 2000 issue of The Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA). "This study of the oldest elderly population found that coronal and root caries (tooth decay above and below the gum line) remain prevalent,'' said lead author JOHN J. WARREN, D.D.S., M.S., assistant professor in the College of Dentistry at the University of Iowa. Utilization of dental services among elderly people traditionally has been reported to be very low, mostly because there have been relatively few people in that age group who have retained natural teeth, the authors reported.

USA TODAY, Nov. 20 -- Derfa Lu, a pre-doctoral fellow at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is quoted in a story asking whether citizens are willing to await the outcome of the presidential election. Lu, who voted for Democrat Al Gore, says: "I want it to be fair; I'm patient." A photo of Lu and her daughter, Luan Heywood, also ran in the printed version of the paper.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/vote2000/pres81.htm

THE AGE, (Australia), Nov. 20 -- A drug that prevents schizophrenia is between five and 25 years away, according to a visiting international expert on the mental illness. NANCY ANDREASEN, who discovered the relationship between manic-depressive illness and creativity, said a preventative treatment for schizophrenia was likely once scientists fully understood the molecular mechanisms behind the disease. "Twenty-five years ago most people thought psychiatric disease was caused by bad parenting," said Andreasen, who holds the chair in psychiatry at the University of Iowa. Andreasen, the Kearney visiting professor at Melbourne's Mental Health Research Institute, has spent 25 years researching mental illness, particularly schizophrenia -- a disease that affects 1 percent of the population.
http://www.theage.com.au/news/20001120/A62378-2000Nov19.html

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Nov. 19 -- A story that asks which presidential candidate in history made the best concession speech quotes KEN CMIEL, a University of Iowa historian who studies political speech. Cmiel said the best concession speech was probably Richard M. Nixon's when he lost to John F. Kennedy in 1960 after another agonizingly close election. Actually, the story says, Nixon didn't quite concede. He went on television about 3 a.m. and said that if the trends continued, then Kennedy would be the next president. "I have great faith about the future of the country," Nixon said. "I have great faith that our people -- Republicans and Democrats alike -- will unite behind our next president in seeing that America . . . does meet the challenge which destiny has placed on us." Cmiel said: "He just hit absolutely right on the mark."
http://web.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2000/11/19/front_page/CONCEDE19.htm

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, Nov. 18 -- Wisconsin has joined eight other states and the federal government in paying for an $800,000 feasibility study of a system that would use satellite technology to record every mile driven by someone, who in turn would be taxed based on that figure. Such a system could lower gas prices, eliminate toll booths and allow businesses to build and run highways, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, one of the researchers leading the 2 1/2-year study. People are using GPS units now to find their way through unfamiliar cities. But the devices could be modified to collect tax data as well, said Forkenbrock, the director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/news/state/nov00/drive19111800a.asp

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, Nov. 17 -- On Thursday, Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush's campaign chairman Don Evans said in a statement that anyone interested in fair play would agree that the Florida results announced Saturday after overseas absentee ballots are counted should be the last word in the election. University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER, who has been watching the process since the Iowa caucuses, called the comment a PR move. "And I think their partisans will applaud them and those on the other side will see it for what it is," said Miller, who believes neither side is winning the public relations war. "Each side has basically accepted the arguments of their partisans, and nobody is budging. And an increasing number of Americans each day are probably getting tired of the whole thing and tuning it out."

USA TODAY, Nov. 17 -- It could be spring before the University of Iowa's driving simulator is ready to be taken for a spin. The NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS) was a multi-million dollar project the university got in 1992 to study and improve driver safety. It was expected to be completed in 1996, but computer glitches have slowed completion, officials said.

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Nov. 17 -- On Thursday, Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush's campaign chairman Don Evans said in a statement that anyone interested in fair play would agree that the Florida results announced Saturday after overseas absentee ballots are counted should be the last word in the election. University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER, who has been watching the process since the Iowa caucuses, called the comment a PR move. "And I think their partisans will applaud them and those on the other side will see it for what it is," said Miller, who believes neither side is winning the public relations war. "Each side has basically accepted the arguments of their partisans, and nobody is budging. And an increasing number of Americans each day are probably getting tired of the whole thing and tuning it out."
http://www.austin360.com/statesman/editions/today/news_1.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov. 17 -- A dated profile of the paper's staff writer, Tom King, says he joined the paper's New York news bureau in 1986 after graduating that year from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He now writes Hollywood Journal, a column about the entertainment business that appears every Friday in Weekend Journal.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB974389563868454130.djm

SALON, Nov. 16 -- A story suggests that the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) failed to predict the presidential election morass. "As Bush and Gore quibble over who will claim the presidency, the Iowa Electronic Markets seem to mimic the confusion, delivering two contradictory results," the article says. "Iowa's winner-take-all market pegged (Republican George W.) Bush as the clear winner, with confidence in a Bush win soaring in the days before the election. But on Election Day, the market swung wildly and finally flipped to favor (Democratic Vice President Al) Gore. The ambivalence held: Even as late as Nov. 10, the day the market closed, Gore futures were selling for 96.9 cents, not the full dollar they should have cost, given the payout. The vote-share market was more stable, but closed at an anomalous pricing of 49.1 cents for Bush and 48.1 cents for Gore.
http://www.salon.com/tech/feature/2000/11/16/election_prediction/index.html

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Nov. 16 -- If a person's immune system successfully fights off an infection, not only does that person recover, but they also acquire immunity against re-infection by that same pathogen. The ability of the immune system to remember pathogens it has already defeated, and to respond rapidly and effectively to them during future exposures, is the basis of vaccination strategies. University of Iowa researchers, led by JOHN HARTY, Ph.D., associate professor of microbiology, are making progress in understanding how these complicated aspects of the immune response are controlled. The UI team has found that two molecules, perforin and interferon gamma, already known to participate in the fight against infections, are also responsible for regulating the size and nature of both the initial immune response and the residual protective immunity. The research findings were published in the Nov. 17 issue of the journal Science. The lead author, VLADIMIR P. BADOVINAC, Ph.D., and co-author AMY R. TVINNEREIM, Ph.D., are both postdoctoral fellows in Harty's lab.

THE GUARDIAN, United Kingdom, Nov. 15 -- A special report on institutions that have applied for nine patents covering 38 genes on the human eye mentions Patent No. WO 9921996, held by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FUND. The story says patent, applied for Oct. 26, 1998 and still pending, is for Gene Pitx3, a gene that is deleted in an eye disorder known as Peter's Anomaly and is useful in diagnosis and treatment.

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 15 -- For women who experience major depression after having a baby, psychotherapy can help, according to results of a study. Symptoms of postpartum depression include low mood and problems with appetite, sleep and energy that last for more than a few weeks, according to Dr. MICHAEL W. O'HARA, of the University of Iowa. Postpartum depression usually occurs within six months of giving birth, but symptoms may begin during pregnancy, O'Hara and his colleagues note in a report published in the November issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001115/hl/depression_8.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 15 -- Vice President Al Gore maintained a razor-thin lead in the Midwest battleground states of Iowa and Wisconsin, where election officials certified vote tallies on Tuesday. Republicans, however, kept alive the prospect of a recount there and in two Western states, scripting a backup strategy if Florida's 25 electoral votes slip away from Texas Gov. George W. Bush. ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said he didn't expect the Bush campaign to request recounts across the country. "The way the numbers are actually working out, it looks like recounting doesn't benefit Bush," Miller said.
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-0011150202,00.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Nov. 15 -- Transportation officials in Minnesota and other states are considering a new kind of tax based on how motorists use the system. Gas excise taxes would give way to Global Positioning System satellites and on-board navigational technology that would track commuters' travel and charge them accordingly. With the ability to track travel, agencies then could create pricing incentives to encourage people to drive at off-peak hours or use different routes when congestion is bad. "You have control. That's what's so neat about this thing," said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa. Forkenbrock is studying the public policy aspects of the system, while University of Minnesota researchers are handling the system's technical feasibility.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 14 -- A story about scholarships for gay students mentions Galen Newton, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and one of the first three recipients in Iowa of a Matthew Shepard scholarship. The story ran in the Education Life insert in the New York Times.

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, (Australia), Nov. 14 -- Of the five senses, touch is most often dismissed or ignored. For some time, scientists have been trying to work out how the body translates a mechanical stimulus such as a stroke, caress or tickle into a nerve impulse to the brain. Now Dr. MAGGIE PRICE from the University of Iowa and colleagues have unveiled BNC1, a protein which responds to the lightest touch. Given the protein's appearance in many places in the body, Price expects that the team will discover that BNC1 and related proteins play many roles in sensory perception. "They are likely to be involved in many different processes such as touch sensation, pain perception and taste, to mention a few."

http://www.smh.com.au:80/news/0011/14/text/world10.html

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Nov. 13 -- Led by principal investigator David Reuben, chief of UCLA geriatrics, researchers from UCLA, Iowa, Vermont, Italy and the National Institute on Aging have collaborated on a study that identifies a biological marker that may help in early identification of at-risk older persons. "The Prognostic Value of Serum Albumin in Healthy Older Persons With Low and High Serum Interleukin-6 (IL-6) Levels" appears in the November issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. In addition to a lead author from UCLA, the article was co-authored by researchers from the National Institute on Aging, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and University of Vermont, the Italian National Research Council on Aging, the University of Padova, and Sytel.

CNN, Nov. 13 -- PEVERILL SQUIRE, a UI political science professor, was interviewed live from Tipton, Iowa, where the national media converged to report on the Cedar County vote canvass. Squire spoke about Iowa voting regulations and the possibility of the Republican Party requesting a statewide recount.

USA TODAY, Nov 13 -- The graduation rate among black college students reached 53 percent at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year, an increase from 37 percent 10 years ago. Graduation rates for white students has remained about 64 percent.

UPI, Nov. 13 -- The counting is all over, and Al Gore won. That's what the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET tells us, anyway. Unlike the people who administer the actual election, the trustees of the IEM strictly follow the rules set for the contracts. And those rules say that whoever has the biggest share of the popular vote as set out in the New York Times and the Washington Post on the Friday after the election is the winner of the Winner Take All contract. This past Friday, that candidate was Al Gore. "We can't be up in the air for months," says Professor THOMAS RIETZ, one of the trustees and organizers of the IEM, "so we need to have a system that is public, known in advance, and reasonably quick." The story ran on the Web site Virtual New York.
http://www.vny.com/cf/news/upidetail.cfm?QID=136464

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 13 -- Although public opinion will play a big role, Democrats are already thinking about the future and coming to the conclusion that the presidency will be no bed of roses for whichever man enters the White House. "There are Democrats who now prefer to allow Bush to stew in his own juices and come back strong in the next election," said CARY COVINGTON of the University of Iowa. Traditionally, the party holding the White House loses seats in Congress in mid-term elections. Democrats need only marginal gains to regain control of both chambers in 2002. Gore will also start thinking about his own future political viability. A classy concession, putting country above his own interests, could transform his image and put him in position for another presidential run in 2004. "Democrats will advise Gore not to poison his own future. And they will tell him that the next four years are not going to be any cakewalk for Bush," said Covington.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001110/pl/election_concede_dc_2.html

BARRON'S, Nov. 13 -- The stock market isn't the only market that has been turned on its head by the presidential election. As Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush duke it out over who won Florida's 25 electoral votes and thus the presidency, bettors on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) had to hold their breath down to the wire, waiting for the final tallies. The University of Iowa Internet futures market, which allows betting on political and economic events, finally decided late Friday to award its own payoffs based on the assumption that Gore won the popular vote, and using tallies in the Washington Post online that gave him about a 200,000 vote margin. "We had them going back and forth over the course of the last week," says THOMAS RIETZ, a finance professor at the university and a director of the market. "We had tons of people calling us and begging us to predict what would happen, but we said it was too close to call," he says.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB973891509475205845.djm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 13 -- The National Communication Association (N.C.A.) presented 16 awards for scholarship at its 86th annual meeting, Nov. 9-12, in Seattle. The organization is the oldest and largest scholarly society for the communication discipline. ROBERT P. NEWMAN of the University of Iowa was named an N.C.A. Distinguished Scholar for a career of outstanding scholarship. And JOHN DURHAM PETERS, of the University of Iowa, received the James A. Winans-Herbert A. Wichelns Memorial Award for his book "Speaking into the Air: A History of the Idea of Communication," published by the University of Chicago Press. He also received $1,000.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2000/11/2000111309n.htm

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Nov. 13 -- A story about the election of Michigan state Sen. Mike Rogers says that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student Shanna Wycoff took time off from school to work on Rogers' campaign staff.
http://www.freep.com:80/news/politics/camp13_20001113.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Nov. 12 -- ART MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, said that based on Iowa's recent electoral history, even if Republicans are granted a recount it's unlikely to tip the state to Bush. "It shouldn't change, because we probably won't have those big irregularities in Iowa that you're seeing in Florida," Miller said.
http://webserv5.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=DIVI12&date=12-Nov-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 12 -- The mathematical forecasts overstated the vote for Democrat Al Gore. Their reliance on economic factors led most of these political scientists to conclude that Gore would win 53 to 60 percent of the votes cast for either him or Bush. It now looks like he will end up with about 50.1 percent of those ballots. Questioned for this article, scholars offered various theories to explain Tuesday's balloting. The most popular explanation was Gore's failure to take advantage of his incumbent status. "Gore willfully distanced himself from Clinton," said MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa. "He was his own undoing."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A64981-2000Nov11.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 12 -- A story about efforts to revitalize the Chicago Public School system says one approach is to offer more challenging programs for high achieving students planning to go to college. One student who says she benefited from taking advanced placement, or AP, courses is Molly Timmons, a senior at Sandburg High School in Orland Park. "I wasn't taking [advanced placement courses] so I could take the advanced-placement test," said Timmons, who passed her advanced-placement tests last year and plans to attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. "I was just taking them because I thought it would be better preparation for when I went to college."

HARTFORD COURANT, Nov. 11 -- Postville, Iowa, was a quiet farming community of 1,400 people, most of them German Lutherans, until 1987. That year, a group of 200 Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews from the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn moved to Iowa to turn a defunct slaughterhouse just outside of town into a thriving kosher abattoir -- now the largest Lubavitcher slaughterhouse in the world. In "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," journalist STEPHEN G. BLOOM adeptly probes the friction between two radically different cultures. Bloom seems ideally suited to have taken on this project. He's a former newspaper reporter who moved to Iowa City in 1993 to teach journalism at the University of Iowa. He soon was drawn to Postville, in part because he is Jewish.
http://www.ctnow.com/scripts/editorial.dll?render=y&eetype=Article&eeid=3422085&ck=&ver=2.11

THE FORWARD, Nov. 10 -- In "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America," journalist STEPHEN G. BLOOM provides a gripping and bittersweet account of a Chabad Lubavitch community that set up camp in a northeastern Iowa farm town in 1987. In 1993, Bloom, a New Jersey native and former newspaper reporter, moved to Iowa City from San Francisco with his wife and young son to begin a career as a journalism professor at the University of Iowa. The Forward is a Jewish weekly newspaper published in New York.
http://www.forward.com/BACK/2000/00.11.10/arts3.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 10 -- The paper ran images and text excerpted from the book "A Curious & Ingenious Art: Reflections on Daguerreotypes at Harvard," by Melissa Banta, a curatorial associate at Harvard University Library's Weissman Preservation Center. The book is being published this month by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i11/11b02301.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 10 -- A story about James Hansen, described as the climate researcher who almost single-handedly drew attention to the global-warming issue, says the scientist, now 59 years old, obtained his doctorate in physics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i11/11a01601.htm

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Nov. 10 -- As the Florida controversies swirled this week, some have called for uniform handling of elections -- uniform ballots, a standardized national system for everyone. "I don't think that will happen," said PEVERILL SQUIRE, a political scientist who studies elections at the University of Iowa. "But I think we will all be contemplating how to make it easier and more foolproof to cast a ballot in this country. We have to think very carefully about how to make it as straightforward as possible for people to express their preferences."
http://web.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2000/11/10/national/VOTING10.htm

KANSAS CITY STAR, Nov. 10 -- Terry L. Applebaum, dean of the UMKC Conservatory since 1994, announced Monday that he will leave his post by the end of the school's fiscal year, which runs through June 30. The 55-year-old administrator said he wishes to return to his native Chicago, where most of his family lives and where for 26 years he taught percussion for the Northwestern University music department -- serving as its associate dean for administration from 1990 to 1994. Applebaum earned bachelor's and master's degrees in music education from Northwestern, a doctor of musical arts from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and an MBA in finance from Loyola University.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,fyi/3774e759.b09,.html

JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY, Nov. 9 -- University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN BLOOM's book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" is reviewed. "By weaving his own personal journey into the book, he created a classic tale of a struggle for an American Jewish identity, updated for the 21st century," the reviewer says.
http://jta.virtualjerusalem.com:80/index.exe?0011134

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 9 -- A Reuters Health article says that when patients whose eating disorders have become life threatening are involuntarily hospitalized, they respond to treatment as well as those who admit themselves voluntarily, University of Iowa College of Medicine researchers report this month. In fact, once they are in the program, many patients acknowledge their need for treatment, they say. A 'substantial minority' of people with eating disorders like bulimia and anorexia will not seek treatment unless they are forced into a treatment program against their will, Dr. ARNOLD E. ANDERSEN and associates report. The question of whether treating such patients against their will is appropriate has been debated among the medical community. The Iowa researchers report on the latest study of this controversial issue in the American Journal of Psychiatry for November.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001109/hl/eating_1.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 9 -- The wild swings in predicting who won Florida in Tuesday's presidential vote are highlighting the danger of relying too heavily on an inexact but crucial tool of modern election coverage: the exit poll. Some election watchers noted that most polls and predictions were largely correct Tuesday and that those successes were eclipsed by the errors in Florida, a battleground state. "If they had gotten it wrong in a state that didn't matter, Rhode Island or Delaware or Maryland, we wouldn't have noticed," said ARTHUR MILLER, director of the University of Iowa Social Science Institute.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Nov. 9 -- Many of the economic indicators favoring Al Gore in the election were based on the robust economy. Usually, there's "a strong correlation" between the incumbent party's performance and the growth of the U.S. economy in the first half of an election year, says MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. To divine the White House winner, the professor has devised a formula based on the economy that also factors in the popularity of the sitting president. His calculation called for Mr. Gore to win about 55 percent of the popular vote against George W. Bush.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB973722921650252380.djm

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, Nov. 8 -- A story about the Olympics Arts Festival in Sydney, Australia, says the event will feature the compositions of Brett Dean, whose "Game Over" with the Bang on a Can All Stars and Australian Chamber Orchestra, was to be performed Sept. 12 and 13 in the Opera House Concert Hall. The story says the work was commissioned jointly by the Olympic Arts Festival and Iowa's HANCHER AUDITORIUM.
http://www.smh.com.au/news/0008/11/text/features21.html
The same information ran in an undated article on ARTSCOPE.NET, an online publication with news about the arts.
http://www.artscope.net/NEWS/new0952000-1.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 8 -- A story about political scientists who forecast presidential elections says some, like MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa, claimed a crystal ball many months before the actual vote. Lewis-Beck predicted in July 1996 that President Clinton would get 54.8 percent of the two-party vote. Clinton won 54.7 percent. This time Lewis-Beck had Gore at 55.4 percent of the two-party vote, which was apparently way off.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 8 -- When cadavers are in short supply, virtual anatomy is the new next best thing. Bones of the Skull, a tutorial created at the University of Iowa, combines interactive text with virtual three-dimensional models of the human skull. "If you just have models, what's the motivation for students to explore beyond the 'gee whiz' factor?" asks JAMES M. DUNCAN, who is coordinator of electronic services at the university's Hardin Library and was a developer of the program. JERALD MOON, an associate professor of speech pathology and audiology who is also the content specialist for Bones of the Skull, approached Mr. Duncan in 1998 with the idea for developing an interactive, computer-based tool for learning the anatomy of the human skull.
http://chronicle.com/free/2000/11/2000110801t.htm

FINANCIAL TIMES, Nov. 7 -- In the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA ELECTION FUTURES MARKET, where speculators bet on the election's outcome, the George W. Bush contract in the "winner-take-all" market lost a bit of its lead overnight but remained well ahead of the Al Gore contract, $0.656 to $0.285. That suggests speculators in the market see a better than 65 per cent chance of a Bush victory. That figure had been as high as 72 cents earlier this week. In the University of Iowa "vote share" market, speculators are betting that Bush will beat Gore, 49 to 44.3 per cent. That margin has widened significantly over the last few hours.

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, Nov. 7 -- With opinion polls suggesting the presidential election is too close to call, another barometer of voter sentiment is looking equally murky: Wall Street. There are two basic theories of how the stock market affects voters, explains TOM RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor. The first is that Americans vote according to their pocketbooks, and incumbents benefit when voters have a lot to spend and are feeling prosperous. "The alternate theory is that ... how people vote depends on how confident they are in the future of the economy and stock market," said Reitz, who also believes the presidential race is too tight to predict. "If you believe that the stock market reflects how people feel about the future, then you should see a correlation between its performance and the vote."

WASHINGTON TIMES, Nov. 7 -- It's the closest election in 40 years, but that isn't keeping some people from betting big money that Republicans will sweep into control of the White House and retain Congress today. On the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET, where investors place bets from $5 to $500 on the outcome of the elections, traders piling into the market at the last minute yesterday were giving long odds that Texas Governor George W. Bush will edge out Vice President Al Gore in the presidential race and that Republicans will retain control of Congress.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 7 -- Commodity prices may be slumping, but there's one futures market that's in an uptrend: the Bush-Cheney ticket. Since 1988, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 'S TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS has run an Internet-based futures market, where traders speculate on elections and other events. It's a real market, with real money on the line, and has pegged the winner of all three presidential elections since its inception.

AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW, Nov. 7 -- The prospect of a clean sweep by the Republican Party in today's U.S. elections has raised concerns in the markets that Governor George W. Bush will be able to fully implement his large tax cuts, sending inflation and interest rates higher. Trading on an election futures market operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA predicts a Bush victory and Republican control of Congress.

CNN, Nov. 7 -- An election-day story about how shares in the two presidential candidates are trading on the University of Iowa College of Business's Iowa Electronic Markets included an interview with Professor ROBERT FORSYTHE. "Much like you can trade on August pork bellies, in our market, you can trade on November Bush or November Gore," he said.

ROCKY MOUNTAIN (Colorado) NEWS, Nov. 7 -- A profile on Bill Knott, a librarian who recently received the Colorado Library Association's Career Achievement Award, says Knott earned bachelor's and master's degrees in library science from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://insidedenver.com:80/massaro/1107gary.shtml

ARIZONA REPUBLIC (Phoenix), Nov. 7 -- With opinion polls suggesting the presidential election is too close to call, another barometer of voter sentiment is looking equally murky: Wall Street. There are two basic theories of how the stock market affects voters, explains TOM RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor. The first is that Americans vote according to their pocketbooks, and incumbents benefit when voters have a lot to spend and are feeling prosperous. "The alternate theory is that ... how people vote depends on how confident they are in the future of the economy and stock market," said Reitz, who also believes the presidential race is too tight to predict. "If you believe that the stock market reflects how people feel about the future, then you should see a correlation between its performance and the vote."
http://www.azcentral.com:80/business/1107mktvote07.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 6 on the Web site of the CHICAGO SUN TIMES.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/business/ele06.html
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 6 on the Web site of the EVANSVILLE COURIER & PRESS in Indiana.
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200011/06+wallstreet110600_news.html+20001106
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 6 on the Web site of ABC NEWS.
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/business/DailyNews/election_wallstreet_001106.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Nov. 6 -- LAUREN RABINOVITZ, professor of American studies at the University of Iowa, says about the findings of a $175,000 two-year study of amusement parks and their effect on society: "They are a link to our past and future, so that we can view where we've been and where we're going." The item was a brief in a column.

FOX NEWS, Nov. 6 -- ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean in the Tippie College of Business and co-director of the UI's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS appeared on the "Fox and Friends" morning program. He explained how the IEM works, and how traders can buy and sell shares of political candidates in vote share and winner-take-all markets.

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 6 -- Most people over age 70 do a pretty good job of rating their own memory (an ability called metamemory), researchers report. When they don't, other problems may be present. "Older individuals must be able to assess their memory skills to function safely in their everyday lives,'' according to Dr. CAROLYN TURVEY from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and associates. Unfortunately, the researchers note, previous studies have provided conflicting results regarding the metamemory of the elderly.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001106/hl/elderly_3.html

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, Nov. 6 -- As more and more Chinese students seek to come to the United States for advanced degrees, some find that it pays to take shortcuts. University of Iowa Professor RICHARD HORWITZ, who was a Fulbright scholar in Beijing for the past year, recounts how he and his wife were approached by one school to help students with their personal statements. Horwitz said he was shocked when he realized the school expected its "consultants" to extensively rewrite the application essays.

DAILY OKLAHOMAN, (Oklahoma City), Nov. 6 -- With opinion polls suggesting the presidential election is too close to call, another barometer of voter sentiment is looking equally murky: Wall Street. There are two basic theories of how the stock market affects voters, explains TOM RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor. The first is that Americans vote according to their pocketbooks, and incumbents benefit when voters have a lot to spend and are feeling prosperous. "The alternate theory is that ... how people vote depends on how confident they are in the future of the economy and stock market," said Reitz, who also believes the presidential race is too tight to predict. "If you believe that the stock market reflects how people feel about the future, then you should see a correlation between its performance and the vote."
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 6 on the Web site of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM in Texas.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on YAHOO! NEWS.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the KANSAS CITY STAR.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the OGDEN NEWSPAPERS chain.
The same Associated Press article ran Nov. 5 on the Web site of the LOS ANGELES TIMES.

LONDON TIMES, Nov. 6 -- The paper says that the best predictor of Tuesday's U.S. presidential election may have been a political stock market set up by academics in Iowa, which challenges voters to put their money where their mouths are. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) sells futures on the candidates‚ political fortunes in just the way that other markets trade pork bellies, soy beans or grain contracts. The system was established in 1988 by a group of professors at the University of Iowa, who were disillusioned that traditional opinion polls had failed to predict the Rev. Jesse Jackson's victory in the Democratic primary in Michigan. "It started with four of us who are faculty at Iowa and were all political junkies," BOB FORSYTHE, a professor who specializes in experimental economics, said.

DESERET NEWS, Utah, Nov. 6 -- With opinion polls suggesting the presidential election is too close to call, another barometer of voter sentiment is looking equally murky: Wall Street. There are two basic theories of how the stock market affects voters, explains TOM RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor. The first is that Americans vote according to their pocketbooks, and incumbents benefit when voters have a lot to spend and are feeling prosperous. "The alternate theory is that ... how people vote depends on how confident they are in the future of the economy and stock market," said Rietz, who also believes the presidential race is too tight to predict. "If you believe that the stock market reflects how people feel about the future, then you should see a correlation between its performance and the vote."
http://www.desnews.com/cgi-bin/libstory_reg?dn00&0011060473

>DENVER POST, Nov. 5 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 28 tracking stocks issued before the end of 1998 reported less than impressive results. The study found, on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year, compared to 21 percent for the overall market. With Sprint PCS, the tracking stock's annual average fell to 5.7 percent.

CNNFN, Nov. 6 -- A discussion about the impact of the election on the stock market refers to the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) as a "very accurate predictor of elections."

THE SUNDAY HERALD, (London,) Nov. 5 -- Towards the end of last week, things were not looking good for Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA runs a futures market where people can bet real dollars on who will enter the White House, which has been right since it was founded in 1988. A few weeks ago Gore was ahead, but by Friday Republican George W. Bush was leading at 0.64 dollars, with Gore support tumbling to 0.35 dollars.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 5 -- More than three-quarters of the nation's colleges and universities now accept online applications, the National Association for College Admission Counseling estimates. Yet many schools reported that less than a third of last year's applications came that route. Vassar's rate was closer to 2 percent, and the University of Richmond got 5 percent. Most schools have been accepting online submissions for a few years. More success has been seen at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where 30 percent of its prospective freshmen applied online last year.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 5 -- Some 14 Russian composers and musicologists gathered recently for a long weekend at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Iowa City institution (best known, perhaps, for its Writers' Workshop) has long been distinguished in contemporary-music circles. In 1966, with Rockefeller Foundation money, it set up a Center for New Music, one of the earliest campus performance outlets of its kind. Now led by DAVID GOMPPER, an energetic 46-year-old composer, conductor and pianist with an admirably ecumenical world view, the center has undertaken a series of display events to acquaint its audience with the work of composers from foreign countries.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/05/arts/05TARU.html

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 4 -- A HealthScout story reports on a University of Iowa specialist's contention that government guidelines for treatment of childhood asthma are too complicated for most doctors. Dr. MILES WEINBERGER, director of the University of Iowa pediatric allergy and pulmonary division, says they haven't done much to improve the quality of care or to keep young patients out of the hospital, adding that parents can improve care by working with their family doctors. The ineffectiveness of the guidelines, which were issued in 1991 and revised in 1997, is demonstrated by national statistics, Weinberger says in a paper that was to be delivered Nov. 6 at the annual meeting of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology in Seattle.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20001104/hl/asthma_guidelines_criticized_as_too_complicated_1.html

THE ECONOMIST, (London, England), Nov. 4 -- The story says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S ELECTRONIC FUTURES EXCHANGE has already made a name for itself in politics and could soon do so in financial economics. Academics at the University of Iowa set up the IEM in 1988 to help teach students about finance. The markets are not for futures in the classical sense -- that is, promises to exchange some good or service at a fixed date and price. Rather, they are of the "cash-settled" variety.

BUSINESS WEEK, Nov. 3 -- A story about the Hollywood Stock Exchange, which started in 1996 as a gaming site that converted films, music, television, and celebrities into shares of virtual stock, says other examples of Web-based polling include THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S POLITICAL FUTURES MARKET, an online educational stock market that turns political candidates into securities, has an above-average record of predicting past Presidential and congressional winners.
http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/nov2000/nf2000113_389.htm

GLOBE & MAIL, (Toronto), Nov. 3 -- As the race for the U.S. presidency enters its final weekend in a fight that appears too close to call, two market-based crystal balls with a history of picking the winner say George W. Bush is primed for a move to Washington. One of them, the Iowa Electronic Markets, is a collection of small futures markets run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS SCHOOL, has correctly predicted the outcome of the past three U.S. presidential elections. In fact, IEM traders effectively predicted the 1988 and 1992 popular vote tally within 0.2 percent. Though not much money is on the line -- a cap of $500 is in place -- the project's directors say people are more involved when their cash is at risk. "It gets people to take it much more seriously," said ROBERT FORSYTHE, an IEM co-founder and senior associate dean of the University of Iowa's business school. Also quoted in the story is JOYCE BERG, a University of Iowa accounting professor and IEM co-director.

CNBC, Nov. 3 -- Commentators displayed a graphic showing shares in the presidential candidates purchased through the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) and said the numbers had not changed substantially despite revelations that Republican George W. Bush had been arrested for drunken driving when he was 30. The commentators also talked about how Bush's vote-share price of 65 cents was related to the probability of Bush winning and how the market compared to the polls.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Nov. 3 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 28 tracking stocks issued before the end of 1998 reported less than impressive results. The study found, on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year, compared to 21 percent for the overall market. With Sprint PCS, the tracking stock's annual average fell to 5.7 percent.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/11/03/national1929EST0280.DTL

MEDIA CENTRAL, Nov. 3 -- The Web site ran a Reuters article about the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. It says that several thousand political junkies have gathered online this year to risk money on the outcome of the U.S. Presidential election in a real FUTURES MARKET run by the TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS. "This is the first presidential election we've run on where there is this much uncertainty this late in the election," said THOMAS RIETZ, professor of finance at Iowa. "It's just too close a race to call."
http://www.mediacentral.com/channels//allnews/11_03_2000.reuff-story-bccampaignmarketsbetting.html
The same REUTERS article ran Nov. 4 on YAHOO! NEWS.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001104/wr/campaign_daytraders_dc_1.html

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 3 -- A HealthScout story reports that forcing people with eating disorders into treatment seems to work in the short term, according to a new study designed and written by TUREKA WATSON, a psychiatric researcher at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. But the eventual fate of people forced into treatment remains unclear, the study says. The Iowa researchers hope to answer some of the questions about long-term consequences in a joint study they are conducting with colleagues at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, following people with eating disorders from five to 20 years after their treatment.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20001104/hl/forced_treatment_may_help_eating_disorders_1.html

BLOOMBERG, Nov. 3 -- Statistical models of U.S. election campaigns led academic experts to predict months ago that Al Gore would win the presidency. For the most part, they're sticking with that conclusion, even though most opinion polls show George W. Bush ahead by between 3 and 5 percentage points. "I think the polls are wrong," said MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a University of Iowa professor whose model predicts a Gore victory with 55.4 percent of the two-party popular vote. But other indicators give Republican George W. Bush the edge Tuesday. His chances of winning are put at 66 percent by traders on a futures market run by the University of Iowa. A separate vote-share contract has Bush leading Gore 52 percent to 48 percent. "Two weeks ago it was almost dead even," said economics professor FORREST NELSON, a director of the Iowa Electronic Markets. "There has been a slow, rocky rise since then for Bush." Statistical models of U.S. election campaigns led academic experts to predict months ago that Al Gore would win the presidency. For the most part, they're sticking with that conclusion, even most opinion polls show George W. Bush leading by between 3 and 5 percentage points.
http://quote.bloomberg.com/fgcgi.cgi?mnu=news&ptitle=Top%20World%20News&tp=ad_fin&T=au_storypage99.ht&s=AOgGpzBTfQWNhZGVt

SEATTLE TIMES, Nov. 3 -- A Bloomberg News article carried by the paper says that statistical models of U.S. election campaigns led academic experts to predict months ago that Al Gore would win the presidency. For the most part, they're sticking with that conclusion, even though most opinion polls show George W. Bush ahead by between 3 and 5 percentage points. "I think the polls are wrong," said MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a University of Iowa professor whose model predicts a Gore victory with 55.4 percent of the two-party popular vote. But other indicators give Republican George W. Bush the edge Tuesday. His chances of winning are put at 66 percent by traders on a futures market run by the University of Iowa. A separate vote-share contract has Bush leading Gore 52 percent to 48 percent. "Two weeks ago it was almost dead even," said economics professor FORREST NELSON, a director of the Iowa Electronic Markets. "There has been a slow, rocky rise since then for Bush."
http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=predict03&date=20001103&query=University+of+Iowa

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 3 -- A reviewer of the book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" asks: What happens when diversity means groups so different that mutual tolerance becomes a practical impossibility? That seems to have been the case in Postville, Iowa, the setting of STEPHEN G. BLOOM's riveting tale of a cultural clash so sharp and irreconcilable that it challenges easy assumptions one might make about the ability of different people to live in a state of harmonious reciprocity.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/11/03/arts/03BOOK.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 3 -- Come Tuesday, Al Gore or George W. Bush will claim the White House. But, barring an unforeseen landslide, neither will claim much of a mandate. Their race is too close, their difference on issues too blurred, the voters too focused on personalities for the election to offer a ringing endorsement of any of their major policy proposals, experts and analysts in both parties agree. "When politicians claim a mandate, it suggests a presumption the president's proposals should be received favorably and enacted," said CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political science professor. "It's to give them an advantage in the consideration and enactment of their legislative agenda."

SUN-HERALD, (Biloxi, Miss.), Nov. 3 -- More than three-quarters of the nation's colleges and universities now accept online applications, the National Association for College Admission Counseling estimates. Yet many schools reported that less than a third of last year's applications came that route. Vassar's rate was closer to 2 percent, and the University of Richmond got 5 percent. Most schools have been accepting online submissions for a few years. More success has been seen at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where 30 percent of its prospective freshmen applied online last year.
http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net:80/living/docs/apply110300.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 3 -- A professor at the University of Iowa has placed online a self-assessment survey for instructors that asks the question: How do you see your primary role as a teacher? The question is part of the Teaching Goals Inventory, a list of 52 goals that users are asked to rate on a scale from "not applicable" to "essential." TOM ROCKLIN, a professor of educational psychology and director of the Center for Teaching at the University of Iowa, put the survey online to increase its availability and to automate the scoring. "In faculty-development circles, it's one of the first books recommended when questions of how a faculty member might assess and improve his or her instruction come up," says Rocklin. Because course goals and teaching strategies change, faculty members may want to visit the site more than once. Ellen O'Keefe, a graduate student in special education at Iowa, did just that, and she says doing so helps "to relook at the issues that were raised." The tool "validates the positiveness of what you're thinking."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i10/10a04401.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 3 -- ED FOLSOM, an English professor at the University of Iowa, led the "'Walt Whitman 2000: The American Poet in a Global Context" conference at Peking University in Beijing, China. He called it the first major international conference on an American writer to be held in China. Whitman scholars from the United States who attended the conference regarded it as remarkable that a discussion of the "poet of democracy," as Whitman is known, was allowed in China. Selected papers from the conference will be published in Chinese by the Peking University Press and in English by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i10/10a05102.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 3 -- The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM), operated by the University of Iowa's College of Business Administration, allows students and nonstudents to buy shares online in markets that track the presidential race as well as the Congressional elections. "It looks like there are some traders who pick stocks based on their political preferences, and there's another set of traders who select stocks as a business strategy, and those are the people who set prices," says JOYCE BERG, codirector of the markets.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i10/10a01203.htm

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Nov. 2 -- STEVE UNGAR, chair of Cinema and Comparative Literature at the University of Iowa, presented a lecture in Seattle Nov. 3 at the University of Washington titled "Display and Identity at the Paris Colonial Expedition."

NEW YORK BOOKS, Nov. 2 -- An article about the upcoming election by author Joan Didion says that MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa estimates that Democratic Vice President Al Gore will win the presidential election with 56.2 percent of the vote. Lewis-Beck's early call on the 1996 election (in collaboration with Charles Tien of Hunter College) was, according to The Washington Post, not only closer to the ultimate result than polls conducted immediately before the election (Lewis-Beck and Tien gave Clinton 54.8 percent, the eventual recorded result was 54.7) but also closer, by almost three percentage points, than exit polls conducted while the election was actually in progress," she writes.
http://www.nybooks.com/nyrev/WWWarchdisplay.cgi?20001102068F@p10

THE GUARDIAN (U.K.), Nov. 2 -- A columnist writes that he can't bear to see either George W. Bush or Al Gore win the U.S. Presidential election because either outcome would validate certain groups of election forecasters. Of the group forecasting a Gore victory, the columnist writes, "This fraternity -- all in their different ways building on polling evidence but mixing in economic portents and voters' feelings about how well off they are compared to last year -- were all agreed that Gore was going to win 53 to 60 percent of the total vote cast for him plus Bush. Conspicuous among them was MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa, who forecast Vice President Gore winning 56.2 percent of the two-party vote. A modest man, he admits to having got things wrong in the 1996 election. He gave Clinton 54.8 percent of the two-party vote. The electors gave him 54.7 percent.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Nov. 2 -- University of Iowa political science professor ARTHUR MILLER has released the 2000 Heartland Poll, which polls voters in seven Midwest states. Miller, a professor of political science and director of the Iowa Social Science Institute, says Presidential candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore are in a "virtual dead heat'' in four Midwest battleground states, but the current momentum seems to favor Gore. Meanwhile, MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a UI political scientist, is standing strong behind his forecast of a victory for Al Gore. UI political scientists PEVERILL SQUIRE and CARY COVINGTON can offer historical perspective and daily analysis as the candidates work toward election day. And six professors in the UI Tippie College of Business who manage the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM), will continue to monitor an extremely close race in the IEM vote-share market.

BARRON'S, Nov. 2 -- The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which enables participants to bet on the outcome of the election, shows Republican George W. Bush a 59 percent choice to win after he languished at close to 30 percent in early October. The Iowa market, run by University of Iowa's business school (www.biz.uiowa.edu), has a pretty good record of forecasting recent presidential elections. The Iowa market also shows that bettors believe Hillary Clinton has a nearly 75 percent chance of winning the New York Senate election.

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 2 -- Reuters reports that in a special "Sexiest Man" issue of People due out on newsstands today, RYAN HANSEN, 22, of the University of Iowa is named "sexiest athlete."
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20001102/re/people_pitt_dc_1.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 1 -- A column about significant events on previous Nov. 1sts says that in 1991 a gunman shot six people to death and left one paralyzed on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus in Iowa City.
http://chicagotribune.com/news/metro/chicago/article/0,2669,SAV-0011010181,FF.html

MIAMI HERALD, Nov. 1 -- Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush recently attacked Democratic candidate Al Gore for having said that faith-based programs are the "crumbs of compassion'' in a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in June 1999. "I believe they are the bread of life,'' Bush said.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Nov. 1 -- On the campaign trail in California this week, George W. Bush has spoken about faith-based charities, which he believes should have a larger role in social services. He called for tax credits and other incentives to help people support charities. He said government should work "side by side" with faith-based institutions. He attacked Gore for having said that faith-based programs were the "crumbs of compassion" in a June 1999 speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I believe they are the bread of life," Bush said.
http://web.philly.com/content/inquirer/2000/11/01/national/CAMPAIGN01.htm

FT. WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, Nov. 1 -- Al Gore issued one blistering attack after another Tuesday on George W. Bush's proposed plan to cut taxes deeply, while Bush cited his own past to a recovering drug addict to illustrate that government is not always the answer to society's problems. He attacked Gore for having said that faith-based programs are the "crumbs of compassion" in a June 1999 speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I believe they are the bread of life," Bush said.
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:TOPHOME5/1:TOPHOME51101100.html
A slightly altered version of the KNIGHT-RIDDER wire story ran Nov. 1 on the Web site of the Lawrence, Kans., JOURNAL-WORLD.
http://www.ljworld.com/section/worldnation/story/31769
The same story ran Nov. 1 on the Web site of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER.
http://web.philly.com:80/content/inquirer/2000/11/01/national/CAMPAIGN01.htm

MONEY, November 2000 -- A brief in the magazine says that as of Oct. 2, players of the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) were wagering 50 cents on the dollar that Gore will win, 41 cents that Bush will win.

DR. DOBB'S JOURNAL, November 2000 -- A team of computer scientists claims to have solved a 32-year-old mathematics problem known as the "quadratic assignment problem." The problem (also called NUG30) was first proposed in 1968 as a test of computer capabilities. Using 1,000 computers in 13 locations running for a week, researchers from Argonne National Laboratory, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Northwestern University finally solved the problem. The key to the solution was an algorithm developed by KURT ANSTREICHER and NATE BRIXIUS of Iowa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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