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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Nov. 22, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

SLIDE LECTURE BY ARTIST XU BING NOV. 29 -- Installation artist Xu Bing will present "Between Vision And Language --- About My Work," a slide and video presentation of his artistic work, at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 29 in Room E109 of the University of Iowa Art Building.

Xu draws upon his intensive study of the history and craft of Chinese calligraphy and the repetitive methodologies of printmaking to create his work. His critical examination of contemporary Chinese culture and cross-cultural relationships have contributed to underlying themes in his work of the futility of expression and people’s inability to communicate in modern times.

Since his emigration to the United States in 1990, Xu has exhibited his artwork extensively. In 1999 his work was included in 18 national and international exhibitions. This year he has been in 10 group exhibitions including the Sydney Biennale in Australia and an exhibition at the Kiasma Museum of Contemporary Art in Helsinki. He recently had a retrospective exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Prague and a solo exhibition at Duke University in North Carolina. Xu was the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation fellowship in 1999. Xu Bing’s visit to the UI campus is sponsored by the printmaking area of the UI School of Art and Art History and the UI Office of International Programs, in collaboration with the Faulconer Gallery and the art department of Grinnell College.

(NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: Xu Bing is pronounced "shoo bing.")

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UI DANCE DEPARTMENT STAGES SPACE/PLACE CONCERT DEC. 1-2-- The University of Iowa dance department will present its fall Space/Place Concert, featuring new choreography by UI graduate and undergraduate dance students, at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Dec. 1 and 2 in the Space/Place Theatre of UI North Hall.

The concert will feature a dozen works of contemporary dance and dance/theater, set to music ranging from classical to jazz to the Kronos Quartet’s comic "Elvis Everywhere" by Cedar Rapids composer Michael Daugherty.

The concert program was selected by a faculty adjudication panel -- Alan Sener, Jeffery Bullock and Armando Duarte -- from among works auditioned by student choreographers.

The selected student choreographers are Alessandra Herszkowicz, Audra Sokol, Victoria Baeder-Helmke, Jennifer Medina, E.E. Balcos, Rachel Urie, Julie Hawkins, Penny Askew, Peggy Mead-Finizio and Kathy Burnett.

Admission will be $10 at the door. Admission for UI students is $5, and admission is free for children under 12.

EVANS READS ‘LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS’ DEC. 4 -- Elizabeth Evans, a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from her latest novel, "Rowing in Eden," at 8 p.m. Monday,
Dec. 4 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Evans is the author of "The Blue Hour" and "Carter Clay." She has received the James Michener Fellowship and a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. Her short stories regularly appear in such journals as Crazyhorse and The Quarterly. Evans teaches in the creative writing program at the University of Arizona.

Lisa Zeidner says Evans’ most recent offering "serves as a love letter to a very particular time and place: small-town Iowa in 1965, teetering . . . on the crest of enormous changes."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu.

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UNIVERSITY AND CONCERT BAND DEC. 6 -- The University and Concert Bands from the University of Iowa School of Music will share a concert program, starting at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 6 in Clapp Recital Hall. The performance will be free and open to the public.

Two of the large wind ensembles at the School of Music, the University and Concert Bands are open to all students at the UI.

The University Band is directed by graduate student Boyd Perkins. They will perform five works on the concert: "Partita" by Edward Gregson; "With Quiet Courage" by Larry Daehn; "Fanfare, Ode and Farewell" by Bob Margolis; "Chorale and Shaker Dance" by John Zdechlik; and "Abschied der Slawin" (Farewell of the Slavic girl) by V. Agapkin.

An English composer, Gregson has worked with and composed for British brass bands. His "Partita," originally composed for brass band, uses material based on the 13th-century chant from the funeral mass, "Dies Irae" (Day of wrath).

Daehn, who has taught junior and senior high band in New Glarus, Wis. for the past 25 years, dedicated "With Quite Courage" to Lois Daehn. He wrote in the score, "Her life was heroic, but without fanfare. She worked and hoped and inspired. She loved and was loved. Her life was a noble song of quiet courage."

Premiered in 1982 by the University of Wisconsin -- Eau Claire Summer Concert Band, Margolis’ "Fanfare, Ode and Festival" is based on popular dances from 16th-century Paris.

Very little is known about Agapkin, a Russian composer of the 19th century. The most popular march in Russia, "Farewell of the Slavic Girl" was probably written during the
Russo-Japanese War around 1904-05. Traditionally it is played when Russian military troops
depart a garrison for combat.

The Concert Band is directed by Kevin Kastens, who is also director of the UI Hawkeye Marching Band. They will perform four works on the program: "Köenigsmarsch" (Royal march) by Richard Strauss, arranged by Roger Barrett; "Lauds" by Ron Nelson; "Sketches on a Tudor Psalm" by Fisher Tull; and "Armenian Dances," Part II by Alfred Reed.

Graduate student Christopher Nicholas will conduct the "Sketches on a Tudor Psalm."

German composer Richard Strauss, known to many as a composer of operas and tone poems, also wrote a number of marches and fanfares. The "Köenigsmarsch" was originally written for piano and was premiered in a military band setting by Franz Pelz on March 6, 1907, for a palace concert in Berlin with the composer conducting.

"Sketches on a Tudor Psalm" is based on a 1567 setting of the Second Psalm by English Renaissance composer Thomas Tallis. A modern adaptation of the Psalm is still used in Anglican services. The same tune was used by Ralph Vaughan Williams as the basis for his Fantasia for Double String Orchestra in 1910.

The two parts of Alfred Reed’s "Armenian Dances" constitute a four-movement suite for concert band based on authentic Armenian folk songs from the collected works of Gomidas Vartabed, the founder of Armenian classical music. Part II, containing the second, third and fourth movements of Alfred Reed’s suite, is built upon three Armenian folk songs, freely treated and developed in terms of the modern concert band.

Kastens is associate professor of music and assistant director of bands at the UI. He directs the Hawkeye Marching Band and the Concert Band, teaches band arranging and marching band techniques, and is the director of the All-State Music Camp.

Kastens has presented workshops and clinics on marching band techniques and computer drill design and appeared as guest conductor throughout the Midwest and Canada. He has had numerous articles published on instrumental music education in The Instrumentalist and other professional publications.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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WAPSIPINICON ALMANAC CONTRIBUTORS READ DEC. 8 -- Timothy Fay, editor of the Wapsipinicon Almanac, will lead a contingent of contributors to the latest edition of his publication in a reading at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8 at Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Contributors Dan Coffey, Dan Ehl, Floyd Pearce, Raymond Tinnian, Dean Williams and Fay himself are scheduled to participate. Fay’s eclectic, biannual periodical contains regional news, essays, fiction, book reviews and poetry. He prints the Wapsipinicon Almanac on his farm in Anamosa. Fay published the first edition of the almanac in 1988.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ page at <http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm>.

For UI arts information, visit this new address -- www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa -- on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu.

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UI STEEL BANDS PERFORM DEC. 8 -- Two steel bands from the University of Iowa School of Music -- the UI Steel Band and Steel Band II -- will present a free concert at 8 p.m. Friday, Dec. 8 in Harper Hall on the UI campus.

The concert, under the direction of Daniel Moore, will be free and open to the public.

The steel pans, or steel drums as they are variously known, are actually 55-gallon oil barrels that have been carefully crafted into tuned musical instruments. Originating on the island nation of Trinidad and Tobago, these tuned drums have a timbre that is immediately recognizable as a Caribbean sound. They characteristically play the Calypso, Soca and Reggae music of the West Indies, as well as Afro-Cuban, American pop and other styles -- even including arrangements of classical music.

Starting as a single volunteer group in 1994, the UI steel band has grown to the point that the percussion area of the UI School of Music now maintains two complete steel bands. The Steel
Band II is open by audition to any student at the UI. It serves as a training ensemble to the UI Steel Band, which consists of percussion majors in the School of Music and other outstanding percussion students. The UI Steel Band performs throughout Iowa.

An internationally known percussionist, composer and teacher, Moore has experience from concert to marching percussion, and from jazz to classical styles. Performing all aspects of percussion, including keyboard percussion, drum set, ethnic and multi-percussion, he is considered a "total percussionist." For the past 12 years he has toured as a member of the Britain/Moore Duo, whose CD "Cricket City" has been described by Pan-lime Magazine as "a brilliant collage of pan-marimba pieces."

Moore joined the UI music faculty in 1995. Only the second full-time professor of percussion at the UI, he succeeded Thomas L. Davis, who taught percussion at the UI for more than 35 years. He is a performing artist for the Yamaha Corporation of America, Sabian Ltd., and Innovative Percussion.

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/artsiowa on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.