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UI in the News

May 2000

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ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, May 31 -- Researchers estimate that 5 million Americans suffer from eating disorders, about 90 percent of them women. Experts say that in recent years more and more men are being diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia and can spend years wandering aimlessly through the nation's health-care system. Few eating-disorder programs treat men. Those that do, like the Renfrew Center in Philadelphia, severely restrict the programs offered to males. "The problem with all of these treatment centers is that they are gender-biased," said ARNOLD ANDERSEN, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Programs at the University of Iowa and an expert on anorexia and bulimia. "They either exclude males or claim they don't know how to treat them."
http://www.ocregister.com/health/anorexic00531cci1.shtml

BIRMINGHAM (Ala.) NEWS, May 31 -- Columnist John Leo writes that campuses are developing doubts about reports of race and gender crimes because of recent cases in which the perpetrators have turned out to be minorities and/or women. He cites the case involving e-mail threats allegedly sent by Tarsha Claiborne to fellow students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY.

BALTIMORE SUN, May 31 -- Who needs elections when we can turn to all sorts of historical predictors to determine the next president -- the taller guy always wins, an incumbent vice-president usually loses, Easter fell in April and historically that indicates a Republican victory. Although these theories sound wacky, there are sound scientific methods for election forecasting, and MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a UI political science professor, was among the first to develop one 20 years ago. "When I started out, people thought it was witchcraft -- they wouldn't even publish the papers because they thought it was some kind of voodoo. It's changed now. It's not only a serious science, but a very popular science."
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150340220106

BOSTON GLOBE, May 29 -- After years of silence, former workers at the Iowa Army Ammunitions Plant in Southeast Iowa are talking about their experiences and how they may have been exposed to radioactive materials. Although the Energy Department had long denied that the plant produced nuclear weapons, officials recently admitted that the Atomic Energy Commission did indeed make nuclear weapons at the plant in Middletown from the late 1940s to the mid-1970s. In fact, from 1949 to 1951, the facility was the nation's only nuclear weapons assembly plant. Many former workers now have cancer and other health problems. The Department of Energy and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have begun a survey of health problems among the plant's nuclear workers, and the department recently began testing workers for possible exposure to beryllium, a toxic metal used in constructing nuclear weapons.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/150/nation/Weapons_plant_s_nuclear_past_finally_told+.shtml

AUSTIN (Texas) BUSINESS JOURNAL, May 29 -- Katherine Hammer, who has a Ph.D. in English and linguistics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, gave up a tenured position at Washington State University twenty years ago to take a chance on a career in information technology. Now she is chairman, president and CEO of Evolutionary Technologies International Inc. and is one of the country's most successful female entrepreneurs.
http://www.bizjournals.com/austin/stories/2000/05/29/smallb1.html

THE TIMES OF LONDON, May 29 -- Although current polls put Texas Gov. George W. Bush ahead in the race for the White House, there are some who believe that with the economy booming Vice-president Al Gore has the election won. These election forecasters, including MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a UI political science professor, have a track record for accuracy. Four months before the 1996 election, Lewis-Beck said Clinton would win 54.8 percent of the vote. Clinton won 54.7 percent. This time Lewis-Beck says Gore will win 56.2 percent of the vote. "It's not even going to be close," he said.

THE RECORD, (Hackensack, N.J)., May 29 -- When 51 people were asked about hip replacements they had had almost 30 years ago, 97 percent of them said they still were satisfied with them. "Few operations have been evaluated for their results more than 25 years later," said Dr. JOHN J. CALLAGHAN of the department of orthopaedics at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and primary author of the study. "This study shows that their procedure demonstrates remarkable durability."

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, May 28 -- Worried parents now can find answers to their questions on everything from bee stings to birth defects at a one-stop online medical library. The site, GeneralPediatrics.com, was created by DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa medical school, to supply authoritative information to doctors and their patients' families.

COURIER-JOURNAL (Louisville, Ky.), May 28 -- MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa foresees Vice President Al Gore winning 56.2 percent of the two-party vote in November. "It's not even going to be close," Lewis-Beck said. His forecasting model is based on growth of the gross domestic product from the fourth quarter of the pre-election year through the first quarter of the election year, and on poll findings on presidential approval and voter opinions on which party's candidate will best promote peace and prosperity.

WASHINGTON POST, May 28 -- College graduates today are entering the best job market in years, but many are not being drawn in by the allure of big money. Signing bonuses are common. At the University of Iowa, almost half of the students who graduated with accounting degrees received hiring bonuses, at an average of $2,300. But DEE HURST, director of the Business and Liberal Arts Placement Office, says many Iowa students are turning down the money. About 25 percent of the accounting class opted to go on to graduate school, up from 8 percent last year, Hurst said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19716-2000May27.html

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, May 27 -- In a story about the presidential elections this fall, MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa is quoted as saying "It's not even going to be close." Lewis-Beck foresees Gore winning 56.2 percent of the two-party vote. His forecasting model is based on growth of the gross domestic product from the fourth quarter of the pre-election year through the first quarter of the election year, and on poll findings on presidential approval and voter opinions on which party's candidate will best promote peace and prosperity. This article originally appeared in the May 26 Washington Post.
http://www.iht.com/IHT/TODAY/SAT/FPAGE/vote.2.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, May 27 -- Campus police at Iowa's three state universities say they should be allowed to carry firearms, but the university presidents and the Board of Regents say they will not alter their long-standing policy against arming campus police. ANN RHODES, vice president of university relations at the University of Iowa, says armed officers might be too tempted. "There's concern that if people have guns or firearms, they would move to use those firearms fairly quickly without trying to use alternative ways of handling problems," she says. CHUCK GREEN, UI director of campus safety, says his officers have encountered students with weapons and in such cases must call in local Iowa City police officers to handle the situation. "One of those times, one of these officers is going to get unnecessarily harmed or, because we're not fully equipped, we won't be able to aid one of our constituents," he said.

ABCNEWS.COM, May 26 -- A round-up of quotable political statements in recent days includes MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK's quote from a front-page Washington Post article regarding the upcoming presidential election. "It's not even going to be close," he said, predicting a Gore victory in November. Lewis-Beck's quote is listed among statements from national figures including President Clinton, Hillary Rodham Clinton, Colin Powell, and Jesse Ventura.
http://abcnews.go.com/sections/politics/onbackground/onbackground000526.html

USA TODAY, May 26 -- A study found that people exposed to radon in their homes are at greater risk of developing lung cancer than earlier studies predicted. The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-led study found that exposure to even a low level of radon results in a 50 percent greater chance of contracting lung cancer.

THE (Columbia, S.C.) STATE, May 26 -- In a story about the presidential elections this fall, MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa is quoted as saying "It's not even going to be close." Lewis-Beck foresees Gore winning 56.2 percent of the two-party vote. His forecasting model is based on growth of the gross domestic product from the fourth quarter of the pre-election year through the first quarter of election year, and on poll findings on presidential approval and voter opinions on which party's candidate will best promote peace and prosperity. This article originally appeared in the May 26 Washington Post.
http://www.thestate.com/nation/docs/campaignforecast26.htm
This article also appeared in the May 26 LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD-LEADER:
http://www.kentuckyconnect.com/heraldleader/news/052600/nationaldocs/26campaign-final.htm

HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, May 26 -- It seems that the Republicans have an infinite number of potential vice-presidential candidates with national political reputations and name-recognition, but the Democrats don't have an instantly recognizable group of candidates. "There are no obvious choices," said CARY COVINGTON, an associate professor of political science at the UI.
http://www.ctnow.com/scripts/editorial.dll?render=y&eetype=Article&eeid=2398701&ck=&ver=hb1.3

LOS ANGELES TIMES, May 26 -- The Justice Department is expected to stick with its plan to split Microsoft in half rather than adopt a suggestion by anti-Microsoft industry groups to divide the company into three parts, a source close to the antitrust case said Thursday. The proposal for a three-way split, instead of the two-way breakup suggested by the Justice Department, came unexpectedly. HERB HOVENKAMP, law professor at the University of Iowa and a leading antitrust authority, said the judge could make substantial changes in the government's remedy proposal, including a wholly different breakup plan. "There is some Supreme Court case law that suggests that all the judge has to do in the initial stage is order a breakup and state in fairly rough terms what that breakup is going to be like and not worry about the details," Hovenkamp said. "Then as you go through the appeals process, and if the breakup, in principle, is affirmed, then the details can be worked out later."

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, May 26 -- The Justice Department is expected to stick with its plan to split Microsoft in half rather than adopt a suggestion by anti-Microsoft industry groups to divide the company into three parts, a source close to the antitrust case said Thursday. The proposal for a three-way split, instead of the two-way breakup suggested by the Justice Department, came unexpectedly in a packed courtroom. Company lawyers flinched and observers looked on in amazement as U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson expressed his admiration for the industry groups' friend-of-the-court brief. The Justice Department's next card will be played Friday, with its revised breakup plan due in Jackson's court. HERB HOVENKAMP, law professor at the University of Iowa and a leading antitrust authority, said Jackson could make substantial changes in the government's remedy proposal, including a wholly different breakup plan.

WASHINGTON POST, May 26 -- In a story about the presidential elections this fall, MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa is quoted as saying "It's not even going to be close." Lewis-Beck foresees Gore winning 56.2 percent of the two-party vote. His forecasting model is based on growth of the gross domestic product from the fourth quarter of the pre-election year through the first quarter of election year, and on poll findings on presidential approval and voter opinions on which party's candidate will best promote peace and prosperity. A slightly altered version of the Washington Post article ran May 26 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site. The same Washington Post article ran May 25 on the MSNBC Web site.

WASHINGTON POST, May 26 -- The U.S. Justice Department and 17 states that filed the successful antitrust case against the company will submit a final draft of their breakup plan today to the court. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust scholar at the University of Iowa who has been a government consultant on the case, said Microsoft probably crossed the line with the judge by asking for too long of a delay and by not proposing its own remedy that was tougher on its future conduct. "I think he's gotten quite impatient with this," Hovenkamp said. "And the Microsoft remedies proposal was not the document that he would have taken seriously. It began with the premise they didn't do anything wrong--so the remedies ended up being totally inadequate."

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 26 --The Justice Department is expected to stick with its plan to split Microsoft in half rather than adopt a suggestion by anti-Microsoft industry groups to divide the company into three parts, a source close to the antitrust case said Thursday. The proposal for a three-way split, instead of the two-way breakup suggested by the Justice Department, came unexpectedly in a packed courtroom. Company lawyers flinched and observers looked on in amazement as U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson expressed his admiration for the industry groups' friend-of-the-court brief. The Justice Department's next card will be played Friday, with its revised breakup plan due in Jackson's court. HERB HOVENKAMP, law professor at the University of Iowa and a leading antitrust authority, said Jackson could make substantial changes in the government's remedy proposal, including a wholly different breakup plan. "There is some Supreme Court case law that suggests that all the judge has to do in the initial stage is order a breakup and state in fairly rough terms what that breakup is going to be like and not worry about the details,'' Hovenkamp said. "Then as you go through the appeals process, and if the breakup, in principle, is affirmed, then the details can be worked out later." The same Associated Press article ran May 26 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site. The same Associated Press ran May 25 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/f/AP-Microsoft.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 25 on the Web site of the Fort Worth, Texas, STAR-TELEGRAM. The same Associated Press article ran May 25 on the Web site of the AUGUSTA CHRONICLE of Georgia. The same Associated Press article ran May 25 on the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE Web site. The same Associated Press article ran May 25 on the ABC NEWS Web site.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 26 -- The article examines the repercussions of a comment made by ANN RHODES, vice president of university relations at the University of Iowa, during a press conference to announce the arrest of a suspect in an e-mail threat case. It says Rhodes apologized for her comment -- made in jest in response to a reporter's question -- that she figured the suspect "was going to be a white guy between 25 and 55, because they're the root of most evil. But what do I know?" In a letter to the state university system's Board of Regents, MARY SUE COLEMAN, the university's president, backed her press chief. "Ann tried to relieve the tension with a very inappropriate comment," Coleman wrote. "She has learned from the experience, and so has the university community."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i38/38a01203.htm

USA TODAY, May 25 -- Antitrust enforcers will stick with a proposal to split Microsoft Corp. into a company that makes Windows operating systems and another that makes applications such as Microsoft Office in their final breakup plan, people familiar with the case said. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson Wednesday questioned whether the government's breakup plan would restore competition, asking about a three-way split. Jackson signaled he was prepared to sign the government's proposal, due Friday, after Microsoft is given two days to comment on it. Some say Jackson is running a risk in entering a breakup order now that a court of appeals would deem the record insufficient to support the remedy. Still, judges in antitrust cases can rely on the entire record of a trial to support a breakup, legal experts said. ''He has a lot of information and it's not too clear to me that he needs more information in order to decide that a breakup is warranted,'' said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who teaches antitrust law at the University of Iowa and consulted on the case for the states.

FOX NEWS, May 25 -- Long-term exposure to radon, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, can increase the risk of lung cancer, researchers report. Their study in the June 1 issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology investigated exposure to radon in the homes of more than 400 women in Iowa who were diagnosed with lung cancer and more than 600 women of the same age who did not have lung cancer. "Overall, these results suggest that cumulative radon exposure is a significant risk factor for lung cancer in women,'' concluded Dr. R. WILLIAM FIELD with the University of Iowa in Iowa City, and colleagues with St. John's University in Collegeville, Minn. and the University of Kansas in Kansas City. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 25 on the Web site of the LANCASTER NEW ERA newspaper in Pennsylvania.

BOSTON GLOBE, May 25 -- An explosion and fire leveled a rental home on a quiet street in Perry, Iowa, early yesterday, creating a cloud of thick smoke that could be seen for miles. Firefighters found two badly burned men outside the house. The scene was being treated as a possible methamphetamine lab, officials said. The burned men, whose names were not released, were flown to the UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City, where one was in critical condition and the other in serious condition.

THE BIRMINGHAM (Ala.) NEWS, May 24 -- A brief listing of biographical information on a candidate for chief justice of the Alabama state Supreme Court notes that he holds a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LAW degree, and that he worked in research and short-course instruction in the UI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION, 1972-1973.
http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/May2000/24-e412390b.html

THE-CAKE.COM, May 24 -- STEVE BLOOM, an associate professor of journalism at the University of Iowa, wrote an article for this London-based Internet magazine about the horror of watching as his son started to cross the street in front of an oncoming car.
http://www.the-cake.com/parenthood4.htm

YAHOO! NEWS, May 24 -- Communities where child abuse is common are also likely to have high rates of elder abuse, U.S. researchers report. Their study findings suggest that factors that contribute to child poverty are also risk factors for child and elder abuse. "Because elder mistreatment is common and may threaten health and survival, it is important to better understand the associated risk factors, especially in areas with a high proportion of older persons,'' according to GERALD J. JOGERST and associates from the University of Iowa in Iowa City. The investigators compared the number of reported and substantiated cases of elder mistreatment with the population makeup, healthcare resources, and social service characteristics for 99 Iowa counties. They report their findings in the May issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000524/hl/abuse_1.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, May 24 -- After months of back-and-forth volleying between Microsoft Corp. and the government, the question of what sanctions should be imposed against the software giant now shifts to the federal judge who has overseen the antitrust case from its start. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson is trying to craft a remedy that will curb Microsoft's future behavior and restore competition in the software industry. "If he has decided to take a structural remedy proposal seriously, then he's going to want to listen to Microsoft's argument that it will take some extra time," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert from the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/business/cutting/techwire/20000524/tCB00V0241.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 24 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/05/24/national1027EDT0559.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran May 24 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150340215732
Another version of the Associated Press article also ran May 24 on the MIAMI HERALD Web site.
http://www.herald.com:80/content/wed/digdocs/064766.htm
Another version of the Associated Press article also ran May 24 on the FOX MARKETWIRE Web site.
http://foxmarketwire.com:80/052400/microsoft.sml

BIRMINGHAM NEWS, Alabama, May 24 -- A story on Justice Harold See, who is running for election as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, says See has a bachelor's degree from Emporia State University in Kansas, a master's in economics from Iowa State University and a law degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.al.com:80/news/birmingham/May2000/24-e412390b.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 24 -- Three gay and lesbian high school students were awarded full tuition to Iowa state universities under a new scholarship named for slain gay student Matthew Shepard. The scholarships, worth approximately $25,000 each over four years, were presented Tuesday to Galen W. Newton, Jessica M. Brackett and Paul N. Whannel. The scholarships include tuition, books and fees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University or University of Northern Iowa. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 24 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 24 -- After months of back-and-forth volleying between Microsoft Corp. and the government, the question of what sanctions should be imposed against the software giant now shifts to the federal judge who has overseen the antitrust case from its start. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson is trying to craft a remedy that will curb Microsoft's future behavior and restore competition in the software industry. "If he has decided to take a structural remedy proposal seriously, then he' s going to want to listen to Microsoft's argument that it will take some extra time," said HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert from the University of Iowa. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 24 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.

SUN-HERALD, Biloxi, Miss., May 24 -- The judge who found that Microsoft Corp. illegally defended its Windows monopoly is likely to signal today whether he will consider breaking up the company or just focus on curbing the software giant's conduct. What U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson billed as a hearing on proposed remedies in the two-year-old antitrust case could turn into a day of wrangling over how much time the court should give Microsoft to gather evidence to counter the breakup proposal made by the U.S. Justice Department and 17 states. Court arguments over the government's plan to split Microsoft into a company that makes the Windows operating system and another that makes software applications will give Jackson ''an impression of how big a monster he is dealing with,'' said antitrust expert HERBERT HOVENKAMP. Jackson could announce that breakup is ''not on the table'' and deny Microsoft's requests for any further delay, said Hovenkamp, a University of Iowa law professor who has consulted for the states on the case.
http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net:80/business/docs/microsoft052400.htm
The same BLOOMBERG NEWS WIRE SERVICE story ran May 24 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
http://www.boston.com:80/dailyglobe2/145/business/Signal_awaited_from_Microsoft_judge+.shtml

YAHOO! NEWS, May 23 -- Vice President Al Gore's performance on the campaign trail in the past two months is making some Democrats anxious and edgy about his prospects in the November presidential election. Polls now seem to partly reflect that view that Gore is not well liked by a sizable proportion of the electorate, raising the question of how much commitment and intensity he will be able to inspire in the fall. On the other hand, most of the models constructed by political scientists predict that Gore ought indeed to win this election, largely on the back of the strong economy. One model unveiled last week by University of Iowa political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, predicted that Gore would win around 56 percent of the vote -- an easy victory.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000523/pl/gore_analysis_1.html

BARRON'S, May 23 -- Even before the market selloff in March, J. Gary Craven, co-lead portfolio manager of the Evergreen Global Opportunities Fund, and his colleagues posted solid results, though their growth-at-a-reasonable price (GARP) philosophy has been out of favor for some time. (Craven handles domestic stocks, while the other lead manager, Gilman C. Gunn, oversees the fund's international stocks.) The fund had a spectacular 1999 (after several disappointing years), garnering a total return of 76.8% -- putting it in the top 10% of Morningstar's world stock category. And though the fund is down about 3% so far this year, it's still outperforming most of its peers. Craven holds an undergraduate degree in business from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The introduction is followed by a Q&A with Craven.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB959102740802748367.djm

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, May 23 -- Two Colville tribal members who recently earned law degrees with help from the tribal government have tacked their shingles at the Reservation Attorneys Office. Theresa Reyes and Melissa Campobasso, who grew up on the Colville Reservation, were welcomed back by tribal Chairwoman Colleen Cawston. Reyes earned her law degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Before joining the tribal legal internship program, she graduated from Gonzaga University with majors in criminal justice and political science. Reyes also worked in a private law office.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=052300&ID=s805831&cat=

WASHINGTON POST, May 23 -- A story on Medical Web site describes as "very helpful" the "VIRUTAL HOSPITAL" (http://www.vh.org/), a database run by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that on many subjects includes the text of books and articles.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53767-2000May23.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, May 23 -- The Department of Education's expert panel, assembled to find the best math programs in the United States, had a key problem, critics say. It relied heavily on studies of student achievement that were authored or co-authored by the directors of the programs themselves -- or by people with close institutional or other ties to the program. In the cases of Core-Plus Mathematics Project and the Connected Mathematics Project, a middle-school program, studies showing positive student achievement were submitted to the Department of Education's expert panel. But neither Core-Plus nor Connected Math has yet published in a peer-reviewed journal the findings from the field-tests of their programs -- though these were the primary studies supplied to the expert panel as proof the programs work. Core-Plus was one of the best of the programs reviewed, panel members say. But studies of its effectiveness were co-authored by HAROLD SCHOEN, a University of Iowa professor. Schoen, who is listed as a co-director of the program, admits he is in line to receive royalties from the sales of Core-Plus textbooks. His studies, he says, are not motivated by the prospect of royalties, of which he has received little. Nobody, including research ethicists, argues that Schoen's studies are invalid. As a co-director of the program, Schoen's studies provide a valuable basis for analysis. However, experts say, his co-authorship and receipt of royalties, mean his reports should require independent peer review. Still, Schoen and Steven Leinwand, the co-chair of the expert panel, both contend that the ultimate peer review for the winning programs was the education panel's process itself.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/05/23/fp15s2-csm.shtml

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, May 23 ---- BASIL THOMPSON, formerly of the Milwaukee Ballet and now a dance professor at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story on Mireille Favarel, whom Thompson hired as a principal dancer in Milwaukee in 1989 when the ballet company was at one of its lowest points. "Hiring Mireille was one of the best decisions I ever made," Thompson said of Favarel, who is trading her ballet slippers for teaching.

NEWS TRIBUNE, (Tacoma, Wash.), May 22 -- A story about a survey showing that men value time over pay quotes University of Iowa sociology professor JENNIFER GLASS. Glass says despite the fact that respondents to the survey by the Radcliffe Public Policy Center failed to report any barriers to making use of benefits such as flex scheduling and paternity leave, this is misleading. "Certainly in the corporate setting there is more talk than action," Glass said. "People are still very reluctant to take advantage of accommodations that might help their family situation because they think it might hurt their career success."

COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, May 22 -- A list of patents issues assigned to central Ohio businesses or individuals for the period ending May 4 include Number US 6061582 for a "method and apparatus for non-invasive determination of physiological chemicals, particularly glucose." The patent holders are Ohio University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION. The inventors are MARK ARNOLD (a chemistry professor at the University of Iowa) and Gary W. Small of The Plains, Ohio.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, May 22 -- More than half of the states do not have tracking systems in place to monitor asthma--the most common chronic disease afflicting children--although California gets credit for trying, according to a new report released today. The study, conducted by the nonprofit organization Health-Track, said many states did not have ready access to asthma hospitalization statistics (19 states) or data on the cost of the disease to their jurisdictions (32 states). And 47 states said they did not have ready access "to data that would inform their jurisdictions about the quality of disease management for asthma sufferers in their communities." Among those--in addition to California--cited for innovative attempts to deal with this knowledge gap were Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, the cities of New York and Chicago, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH.

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, May 21 -- The younger generation of working women today place considerably more importance on job prestige and salary, while also placing a stronger priority on family time than did their elders, a recent study shows. When asked to rate various job characteristics, 36 percent of young women said job prestige and status was very important -- double the ratio of all other age groups. Those women, ages 21 to 29, hold status in higher regard than all ages of men, according to the national survey of 1,008 men and women interviewed in January and February and recently released by the Radcliffe Public Policy Center in New York. Few respondents to the Radcliffe survey reported any barriers to their making use of benefits such as flex scheduling and paternity leave. But some say that is misleading. "Certainly in the corporate setting there is more talk than action," said JENNIFER GLASS, a sociology professor at the University of Iowa. "People are still very reluctant to take advantage of accommodations that might help their family situation because they think it might hurt their career success." That is less true in the non-corporate setting, she said, crediting labor unions with furthering the family-friendly movement.

THE OREGONIAN, May 21 -- An anniversary story on the 1998 Springfield, Ore., school shooting spree in which Kip Kinkel murdered his parents before killing classmates at his school quotes DAVID ROSENTHAL, a family therapist and associate professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Rosenthal says the fact that Kinkel lived and his victims had a chance to confront him at his sentencing trial gave them a boost in their recovery, unlike the students at Columbine High School, where the student gunmen killed themselves. "You begin the process of healing by sharing," he said. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 20 on the Web site of the SPOKANE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=052000&ID=s804852&cat=

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, May 21 -- Real money is being made and lost on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem), an academic experiment run by the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. People can trade presidential candidates, Senate and House races -- or even buy stock in the Mexican presidential race. As for congressional elections, those who wish to can buy any combination of party control in the House and the Senate.

THE ECONOMIST (London, England), May 20 -- In a recurring feature, the magazine includes a graph from the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. This graph shows Al Gore and George W. Bush neck-and-neck in the markets, with their shares at about 48 cents each.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 19 -- A story about community colleges' decisions to hire consultants to help them retain and recruit students quotes Robert L. Breuder, president of William Rainey Harper College in Palatine, Ill., who wants to position the college so that top high-school students include Harper on their short list with four-year institutions like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i37/37a06501.htm

USA TODAY, May 18 -- While as many as 85 percent of menstruating women report having at least one symptom of premenstrual syndrome, only 5 percent to 10 percent experience debilitating PMS symptoms, according to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). Two decades ago, the most doctors had to offer women complaining of PMS was a sympathetic ear. ''I think that the major service I probably provided back in those days was being somebody who would listen to women tell about their symptoms and believe them,'' says SUSAN JOHNSON, a University of Iowa College of Medicine obstetrician-gynecologist who co-wrote the ACOG guidelines. Often, Johnson says, those women had seen several physicians, who assured them that their symptoms were ''just a normal part of being a woman'' or ''all in their head.''

BOSTON GLOBE, May 17 -- Fans, old and new, and Harvard Square booksellers greeted novelist Jane Smiley at a reception at the First Parish Church before the writer read from her new novel, ''Horse Heaven,'' as part of the square's sixth annual Book Festival. In addition to new fans like Twila Alexander of the Harvard Coop's bookstore, there were old fans and friends like business writer Deborah Dumaine of Lincoln who knows Smiley from their days together at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S WRITERS' PROGRAM.

SALON, MAY 17 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, who teaches medical reporting at the University of Iowa, is the author of an article on the effects of antidepressants on sexual fulfillment.
http://www.salon.com/health/sex/urge/2000/05/17/sex_drugs/index.html

NATIONAL REVIEW, May 16 -- The on-line version of the magazine confirms that its "Hotline" reported last week that a University of Iowa professor (Political Science Professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK) predicts (Al) Gore will win the election with 56 percent of the vote. "That's not a typo: a 56 percent Gore landslide. The professor's predictive model uses the economy and public opinion polls about the current president and political parties," the article states.
http://www.nationalreview.com/nota_bene/nota_bene.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, May 16 -- A story about Al Gore's struggle to hold onto "safe states" says that in Iowa, which voted Democratic in the past three elections, part of the reason George W. Bush and Gore are running even is the economy. Some voters won't give credit for the economic boom to a vice president -- even one as active as Gore. "There's some spillover, but a lot of people say it's (Federal Reserve Chairman) Alan Greenspan or the private sector that are driving the economy," says ARTHUR MILLER, a professor and pollster at the University of Iowa. Another element of Gore's soft support in these states is his criticism of Bush. "It doesn't gain him anything to be aggressive all the time," Miller says. "That may backfire on him eventually."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/05/16/text/p1s4.html

MSNBC, May 16 -- A story about pregnancy supplements says that while it's been a staple in many Asian-American households, ginger's safety has never been tested over the long haul, says Dr. JENNIFER NIEBYL, chairwoman of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa Medical School. One study showed eating ginger did help women with severe morning sickness, Niebyl says, but the study didn't follow the women six or eight months later to check on the health of their babies. "While it is unlikely that ginger causes harm, we can't say that for sure because the studies haven't been done," she says.
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/408028.asp?cp1=1#BODY

THE NATION, May 15 -- A sidebar to a story about the "new student movement" across U.S. college campuses says that more than 30 students and community activists called on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to embrace the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC) and occupied the administration building for six days in April. Police removed the protesters and arrested five of them.

MSNBC, May 15 -- A story about the University of Iowa's study of Benadryl's impact on drivers using its driving simulator says a photographer with an NBC affiliate station in Chicago took the same test -- with similar results. "When all of a sudden I saw a truck pull out in front of me, I didn't react fast enough," he said. "After going through the simulator, I'll never take Benadryl and drive again." In the University of Iowa's tests, drivers in the simulator who took an over-the-counter antihistamine had trouble avoiding accidents and staying in their lanes. The antihistamine they took, called diphenhydramine, is commonly known by the trade name Benadryl. "What we found was the performance after taking diphenhydramine was worse than after taking alcohol," said researcher Dr. JOHN WEILER, who led the study.

MODESTO (Calif.) BEE, May 15 -- A story about ARMANDO DUARTE, who dances, choreographs and teaches, was born in Brazil and has lived in the United States for 10 years, teaching at the University of Iowa for the past six. For much of March he toured the West, visiting 19 cities -- from Salt Lake City to Seattle to Tucson -- to view the work of 23 companies that will participate in this week's Regional Dance America festival in Modesto, Calif.
http://www.modbee.com/entertainment/story/0,1159,159207,00.html

TIMES-PICAYUNE, New Orleans, May 14 -- Campus police at Iowa's three state universities say they should be allowed to carry firearms, but the university presidents and the Board of Regents say they will not alter their long-standing policy against arming campus police. ANN RHODES, vice president of university relations at the University of Iowa, says armed officers might be too tempted. "There's concern that if people have guns or firearms, they would move to use those firearms fairly quickly without trying to use alternative ways of handling problems," she says. CHUCK GREEN, UI director of campus safety, says his officers have encountered students with weapons and in such cases must call in local Iowa City police officers to handle the situation. "One of those times, one of these officers is going to get unnecessarily harmed or, because we're not fully equipped, we won't be able to aid one of our constituents," he said.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, May 13 -- College administrators across the country are scrambling to accommodate the latest campus craze: majoring in the computer sciences. With the Internet economy producing a healthy supply of high-tech, high-paying jobs, computer science courses are experiencing a popularity unequaled since personal computers arrived in the early 1980s. A recent survey by Michigan State University found that expected starting salaries for May graduates with bachelor's degrees in the computer sciences were among the highest of all graduates', topping out at $48,000. "It's taking a toll on the faculty. Every year they're faced with bigger classes," said STEVE BRUELL, chairman of the computer science department at the University of Iowa.

COPLEY NEWSPAPERS, May 11 -- A story about opera singer Steve Jepson, who will perform May 28 for an audience of 2,800 people at Carnegie Hall, says Jepson portrayed the character Escamillo in "Carmen" throughout France and Spain. He said that the 1995 role was a turning point in his career. As a music student from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the machismo role of Escamillo was a change of pace, in contrast with his low-key personality. Copley publishes a variety of Chicago-area newspapers under its Sun Publications.

NEW YORK TIMES, May 11 -- The legal protest that Microsoft filed yesterday in reply to the government's plan to break up the company is an essay of grim futurism. Microsoft calls the government plan a "Draconian" and "speculative" proposal that would bring "uncertainty and chaos." Employees, the company says, would leave in droves. Its business would be destroyed, and the industry and consumers would "suffer enormous harm." The apocalyptic passages seem intended to warn Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson that splitting up Microsoft would be a dangerous gamble to take with a company that is a pillar of the nation's high-technology economy. "The judge has to make an informed hunch about how things are likely to play out," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school. "It's not really some exact science."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/05/biztech/articles/11assess.html
The same New York Times article ran May 11 on the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Web site.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/reax11.shtml

BLACK ISSUES IN HIGHER EDUCATION, May 11 -- The publication reports the arrest of Tarsha Claiborne for allegedly sending e-mail threats to fellow minority dental students at the University of Iowa. "You would guess it was motivated at some level by hostility, but you don't know if that hostility was aimed toward specific individuals, or hostility in general -- or if her motivation was just to get the black community in Iowa City riled up about something," said DONALD BLACK, a psychiatry professor at the UI.

BOOK, May 10, 2000 -- A story about the book "A Region Not Home: Reflections From Exile," by JAMES ALAN MCPHERSON, says that reflections on Othello, Ralph Ellison and being black in America are among the topics addressed in these meditations by this Pulitzer Prize-winning essayist and teacher at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. One of the best essays, "Gravitas," was inspired by the publication of Ellison's "Juneteenth," and looks back on Ellison's life and times.
http://www.bookmagazine.com/archive/issue10/capsules.shtml

GLOBE & MAIL, (Toronto, Canada), May 10 -- In the past decade it has become clear that cell-to-cell communication in certain "biofilms" such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a dedicated signaling system that allows bacteria to turn on beneficial genes once their population reaches a critical size. In 1994, PETE GREENBERG, a microbiologist at the University of Iowa, coined the term "quorum-sensing" to describe it. It's now known to be a relatively common phenomenon.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, May 10 -- A story about a 31-year-old woman charged with murder for allegedly driving into oncoming traffic on purpose, killing several of her children as well as three people in the van she hit, says that about 10 percent of women who give birth suffer from postpartum depression. Some experts blame it on the sudden hormonal changes that follow childbirth. In one in 1,000 mothers, postpartum depression can go from a bad case of the lingering blues to hallucinations, paranoia and worse, said Dr. SCOTT STUART, who researches the topic for the University of Iowa. "Women have reported hearing voices telling them to kill their children," he said. And over the years, some have done so. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 10 in the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, the STAR-LEDGER in Newark, N.J., the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER and the COURIER-JOURNAL in Louisville, Ky.

ARIZONA DAILY STAR, May 10 -- A story about a 31-year-old woman charged with murder for allegedly driving into oncoming traffic on purpose, killing several of her children as well as three people in the van she hit, says that about 10 percent of women who give birth suffer from postpartum depression. Some experts blame it on the sudden hormonal changes that follow childbirth. In one in 1,000 mothers, postpartum depression can go from a bad case of the lingering blues to hallucinations, paranoia and worse, said Dr. SCOTT STUART, who researches the topic for the University of Iowa. "Women have reported hearing voices telling them to kill their children," he said. And over the years, some have done so.The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 10 on the SEATTLE TIMES Web site.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/nation-world/html98/post10_20000510.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the TOPEKA (Kan.) CAPITAL-JOURNAL Web site.
http://cjonline.com/stories/051000/new_postpartum.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the Florida SUN-SENTINEL Web site.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/daily/detail/0,1136,31500000000109780,00.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site. The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the APB NEWS Web site. APB News is an on-line news service covering police and crime news, information and entertainment.
http://www.apbnews.com:80/newscenter/breakingnews/2000/05/09/postpartum0509_01.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the NANDO TIMES Web site. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150340206615
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/05/10/national0103EDT0413.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/national/050900/postpartum.sml
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on the COURT TV Web site.
http://www.courttv.com:80/national/2000/0509/postpartum_ap.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on CANADIAN ONLINE EXPLORER, a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site.
http://www.canoe.com:80/CNEWSFeatures0005/09_four.html

WASHINGTON POST, May 10 -- In March researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA published results in the Annals of Internal Medicine showing that drivers under the influence of Benadryl performed as if they were legally drunk. One employee at the National Institute for Allergies said that after taking one such antihistamine, she got so high that "I felt like I was in a remake of 'Valley of the Dolls.' "
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A37368-2000May9.html

NEWSDAY, May 10 -- Robert L. Fleischer, a geology professor at Union College, led a team that examined 17 sets of eyeglass lenses using regular and electron microscopy, measuring and mapping the tiny, conical dents made when radioactive particles of a decaying radon molecule smash into lenses made of CR-39 plastic. By comparing the ''etchings'' -- less than a few thousandths of an inch deep -- to constant markings created in a radon chamber, Fleischer determined how much radon the wearer was exposed to since he or she first started wearing glasses. R. WILLIAM FIELD, a cancer epidemiologist at the University of Iowa, said Fleischer's research will work best in conjunction with environmental studies to provide a better idea of radon's effect on lung cancer. ''The hardest part of a radon epidemiology study is you have to know what the retrospective radon exposure was,'' Field said. ''These give us better dose estimates. When we have better dose estimates we can make better risk projections concerning the health risks posed by home exposure. It's very innovative.''The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 10 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.

YAHOO! NEWS, May 9 -- A story about a 31-year-old woman charged with murder for allegedly driving into oncoming traffic on purpose, killing several of her children as well as three people in the van she hit, says that about 10 percent of women who give birth suffer from postpartum depression. Some experts blame it on the sudden hormonal changes that follow childbirth. In one in 1,000 mothers, postpartum depression can go from a bad case of the lingering blues to hallucinations, paranoia and worse, said Dr. SCOTT STUART, who researches the topic for the University of Iowa. "Women have reported hearing voices telling them to kill their children," he said. And over the years, some have done so.
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the CHICAGO SUN-TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 10 on the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Web site.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/national/dead10.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran May 9 on the EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER-PRESS Web site.
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200005/09+jury050900_news.html+20000509

WASHINGTON POST, May 9 -- In response to a young woman's question about incontinence while exercising, the author of a health article quotes INGRID E. NYGAARD, an associate professor in obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, as saying: "While we don't know exactly why this seems to be a problem, we do know that each person has a continence threshold determined by muscles, ligaments and blood supply. When a person surpasses that, it is very likely they will leak."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29006-2000May8.html

HONG KONG STANDARD, May 8 -- Microsoft Corp. will follow a federal judge's order and this week propose restrictions on its business practices, taking an approach sharply divergent from a government plan to cleave the software giant into two firms. Microsoft has said it wants extensive hearings to review the government's proposal, especially in light of new Justice Department allegations of the company's wrongdoing that were outside of the trial record. "To the extent that Judge (Thomas Penfield) Jackson is going to rely on evidence outside of the trial record to justify his trial remedy, he needs to be extremely sure the information he gets is balanced and reliable,'' said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa, who has consulted occasionally for states that helped bring the case.
The same REUTERS article ran May 8 on the MACWEEK Web site.
http://macweek.zdnet.com:80/2000/05/07/0508mspenalty.html
The same Reuters article ran May 8 on the INFORMATION WEEK Web site.
http://www.informationweek.com:80/story/IWK20000508S0003

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, May 8 --Economists who have studied local subsidies to private enterprise say the deals often fail to deliver on promises to taxpayers and frequently flunk cost-benefits tests. In general, the direct public benefits of subsidies should outweigh the costs, said ALAN PETERS, professor of urban and regional planning at the University of Iowa. But in most property tax subsidies, he said, "if you look at dollars lost and gained, it's unlikely that the benefits will make sense for a city . . . "

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, May 8 -- Allergy medications are often hard to take. The primary weapon remains antihistamines, which were developed in the 1930s and block the production of histamine, the body chemical that causes hives, itching, and nasal congestion. Many people are choosing over-the-counter drugs over costly prescriptions, putting themselves and others at risk. Benadryl and other older antihistamines have been implicated in fatal traffic accidents, including several involving bus drivers. In March, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA published results in the Annals of Internal Medicine showing that drivers under the influence of Benadryl performed as if they were legally drunk.
http://www.usnews.com:80/usnews/issue/000508/allergies.htm

TECHWEB, May 8 -- Microsoft Corp. will follow a federal judge's order and this week propose restrictions on its business practices, taking an approach sharply divergent from a government plan to cleave the software giant into two firms. Microsoft has said it wants extensive hearings to review the government's proposal, especially in light of new Justice Department allegations of the company's wrongdoing that were outside of the trial record. "To the extent that Judge (Thomas Penfield) Jackson is going to rely on evidence outside of the trial record to justify his trial remedy, he needs to be extremely sure the information he gets is balanced and reliable,'' said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa, who has consulted occasionally for states that helped bring the case.
http://www.techweb.com/wire/story/reuters/REU20000508S0005
The same REUTERS article ran May 7 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/reuters/technology/tech-microsoft-respon.html
The same Reuters article ran May 7 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000507/wr/microsoft_response_3.html

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, May 7 -- State civil rights officials will not act on complaints against the University of Iowa over a spokeswoman's remark that white men are "the root of most evil." The comment was made April 20 by ANN RHODES, vice president for university relations, during a press conference about the arrest of a black woman in a series of threats against minority students at the UI College of Dentistry. She immediately apologized for the comment.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, May 7 -- CARY COVINGTON, a University of Iowa political scientist, says that Republicans haven't really won the middle swing voters in the last two presidential elections and they haven't won the presidency. He said that an endorsement by former GOP candidate John McCain would give George W. Bush a leg up with that key group.

DETROIT NEWS, May 7 -- Public safety officials at the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa say their officers sometimes feel overmatched, making traffic stops and arrests armed with just a nightstick and a can of pepper spray. But university presidents and the Iowa Board of Regents, which oversees the state schools, balk at arming officers on campus. ANN RHODES, vice president of university relations at Iowa, says armed officers might be too tempted. "There's concern that if people have guns or firearms, they would move to use those firearms fairly quickly without trying to use alternative ways of handling problems," she says. Security officials say today's world is more dangerous than ever. Earlier this year, unarmed officers at Iowa encountered a student running from an apartment in a building owned by the university. He told police of a roommate armed with a shotgun, assault rifle, semiautomatic pistol and a couple of knives. "He apparently wanted to kill himself by 'suicide-by-cop,'" recalls CHUCK GREEN, safety director there. Iowa City Police handled the call. "You can have a myriad of near-misses like that," says Green. "One of those times, one of these officers is going to get unnecessarily harmed or, because we're not fully equipped, we won't be able to aid one of our constituents."
http://detnews.com:80/2000/nation/0005/07/a13-50631.htm

WASHINGTON POST, May 7 -- DAVID SCHOENBAUM, a professor of history at the University of Iowa who is working on a social history of the violin, is the author of an article on a recent tour of China, where he saw a high school ensemble from Cincinnati engage the Chinese people in music. "The three-week tour nonetheless convinced me of a couple of important facts: The first is that a lot of increasingly assertive Chinese parents want for their children what Americans long ago learned to take for granted; the second is that a group of talented young Americans with no political agenda can be extraordinarily persuasive, even inspirational role models. While it was hard enough squeezing four cellos and a borrowed bass onto the bus, both observations made me wish that a few dozen members of Congress had come along to see what I saw."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A19888-2000May6.html

SEATTLE TIMES, May 7 -- Nike, one of the nation's leaders in outfitting college sports teams and manufacturing licensed apparel with university and team logos, and its prominent chairman, Phil Knight, have withdrawn millions of dollars in financial support from three universities in the past three weeks. The schools -- the University of Michigan, the University of Oregon and Brown University recently have joined a student-led group that wants to impose tougher standards concerning wages and working conditions in Nike's overseas factories, which some critics have called sweatshops. Brown was one of the Workers' Rights Consortium's three charter members. Now, 47 institutions, including Oregon, Michigan and Georgetown University, have aligned themselves with the organization. At least five other of the 47 WRC schools have large-scale deals with Nike. Some of these 47 schools, such as Georgetown, left the Fair Labor Association and aligned with the WRC on a conditional basis. Georgetown does not have an institutional contract with Nike to outfit all of its teams, but the universities of North Carolina, IOWA and Illinois are Nike "University Partners" and are affiliated with the WRC. This is a Washington Post article.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=clos07&date=20000507&query=university+of+Iowa

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, May 5 -- Modern Maturity magazine, published by AARP, set out to find 50 of the nation's towns and cities best suited for the "new style" of retiring, in which retirees don't just relax, but go back to college, start a business, or take up consulting. Iowa City, home of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was ranked sixth out of the 10 listed in the Chronicle. No. 1 was Austin, Texas (home of the University of Texas).
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i35/35a01403.htm

DENVER POST, May 5 -- The Boulder Valley, Colo., school district hired the nine-year head of the Tucson Unified School District in Arizona as its new superintendent. George Garcia, 57, will take the post being vacated by Tom Seigel, whose two-year contract as superintendent ends in June. Before Tucson, Garcia spent four years as superintendent in Kansas City, Mo., during the desegregation of that district. He also held top administrative and teaching positions in Texas and Iowa, where his service ranged from a junior high school principal to a teacher at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Iowa State Penitentiary.
http://www.denverpost.com/news/news0505k.htm

BALTIMORE SUN, May 5 -- A story of the rehabilitation of old apartments in south Baltimore quotes renovator Shane Mitchell, who moved to the city from Anamosa, Iowa, seven years ago to care for his ailing grandmother. He also ended up tending to her rental property, and inherited it when she died. Mitchell had put himself through the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA working construction jobs, and had a few rehab projects while in the mortgage business. When he moved to Hanover Street in 1998 and saw the potential, he called his college roommate, Andrew Todtz, and pitched his business idea. Soon after, Todtz left Iowa to subcontract for Green Door.

WASHINGTON POST, May 4 -- Nike, one of the nation's leaders in outfitting college sports teams and manufacturing licensed apparel with university and team logos, and its prominent chairman, Phil Knight, have withdrawn millions of dollars in financial support from three universities in the past three weeks. The schools -- the University of Michigan, the University of Oregon and Brown University recently have joined a student-led group that wants to impose tougher standards concerning wages and working conditions in Nike's overseas factories, which some critics have called sweatshops. Brown was one of the Workers' Rights Consortium's three charter members. Now, 47 institutions, including Oregon, Michigan and Georgetown University, have aligned themselves with the organization. At least five other of the 47 WRC schools have large-scale deals with Nike. Some of these 47 schools, such as Georgetown, left the Fair Labor Association and aligned with the WRC on a conditional basis. Georgetown does not have an institutional contract with Nike to outfit all of its teams, but the universities of North Carolina, IOWA and Illinois are Nike "University Partners" and are affiliated with the WRC.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A474-2000May3.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, May 4 -- A story about the band Special Consensus lists as one of the previous band members mandolinist WALLY VISPOEL (1976-1977), associate professor of educational psychology and measurements and statistics at the University of Iowa.

REUTERS HEALTH, May 4 -- The vast majority of patients who had a hip replacement 25 years ago remain satisfied with the results of their operation, according to a recent report. "In addition to demonstrating the remarkable durability of the results of total hip (replacement), this study should provide the means for comparison with procedures performed with newer cementing techniques and newer designs,'' the authors write in The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. The results of the study are based on the experience of RICHARD C. JOHNSTON, an orthopedic surgeon with the University of Iowa College of Medicine in Iowa City. Between 1970 and 1972, Johnston performed 330 total hip replacements in 262 patients using a type of implant known as a Charnley hip prosthesis, for a number of hip problems such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and arthritis related to a congenital problem or caused by an accident.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000504/hl/hip_replacement_1.html

SALON, May 4 -- A story on the risks of the semi-sterile environment in which many Westerners live discusses at length the work of JOEL WEINSTOCK, a parasitologist and director of the Center for Digestive Diseases at the University of Iowa and the lead researcher in a study on the apparent ability of a drink laced with the eggs of parasitic worms to treat Crohn's Disease, an inflammatory bowel disease. Humans, Weinstock notes, "traditionally evolved to live more like in the underdeveloped countries, closer to the soil, closer to our animals. We didn't evolve as creatures that live in sterile rooms, eating sterile food, with our children playing in plastic playgrounds at the mall, playing with animals that have been dewormed." Kids, in fact, used to have worms all the time, too: pinworms, whipworms, roundworms. "If you look at the public health data, up until the 1930s most children had these worms," Weinstock says. "Of children between the ages of 3 and 12, 70 percent had it [pinworms and trichuras] in their [gastrointestinal] tract at any one time. It's the same in undeveloped countries today."
http://www.salon.com/health/feature/2000/05/04/germ_warfare_two/index.html

USA TODAY, May 4 -- A judge has ordered that a black student accused of sending racist e-mails to her minority classmates at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA DENTAL SCHOOL undergo psychological evaluation. Tarsha Claiborne, 23, was arrested last month on a string of charges stemming from the threats that occurred over three weeks. A doctor who initially evaluated Claiborne said she suffered a severe depressive disorder and recommended prompt treatment.

(Cleveland) PLAIN DEALER, May 3 -- Doctors tend to underestimate premature babies' odds of survival and overestimate their chances of a serious handicap, and, as a result, many premature infants might not be getting proper care, researchers say. The researchers surveyed about 630 obstetricians and pediatricians and published the findings in the May issue of the journal Pediatrics. "It is very important that professionals and mothers understand that the outcomes for very low birthweight babies are far better than most people believe," said Dr. MICHAEL ACARREGUI, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa who was not involved in the study. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared May 3 in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL and THE GAZETTE of Montreal, Quebec.

THE HINDU, May 3 -- With its recent proposal, filed in a federal district court in Washington, the government has formally opted for drastic surgery, a split-up of Microsoft into two companies and a litany of restraints on its business practices for three years. But HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School, says that in the end it's up to the judge to decide the remedies in the case. "He's not bound by the recommendations of either side on remedies," said Hovenkamp. "And the result could be that his ultimate remedy does not closely resemble the proposals of either side." The Hindu is India's National Newspaper.
http://www.indiaserver.com:80/thehindu/2000/05/03/stories/0603000a.htm

SALON, May 3 -- The on-line magazine features an article on the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM), run by the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. The markets started in 1988 as an academic experiment by three Iowa professors who looked at Jesse Jackson's presidential race in Michigan and realized his primary win had never been predicted in the polls. The trio decided to set up a system that would create a better, more accurate predictive model -- and tried to lure people to log on, invest in politicians and maybe make a little money. Addressing the huge drop in New York Senate candidate Rudy Giuliani's stock after he announced he has prostate cancer, JEANINE PFUNTNER, operations manager of the Iowa Electronic Markets, said "It's much like what we saw when (Bill) Bradley announced he had a heart problem." At the time, Bradley's stock fell from 23 cents to 13 cents and, obviously, never really recovered. Says Pfuntner: "If people think you are going to die, they don't want to elect you."
http://salon.com/politics2000/feature/2000/05/03/stock/index.html

NEWSDAY, May 2 -- Doctors tend to underestimate premature babies' odds of survival and overestimate their chances of a serious handicap, and as a result, many premature infants might not be getting proper care, researchers say. The researchers surveyed about 630 obstetricians and pediatricians and published the findings in the May issue of the journal Pediatrics. "It is very important that professionals and mothers understand that the outcomes for very low birthweight babies are far better than most people believe," said Dr. MICHAEL ACARREGUI, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa who was not involved in the study.
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 2 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 2 on the ABC NEWS Web site.
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/living/DailyNews/birth_premature0502.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 1 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 1 on the NANDO TIMES Web site. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.

SLATE, May 2 -- The on-line magazine published a poem by SUSAN WHEELER, whose books include "Bag 'o' Diamonds and Smokes." A current Guggenheim Fellow, she teaches at Princeton University and in the graduate creative writing programs at the New School in New York City and the University of Iowa.
http://slate.msn.com:80/Poem/00-05-02/Poem.asp

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, May 2 -- Doctors tend to underestimate premature babies' odds of survival and overestimate their chances of a serious handicap, and as a result, many premature infants might not be getting proper care, researchers say. The researchers surveyed about 630 obstetricians and pediatricians and published the findings in the May issue of the journal Pediatrics. "It is very important that professionals and mothers understand that the outcomes for very low birthweight babies are far better than most people believe," said Dr. MICHAEL ACARREGUI, an assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa who was not involved in the study. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran May 2 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran May 2 on the MSNBC Web site.
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/402098.asp?cp1=1
The same Associated Press article ran May 2 on THE (Myrtle Beach, S.C.) SUN NEWS.
The same Associated Press article ran May 2 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/05/02/national0105EDT0408.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran May 1 on the MODESTO (Calif.) BEE Web site.
http://www.nandotimes.com/24hour/modbee/healthscience/story/0,1655,500199016-500273667-501444708-0,00.html
The same Associated Press article ran May 1 on the TOPEKA (Kan.) CAPITAL-JOURNAL Web site.
http://cjonline.com/stories/050200/new_preemies.shtml

EASTSIDE JOURNAL, Bellevue, Wash, May 1 -- A story about tracking stocks, which are spun off from large companies to existing shareholders of the parent corporation to monitor the relative performance of a division and neither give the holder voting rights nor pay dividends, cites a recent study by MATTHEW T. BILLETT and ANAND M. VIJH of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. The study measured performance of all tracking stocks issued in the U.S. between 1984 and 1999 over a three-year period beginning on the initial date of issue, and compared them to three benchmarks adjusted for the entire market, the company's industry, and stocks of a similar size. When compared to three benchmarks, 19 of the 28 tracking stocks underperform all three, and only five outperform all three benchmarks, according to the study.
http://www.eastsidejournal.com/sited/retr_story.pl/18483

COMMUNITY COLLEGE WEEK, May 1 -- Vinson Horace Champ, a comedian accused of committing a string of sexual assaults on or near college campuses where he performed, was found guilty in late April of the 1997 rape of a Nebraska college student. Authorities in Iowa City in April charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping in connection with the rape of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in 1996.

SOUTH AMERICAN EXPLORER, May 2000 -- "The River of Lost Voices: Stories from Guatemala," a book written by Mark Brazaitis and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is reviewed. Brazaitis, who now teaches English in a Harlem nursing school, was a Peace Corps volunteer and technical trainer in Guatemala, mostly in and around the village of Santa Cruz Verapaz, for nearly five years in the 1990s. "What he came to understand is this: there are really at least two distinct, and sometimes conflicting and confusing, Guatemalas, two cultures, divergent classes, or even parallel universes with little or no overlap -- an aristocratic one populated by the Spanish-speaking Latinos who do their best to deflect the marginalized hordes of Mayan Indigenas speaking many tongues," writes the reviewer.

HEALTH, May 2000 -- ARTHUR HARTZ, a Chronic Fatigue Syndrome researcher at the University of Iowa, says in a story on the condition that "the classic case is someone who is doing well, has an infectious illness, and then never recovers."

MODERN MATURITY, May-June 2000 -- An article about great places to retire ranks Iowa City sixth among college towns. "Iowa City claims to be the most educated community in America. While we can't confirm that, it does have a strong intellectual bent. The University of Iowa's famous IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP brings poetry readings to the Prairie Lights bookstore. And the university's teaching hospital is one of the largest in the U.S."

CONSUMER REPORTS, May 2000 -- ARTHUR J. NOWAK, D.M.D, a professor of pediatric dentistry and pediatrics at the University of Iowa, wrote a letter to the magazine in response to its March "Front Lines" item on children and caffeinated sodas. The piece "should also have pointed out the effects on oral health. Many of us in pediatric dentistry are alarmed by the increase of children under three who are referred to us because of nursing-bottle caries, a severe destruction of the upper front baby teeth."

CIVILIZATION, May 2000 -- LINDA K. KERBER, author and professor of history at the University of Iowa, describes the challenge she faced researching a book on the role of women in the Revolutionary War. Most libraries didn't take her seriously. "But when I brought my pencils ä to the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, Carolyn Hoover Sung and David Wigdor made me welcome." Kerber's article was one of several written in commemoration of the Library of Congress' birthday.

SKY & TELESCOPE, May 2000 -- The magazine reports that a nine-month observing project to detect miniature comets zipping past Earth has "come up empty." The research was done by ROBERT L. MUTEL of the University of Iowa and John D. Fix of the University of Alabama, Huntsville. "We got zero," Mutel says. Despite the findings, LOUIS A. FRANK of the University of Iowa says his own analysis of what he considers the best images has turned up at least nine very faint trails. "The objects are there," he says. Frank and Iowa colleague JOHN B. SIGWARTH have maintained since 1986 that an immense population of 20- to 40-ton comet nuclei pervade the inner solar system and strike Earth's upper atmosphere five to 30 times a minute.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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