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UI in the News

March 2000

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NEW YORK TIMES, March 31 -- The paper's Art Guide includes a listing and brief review of an exhibition by JOHN DILG, a UI professor of art and art history. His first New York solo show features "small, exactingly composed paintings." The reviewer notes that "with delicate, slightly blurry lines inscribed into smooth fields of blue-gray, olive or brown, they exude a modest archetypal mystery."

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 31 -- Gov. Tom Vilsack and the mother of Matthew Shepard announced the establishment of a college scholarship program in Shepard' s name for openly gay high school students. Three scholarships a year will be given to gay high school graduates who want to attend one of Iowa' s three state universities. The scholarships will cover tuition, fees and books at the University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University or the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
The same Associated Press article ran March 31 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran March 31 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
A slightly modified version of the Associated Press article ran March 31 on the PLANETOUT Web site. PlanetOut is an Internet media company offering news and other services for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people as well as their family and friends.

COPLEY NEWSPAPERS, March 31 -- A story about 29-year-old Illinois resident Estlin Feigley, who recently directed an 80-minute independent feature film titled "Toll Bridge to Iowa," says Feigley earned a master's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The story ran on the Web site of the Copley newspaper chain.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 31 -- JOHN DILG, a professor at the University of Iowa having his first New York solo show, "makes small, exactingly composed paintings featuring pictographic images of things like a horse, a fallen tree or Adam and Eve. With delicate slightly blurry lines inscribed into smooth fields of blue-gray, olive or brown, they exude a modest archetypal mystery."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 31 -- Abigail Foerstner's book, "Picturing Utopia: Bertha Shambaugh and the Amana Photographers," is excerpted. The book will be published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS next month.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i30/30b01001.htm

TIMES OF INDIA, March 31 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.
http://www.timesofindia.com/today/31worl40.htm
The same Associated Press article ran, with a photo of Brown, March 30 on the CANADIAN ONLINE EXPLORER, a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site.
http://www.canoe.com:80/TechNews0003/30_emails.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 in the DESERET NEWS in Utah. http://www.desnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,155013918,00.html?
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 on the Web site of the CONCORD (N.H.) MONITOR.
http://www.concordmonitor.com/stories/front0699/ccm_0330email.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 on the FOX NEWS Web site. http://www.foxnews.com/vtech/033000/sloppy.sml
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 on the NASHUA (N.H.) TELEGRAPH Web site.
http://www.nashuatelegraph.com/Daily_Sections/News/Archives/2000/march/stories/0330w-email.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=81523327
The same Associated Press article ran March 30 on the Web site of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/lifestyle/emal30.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE Web site, as well as on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20000329/tc/sloppy_e_mail_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
http://www.latimes.com/business/microsoft/20000329/tCB00V0668.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the MSNBC Web site.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/388509.asp?cp1=1
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/a/AP-Sloppy-E-mail.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH Web site.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/stories.nsf/ByDocID/8AF482DF228A9F4E862568B100352

NEW YORK TIMES, March 31 -- Commenting on the Microsoft anti-trust case, Nicholas Economides, an economist at New York University, said he likes the idea "of having a uniform price list for all customers" to prevent price discrimination by Microsoft. But others see significant pitfalls. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa who serves as an occasional consultant for the state and federal governments in this case, notes that there are myriad ways Microsoft could continue rewarding friends and punishing others, even with a uniform price list. The company could make special joint marketing arrangements with preferred customers, or give them special terms in technical-support contracts. "One of the things we know about pricing is that firms are extremely creative about evading price restrictions," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/03/biztech/articles/31soft.html
The same New York Times article ran March 31 on the Web site of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/msft311.shtml

USA TODAY, March 30 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA officials hope to trace the source of a threatening e-mail that said the dental school should exclude minority students.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/usatonline/20000330/2088047s.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, March 30 -- A review of a new book about writing, "The Forest for the Trees: An Editor's Advice to Writers" by Betsy Lerner, notes that many of the leading teachers of writing believe it is not possible to learn about writing from a book. FRANK CONROY, who heads the UI Writers' Workshop, said: "We never use a book that teaches you to write; we never even read them. I don't think you can learn writing from a book, except from reading literature."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/books/033000making-books.html

NEW YORK TIMES, March 30 -- The Associated Press news on the paper's Web site includes a story about a study of how pesticides affect the health of Iowa farmers. Beginning this spring, farmers from 12 Iowa counties will be recruited for medical tests --such as providing urine samples -- to help University of Iowa researchers measure their exposure to pesticides. "With the generous cooperation of some local farm families, we may be able to learn more about how pesticide exposure occurs and what we can do to prevent it," said STEVE REYNOLDS, associate professor of occupational and environmental health.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/f/AP-Farm-Scene.html

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, March 30 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. Some teachers and other grammar purists find this trend disturbing. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?" gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the UI business school.
http://www.seattlep-i.com/lifestyle/emal30.shtml

KNOXVILLE NEWS-SENTINEL, Tenn., March 30 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.

THE OREGONIAN, March 30 -- A story about the rush to provide online courses cites a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study that put 1,900 students on an experimental online course; more than half got F's on their midterm report cards.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, March 29 -- Ruling against Miami-Dade police in a stop-and-frisk case, the Supreme Court in a unanimous decision Tuesday held that an anonymous tip is not reliable enough, by itself, to justify a lawful search. "This was a slam-dunk victory for individual rights,'' said JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa law professor who represented the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups in a friend-of-the-court brief attacking searches based on anonymous tips. The same article appeared March 29 in THE COMMERCIAL APPEAL in Tennessee, THE SAN FRANCISCO DAILY JOURNAL, THE TENNESSEAN, THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH and the KANSAS CITY STAR.

STAR-LEDGER, Newark, N.J., March 29 -- The U.S. Supreme Court sharply curtailed police power to rely on anonymous tips to stop and search people. The unanimous ruling Tuesday was a victory for civil rights organizations, but a police group said the nation's streets may become more dangerous. "This was a slam-dunk victory for individual rights," said JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa law professor who represented the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups in a friend-of-the-court brief attacking searches based on anonymous tips. "The court made clear it is not going to sacrifice personal privacy whenever the magic word 'firearm' is mentioned," he said. "That message was made even more emphatic by the fact the court was unanimous." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran March 29 in the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, the DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, the VIRGINIAN-PILOT, the POST AND COURIER (Charleston, S.C.), the PRESS-ENTERPRISE (Riverside, Calif.) and the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL.

NEWSDAY, March 29 -- The U.S. Supreme Court sharply curtailed police power to rely on anonymous tips to stop and search people. The unanimous ruling Tuesday was a victory for civil rights organizations, but a police group said the nation's streets may become more dangerous. "This was a slam-dunk victory for individual rights," said JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa law professor who represented the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups in a friend-of-the-court brief attacking searches based on anonymous tips. "The court made clear it is not going to sacrifice personal privacy whenever the magic word 'firearm' is mentioned," he said. "That message was made even more emphatic by the fact the court was unanimous."
http://www.newsday.com/ap/washington/ap45.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER:
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/national/scot292.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of the BERGEN RECORD of New Jersey:
http://www.bergen.com/morenews/court20000329.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of the SUN NEWS of Myrtle Beach, S.C.:
http://www.thesunnews.com/news/stories/2085122.htm
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE:
http://www.ardemgaz.com/today/nat/cscotu29.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of the TOPEKA CAPITAL JOURNAL in Kansas:
http://cjonline.com/stories/032900/new_courttips.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the Web site of ACCESS ATLANTA, an Internet provider whose partners include the Atlanta Journal Constitution:
http://www.accessatlanta.com/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/today/news_831eeaffa1f391e710c1.html
The same Associated Press article ran March 29 on the EXCITE!NEWS Web site: http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/000328/15/news-scotus-anonymous-tip
The same Associated Press article ran March 28 on the Web site of the LAS VEGAS SUN:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/bw-scotus/2000/mar/28/032800699.html

MIAMI HERALD, March 29 -- Ruling against Miami-Dade police in a stop-and-frisk case, the Supreme Court in a unanimous decision Tuesday held that an anonymous tip is not reliable enough, by itself, to justify a lawful search. "This was a slam-dunk victory for individual rights,'' said JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa law professor who represented the American Civil Liberties Union and other groups in a friend-of-the-court brief attacking searches based on anonymous tips.
http://www.herald.com:80/content/today/docs/055274.htm

DETROIT FREE PRESS, March 29 -- An anonymous tip that a person is carrying a gun is not enough to justify a stop and frisk by the police without some further sign that the information is reliable, the Supreme Court ruled with surprising unanimity yesterday. The court rejected the argument put forward by Florida, the Clinton administration and a broad coalition of state attorneys general that because guns are so inherently dangerous, police can act on a tip involving a gun on the basis of less evidence than the Constitution would otherwise require. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a law professor at the University of Iowa who filed a brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and other groups against searches based on anonymous tips, said yesterday that the decision had broad implications as a demonstration that "crime control is a concern of a free society, but not the only concern." He attributed the court's unanimity to the fact that "this was an extreme claim; that when someone says the magic words 'firearm,' the protection of the Fourth Amendment disappears." This is a New York Times article.
http://www.freep.com/news/nw/court29_20000329.htm

BOSTON HERALD, March 29 -- In a rare rebuff to police, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that an officer may not stop and frisk a pedestrian based only on an anonymous caller's tip. Instead, the justices reaffirmed the Constitution's protection against unreasonable searches and stressed that officers need specific, reliable evidence of wrongdoing before they stop a person on the street. ''This sends an important message that there are limits on what the police can do,'' said University of Iowa Law Professor JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, who filed a brief on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. ''This decision, because it is unanimous, emphatically says the Fourth Amendment still means something. What's happened in New York and Los Angeles has made clear there are risks to ignoring the Fourth Amendment.''

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 29 -- The Supreme Court ruled unanimously that police need more than just general information provided by an anonymous tip to stop and search a person for a gun. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, said, "The implicit message here is: Yes, due to us living in a free society, a certain amount of harm will occur, but if you want perfect crime control, you will live in a society that isn't free."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB954259287610925378.djm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, March 29 -- In a rare rebuff to police, the Supreme Court ruled yesterday that an officer may not stop and frisk a pedestrian based only on an anonymous caller's tip. Instead, the justices reaffirmed the Constitution's protection against unreasonable searches and stressed that officers need specific, reliable evidence of wrongdoing before they stop a person on the street. ''This sends an important message that there are limits on what the police can do,'' said University of Iowa Law Professor JAMES J. TOMKOVICZ, who filed a brief on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. ''This decision, because it is unanimous, emphatically says the Fourth Amendment still means something. What's happened in New York and Los Angeles has made clear there are risks to ignoring the Fourth Amendment.''
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20000329/t000029467.html
The same Los Angeles Times article ran March 29 on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE:
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/089/nation/Supreme_Court_curbs_police_power_to_stop_search_based_on_tips+.shtml
The same Los Angeles Times article ran March 29 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES:
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/nation-world/html98/scot29_20000329.html

NEW YORK TIMES, March 29 -- An anonymous tip that a person is carrying a gun is not enough to justify a stop and frisk by the police without some further sign that the information is reliable, the Supreme Court ruled with surprising unanimity yesterday. The court rejected the argument put forward by Florida, the Clinton administration and a broad coalition of state attorneys general that because guns are so inherently dangerous, police can act on a tip involving a gun on the basis of less evidence than the Constitution would otherwise require. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a law professor at the University of Iowa who filed a brief for the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and other groups against searches based on anonymous tips, said yesterday that the decision had broad implications as a demonstration that "crime control is a concern of a free society, but not the only concern." He attributed the court's unanimity to the fact that "this was an extreme claim; that when someone says the magic words 'firearm,' the protection of the Fourth Amendment disappears." This is a New York Times article.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/scotus/articles/032900police-search.html
The same New York Times article ran March 29 on the Web site of the ARIZONA DAILY STAR.

BALTIMORE SUN, March 29 -- A unanimous Supreme Court barred the police Tuesday from stopping and frisking someone to look for a gun based solely on an anonymous tip that the person has a weapon. Before officers may accost someone after receiving such a tip, the court said, they must have information to show that the tip or the tipster is reliable and that the subject of the tip is doing something illegal. JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a University of Iowa law professor who filed a brief on behalf of the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, conceded that "if police honestly obey the decision, it will prevent a certain amount of detection of firearm violence." But, Tomkovicz added, that is a product not of the ruling but of the Constitution itself. Under the Fourth Amendment's ban on unreasonable searches, the professor said, "police need an objective justification, something more than an inkling, a hunch."
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150300205946
The same Baltimore Sun article ran March 29 on the Web site of the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE:
http://www.sltrib.com/03292000/nation_w/36999.htm
The same Baltimore Sun article ran March 29 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/03/29/MN100025.DTL
The same Baltimore Sun article ran March 29 on the Web site of the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER:
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/2000/Mar/29/front_page/COURT29.htm

MSNBC, March 29 -- A 24-year-old man was gunned down Friday night as he walked with friends along McKinney Avenue in Dallas, Texas, near many popular clubs and restaurants. A $15,000 reward is being offered for information leading to the gunman's arrest. Police are looking for a gunman who shot and killed Daniel Holmstrom during a robbery attempt on a busy stretch of McKinney Friday night. Holmstrom graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last spring. He moved to Dallas from Iowa City just four months ago.
http://www.msnbc.com/local/KXAS/50133.asp

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 27 -- A profile of America Online Vice President and General Manager Jonathan Sacks notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM.

VARIETY, March 27 -- Straight out of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA writing program, 27-year-old Thisbe Nissen has landed a two-book deal with Knopf for a mid-six-figure sum, reports Reuters news service. Outbidding several houses, Knopf editor Jennifer Minton acquired "The Good People of New York,'' a romantic comedy about the relationship of a mother and daughter, and a group of New York friends, from the 1970s to the present, and an untitled second novel. Minton had previously bought reprint rights to Nissen's first collection, "Out of the Girls Room and Into the Night,'' which won the Iowa fiction prize last year and was previously published by the University of Iowa.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000327/en/film-scripts_25.html

BEACON JOURNAL, (Akron, Ohio), March 27 -- The paper ran an abbreviated version of a New York Times article on the NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS) at the University of Iowa. The simulator is a research tool to improve vehicle and highway design and better predict driving behavior. It will give researchers the chance to test car safety systems, for example, or ride virtual shotgun with drivers whose abilities are impaired by alcohol or medication or who are so absorbed in a cell phone conversation that they do not notice they are driving off the road. "There has never been a motion simulator as complex or as large,'' said Keith Brewer, director of the Office of Human-Centered Research at the highway safety administration in Washington.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/03/circuits/articles/23howw.html

LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR, March 27 -- A story about John Reinhardt, who has become the eighth dean of the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Dentistry, says he is a former faculty member and department chairman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I'm constantly trying to improve things, but I'd done all I could to help the department," he said. "I don't sit still very well."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, March 27 -- PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa' s Disability Law Research Center, said the Internet has had a profound effect on the employment picture. It has given people with disabilities "more of a level playing field" and helped employers gain access to millions of people who want to work.

SEATTLE TIMES, March 26 -- Microsoft's proposed settlement of its antitrust case did not go far enough in admitting wrongdoing, government lawyers said. Lawyers continue negotiating, but U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson said he would issue his verdict March 28 if no agreement is reached. "It is quite typical for settlement negotiations to go down to the last minute," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a UI law professor who served as a consultant to the states early in the trial. "The two sides can wait to settle it if they choose, up to the minute Judge Jackson opens up his court-room doors to deliver his ruling."
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=msft26&date=20000326

DENVER POST, March 26 -- PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa' s Disability Law Research Center, said the Internet has had a profound effect on the employment picture. It has given people with disabilities "more of a level playing field" and helped employers gain access to millions of people who want to work.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 26 -- With the guilty verdict in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust trial, the relatively easy part is over for the federal judge who heard the case. Now U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, with help from lawyers from the Justice Department and the 19 states that brought the lawsuit, must figure out how to redress the alleged harm caused by the software giant's anti-competitive behavior. In the annals of antitrust cases, some breakups were less than brilliant in execution, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law expert at the University of Iowa College of Law. "The Supreme Court has made some pretty serious mistakes in breaking up companies. It's broken them up in the wrong way." For instance, in a 1966 case, it broke up a silent-alarm company whose technology required the company to have sole control over the systems in numerous cities. But the order forcing the company to sell some operations wound up creating two firms with monopolies instead of one.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 26 -- Microsoft Corporation's 11th-hour bid to settle its antitrust case appeared to have fallen short Saturday, leaving the outcome of the biggest antitrust case since the breakup of Standard Oil in the hands of a federal judge. Sources close to the government said a detailed settlement proposal that Microsoft sent on Friday to the U.S. Justice Department, 19 states and the District of Columbia was inadequate because it failed to acknowledge any antitrust wrongdoings or agree to significant restrictions in the way it develops and markets Windows. Industry observers noted that settlement negotiations often go down to the wire and that Microsoft and the government still have time to salvage a deal. "It is quite typical for settlement negotiations to go down to the last minute," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor who served as a consultant to the states early in the Microsoft trial. "The two sides can wait to settle it if they choose, up to the minute Judge Jackson opens up his courtroom doors to deliver his ruling."
The same article appeared March 26 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site at:
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20000326/t000028536.html
The same article appeared March 26 on the SEATTLE TIMES Web site at:
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=msft26&date=20000326&query=%22university+of+Iowa%22
A similar article that quotes Hovenkamp appeared March 25 on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE Web site. In that article, Hovenkamp said the settlement talks had progressed as expected, with both parties initially making strong public statements, negotiating in private and then stalling until they're forced to make a final agreement or walk away from the negotiating table. "This is almost textbook procedure," said Hovenkamp, who has served as a consultant to the government in the case. "That's why so many cases get settled when the jury is out. Parties go right to the very last second and try to settle."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,2669,SAV-0003250150,FF.html

COLUMBUS DISPATCH, March 26 -- The College of Humanities at Ohio State University has chosen a new dean. Michael J. Hogan, 55, of Upper Arlington previously was interim dean and chairman of the history department. He received his bachelor's degree from the University of Northern Iowa and his master's and doctorate from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dispatch.com:80/news/newsfea00/mar00/218816.html

THE GLOBE AND MAIL, Toronto, Ontario, March 25 -- DANIEL TRANEL, a University of Iowa neuropsychologist, presented evidence during a recent conference in Toronto that sociopathic behavior could be partly attributed to damage to the brain's prefrontal cortex. When one psychologist commented that "you can't ignore the psychological or sociological factors," Tranel countered that nothing was absolute, that a badly wired brain could be repaired by the environment, just as a poor environment could ruin the moral compass of a good brain. The same article ran March 24 in the TORONTO STAR.

TOLEDO BLADE, (Ohio), March 25 -- Blade staff writer Mildred Benson has been chosen to receive the College of Liberal Arts Alumni Fellow Award from the University of Iowa, where in 1927 she was the first woman to receive a master's degree in journalism. She is renowned internationally as the author of more than 130 books for young people, including 23 of the first Nancy Drew mysteries. "She's had a tremendous impact on generations of young women and is a role model of how someone can have an incredible career and have an impact," said LINDA MAXSON, dean of the college of liberal arts. With her career record, the choice was "a slam-dunk," said JOHN SOLOSKI, director of the school of journalism and mass communication. "She has contributed not only to journalism, but to literature." The award presentation will take place April 10 at the university. Benson will be unable to attend, but Maxson and Soloski plan to visit Toledo in May to give her the award. "We're sad she isn't able to make it. But we want her to know that everyone here thinks of her very highly and are pleased we're able to honor her," said JILL FISHBAUGH, an administrative assistant in the school of journalism. Other liberal arts alumni fellows this year include Katherine Hammer, president of Evolutionary Techs, Inc., Austin, Texas; Henderson Forsythe, formerly of the university's theater arts department, and Marcus Milling, executive director of the American Geological Institute, Maxson said.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/news/0c25mill.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, March 24 -- A story about "Familie-Portrett" at the Nordic Heritage Museum in Seattle says the show features veteran Seattle artist Joan Stuart Ross, who has a "strong printmaking background from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA."
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/entertainment/html98/matt_20000324.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 24 -- Although the job outlook has improved somewhat in recent years, it remains tight in many fields. For generations, A.B.D. status didn't impede job searches, and lots of professors finished their dissertations while already employed and en route to tenure. Now, only superstars get tenure-track jobs when they're A.B.D. Some departments won't even look at a candidate whose dissertation is still in the works. The University of Iowa's political-science department hired CHARLES SHIPAN when he was A.B.D. eight years ago, but wouldn't do the same today. Shipan, now an associate professor, led a search for a junior faculty member last year, and was told that candidates had to have the Ph.D. in hand by the time of appointment.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i29/29a00101.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, March 23 -- The Circuits section of the paper includes a lengthy feature on the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) at the University of Iowa. Accompanying the story are two detailed graphics illustrating how the NADS will work when completed this summer. "NADS is different because it's so incredibly realistic," said GINGER WATSON, the NADS branch chief of human factors and highway safety research at the University of Iowa. "We can expose people to a set of procedures when they are on a drug or off, with a device like a cell phone or without. Then we can put those same variables together over multiple drivers and record the results." "The possibilities are really endless for NADS," said the director of the simulator project, LEA DER CHEN. "If we could reduce the number of overall fatalities by even 1 percent, that would be a significant saving of lives."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/03/circuits/articles/23howw.html

THE NANDO TIMES, March 22 -- A 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel Monday upheld a ruling requiring the Professional Golfers' Association Tour to allow disabled golfer Casey Martin to ride a cart. PETER BLANCK, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, said the ruling does not suggest that other disabled golfers would merit a cart, only that Casey Martin does given his medical condition. "It's a rather narrow opinion," said Blanck, director of the school's disability law center. As a result, Blanck and others see little likelihood that the U.S. Supreme Court would take up the case if the tour were to appeal. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.

THE GLOBE & MAIL, Toronto, Canada, March 22 -- DANIEL TRANEL, a neuropsychologist at the University of Iowa, studies patients who acquired injuries to their brain's frontal lobes -- whether it be by stroke, infection or gunshot -- and who exhibit antisocial and sometimes violent behavior. After 20 years of research, the article says, he is certain the frontal lobes house the brain's moral compass.

ARKANSAS TRIBUNE, March 21 -- Electronic checkups enabled a Coralville, Iowa, cafeteria worker to return to work after her 93-year-old mother had brain surgery, says Mary Ann Murray, director of operations at resourceLink of Iowa, a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a unit of Cyber-Care, Boynton Beach, Fla. When nurses began giving the mother videoconference check-ups each morning, her daughter was able to return to work.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 21 -- PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa' s Disability Law Research Center, said the Internet has had a profound effect on the employment picture. It has given people with disabilities "more of a level playing field" and helped employers gain access to millions of people who want to work.
The same article appeared March 21 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site and on March 22 on the ANCHORAGE DAILY NEWS Web site and on Canadian Online Explorer (CANOE), a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site, at:
http://www.canoe.com:80/TechNews0003/22_enabled.html

FOX NEWS.COM, March 21 -- A story about the impending allergy season mentions a study of antihistamines and driving by the University of Iowa. According to the study, published in the March 7 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, these drugs may have a more severe impact on driving ability than alcohol. In the study, subjects received either a 50 mg dose of the antihistamine diphenhydramine, an ingredient in Benadryl and other over-the-counter antihistamines; enough alcohol to have .10 blood alcohol concentration (legally drunk in all 50 states); 60 mg of the non-sedating antihistamine Allegra, or a placebo. Those who took diphenhydramine performed more poorly on a driving simulator than those under the influence of alcohol, while those who took Allegra or a placebo did not display impairment. "Another important finding of this study was the observation that drowsiness was not a good indicator of impairment," wrote study leader JOHN WEILER, of the University of Iowa. Over half of the states have made it illegal to drive under the influence of impairing medications, Weiler said. But many medicated allergy sufferers remain unaware of the dangers of driving under the influence of antihistamines.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/health/032100/allergies.sml

TOLEDO BLADE, March 21 -- A vice president of a Catholic university in Chicago has been named the president of Lourdes College in Ohio. George C. Matthews, who turns 63 on Thursday and is the vice president for academic affairs at St. Xavier University, was a unanimous choice of the Sylvania school's presidential search committee, its board of trustees, and its sponsor, the Sisters of St. Francis. A native of the Bronx, N.Y., Matthews holds bachelor's and master's degrees in English from Iona College, New Rochelle, N.Y., and DePaul University, Chicago, respectively, and a doctorate in American literature from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa City. http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/news/0c21lour.htm

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, March 21 -- Electronic checkups enabled a Coralville, Iowa, cafeteria worker to return to work after her 93-year-old mother had brain surgery, says Mary Ann Murray, director of operations at resourceLink of Iowa, a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a unit of Cyber-Care, Boynton Beach, Fla. When nurses began giving the mother videoconference check-ups each morning, her daughter was able to return to work.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/business/getahead/docs/workfam21.htm

MSNBC, March 21 -- University of Iowa researchers may have uncovered a basic chemical trigger for breast cancer. FREDERICK DOMANN is a professor of radiology and one of the study's leaders. He says the discovery could lead to new drugs to block the development of cancer. The researchers' findings are detailed in the March issue of the International Journal of Cancer. The discovery involves processes in breast cancer cells that stop a gene that suppresses tumor development in healthy breast tissue. When the gene becomes silenced, tumors can grow and spread.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, March 20 -- A story on the human genome project says that VAL SHEFFIELD, a professor of pediatrics in the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at the University of Iowa, specializes in identifying the location of disease genes on various chromosomes. Much of his work has been done on hereditary deafness and blindness. Sheffield agreed to collaborate with two other researchers by analyzing DNA samples from two Arab Israelis with Pendred syndrome. Those affected by the syndrome are typically born deaf and develop a goiter later in life. About three weeks after getting the DNA, Sheffield had linked the faulty gene to a region along chromosome 7.

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, March 20 -- Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that alcohol impairs the body's ability to tighten the blood vessels, the natural process that maintains proper blood pressure when a person moves from a sitting to a standing position. A person who has had too much to drink loses the reflex that makes the woozy feeling go away, and passes out.

SALON, March 20 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, who teaches medical reporting at the University of Iowa, wrote a feature article about his son's involvement in the Scouts.
http://www.salon.com/mwt/feature/2000/03/20/cub_scouts/index.html

INDIANAPOLIS BUSINESS JOURNAL, March 19 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCH FOUNDATION spawned four start-up companies in fiscal 1998, according to a list of Big Ten universities' success rate.

THE OREGONIAN, March 19 -- A story about St. Helens High School in Oregon, where students manage businesses ranging from a construction company to a day-care center, quotes EDWARD W. MOLDT, who directs the John Pappajohn Entrepreneur Center at the University of Iowa. Moldt said that today's e-commerce is pushing the concepts of succeeding, failing and entrepreneurship down to elementary grades where students can learn basic business skills by selling such things as cookies or T-shirts. "You need to give students the opportunity to think about this and practice it," he said.
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/business/00/03/bz031901.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 19 -- Couples who work odd shifts so they can watch their own children are a rarity. In talking to parents working different shifts, sociology professor JENNIFER GLASS of the University of Iowa said she did not find many who defied the clock for the sake of family child care. "Very few of them said they changed their work schedules so their spouse or partners could watch the children," Glass said. "It's a major stress."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0003190133,FF.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, March 19 -- A story about David Wong Louie, author of his acclaimed second book and first novel, "The Barbarians Are Coming," says he earned a bachelor's degree in English from Vassar College before going off to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA for his master's in fine arts.

WASHINGTON POST, March 19 -- A story about the Second Wind Band, which is made up of senior citizens, says that researchers have found that the challenge of learning to read music and the complexities of an instrument seem, at least anecdotally, to increase older adults' vitality and mental acuity. It gets them out of the house and away from the isolation of the television. And for some, it's even meant new love. "The most noticeable effect on these folks is increased sense of community and socialization," said DON D. COFFMAN, an associate professor of music education at the University of Iowa and founder of a New Horizons Band in Iowa City. "It's very easy to see how much they enjoy making music with other people."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-03/19/188l-031900-idx.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, March 18 -- The family of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student from Elgin who died after a night of drinking is asking the Iowa Supreme Court to let them pursue a lawsuit against a fraternity. Matthew Garofalo, 19, a Lambda Chi Alpha pledge, died in September 1995 after drinking alcohol at a party at the fraternity house after an initiation ceremony. Doctors determined that Garofalo's blood alcohol level was .188 when he died and likely closer to .300 in the hours after he drank beer and whiskey. Garofalo's death led to a decision to ban alcohol from fraternity houses on the Iowa City campus in 1999. Fraternities voluntarily went dry in the fall of 1998.

AUSTRALIAN FINANCIAL REVIEW, March 18 -- A story about betting in Taipei, Taiwan, on candidates in the past weekend's presidential election says that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the Centre for Chinese Electoral Studies at North Carolina's Duke University have set up a novel futures market for people wanting to buy shares in the candidates.
http://www.afr.com.au:80/content/000318/world/world1.html

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, March 17 -- JEFFREY A. SMITH, a professor of journalism and mass communication at the University of Iowa, will give a free, public lecture on "What's God Doing in Hollywood" -- a look at the portrayal of God by filmmakers and the sensitivity of theological issues becoming entertainment -- at 7 p.m. Wednesday at Marquette University in Room 001 of Katharine Reed Cudahy Hall, 1313 W. Wisconsin Ave.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 17 -- The National Collegiate Athletic Association is considering changes to deal with recruiting problems in men's basketball -- and those changes may make it less likely that high-school athletes will receive illegal benefits. Most prominently, the Big Ten Conference is pressing the association to eliminate the practice of college coaches watching high-school stars during the summer, which would reduce the importance of summer leagues and camps, depriving summer-league coaches of their influence over high-school players. "If we could move basketball evaluation totally out of the summer, it would diminish the potential for repeated violations such as what we're getting now," said CHRISTINE GRANT, director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa. "It would make a huge, huge difference."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i28/28a05501.htm

SPACE.COM, March 16 -- When the Galileo spacecraft streaked by Jupiter's moon Io last October, it measured the composition of the charged-particle ring that circles the satellite. The spacecraft's plasma wave experiment detected abundant sulfur monoxide in the moon's plasma torus -- a ring of charged gas that circles the volcanic moon, stretching as far as 20,000 miles (32,186 kilometers) from the surface. The finding is surprising scientists because observations of Io's surface, and the volcanic plumes spewing from its fiery mountains have showed a world where sulfur dioxide -- not monoxide -- is the dominant molecule. But not all scientists who work on Io are so quick to turn the accepted picture of the jovian moon on its head. LOUIS FRANK, a professor of physics at the University of Iowa and leader of Galileo's Plasma particle investigation team, said it is still too early to say what the significance is of the abundant sulfur monoxide. "The first pass through, the geometry of going through there, was a lot different than it was for this October 11 pass," Frank said. "So that -- coupled with the fact that there has been recent volcanic activity -- it may be temporally variable. But I wouldn't pretend to answer a question like that until we look at one or two more passes past Io."

BALTIMORE SUN, March 16 -- Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Texas have shown that college freshmen and sophomores had significantly more trouble with non-native speaking teachers than upperclassmen. Consequently, some schools, such as the University of Texas, now try to place international students in teaching slots for older, more advanced undergraduates. It remains a challenge, though, because graduate assistants are needed mostly in large survey courses filled with underclassmen.

FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, March 16 -- FREDERICK DOMANN, associate professor of radiology at the University of Iowa, and other research at the university have uncovered a basic genetic process that may contribute to 80 percent of breast cancers. The process, called methylation, can affect the DNA of certain cells, thereby silencing genes that prevent tumor growth. Methylation is controlled by enzymes in the breast-cancer cells, "and generally any process mediated by enzymes can often be affected by pharmacological interventions," said Domann, lead author of the study.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, March 16 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA EDUCATION experts recently attended the International Conference on Learning With Technology at Temple University, where they said early results from a three-year study of laptop use among fifth-graders found teachers must receive appropriate training or the students will use the machines only for word processing, instead of as tools that extend learning opportunities.

BALTIMORE SUN, March 16 -- Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Texas found that freshmen and sophomores had significantly more trouble with non-native speaking teachers than upperclassmen. Consequently, some schools now try to place international students in teaching slots for older, more advanced undergraduates.

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, March 15 -- EBON FISHER of the University of Iowa celebrated his credo, "Wiggle-ism," and talked just like a character in a Tom Robbins novel. "Creationism is a myth. That's all I have to say," he said. "Support midwifery. Legalize and regulate marijuana. ä Support small business. Stop corporate welfare."

CURRENTS, March 15 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is one of 10 institutions involved in the "A Matter of Degree" project, which strives to change norms, attitudes, policies and practices affecting drinking among college students, both on and off campus.

NEW CHOICES FOR LIVING EVEN BETTER AFTER 50, March 15 -- HAROLD P. ADAMS JR., a neurologist at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and chairman of the advisory committee of the American Heart Association, says strokes can occur at any time to anyone. Children, even fetuses in the womb, can suffer a stroke, although clearly, age plays a role. Decade by decade after age 55 the risk of stroke doubles.

INFORMATION TODAY, March 15 -- The University of Iowa Libraries is using a combination of OCLC RetroCon services to convert 656,000 book titles and 38,000 scores and sound recordings to machine-readable form. "We selected OCLC because of their proven track record of successful completion of projects carried out for large research libraries and their reputation for delivering a consistently high-quality, reliable product," said MARY MONSON, coordinator of Central Processing Services at the UI Libraries.

CAMERA ARTS, March 15 -- A blurb at the end of an article written by Abigail Foerstner, a journalist and art critic who writes regularly on photography for newspapers and magazines, says Foerstner's book, "Picturing Utopia," is being published this spring by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, March 15 -- Despite a decade of aggressive prevention efforts, heavy drinking on college campuses did not diminish in the 1990s, according to a study released yesterday by the Harvard School of Public Health. The study was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation to address binge drinking on 10 campuses across the country. MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, one of the 10 campuses, said she had focused on the community's collective responsibility for solving the problem, with initiatives like removing alcohol from her own pre-football game brunches and urging local bar owners to buy scanners that highlight fake identification cards. "Of course, students who drink too much must be responsible for the problems that they cause," Coleman said. "But students are not responsible for manufacturing and marketing alcoholic beverages. Students are not responsible for the excessive number of bars within walking distance of our campuses. Students are not responsible for the price specials that encourage drinking to get drunk." This article originally appeared in the New York Times March 15.

NEW YORK TIMES, March 15 -- Despite a decade of aggressive prevention efforts, heavy drinking on college campuses did not diminish in the 1990's, according to a study released yesterday by the Harvard School of Public Health. The study was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson foundation to address binge drinking on 10 campuses across the country. MARY SUE COLEMAN, president of the University of Iowa, one of the 10 campuses, said she had focused on the community's collective responsibility for solving the problem, with initiatives like removing alcohol from her own pre-football game brunches and urging local bar owners to buy scanners that highlight fake identification cards. "Of course, students who drink too much must be responsible for the problems that they cause," Coleman said. "But students are not responsible for manufacturing and marketing alcoholic beverages. Students are not responsible for the excessive number of bars within walking distance of our campuses. Students are not responsible for the price specials that encourage drinking to get drunk."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/031500binge-edu.html

DENVER POST, March 15 -- An article about the recent report on binge drinking on college campuses includes a sidebar that says in September 1995, Mathew Garofalo died after chugging from a bottle of whiskey during a Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity pledge ceremony at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The UI is not mentioned elsewhere in the sidebar or main article.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, March 14 -- A story about nuclear cardiologist Richard Fleming, who uses Scintimammography for nuclear imaging of breasts, says he is a board-certified physician who has authored several chapters of a medical textbook, published articles in numerous medical journals and works in a one-doctor private practice he founded a year ago named The Fleming Heart & Health Institute. A 1986 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL SCHOOL, Fleming has practiced medicine in Omaha for four years.

AZCENTRAL.COM, March 14 -- A story about amateur Egyptologist Don Kunz says the Phoenix attorney earned a degree in English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and then a law degree at the University of Arizona. AZCENTRAL.COM is the Web site for the ARIZONA REPUBLIC newspaper. http://www.azcentral.com:80/community/comstories/0314kunz.shtml

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 14 -- A Feb. 11 story in the Metro section of the paper said that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has a policy notifying parents when students are caught violating rules about alcohol use. The university's current policy is to notify parents only when students' behavior is life-threatening.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=CX0314&date=14-Mar-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

BOSTON REVIEW, March 14 -- A story on Bin Ramke's poetry collection, "Wake," says the book was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu:80/BR25.1/winter.html

WASHINGTON POST, March 14 -- A story on postpartum depression lists among possible resources for women The Marce Society (named for Louis Victor Marce, a 19th-century French physician who argued that postnatal mental illness was unique from other forms of depression.) The society's North American representative, MICHAEL O'HARA, can be reached at the department of psychology, University of Iowa.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-03/14/040l-031400-idx.html

PEOPLE, March 13 -- DOUGLAS BEHRENDT, a cardiothoracic surgeon at the Children's Hospital, performed two heart transplants on a young girl who was born with a rare and fatal defect -- the first when the girl was just 7 days old, the second last year when she was 11.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 12 -- A story about Pioneer 10, a spacecraft designed to leave the inner solar system and fly to Jupiter, says that University of Iowa professor JAMES VAN ALLEN continues to analyze data sent back by the spacecraft, just as he has done since 1972. The story says Van Allen, now 85, is the astronomer who in the 1950s discovered that charged particles from the sun are trapped in a ring around the Earth by our planet's magnetic field. This ring, as every high school science student knows, is called the Van Allen Radiation Belt.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=PION12&date=12-Mar-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

TACOMA (Wash.) NEWS TRIBUNE, March 12 -- The Tacoma Little Theatre named TOM JONES producing artistic director. He will start April 5, after he and his wife Connie relocate from Memphis, Tenn. Jones is originally from Tulsa, Okla., and taught theater most recently at Rhodes College in Memphis. He has a Ph.D. in dramatic art from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, March 12 -- In an article featuring the "American River Review," published by the writing program at American River Community College, TONY SWOFFORD is given as an outstanding example of the American River program. He is now enrolled in the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP graduate program at the University of Iowa.

SALON.COM, March 10 -- "Isolato," Larissa Szporluk's second book published by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, is reviewed, featuring seven poems about the attractions of escape as represented by outer space.
http://www.salon.com:80/books/feature/2000/03/10/poetry/index.html.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, March 10 -- In a story about the costs for student government campaigns at the University of Nebraska and other colleges across the country, University of Iowa campaign spending levels are cited. At the UI, spending is limited to $1,500 per slate, down from $3,500 last year. "We determined that it was too high and might make the race unattainable to the average student," said UI sophomore LARRY HOUSTON, chief justice of the student judicial court. "We didn't want students going into debt because of student government elections."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 10 -- Officials with the National Institutes of Health are struggling to find a way to finance stem-cell studies while adhering to a congressional ban on spending federal money for research that relies on the destruction of human embryos. Many researchers note that, while some private laboratories are engaged in stem-cell studies, the government should play a role in establishing guidelines for proper oversight of the research. They also said federal sponsorship will promote better science. "I think this research will go on in the private sector, regardless of what the government decides to do," said ROBERT P. KELCH, dean of the University of Iowa College of Medicine. "The best thing to do is have the government support it, with appropriate oversight and controls."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i27/27a03601.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 10 -- Villagers in Getsemani, a settlement in the cloud forests of northwest Ecuador, are working with papermakers from Rutgers University at New Brunswick to transform sisal -- also known as cabuya, a wide-leafed, fleshy agave plant that grows to over 10 feet high throughout the Andes -- into high-quality, handmade paper products. Rutgers staff members, working with colleagues at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CENTER FOR THE BOOK, which specializes in handmade books, tried various cooking and fermentation agents before settling on lime produced in the region.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i27/27b00201.htm

WASHINGTON POST, March 10 -- The U.S. Department of Labor is proposing new rules for employers to prevent and remedy ergonomic injuries and the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) sought input on the proposal. MARC LINDER, a law professor at the University of Iowa, sent OSHA a law review article called "I Gave My Employer a Chicken That Had No Bone: Joint Firm-State Responsibility for Line-Speed-Related Occupational Injuries."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-03/10/067l-031000-idx.html

THE TENNESSEAN, Nashville, March 9 -- JOHN REINHARDT, (former) head of operative dentistry at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry, says that flossing teeth is an easy and quick way for people to maintain healthy teeth and improve self-esteem. "I've never set a stopwatch, but I think I can personally floss in less than 90 seconds," Reinhardt says.

CNN.COM, March 9 -- CNN.com's Interactive Chat page invites visitors to the Web site to take part in an Internet discussion 1 p.m. ET Friday, March 10 with JOHN WEILER, professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa and lead author of a recent study showing that antihistamines have more impact on driving than alcohol.

ALBUQUERQUE (N.M.) JOURNAL, March 8 -- A drug common to over-the-counter allergy medicines used by millions might affect drivers more than liquor, a study suggests. University of Iowa researchers tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator. They found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence" -- the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. ''We were quite surprised to find that diphenhydramine may have an even greater impact on the complex task of operating an automobile than does alcohol,'' said JOHN WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor. ''That sends a chilling message. You would not want to be on the road when someone is driving at you who is taking these."
http://www.abqjournal.com:80/wheels/1wheels03-09-00.htm
The study is also referenced in SCIENCE DAILY at
http://www.sciencedaily.com:80/releases/2000/03/000309075245.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, March 8 -- A story on the Berdos -- a well-known farming family in Washington, Iowa -- says MARY BERDO, 22, plays basketball for the University of Iowa and was dazzled by New York City on a recent visit to a college friend in Brooklyn. "The path will almost surely lead to a city," the article says.

FOX NEWS, March 8 -- The cable network reported that a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study has found that the antihistamine contained in Benadryl had a greater effect than alcohol on subjects in a driving simulator. The story also said two of the study's co-authors are former advisors to Benadryl's main competitors.

USA TODAY, March 8 -- Microsoft stock rose 2.5 percent to $92 7/8 Tuesday on an analyst report suggesting there has been progress in settlement talks with the government on the landmark antitrust case. ''There appears to be a flurry of activity on the settlement front but no way of gauging probabilities,'' Rick Sherlund of Goldman Sachs says in a research note. Sherlund's note was based on an analysts' meeting with Microsoft's new chief financial officer, John Connors. William Epifanio of J.P. Morgan Securities, who met privately with Connors, says the market overreacted to the report. ''Microsoft is working diligently to settle the case, but (Connors) did not say they're close to a settlement.'' Connors' comments could be a signal to the judge in the case ''to hold off'' on his ruling while the two sides make headway, says antitrust expert HERBERT HOVENKAMP of the University of Iowa Law School.

KANSAS CITY STAR, March 8 -- A story about author Robert Olen Butler's new novel, "Mr. Spaceman" (Grove Press, $23), says Butler received a master's in playwriting from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat,fyi/37744b36.308,.html

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, March 8 -- A story about sculptor Elizabeth Catlett says she earned a master's degree at STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she discovered sculpture. By 1940 she had gained recognition for her work at the American Negro Exposition in Chicago.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/hotnews/stories/08/Scatlett.dtl

WALL STREET JOURNAL, March 8 -- Electronic checkups enabled a Coralville, Iowa, cafeteria worker to return to work after her 93-year-old mother had brain surgery, says Mary Ann Murray, director of operations at resourceLink of Iowa, a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a unit of Cyber-Care, Boynton Beach, Fla. When nurses began giving the mother videoconference check-ups each morning, her daughter was able to return to work.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, March 8 -- Over-the-counter medicines used by millions of people may affect a person's driving ability more than does alcohol, a study indicates. JOHN M. WEILER, a medical professor at the University of Iowa, and colleagues who tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and many similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence," or the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran March 7 in the TORONTO SUN.

THE MEDICAL POST, March 7 -- Many patients report bowel symptoms following radical hysterectomy, but little objective information exists on the issue, according to ANIL SOOD, assistant professor of medicine at the University of Iowa. He presented findings of a pilot study at the recent meeting for the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists in San Diego. Sood preoperatively assessed 10 women with stage IB-IIA cervical cancer who were scheduled to undergo radical hysterectomy.

THE OREGONIAN, March 7 -- A 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals panel Monday upheld a ruling requiring the Professional Golfers' Association Tour to allow disabled golfer Casey Martin to ride a cart. PETER BLANCK, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, said the ruling does not suggest that other disabled golfers would merit a cart, only that Casey Martin does given his medical condition. "It's a rather narrow opinion," said Blanck, director of the school's disability law center. As a result, Blanck and others see little likelihood that the U.S. Supreme Court would take up the case if the tour were to appeal.
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/news/00/03/st030702.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 7 -- Over-the-counter medicines used by millions of hay fever sufferers may affect a person's driving ability more than alcohol does, a study indicates. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator. They found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence" -- the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in Tuesday's issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. The maker of Benadryl, Warner-Lambert Co., attacked the new study as "seriously flawed" because it was partially funded by Aventis, maker of Allegra. The study concluded that the antihistamine used in Allegra was indistinguishable from a placebo in its effects on driving.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, March 7 - BABA SHIV, an assistant professor of marketing in the University of Iowa Henry B. Tippie College of Business, is quoted in an article about using brain wave activity to measure the effectiveness of web page banner ads. As brain wave research becomes more refined in commercial use, it could provide a direct measure of attention, said Shiv, who has studied the effect of banner ads on the subconscious. "This is the next frontier, a more sophisticated measure of what goes on in the consumer's head," he said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/2000/03/07/SPECIAL3287.dtl

LINCOLN, (Neb.), JOURNAL STAR, March 7 -- JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor, was lead author of a study that found that over-the-counter medicines used by millions of hay fever sufferers might affect their driving more than alcohol. Weiler's team tested 40 allergy sufferers ages 25 to 45 in a driving simulator and found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and many similar medicines had a greater effect than alcohol on driving "coherence,'' or the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine -- diphenhydramine -- also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering ability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in today's issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. "We were quite surprised to find that diphenhydramine may have an even greater impact on the complex task of operating an automobile than does alcohol," said Weiler. "That sends a chilling message. You would not want to be on the road when someone is driving at you who is taking these." The study also looked at a newer antihistamine, fexofenadine, used in the prescription drug Allegra. The researchers said that when it came to driving ability, fexofenadine was indistinguishable from a placebo. Warner-Lambert Co., the maker of Benadryl, attacked the new study as "seriously flawed" because it was partially funded by Aventis, the maker of Allegra. Weiler strongly defended his work, saying, "I am not for sale." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran March 7 on the MIAMI HERALD Web site.

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, March 7 -- Over-the-counter medicines used by millions of people may affect a person's driving ability more than does alcohol, a study indicates. UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers who tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and many similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence," or the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. The same Associated Press article ran March 7 on the ORANGE COUNTY, Calif., REGISTER Web site. http://www.ocregister.com/health/7health.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran March 7 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-03/07/119l-030700-idx.html
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the BERGEN, N.J.,
DAILY RECORD Web site.
http://www.bergen.com/morenews/colon0720000307c.htm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared March 7 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site. A longer version of the Associated Press story that includes comments from JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor and lead author of the study, appeared March 6 in the NANDO TIMES, the Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer in North Carolina. "We were quite surprised to find that diphenhydramine may have an even greater impact on the complex task of operating an automobile than does alcohol," said Weiler. "That sends a chilling message. You would not want to be on the road when someone is driving at you who is taking these." The study also looked at a newer antihistamine, fexofenadine, used in the prescription drug Allegra. The researchers said that when it came to driving ability, fexofenadine was indistinguishable from a placebo. Warner-Lambert Co., the maker of Benadryl, attacked the new study as "seriously flawed" because it was partially funded by Aventis, the maker of Allegra. Weiler strongly defended his work, saying, "I am not for sale."
http://www.nandotimes.com/24hour/modbee/healthscience/story/0,1655,500177478-500232106-501131455-0,00.html
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the WALL STREET JOURNAL Web site.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB952390627990974012.djm
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 in the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER on Newslink, the Web site of the Ogden Newspapers Inc. chain, and on the MYRTLE BEACH, S.C., SUN NEWS Web site.
http://www.thesunnews.com/news/stories/2055109.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the Web site of the TIMES-UNION of Albany, N.Y.
http://www.timesunion.com:80/AspStories/story.asp?storyKey=29306&category=N
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Web site, the ARIZONA DAILY STAR Web site and on the PHILADELPHIA DAILY NEWS Web site.
http://www.phillynews.com/daily_news/2000/Mar/07/national/ALLE07.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the SEATTLE TIMES Web site.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/nation-world/html98/driv_20000307.html
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the FOX MARKET WIRE Web site.
http://www.foxmarketwire.com/wires/0306/f_ap_0306_46.sml
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on NEW JERSEY ONLINE, the Web site for THE STAR-LEDGER and THE TIMES of New Jersey and on the NEWSDAY Web site and on ALABAMA LIVE, a Web site developed in cooperation with three Alabama newspapers: The Birmingham News, Mobile Register and The Huntsville Times. It also appeared March 7 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site and the Web site of the WICHITA EAGLE in Kansas.
http://www.wichitaeagle.com/news/health/docs/benadryl0307_txt.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the TOPEKA, Kans., CAPITAL-JOURNAL Web site.
http://cjonline.com/stories/030700/new_otcdrugs.shtml
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site and the Florida SUN-SENTINEL Web site.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/daily/detail/0,1136,29000000000107473,00.html
The same Associated Press article appeared March 7 on the HOUSTON CHRONICLE Web site, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/03/07/national0148EST0433.DTL
The same Associated Press article appeared March 6 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/thrive/2000/mar/06/030700629.html
The same Associated Press article appeared March 6 on the USA TODAY Web site.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/health/allergies/lhall009.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared March 6 on the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL Web site.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/alive/news/mar00/meds07030600.asp
Another version of the article, which quotes JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor and lead author of the study, appeared March 7 on the BBC NEWS Web site.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_667000/667818.stm
A Reuters wire service version of the article, which quotes JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor and lead author of the study, and also mentions the IOWA DRIVING SIMULATOR, ran March 6 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/0306/h_rt_0306_24.sml
A shorter version of the same Reuters article appeared March 6 on the YAHOO! FINANCE Web site.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/000306/bft.html
The same Reuters article appeared March 6 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site. http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000306/sc/health_antihistamine_1.html
Another version of the story, which quotes JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor and lead author of the study, aired March 6 on CNN, and appeared in print form the same day on CNN.COM, the network's Web site.
http://cnn.com/2000/HEALTH/03/06/allergy.driving/index.html
Another version of the article that mentions the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was read by anchor Brian Williams on CNBC-TV March 6. No link is available.

LINCOLN, Neb., JOURNAL STAR, March 7 -- A story that caught up with graduates of Lincoln Public Schools 1991 graduates says that Paul Grandgenett finished at Nebraska Wesleyan in 1995 and worked in retail before entering a five-year UNIVERSITY OF IOWA doctoral program in genetics. Ultimately, he would like to run his own research lab at a major university.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/030600/lif/stox

BOSTON HERALD, March 7 -- JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor, was lead author of a study that found that over-the-counter medicines used by millions of hay fever sufferers might affect their driving more than alcohol. Weiler's team tested 40 allergy sufferers ages 25 to 45 in a driving simulator and found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and many similar medicines had a greater effect than alcohol on driving "coherence,'' or the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine -- diphenhydramine -- also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering ability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in today's issue of Annals of Internal Medicine.

KANSAS CITY STAR, March 7 -- Over-the-counter medicines used by millions of people may affect a person's driving ability more than does alcohol, a study indicates. University of Iowa researchers who tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and many similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence," or the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. JOHN M. WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor and lead author of the study, said: "We were quite surprised to find that diphenhydramine may have an even greater impact on the complex task of operating an automobile than does alcohol. That sends a chilling message. You would not want to be on the road when someone is driving at you who is taking these." The same Associated Press article ran March 7 in the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATEMAN in Texas, the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL, the GLOBE & MAIL of Toronto, Ontario, the FLORIDA TIMES-UNION of Jacksonville, the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, the DETROIT FREE PRESS, the PRESS-ENTERPRISE of Riverside, Calif., the HARTFORD COURANT of Connecticut, the DAILY NEWS of Woodland Hills, Calif., the PALM BEACH POST of Florida, the OTTAWA CITIZEN of Ontario, the DENVER POST, the CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, the DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, the ST. PAUL PIONEER-PRESS, the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, the OREGONIAN, the LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER of Kentucky, the ASBURY PARK PRESS of Neptune, N.J., the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the DAILY NEWS of New York, the PROVIDENCE JOURNAL of Rhode Island, the VIRGINIAN-PILOT of Norfolk, Va., the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, the ST. PETERSBURG TIMES of Florida, the GRAND RAPIDS PRESS of Michigan, the ATLANTA JOURNAL and the ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, the SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS, the VANCOUVER SUN, the AKRON BEACON JOURNAL of Ohio, the TULSA WORLD, the NEWS-PRESS of Fort Myers, Fla., the CLARION-LEDGER of Jackson, Miss., the FRESNO BEE, the MIAMI HERALD, the PRESS-TELEGRAM of Long Beach, Calif., the COLUMBUS DISPATCH of Ohio, THE STATE of Columbia, S.C. , the DALLAS MORNING NEWS and the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, March 7 -- When Henry Tippie gave the University of Iowa's College of Business $30 million last year, the university thanked him by naming the school after him. Now a committee of administrators is deciding how much it should cost to have a building, professorship or a whole school bear your name. The committee's goal, said ALAN SWANSON, a senior vice president for development services at the University Foundation, is to have overall consistency" in setting the guidelines. Opportunities to name a building are discussed individually for each project, said University Foundation President MICHAEL NEW.

ASBURY PARK(N.J.) PRESS, March 7--Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that alcohol impairs the body's ability to tighten the blood vessels, the natural process that maintains proper blood pressure when a person moves from a sitting to a standing position. A person who has had too much alcohol loses the reflex that makes the lightheadedness associated with standing too quickly go away, and passes out. This same Los Angeles Times Syndicate article ran Feb. 28 in the CHARLOTTE OBSERVER of North Carolina.

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, March 7 -- The new law that allows people with disabilities to go to work with no loss of medical benefits may make 2000 a banner year for them. The Work Incentives Improvement Act, signed by President Clinton last December, "could potentially help thousands of people with disabilities join or rejoin the workforce," said PETER BLANCK, professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa.

EXPRESSO, March 6 - University of Iowa professors and neurologists ANTONIO and HANNA DAMASIO are profiled. The article mentions Antonio Damasio's books "Descartes' Error: Emotion, Reason, and the Human Brain," and "The Feeling of What Happens." One unnamed student is quoted as saying Antonio Damasio "is different from all the other professors, because he knows everything and he knows how to speak on everything. He has an inexhaustible mind." Expresso is the Website of a publication based in Lisbon, Portugal.
http://www.expresso.pt/ed1440/r0341.asp?il

COMMUNITY COLLEGE WEEK, March 6 -- Bryanna Brodell, a 20-year-old University of Iowa nursing student, and professor DAVID KLEMM, who teaches a Religion and Society class at the university, are quoted in a story about on-line class notes. Notes for Klemm's class -- like those for 50 other courses at the university -- are available through a company called Versity.com, which hires students to take notes in class and give them to the company. Brodell says she doesn't want to use the on-line notes because they'll encourage her to skip classes. Klemm said: "I think it's regrettable that students might end up relying on such notes rather than attending class. I think there's a big danger there for students who come to depend on these notes."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, March 6 -- A story about Don Michael Randel, who is leaving Cornell University to become president of the University of Chicago in July, said that in 1994 -- when Cornell was looking for a president -- Randel was the "inside" candidate and HUNTER RAWLINGS, then president of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was the "outside" candidate. Rawlings got the job, but then named Randel his provost.

MSNBC, March 6 -- Millions of people taking certain over-the-counter medicines for allergies and colds may be more hazardous drivers than those who are legally drunk, a new study found. Medicines containing diphenhydramine, commonly known as Benadryl, can cause serious impairment and are best avoided by drivers, reported lead researcher JOHN WEILER, a professor of internal medicine at the University of Iowa. The researchers looked at study participants' performance on a driving simulator and concluded that they generally did worse when taking diphenhydramine than after drinking enough alcohol to be considered legally drunk. "We were surprised to find that this antihistamine has more of an impact on driving performance than alcohol," he said.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/378663.asp?0m=N11P

SALON, March 6 -- Defining the reality of pain is a little like defining the existence of a supreme being. If it can't be observed or measured, does it still exist? "Absolutely," says CAROLINE CARNEY DOEBBELING, board certified in both psychiatry and internal medicine at the University of Iowa. "Pain without an identified source is very real. Science just hasn't advanced to the point it can tell us where it's coming from." Doebbeling believes the mind and the body are so intertwined that it's hard to tell which one has the wheel of the car.
http://www.salon.com/health/feature/2000/03/06/psychosomatic/index.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, March 6 -- A story on surgery for obesity says modern gastric bypass surgery was developed 40 years ago by Edward E. Mason, a surgeon at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the founding president of the bariatric surgeons society. Mason observed that patients who underwent irreversible operations to remove large parts of their stomachs or intestines to treat cancer or severe ulcers lost a lot of weight and remained underweight regardless of what or how much they ate. They also suffered from severe "dumping" every time they ate.

TIMES-PICAYUNE, New Orleans, La., March 5 -- A University of Iowa research team believes that worms, long considered disgusting intruders, may actually be good for their human hosts. JOEL WEINSTOCK'S team has been studying worms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. IBD is almost unheard of in developing nations where people routinely have worms, but has been growing significantly in the United States and other industrialized countries. Previous research has shown that worms modulate the immune system, preventing it from responding so intensely to pathogens. Without worms, Weinstock's team guessed, the immune system might be more likely to overreact, as it does in autoimmune diseases such as IBD. "They've become part of us," Weinstock said of the worms that have lived in our guts through the millennia. "We're the first population never to experience these worms. Suddenly, our immune system is out of balance." The same KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWSPAPERS article ran Feb. 28 in the ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL in New Mexico.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE, March 5 -- Among employees recently promoted at First National Bank of Springdale, Ark., is Jennifer Hingst, a consumer loan officer who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

DALLAS MORNING NEWS, March 5 -- A feature story explains the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM) and quotes UI finance professor TOM RIETZ, who helps direct the markets. "We are a lot more stable than the polls, especially in predicting vote shares," he said. "It's proven pretty accurate.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, March 5 -- A story about former poet laureate and Pulitzer Prize winner RITA DOVE says she earned her master of fine arts degree at the University of Iowa in 1977, when that school was the apex of creative-writing programs. It also says she met her husband, German novelist Fred Viehbahn, there.

THE DETROIT NEWS, March 5 -- DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and author of "Bad Boys, Bad Men: Confronting Anti-social Personality Disorder," co-authored an editorial about a boy who stabbed a girl with a pencil and shot a classmate. "The boy, like the bullet he fired into the neck of his first-grade classmate, is traveling at high speed toward more episodes of criminality and violence," Black wrote.

YANGTZE EVENING NEWS, (Nanjing, China), March 5 -- DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about Web addiction. The Evening News is a Chinese-language newspaper. The article ran in the paper's weekly computer section.

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, March 4 -- A story on self-described "creative thug" poet Gerald Stern says he once considered living in Arizona after retiring in 1995 from 14 years of teaching at the famed UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. But he was drawn back to his Eastern roots and settled along the Delaware River in Lambertville, N.J. He now lives in Pennsylvania outside New York City.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/community/comstories/0304stern.shtml

THE ECONOMIST, March 4 -- A fever chart is featured in the magazine showing how Republican presidential candidates George W. Bush and John McCain are doing in the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, which is run by the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business. The chart shows Bush's "stock price" rising and McCain's falling in March.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 3 -- Academics and artists are debating how to protest the rightist coalition that has won control of the Austrian government and stirred up the ghosts of fascism in the heart of Europe. GERHARD LOEWENBERG, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, agrees that while Germans experienced a serious debate about their fascist past at the end of the 1960s, Austrians have not. "If there is a fortunate side to all this," says the specialist in European parliamentary politics, "it is that the reaction to what is happening in Austria will stimulate Austrians to look at their past."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i26/26a05101.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, March 3 -- DuPont Company publicized the value of several patent contributions last year, including the $64-million worth that were announced simultaneously: $35-million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, $23-million to Virginia Tech, and $6-million to the Pennsylvania State University at University Park.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i26/26a03601.htm

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, March 3 -- One of the world's leading scholars on U.S. poet Walt Whitman is joining the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Kenneth Price, professor of English and American studies at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., will join UNL's English department this fall as the Hillegass Chair in 19th Century American Literature. A prolific scholar, Price co-edits the Walt Whitman hypertext archive with University of Iowa English professor ED FOLSOM. The electronic site features all known photographs of Whitman, contemporary reviews of his work and selected manuscripts.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/030300/loc/sto5

THE STRAITS TIMES, Singapore, March 3 -- The protective effects of parasites was demonstrated dramatically last year, when researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA said that five out of six patients with an untreatable inflammation of the gut, known as Crohn's disease, improved dramatically when they were given the eggs of small parasitic worms to drink. The Straits Times is one of the Singapore area's oldest English-language daily newspapers. It is the flagship publication of the publicly-listed Singapore Press Holdings group and has a weekday circulation of around 370,000.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com/world/wrld17_0303_prt.html

YAHOO! NEWS, March 2 -- The two most popular brands of saline-filled breast implants are safe and effective and should stay on the U.S. market, a federal advisory panel said Thursday after reviewing new data on possible complications. The committee said, however, that the company that makes a third brand of saline implants did not present enough information to prove the benefits of its product outweighed its risks. The panel recommended the FDA approve implants made by Inamed Inc.'s McGhan Medical unit and Mentor Corp., two California companies that lead the breast implant market. "The data shows these implants are reasonably safe and effective,'' said panel member Dr. PHYLLIS CHANG of the University of Iowa College of Medicine after studying McGhan's results.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/000302/bja.html
The same Reuters article ran March 2 on the FOXMARKETWIRE Web site.

MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL, March 2 -- Omaha's Alvine and Associates completed a $55 million telecommunications project for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The company wired each dorm room so students can connect to the local area network and the Internet.

YAHOO! NEWS, March 1 -- Doctors may not take the physical complaints of people with a history of psychiatric problems as seriously as the complaints of other patients, results of a study suggest. Family doctors are less likely to order tests for a patient complaining of severe headache or abdominal pain if the patient has a history of depression or a history of health complaints related to emotional problems, according to a report in the March issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine. "Hopefully, we will all be humbled by the results,'' said lead researcher MARK A. GRABER, associate professor of family medicine and surgery at the University of Iowa.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000301/hl/hca_53.html

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, March 1 -- Noted Midwestern writer Jonis Agee returns to her native Nebraska this fall to teach at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Agee, who owns land near Valentine, earned her bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and her master's and Ph.D. degrees at SUNY-Binghamton.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/030100/loc/sto4

USA TODAY, March 1 -- Hundreds of students at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA residence hall may have been accidentally exposed to cancer-causing asbestos, school officials said. Workers who were installing a fire alarm and sprinkler system at Mayflower Hall drilled through material that contained 2 percent to 5 percent asbestos, officials said.

CBS HEALTHWATCH, March 1 -- Newly published research by JEROME YANKOWITZ, UI associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology, and JOHN ELY, UI professor of family medicine, reveals that concerns about malpractice lawsuits have led many obstetricians and family physicians to ban patients' families from videotaping in the delivery room. "The main concern of most of the doctors we surveyed was that a videotape could be used against them in malpractice suits," Ely said. "But we also did a study of lawyers, and we found there that the videotape helps the doctor as often as it hurts the doctor in these cases."

PARENTS, March 2000 -- GARY GAFFNEY, M.D., an associated professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, offers advice for a parent whose 12-year-old daughter is always pulling at -- and out -- the hair on her head and eyebrows. "Hair-twirling is a common nervous habit. However, if your daughter has developed a bald spot, it sounds as if something more is going on," Gaffney writes. "It could be a dermatologic condition that causes itching, or a psychological problem."

NURSING MANAGEMENT, March 2000 -- The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality has funded "Evidence-based practice: From book to bedside," a research project by MARITA TITLER, R.N., Ph.D., School of Nursing, University of Iowa. The goal of the project is to "promote the translation of acute pain-management research into clinical practice using a multidimensional approach targeted to hospitalized elderly. Researchers will perform a three-year randomized evaluation in 12 hospitals in Iowa, Missouri and Illinois.

MECHANICAL ADVANTAGE, March 2000 -- TED SMITH, chairman of the mechanical engineering department at the University of Iowa, says that undergraduates are often in the dark about graduate school. For instance, he says, some are unaware that most graduate students are supported by research money, grants or teaching assistantships. "Until I tell them otherwise, they think graduate school is going to be expensive," he says

GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGY, March 2000 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, a charter member of Internet2, is piloting a video streaming and tele-immersion project that employs ImmersaDesks, drafting-table-style virtual-reality systems that enable faculty and students to explore 3D objects and environments together. Collaborating with the National High Performance Computing Center of Taiwan, the university is examining several engineering problems, such as the pressure on a train going through a tunnel. The project is reportedly going well, despite small problems. "In this case, the time-zone difference is a bit of a problem," said Judith Brown, Internet2 project manager. "It is 6 p.m. in Iowa when it is 8 a.m. the next day in Taiwan. Also, the sound had about a six second latency, but the graphics were good." Brown said the University of Iowa is also involved in some ongoing work between geography classes at the University of Iowa and Penn State.
http://www.govtech.net:80/publications/gt/2000/mar/educationfolder/education.shtm

JOURNAL OF GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING, March 2000 -- DEBORAH PERRY SCHOENFELDER, Ph.D., R.N., a clinical assistant professor in the University of Iowa College of Nursing, is the author of an article on a fall-prevention program for elderly individuals.

MECHANICAL ADVANTAGE, March 2000 -- WILFRID NIXON, professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Iowa, is pioneering the use of the Internet for non-academic courses aimed at working professionals. He started a winter highway-maintenance program offered on-campus and to a handful of remote video-communications classrooms throughout Iowa in 1998. Last year, he decided to digitize the course, making audio recordings of his lectures and synchronizing them with animated overheads -- all of which were placed on CD-ROMs.

COSMETIC DERMATOLOGY, March 2000 -- THOMAS L. RAY, M.D., was elected to the American Academy of Dermatology recently. Ray is a professor of dermatology, department of dermatology, at the University of Iowa. He is also an assistant editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

EH&S SOLUTIONS, March 2000 -- A story on the creation of eight centers to support children's environmental health research mentions the center at the University of Iowa School of Medicine that focuses on Etiology and Parhogenesis of Airway Disease in Children from Rural Communities. The story says rural communities introduce unique environmental exposures that are known to play a role in airway disease. Children may be adversely affected by grain dust and endotoxin, commonly found in farming communities, and such exposure may lead to asthma and other respiratory diseases. DAVID A. SCHWARTZ, M.D., is named as the principal investigator.

OR MANAGER, March 2000 -- FRANKLIN DEXTER, M.D., Ph.D., in the department of anesthesia at the University of Iowa, is the author of a column on developing efficient methods for scheduling elective surgical cases.

MONEY, March 2000 -- A list of helpful medical Web sites includes a link to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S HARDIN META DIRECTORY. It says the directory, which it describes as "a massive but extremely well-organized site aimed mainly at doctors," reviews and sorts medical links.

MONEY, March 2000 -- A story about how "the Internet can save your life" includes a list of 15 prominent starter sites for finding health information on the Internet, including two listed for research purposes -- the Hardin Meta Directory, based at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and the National Library of Medicine, based at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md.

GEORGE, March 2000 -- JAMES TOMKOVICZ wrote a letter to the editor of George saying that the magazine's writer, Ann Coulter, failed to understand the legal issues involved in her November 1999 article "Harmin' 'Miranda'." Tomkovicz says, "Every freedom and protection that affects criminal justice is costly to law enforcement -- including the right to counsel, the guarantee against double jeopardy, the right to confront witnesses, the right against unreasonable searches and seizures, the promise of due process of law, and the foundation of 'Miranda,' our Fifth Amendment privilege against compulsory self-incrimination." Many believe 'Miranda' is not, as Coulter states, "the Warren Court's high-water mark for foolish law rulings." Instead, Tomkovicz says, many "see it [Miranda] as the country's ultimate guardian of rights to halt decades of law enforcement abuses in securing confessions-abuses that endangered core guarantees of our system."

 

 

 

 

 

 

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