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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
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Release: March 24, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

NOTE TO EDITORS: The print sale by graduate printmaking students from the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History, scheduled for Saturday, April 1 and announced in Arts Center Relations' Campus Notes last Friday, March 17, has been postponed until a later date. Please remove this event from all calendar listings, and if you have run our release, please also run the following announcement of the change. Thank you.

APRIL 1 PRINT SALE IS POSTPONED -- The print sale by graduate printmaking students from the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History scheduled for Saturday, April 1 has been postponed until a later date.

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CHAMBER ORCHESTRA CONCERT APRIL 2 -- The Chamber Orchestra of the University of Iowa School of Music will perform a free concert under the direction of graduate conducting student Lucia Matos at 3 p.m. Sunday, April 2 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

Jessica Walsh, the winner of the 1999-2000 University Concerto Competition, will be the featured soloist, performing Mozart's Concerto for Bassoon on the euphonium. The euphonium is a brass instrument related to the tuba that plays in approximately the same range as the bassoon.

Other works on the program will be the "Hebrides" Overture of Felix Mendelssohn; "Pavane pour une infante defunte' (Pavanne for a dead princess) by Maurice Ravel; and the Suite No. 1 from the opera "Carmen" by Georges Bizet.

In 1829 Mendelssohn, then just 20 years old, made an extensive trip to Great Britain that included travel through Scotland. Two of his most popular works were inspired by this trip: the "Scottish" Symphony by the highlands and the "Hebrides" Overture by a stormy steamship crossing to the island of Skaffa in the Scottish Hebrides.

Originally titled "The Lonely Island," it was revised in 1850 under the title "The Hebrides," and it is also known as "Fingal's Cave" for Skaffa Island's best known landmark, the retreat of a legendary Scottish hermit. "The Hebrides" is actually a miniature descriptive tone poem. With its ominous theme in B minor and turbulent orchestral development, it is highly evocative of the stormy ocean and the rugged coast of Skaffa Island.

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SCOTT AND LONGENBACH READ APRIL 3 -- Fiction writer Joanna Scott and scholar and poet James Longenbach will read at 8 p.m. Monday, April 3, in Room 321 of the Chemistry Building on the University of Iowa campus. The reading, sponsored by the UI Writers' Workshop, is free and open to the public.

Scott is the author of five novels, including 1997 Pulitzer Prize finalist "The Manikin," and a short story collection, "Various Antidotes," which was a finalist for the 1995 PEN/Faulkner Award. Her first three novels were "Fading, My Paracheene Belle," "The Closest Possible Union" and "Arrogance."

Her most recent novel, released in February, is called "Make Believe." "A risk-taking book . . " writes the Kirkus Reviews critic. "Scott just keeps getting better."

The New York Times Book Review critique stated, "As is made dazzlingly clear in 'Make Believe,' her fifth novel, Joanna Scott is a Michael Jordan: she has talent to burn."

Scott has received a MacArthur "genius grant" Fellowship and a Lannan Award.

Longenbach has written several works of literary scholarship on modern poetry, including "Stone Cottage: Pound, Yeats, and Modernism," "Wallace Stevens: The Plain Sense of Things," "Modern Poetry After Modernism."

In 1998 he published his first collection of poetry, entitled "Threshold."

Kirkus Reviews critic wrote, "Meditative and often somber, Longenbach's measured verse explores the boundaries between human and spiritual existence, between man and nature, between parent and child, and between the everyday and the transcendent . . . all in all, an impressive debut."

Longenbach was the recipient for a National Endowment for the Humanities fellowship in 1987-88. He is currently a professor of English at the University of Rochester.

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CULVER READS APRIL 3 -- Former United States Senator John Culver will read from his new biography of Iowa politician and reformer Henry Wallace, "American Dreamer," co-written with John Hyde, at 8 p.m. Monday, April 3 at Buchanan Auditorium on the University of Iowa campus.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

George McGovern writes, "This is a great book about a great man. I can't recall when -- if ever -- I've read a better biography."

Sen. Edward M. Kennedy writes, "In this eminently readable biography, John C. Culver and John Hyde have put together a captivating chronicle of American politics from the Depression through the 1960s. The remarkable life of Henry Wallace is one of the most profound and extraordinary chapters in the history of American liberalism. Many of the dramatic scenes so vividly painted by Culver and Hyde will make you feel you're there in person. 'American Dreamer' is a fascinating narrative."

Henry Agard Wallace was a geneticist of international renown, a prolific author, a groundbreaking economist, and a businessman whose company paved the way for a worldwide agricultural revolution. He also held two cabinet posts, served four tumultuous years as America's wartime vice president under FDR, and waged a quixotic campaign for president in 1948.

Culver is a former Democratic senator from Iowa. Hyde is a former reporter for the Des Moines Register.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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PROSE READS APRIL 4 -- Novelist Francine Prose, a former faculty member in the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, will read from her new novel, "Blue Angel," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 4 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Publishers Weekly calls "Blue Angel" "a peerlessly accomplished performance, at once tingingly contemporary and timelessly funny."

Russell Banks writes, " 'Blue Angel' is a smart-bomb attack on academic hypocrisy and cant, and Francine Prose, an equal-opportunity offender, is as politically incorrect on the subject of sex as Catullus and twice as funny. What a deep relief it is, in these dumbed-down Late Empire days, to read a world class satirist who's also a world class story-teller."

The critic of Kirkus Reviews wrote, "When Prose is doing the imagining, you can count on nodding in recognition while howling with laughter. Prose once again proves herself one of our great cultural satirists."

Francine Prose is the author of 10 works of fiction, including "Bigfoot Dreams," "Household Saints," "Hunters and Gatherers," "Primitive People," and "Guided Tours of Hell." Her work has appeared in The New Yorker, Atlantic Monthly, GQ and the Paris Review.

She is a contributing editor at Harper's magazine, and she writes regularly on art for the Wall Street Journal.

The recipient of numerous grants and awards, including Guggenheim and Fulbright fellowships, Prose is a Director's Fellow at the Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library. In addition to the UI Writers' Workshop, she has taught at the Sewanee Writers' Conference and Johns Hopkins University.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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PERSPECTIVES, APRIL 5 -- UI faculty member Estera Milman will give a gallery tour of "Latin American Realities/International Solutions," an exhibition of 43 selected works from a significant 1972 exhibition of politically motivated art, at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 5 at the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

Milman, who is the museum's curator of intermedia art and director of Alternative Traditions in the Contemporary Arts (ATCA) at the UI, organized the exhibition. Her gallery tour is part of the weekly Perspectives series held Wednesdays at the museum. Admission is free to both the museum and the series.

"Latin American Realities/International Solutions" will be on display in the Carver Gallery through Sunday, April 30. The exhibition was listed in the March issue of the New Art Examiner of Chicago as one of seven exhibitions around the United States considered "essential viewing . . . throughout the international art world."

The exhibition at the UI Museum of Art presents selections from the 1972 Latin-American exhibition "Towards a Profile of Latin American Art," which was mounted by the Argentinean "Centro de Arte y Communicacion" (Center of Art and Communication, or CAYC) and shown at the 3rd Coltejer Biennial in Medellin, Columbia.

Milman stresses the political content and impact of the original exhibition. "It was intended to illustrate a fundamental interrelationship among the artistic vanguard, cultural revolution and technology," she explained. "The exhibition is composed of works that are representative of the diverse agenda-driven sociopolitical positions of their makers."

The entire original exhibition has also been placed on the World Wide Web at the UI libraries web page, and can be accessed at http://sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu/cayc. It is presented at the museum in affiliation with the UI's newly established Center for Human Rights.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of Milman's talk. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1999-2000 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~artmus on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr.

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BAIR READS APRIL 5 -- Essayist and fiction writer Julene Bair, a University of Iowa alumna, will read from her new collection of personal essays, "One Degree West: Reflections of a Plainsdaughter," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, April 5 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Michael Steinberg writes, " 'One Degree West' is a bittersweet paean to a place, a time, and a way of life. This lyrical, evocative collection combines descriptions of a vital and demanding farming culture with the author's reflections on her own personal evolution. The book is a deeply human story of one woman's connections to her family and the land, as well as a compelling narrative about generational conflicts, romantic yearnings, separations and reconciliations."

Jo Ann Beard describes "One Degree West" as "a luminous account of life on the western plains. Told both from the solitary and soulful perspective of a girl gazing at the immense night sky, the toes of her boots poked though a wire fence, and the thoughtful and intelligent woman she becomes, these stories are profound and beautiful, utterly compelling."

UI emeritus faculty member Carl Klaus writes, "From childhood to motherhood, from seed time to harvest, 'One Degree West' vividly bears witness to the bittersweet lot of a woman's life on the farm. Fraught with the challenging weather of existence on the edge of the Plains, Julene Bair's memoir is much more than a personal story. It's a haunting family saga, an eloquent tribute to a passing way of life by a person who passed it by -- a new farming classic."

Bair earned degrees from both the UI Nonfiction Writing Program and Writers' Workshop. This is her first book.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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ORTIZ READS APRIL 6 -- Acoma Pueblo poet, essayist and storyteller Simon Ortiz will read from his work at 8 p.m. Thursday, April 6 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. There will also be drumming and storytelling by Steve Thunder McGuire and Jerome Kill Small.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public. It is cosponsored by the UI American Indian/Native Studies Program.

Ortiz's two most recent books are "From Sand Creek" and "Men of the Moon: Collected Short Stories." "From Sand Creek" is a collection of poetry that remembers injustices done to native peoples in the name of Manifest Destiny. It also refers to the spread of that ambition in other parts of the world -- notably in Vietnam -- as Ortiz asks himself what it is to be an American, a United States citizen, and an Indian.

Thomas McGrath writes, "In this work by Simon Ortiz, Sand Creek shines like a dark star over a continent of pain, and gives the poet a powerful vision which is alternately personal, social-political and historical: a vision of damnation and resistance which is nevertheless understanding and even hopeful."

In a review of "Men on the Moon: Collected Short Stories," Booklist's reviewer writes, "Native American poet Ortiz's short stories seem more spoken than written, but there is nothing casual about their structure or intent. Having grown up in the Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico, Ortiz is acutely sensitive to the spiritual conflict between Indian and white cultures, and this ongoing strife is the underlying theme in each of his dramatic, sometimes humorous tales . . . . Each of Ortiz's powerfully tender stories weaves the tragic with the transcendent, the absurd with the cosmic, whether it focuses on work or family, happiness or heartache, the laws of nature or of society, loyalty or love."

Ortiz's other books include "Woven Stone," "After and Before the Lightning" and "Speaking for the Generations: Native Writers on Writing."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series‚ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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LECTURE ON FRENCH OPERA APRIL 7 -- David Charlton, a professor at the University of London, Royal Holloway, will present a lecture on French opera at 1:30 p.m. Friday, April 7 in Room 1027 of the Voxman Music Building on the UI campus.

Charlton's lecture, "Of Nations and Narratives: Continuities in French Opera," will be free and open to the public. It is part of the Musicology and Music Theory Colloquium series at the School of Music.

Charlton's lecture debates how historical subject matter in French opera was defined and dramatized in France before the Revolution of 1789. Charlton will show that there is a great deal of research remaining to be done relating the operas of the time to their social context. He will also consider how different -- insofar as it was different -- the treatment of historical matter in 18th-century opera in France was from its treatment in 19th-century Grand Opera.

Charlton began his academic career in 1970 as lecturer and then reader at the University of East Anglia in Norwich, England. Since 1995 he has been reader in music at Royal Holloway, University of London. He serves on the editorial boards of the academic publication Cambridge Opera Journal and the "New Berlioz Edition." He is review editor for the Royal Music Association and area editor for France for the second edition of the "New Grove Dictionary of Music." He is co-editor of the "Cambridge Companion of Grand Opera," currently in preparation.

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SHAPIRO AND SLATER READ APRIL 7 -- Literary couple Gerald Shapiro and Judith Slater will read from recent short-story collections at 8 p.m. Friday, April 7 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Shapiro teaches creative writing at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where he also serves as a reader for the journal Prairie Schooner. His stories have appeared in Kenyon Review, Gettysburg Review, Quarterly West and elsewhere. He is the author of the collection "From Hunger" and new collection, "Bad Jews."

In a review of "Bad Jews," Marly Swick writes, "Gerald Shapiro manages to pull off that rare feat of writing fresh, surprising stories that are, at the same time, clearly informed by the long, rich tradition of Jewish-American fiction. Short stories do not get any funnier or any sadder -- any wiser or more beautifully written than these simultaneously entertaining and heartbreaking stories."

Slater grew up in Oregon and received her Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She has been living in Nebraska since 1987.

Her work has appeared in Redbook, Colorado Review, Greensboro Review and many other journals. She teaches creative writing and, like Shapiro, serves as a reader for Prairie Schooner at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, where she has won awards for her teaching.

Her collection "The Baby Can Sing and Other Stories" won the Mary McCarthy Prize in Short Fiction in 1998. A Publishers Weekly called the book, "A promising first collection of 13 stories that tread the fine line between sweet reflection and bittersweet sentimentality."

Kirkus Review's critic wrote, "Slater has a light touch, which lends a grace to her work that's as welcome (in its lack of pretense) as it is rare."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series‚ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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ART OF THE MONTH, APRIL 8 -- Kathryn Floyd, a doctoral candidate in the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History, will discuss a series of seven prints in a lecture entitled "Uprising!: Kaethe Kollwitz and The Peasants' War" at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 8 at the UI Museum of Art.

Floyd's lecture is the third and final installment in this spring's Art of the Month mini-course, "Pleasures, Portraits, and Peasants: Prints from the Museum's Permanent Collection." New participants are welcome.

The monthly sessions are held in the Member's Lounge of the Museum of Art. During the current year the series has been sub-titled "Satisfy your Appetite for Art." Bruegger's Bagel Bakery of Iowa City will provide a mini-brunch of coffee, bagels and cream cheese. Seating in the Member's Lounge will be limited.

Turn of the century Expressionist Kaethe Kollwitz was known for her concern for the poor and working classes in her native Germany. In her series "The Peasants' War" she depicts human struggle and plight inspired by a 16th-century uprising of German serfs against the landed aristocracy.

Floyd will discuss Kollwitz's political ideology as revealed in "The Peasants' War" and its place in the politics of early 20th-century Germany. She will also explore the connection between women and revolution, both as depicted in the print series itself and in the position of the artist, a revolutionary woman of her own time.

"Kollwitz's prints are stark and powerful," says Floyd. "I hope that people will come away from the lecture thinking that the work of Kaethe Kollwitz and the questions it raises continue to be relevant and provocative today. Not only do specific aspects of her images and biography touch on issues that continue to face our own society, but the broader question of the connection of propaganda and art remains significant for our visually-oriented culture."

Floyd began her studies in the doctoral program at the UI in the fall of 1999, concentrating on the art of early 20th-century Germany.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturdays. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

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CONCERT OF NEW MUSIC APRIL 9 -- The Composers Workshop from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a free concert of new works by music students at 8 p.m. Sunday, April 9 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus. The performance will be free and open to the public.

Four works will be performed April 9: "Line" for solo clarinet by Rob Bennett; "Physiognomy I" for alto saxophone by Alexandre Lunsqui; "This is not for You (Part 2)" for alto and tenor saxophone, bass, piano and drums by Lunsqui; and "Nuit" for clarinet, viola and piano by Dimitri Papageorgiuo.

Papageorgiuo said that "Nuit," written between April and October 1999, was composed as a musical diary. The title refers to both the French word for night and an Egyptian goddess, whose name is spelled the same way.

"I was working exclusively at night," Papageorgiuo said. "The word "Nuit' also refers to the Egyptian goddess of the Ever Unknown, who appears in Aleister Crowley's 'The Book of the Law,' a book that accompanied me during that period."

The Composers Workshop is a collaborative project between composers and performers in the UI School of Music. It is devoted to the performance of music written at the UI and aims to foster greater co-operation and interplay between composers and performers in the Iowa City area. The Composers Workshop performance season is managed by a doctoral composition student, thus affording composers practical experience in organizing performances of new music.