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June 2000

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SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, June 30 -- A Taiwanese medical resident who was facing dismissal from his program at the University of Washington shot and killed his supervising doctor before committing suicide. Foreign medical and graduate students face the added barrier of learning a new language along with their high-level studies. This can be stressful, but rarely leads to this kind of violence. At the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1991, graduate student Gang Lu, considered "brilliant but disturbed" by colleagues, shot his physics instructor and five others before killing himself. In a letter, he claimed grievances against the people he murdered.
http://seattlep-i.nwsource.com/local/for30.shtml

USA TODAY, June 29 -- A listing of jazz events planned for this year included Nicholas Payton's Louis Armstrong tribute at HANCHER AUDITORIUM in Iowa City on Nov. 17.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/travel/leisure/2000/ltl324.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, June 29 – An Associated Press story on the newspaper's Web site notes that the documentary "Dvorak and America," to be shown Monday at 10 p.m. Eastern on PBS, follows Dvorak's move from Bohemia -- a region in the Czech Republic – to America, where he lived from 1892 until 1895. He spent the summer of 1893 in Spillville, Iowa. "Here was this quaint, shy, awkward person who comes and sees something about us that Americans are not seeing themselves," said PETER ALEXANDER, a musicologist at the University of Iowa. "What sounds American to anybody in the world -- Broadway, jazz, pop music -- that all comes from the African-American influence. Dvorak somehow foresaw that. This film stresses that very, very successfully."
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/e/AP-AP-on-TV-Dvorak-in-Iowa.html
The same article appeared on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web page June 29.
http://www.calendarlive.com/tvent/20000629/tCB00V0735.html
The same article appeared on EXCITE NEWS.COM June 29.
http://news.excite.com/news/ap/000629/12/ap-on-tv-dvorak-in-iowa
The same article appeared on MSNBC.COM June 29.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/427114.asp?cp1=1

NEW YORK TIMES, June 29 -- A quite different approach to election forecasting has been taken by some researchers at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. On their Web site at http://www.biz.uiowa.edu/iem/index.html you can buy and sell political candidates -- not with campaign contributions, but by participating in an online futures market in presidential elections offered through the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM). The electronic market is operated by the researchers at the University of Iowa as an economic experiment, with the goal of better understanding speculative markets. As a side benefit, it has ended up being a remarkably accurate predictor of presidential elections, forecasting the correct outcome of every election since 1988.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/financial/columns/062900econ-scene.html

WASHINGTON POST, June 29 -- An NCAA subcommittee is drafting an amendment that would allow student-athletes to obtain loans based on potential earnings as a professional athlete. CHRISTINE GRANT, chairman of the NCAA's subcommittee studying amateurism, said her group hopes to meet with banking executives during the next two months to draft legislation that would permit student-athletes to obtain loans based on potential earnings. Such legislation might help deter student-athletes from leaving college before their eligibility is complete in order to turn professional. "There have been many people who are questioning whether the NCAA has the authority to dictate what a prospective student-athlete does from the moment he or she is born until enrolling in a university," said Grant, who earlier this week announced she is retiring as director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa. "That is what the NCAA has been trying to do. . . The question is, should you do that? And is it feasible?"
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A9307-2000Jun28.html

BBC NEWS, June 28 -- Supercomputer centres around the world are linking up over the Internet to create a new generation of enormously powerful machines. A research group led by KURT ANSTREICHER and NATHAN BRIXIUS from the University of Iowa have used some Grid software called Globus to tie together computers to solve the "nug30" Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP) that was first posed in 1968. The computational crunching to solve the problem involved more than 1,000 computers from eight different institutions scattered around the world. Cracking the problem took a total of 6.9 days. The researchers estimate that if a single machine had done the number crunching it would have taken 6.9 years to solve the problem.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/sci/tech/newsid_806000/806410.stm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 28 – The violence of the trans-Atlantic slave trade had one peaceful outcome, according to a panel of food historians at "Grits, Greens and Everything In Between," a conference sponsored by the Culinary Historians of Chicago: The impact of African ingredients and traditions has been a lasting benefit to American regional cooking. The two-day symposium, billed as the first national conference on soul food, was held this past weekend at the Chicago Historical Society and Roosevelt University. The conference included presentations by food historians including DORIS WITT, a University of Iowa English professor.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/goodeating/article/0,2669,SAV-0006280260,FF.html

LAS VEGAS SUN, June 27 -- Supreme Court justices, ready to begin a three-month summer recess this week, like to use that time to travel -- and have other people pick up the tab. Newly released financial disclosure reports for 1999 show the justices left the nation's capital for fully subsidized trips to four other continents -- Australia, Europe, Asia and South America -- and dozens of American cities last summer. Justice John Paul Stevens was reimbursed for trips to speak at the Gerald Ford museum in Grand Rapids, Mich., and at a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA event.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/bw-scotus/2000/jun/27/062700824.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran June 27 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0627AP-SCOTUS-TRAVEL&date=27-Jun-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran June 27 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/w/AP-Scotus-Travels.html
The same Associated Press article ran June 27 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/06/27/national1411EDT0603.DTL

ATLANTA JOURNAL-CONSTITUTION, June 27 -- An obituary of Sally Morgan Fitzgerald, who edited a collection of Flannery O'Connor's letters titled "The Habit of Being," says Fitzgerald and her husband were living in Connecticut when O'Connor boarded with them for a year. The devoutly Catholic young writer from Milledgeville recently had graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and was completing a fellowship at Yaddo, an artists' community in New York. The Fitzgeralds were as close as any friends Ms. O'Connor ever had. Fitzgerald, 83, of Cambridge, Mass., died Sunday of complications from cancer.
http://www.accessatlanta.com:80/partners/ajc/epaper/editions/tuesday/local_news_938559bf13a4624a0035.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, June 27 -- In a column about his father's contraction of an infection while under a Chattanooga, Tenn., hospital's care, the writer says his research into whether the hospital had a history of infections led him to the case of a woman named Karen Burton who had sued the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA a few years earlier for refusing to disclose its hospital's infection rate. A district court ruled in her favor, but the state supreme court overturned the ruling.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB959362655463086568.djm

DULUTH NEWS TRIBUNE, (Minn.), June 27 -- A University of Iowa doctor says he is not surprised by a study that says Iowans and other Midwesterners are twice as likely to have Parkinson's disease as people in other parts of the country. "We think that one of the causes of Parkinson's is environmental factors, and toxins are among those," said ROBERT RODNITZKY, vice chairman of the department of neurology. "One of the toxins that is most considered as a risk factor is pesticides. We know that in a rural state like ours, there's a much greater risk of exposure to pesticides," he said. The National Parkinson's Foundation estimates that about 1.4 million people in the United States have the neurological disease, or one of every 250 people.
http://www.duluthnews.com/today/dnt/local/park.htm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran June 26 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=82007375

BALTIMORE ALTERNATIVE, June 27 -- Health insurance benefits will be offered to homosexual partners of University of Iowa employees as a result of action by the State Board of Regents. The move could cost the university $18,000 to $43,000 the first year -- a small amount compared with the school's nine-figure overall budget, which President MARY SUE COLEMAN complained was weakened by a lack of support by state legislators.

OMAHA WORLD HERALD, June 26 -- The story notes that the documentary "Dvorak and America," which was to be shown July 3 on PBS, follows Dvorak's move from Bohemia -- a region in the Czech Republic -- to America, where he lived from 1892 until 1895. He spent the summer of 1893 in Spillville, Iowa. "Here was this quaint, shy, awkward person who comes and sees something about us that Americans are not seeing themselves," said PETER ALEXANDER, a musicologist at the University of Iowa. "What sounds American to anybody in the world -- Broadway, jazz, pop music -- that all comes from the African-American influence. Dvorak somehow foresaw that. This film stresses that very, very successfully."

INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY, June 26 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor, is quoted in a story comparing the two antitrust cases against Microsoft and IBM, the latter of which was launched in 1969. "The IBM case was wrongheaded to begin with," Hovenkamp said. "So much of the stuff that the government was attacking was innovation practices, such as the consolidation of the computer system into one box and fairly aggressive pricing. IBM reduced the costs of making a computer quite a bit."

EXCITE NEWS, June 26 -- A new initiative called "Ticket to Work" that is meant to move people with disabilities from Social Security rolls to payrolls is scheduled to start on Jan. 1. All the details are not worked out yet, but the program will offer lucrative incentives to private sector providers who train and place the disabled. "The plan does have great potential but the devil is always in the implementation," PETER BLANCK, professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa in Iowa City, said. "It's not a panacea." Blanck said the states have to rethink their approach and must be willing to match federal dollars if "Ticket To Work" is to succeed.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/r/000626/12/column-workplace

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, June 26 -- JEFF MURRAY, professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, whose lab did some sequencing for the Human Genome Project, comments in a collection of quotes about the Human Genome Project: "It is important to recognize that it is built on the shoulders of work that's gone before. It's not going to change or cure anybody the next day, but it will, in the lifetime of those of us here today, change the care we receive in a very tangible way."
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=81992707

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, June 26 -- Important as it is, drafting the genome won't prompt overnight changes in the management of patients and their diseases, said Dr. JEFF MURRAY, a professor of pediatrics whose lab at the University of Iowa did sequencing work for the genome project. "We need to be honest with people that translating this into cures for diseases may be many years away," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=GENO26&date=26-Jun-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

WALL STREET JOURNAL, June 26 -- TERRY BRANDS, twice a world champion in freestyle wrestling, returned from retirement to win a place on the 2000 U.S Olympic Team. Those who run the sport seem glad to have him back. "Terry puts an edge on everything he does. It couldn't hurt if some of that rubbed off," said DAN GABLE, the U.S. freestyle co-coach who also coached Brands at the University of Iowa.

NEW YORK TIMES, June 26 -- Phyllis Propp Fowle, a New York lawyer who was the first woman to be an officer of the Army judge advocate general's (JAG) corps, died Thursday in Manhattan. She was 92. She was also the only woman in the corps to serve overseas during World War II. A native of Laurel, Iowa, and a 1930 graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, she earned her law degree there and was the only woman in the law school's class of 1933.
http://www.nytimes.com/00/06/26/news/national/obit-p-fowle.html

THE NEWS TRIBUNE, Tacoma, Wash., June 25 -- MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a University of Iowa professor who began using statistical models to predict election results 20 years ago, says "When I started out, people thought it was witchcraft -- they wouldn't even publish the papers because they thought it was some kind of voodoo. It's changed now. It's not only a serious science, but a very popular science."

LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL, June 25 -- A problem proposed 32 years ago to challenge computers has finally been solved by a group of Midwest-based researchers using more than a thousand computers around the world working on it. Researchers from Northwestern University, Argonne National Laboratory and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA used software developed at the University of Wisconsin to link the computers.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, June 25 -- A federal judge has ordered Macy's West to establish 32-inch minimum pathways between clothing racks in its flagship San Francisco store so that disabled shoppers can reach them more easily. This is the first decision among a number of lawsuits against large department stores filed by advocates for the disabled who say the store's narrow pathways and tall counters violate the 10-year-old Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). A Macy's representative declined to say if the store would appeal the decision, but PETER BLANCK, an expert on disability issues and a professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa, said the retailer would be well advised to accept the ruling. "If Macy's makes the changes, they will be even more competitive because they will better serve women who push strollers, people who use walkers and people who use wheelchairs," he said. "If anything, the ADA has opened a new consumer market comprised of individuals whose dollars are as green as anybody else's."
http://www.latimes.com/news/state/20000625/t000060168.html

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, June 25 -- The meaning of the term "soul food" is being broadened by a new development in the connections between food and travel-- the emerging Afro-Atlantic tradition. This is a topic covered in UI English professor DORIS WITT's book "Black Hunger: Food and the Politics of U.S. Identity," which the article calls "a fascinating look at food's role in African-American culture." Witt was a speaker on African-American cookbooks and literature at the "Grits and Greens and Everything in Between" Conference held in Chicago recently. "Soul food is caught up in migration and travel issues," Witt said. "I got interested when all these soul food cookbooks started popping up in the late 1960s and early '70s. Why was 'soul food' the label for African-American foodways? The most common understanding was that it referred to the foodways of the South. Pork and cornmeal products were the main focus. It's not just chitlins and collard greens boiled for endless hours. True black Southern country foodways include a lot of fresh garden vegetables, things like that." Witt traveled to rummage sales, used bookstores and libraries across the country to find nearly 100 cookbooks that she used as references in writing "Black Hunger."

THE ECONOMIST, June 24 -- In a recurring feature, the magazine includes a graph from the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. This graph shows Al Gore slightly ahead of George W. Bush, with their shares at about 49 and 47 cents, respectively.

NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, June 22 -- KJELL BENSON, now a third-year medical student in the UI College of Medicine, and ARTHUR J. HARTZ, a UI professor of medicine in the Department of Family Medicine, report the results of their study comparing randomized controlled trials and observational studies. Although most physicians consider observational studies to be less valid than randomized controlled trials, Benson and Hartz found that observational studies published in reputable medical journals often give similar results to randomized controlled trials. Benson's effort was supported through the UI College of Medicine's Student Research Fellowship Program, part of which is funded by the NIH.
http://www.nejm.org/content/2000/0342/0025/1878.asp

ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER, (Calif.), June 21 -- Researchers said they may have created a new compound to fight the virus that causes AIDS. The compound may survive in cells longer than existing drugs now used in cocktails to fight HIV, they reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. VASU NAIR of the University of Iowa and colleagues said they had created the compound using molecular engineering techniques. They stressed that they have not yet tested it on humans or even animals, but said it looks very powerful in the test tube. If developed into a drug, it would join an experimental but promising new class of drugs called integrase inhibitors. "The integrase step is the most critical step in my point of view, because this is where the (viral) invasion is complete," Nair said in a statement. "From a scientific point of view, this is the step in which the real damage is done."
http://www.ocregister.com/health/21healthcci.shtml

YAHOO! NEWS, June 21 -- Researchers said they may have created a new compound to fight the virus that causes AIDS. The compound may survive in cells longer than existing drugs now used in cocktails to fight HIV, they reported Tuesday in the Journal of the American Chemical Society. VASU NAIR of the University of Iowa and colleagues said they had created the compound using molecular engineering techniques. They stressed that they have not yet tested it on humans or even animals, but said it looks very powerful in the test tube. If developed into a drug, it would join an experimental but promising new class of drugs called integrase inhibitors. "The integrase step is the most critical step in my point of view, because this is where the (viral) invasion is complete,'' Nair said in a statement. "From a scientific point of view, this is the step in which the real damage is done.''
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000621/sc/aids_integrase_dc_2.html

WASHINGTON POST, June 21 -- A federal judge yesterday gave the government permission to take the Microsoft Corp. antitrust case directly to the U.S. Supreme Court, but he also bowed to the pleas of the software giant and put on hold sweeping business-practice restrictions until appeals are decided. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson cited importance to the public and the "administration of justice" in his long-expected decision to let the government bypass the U.S. Court of Appeals. If the Supreme Court accepts the historic lawsuit, the final outcome could be decided in a year or two, perhaps sooner than if it goes to the appeals court first. HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa antitrust professor, said that if the Supreme Court defies its recent history of dodging antitrust cases and hears the case quickly, a ruling could come before year's end. That means, he said, that "the two- to three-year delay before a ruling, I think, is a lot less likely."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A30327-2000Jun20.html

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, June 21 -- One of seven finalists for Scottsdale city manager is Alan E. Tandy, who has managed Bakersfield, Calif., for eight years and who holds a master's degree in municipal administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/community/comstories/0621manager.shtml

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 19 -- CHRIS DOYLE, the strength coach for the University of Iowa football team, recently participated in the Chicago Highland Games and Scottish festival. He entered the caber toss event, in which men lifted tapered lodge-pole pine tree trunks, some more than 19 feet 3 inches long and up to 98 pounds. Doyle was among the hefty men in kilts who attempted to balance a caber vertically in his hands, then toss it end-over-end to make it land closest to the 12 o'clock position. "You have to have strength in order to throw it accurately. You have to control that caber; the taller it is, the harder it is," Doyle said, after a successful toss, which drew a roaring round of applause.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0006190144,FF.html

NEW YORK TIMES, June 19 -- A profile of David Milch, the co-creator and architect of the television series "N.Y.P.D. Blue" notes that he attended graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.nytimes.com/00/06/19/artleisure/nypd-tv.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 17 -- Prosecutors say they will ask child-abuse expert RANDALL ALEXANDER of the UI Medical School to testify in the case of a day-care operator accused of killing a child in her care. Alexander has testified at the trials of two other Chicago-area child care workers accused of killing children in their care.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0006170115,FF.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, June 16 -- A story about a massive civil antitrust class-action lawsuit planned against Microsoft quotes University of Iowa law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, whose treatise on antitrust law was frequently cited in the government's antitrust trial against Microsoft. "The potential exposure for them (Microsoft) is catastrophic if everybody wins every lawsuit," Hovenkamp said.

THE COLLEGE STORE, Oberlin, Ohio, June 16 -- A feature on David Holcomb, director of student auxiliary services at the Student Bookstore at Orange Coast College in Costa Mesa, Calif., says Holcomb spent his first 20 years in the industry at an off-campus bookstore, Iowa Book and Supply, which served the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 16 -- A Naperville mother is organizing a seminar, "College Bound--Safely" for students preparing to leave home for college this fall. Among the speakers at the seminar will be local students who are home for the summer from a number of colleges and universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They will talk about dating, roommates, parties and participating in sports.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0006160237,FF.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, June 16 -- The paper's daily online magazine feature summarizes an article in the spring-summer issue of "Salmagundi" written by MARILYNNE ROBINSON, an instructor in the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Robinson writes that Americans lamenting the dreary state of politics in the United States have much to learn from the late British philosopher Michael Oakeshott, who focused on morality, but in doing so ultimately contributed to what she terms the "Conservative Devaluation of Value."
http://chronicle.com/daily/2000/06/2000061601j.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, June 15 -- A story about the emergence of companies trying to make thousands of copyrighted books and other materials accessible via the Web for research purposes, says that one such company, Questia, has hired Carol Hughes, a research librarian who recently worked at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to lead a team of librarians in selecting core titles that have been known to be useful to college students. A few of the books that will be included on Questia are "The Industrial Revolution," a 1956 book by Arnold Toynbee, and a 1982 edition of Dante's "Divine Comedy." Hughes said she suspected that Questia might drive more students to the actual library instead of away from it. After using the Web to find books that meet their needs, she said, they may want to check them out to read them more closely. "I think it is going to greatly enhance libraries," she said.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/06/circuits/articles/15book.html

VIRGINIAN-PILOT (Norfolk, Va.), June 14 -- Monday in Virginia Beach, Hampton Roads' only fully professional dance company closed the first subscription season of its decades-spanning history with "International Choreography Showcase," a program of premiere works by some of the world's finest young choreographers. University of Iowa dance department chair DAVID BERKEY's "A Bend In Time," a work for three barefooted couples set to the music of Rachmaninoff and Khachaturian, closed the satisfying program. Like the evening's opener, "A Bend In Time" was modern in style, with a great respect for solid ballet technique. The article is posted on the Web site of the Virginia Ballet Theatre.
http://www.chm.net/ballet/reviews.htm

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, June 14 -- In a critique of the book "Truth at Any Cost" -- advertised as the definitive book on Kenneth Starr's probe of President Clinton -- the writer mentions an excerpt quoting University of Iowa journalism professor GILBERT CRANBERG's article in Harvard's Nieman Reports about the imaginary "$50,000 benefit" to the Clintons' investment from an illegal loan to Susan McDougal. The book's authors seek to justify the Office of Independent Counsel's treatment of Susan McDougal by emphasizing how crucial it was to learn "whether Bill Clinton had lied" when he denied pressuring witness David Hale to lend $300,000 to the McDougals. "Some of that money," the authors assure us, "had gone to the benefit of the Whitewater Development Corporation, jointly owned by the Clintons and the McDougals." That allegation was itself false. As Cranberg showed, the first Associated Press wire story that went out after closing arguments in the Tucker-McDougal trial stressed that OIC prosecutors had rested "without showing how Clinton benefited from a $300,000 loan as Hale had claimed."

KANSAS CITY STAR, June 14 -- A story about Red Star Studios in Kansas City says that in his exhibit "Spirit Houses" studio potter GERRY ESKIN, an adjunct professor of art and art history at the University of Iowa, attempts to juggle the "functional" and the "sculptural." The show includes four wood-fired ceramic boxes, each the size of a small doghouse. The front of each bears a simple cartoonlike face made up of round eyes, a long nose and a gaping opening for the mouth. In his artist statement, Eskin explains that his Spirit Houses reference ossuaries, or bone boxes, from the ancient Middle East. But it is hard to imagine these comical "Sesame Street"-like characters charged with the responsibility of keeping the bones of the deceased safe for eternity. Eskin's works are most interesting for their dynamic surfaces. The ceramic glazes on the Spirit Houses sometimes fool the eye, as cracks, rough textures and splotches of color add to the illusion that these could have been carved from gray marble, brown stone or constructed from rusting metal.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat?file=fyi/37748955.614

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, June 14 -- A state judge in Oregon has dismissed a lawsuit against Microsoft Corp. that claimed consumers paid too much for Windows 98, giving the software maker one of its first victories in a string of consumer antitrust suits filed in 37 states and the District of Columbia. Since a federal judge has found that Microsoft violated federal antitrust laws, there has been a rush on the courts by attorneys looking to sue the company. U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson last week ordered Microsoft be broken up into two companies. Microsoft is appealing the decision. Consumer lawsuits could be expensive for Microsoft, as federal law allows for three times the normal damages. But HERB HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert at the University of Iowa, said the law was fairly clear on third-party antitrust lawsuits. "This is probably an attempt by the local plaintiff to get an interpretation of Oregon's statute on this," said Hovenkamp, whose book, "Antitrust Law," has been repeatedly cited by all parties in Microsoft' s federal antitrust case. "This gives Oregon courts some precedent, but also other state courts can look at this as well."
An ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the article ran June 15 on the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Web site.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/wind151.shtml
An Associated Press version of the article ran June 14 on the Web site of the WALL STREET JOURNAL.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=BT-CO-20000614-006134.djml

YAHOO! NEWS, June 13 -- Women who are diagnosed with cervical cancer during pregnancy seem to do better if they deliver by cesarean section, a new report suggests. The risk of being diagnosed with the cancer in pregnancy is rare -- occurring in 0.05% of all pregnant women -- but cervical cancer is still the most common malignancy associated with pregnancy, according to the report in the June issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. In a study of 83 women diagnosed with cervical cancer either during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth, researchers found that the cancer was more likely to recur in either the pelvis or a distant site such as a lung after a vaginal delivery than after a cesarean section. In an interview with Reuters Health, study co-author Dr. JOEL SOROSKY from the University of Iowa explained that "tumor cells may be spread locally and distantly by the dilation of a cervix with cancer.'' The cancer had no impact on the newborns regardless of the method of delivery, Sorosky added.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000613/hl/birth_1.html

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, June 13 -- An Internet camera focused day and night on an Iowa cornfield has proved more interesting than watching grass grow. Visitors to the CornCam Web page seem fascinated by the sight of cornstalks getting taller with each passing day and have been e-mailing their appreciation. CornCam is the brainchild of Jim Greif and Dan Zinkand, crops editor of the Iowa Farmer Today, a weekly paper. Greif said the two hatched the idea while enduring a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game in which the Hawkeyes were losing "about a zillion-to-nothing."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/business/corn13.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran June 12 on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
The same Associated Press article ran June 11 on the Web site of the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=corn11&date=20000611&query=University+of+Iowa
The same Associated Press article ran June 10 on the Web site of the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/lifestyle/corn10.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran June 10 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/06/10/national0100EDT0410.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran June 9 on the Web site of CNN.
http://www.cnn.com/2000/US/06/09/corn.cam.ap/index.html

WASHINGTON POST, June 13 -- The work that the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration does in the area of driver safety will accelerate dramatically when a $60 million advanced driving simulator is ready to go to work at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the fall. The agency plans to do human behavior tests on cell phones, navigation systems and other devices that it now cannot do -- even on a test track -- because the distractions are too risky for the drivers.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A46221-2000Jun12.html

TRANSPORT TOPICS, Alexandria, Va., June 12 -- DANIEL V. MCGEHEE, director of human factors research at the University of Iowa, says commercial trucks traditionally have more communications and readouts than cars because of truckers' needs to get information on the fly. McGehee helped develop a technology that provides lane-crossing warnings to snow plow drivers during snow storms. The right side of a driver's seat vibrates when the truck crosses onto the shoulder of the road and the left side vibrates when drivers cross the center line.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, June 12 -- Mark Mittelstadt, an Associated Press editor and bureau chief for two decades, has been named director of editorial planning for the news cooperative and will serve as its chief liaison with the Associated Press Managing Editors (APME) organization. Mittelstadt, 46, joined the AP in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1981 and became news editor two years later. He was promoted to chief of bureau in Albuquerque, N.M., in 1988. Mittelstadt is a native of Fort Dodge, Iowa, and a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. He previously worked at three Iowa newspapers: The Fort Dodge Messenger, The Waterloo Courier and The Cedar Falls Record, where he was editor.

THE (Biloxi, Miss.) SUN HERALD, June 12 -- How you react to a toxin found in dust and pollution may be at least partly programmed into your genes, a new study suggests. Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that people with mutations in a gene called TLR4 are less likely to have an asthma-like response to a substance called endotoxin. The study is an example of a broad area of research aimed at understanding why some people are more susceptible to certain medical conditions than others.
http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net/living/docs/pulse061200.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, June 11 -- Rinde Eckert is currently performing in "And God Created Great Whales," inspired by Moby Dick. In the 80-minute music-theater piece, he sings, speaks and plays the piano and ukulele, "stands in a clear relation to the epic but ramifies it in completely different ways." Eckert attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, planning to study theater. Midway through, however, he found himself annoyed by the lack of specificity in the training and switched to music.
http://www.nytimes.com/00/06/12/artleisure/eckert-theater.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, June 11 -- Microsoft officials say they will appeal a judge's decision to break up the company, but HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law, says it won't be an easy path. "The government has done a very good job of presenting this case," he said. "I don't think Judge Jackson made too many mistakes that would be reversible, either."

DESERET NEWS, Utah, June 10 -- An Internet camera focused day and night on an Iowa cornfield has proved more interesting than watching grass grow. Visitors to the CornCam Web page seem fascinated by the sight of cornstalks getting taller with each passing day and have been e-mailing their appreciation. CornCam is the brainchild of Jim Greif and Dan Zinkand, crops editor of the Iowa Farmer Today, a weekly paper. Greif said the two hatched the idea while enduring a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA football game in which the Hawkeyes were losing "about a zillion-to-nothing."
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,175011022,00.html?
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran June 10 on the Web site of the COLUMBUS DISPATCH in Ohio.
http://www.dispatch.com:80/news/newsfea00/jun00/309523.html

NEW SCIENTIST, June 10 -- A chance sighting of a tear in the Earth's magnetic shield has led to what astronomers are claiming is the first empirical proof to end a 50-year-old debate about how space weather causes polar auroras and disrupts satellite communication systems. In 1996, a NASA spacecraft named Polar appeared to travel directly through a tear in the cocoon. Until this happened, most scientists thought the tears, known as "magnetic reconnections" were too small to be seen directly. Since that initial pass, Polar has buzzed through some 40 more tears, and NASA researchers have spent the past few years studying and confirming what they have seen. "I think everybody is surprised," says JACK SCUDDER, a professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Iowa, who headed the analysis.
http://www.newscientist.com/news/news_224242.html

MILENIO DIARIO (Mexico), March 13 to June 10 -- An article explains how the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS tracks the Mexican presidential elections.

LIFE, June 9 -- On this day -- June 9 -- in 1925, Clifford L. Lideen received a B.A. degree by radio from the STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It was the first degree conferred by radio in the United States.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, June 9 -- The newspaper's annual report on campus crime includes crime statistics from 481 colleges, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/stats/crime/

SAN DIEGO COMMERCE, June 9 -- Microsoft officials say they will appeal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's decision to split the company in two as a remedy to anti-trust violations. But HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law and leading anti-trust expert, says it won't be the easy win that Microsoft anticipates. "The government has done a very good job of presenting this case," he said. "I don't think Judge Jackson made too many mistakes that would be reversible, either." The same article ran June 8 in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH in Ohio and the ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH.

ROLL CALL, June 8 -- Political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa says that the presidential trial-heat polls are irrelevant. He says that the growth in the gross domestic product in the last quarter of 1999 and the first quarter of 2000, President Clinton's popularity and the Democrats' advantage on "peace" and "prosperity" poll questions guarantee a victory for Vice President Al Gore.

THE TENNESSEAN, June 8 -- Microsoft officials say they will appeal a judge's decision to break up the company, but HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law, says it won't be an easy path. "The government has done a very good job of presenting this case," he said. "I don't think Judge Jackson made too many mistakes that would be reversible, either." The same article appeared June 7 in the DAILY COMMERCE of Los Angeles and THE FRESNO BEE in California.

USA TODAY, June 8 -- Many in the legal community are waiting to see if the Microsoft case will break new ground in antitrust law. While the claims the government made in the Microsoft case are common in antitrust cases, "There's not a great deal of antitrust experience" in the computer software industry, says HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa's law school.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 8 -- Iowa Gov. Vilsack spent time in Chicago this week hoping to lure former Iowans back to the state. Iowa companies are desperately seeking professionals to fill numerous open positions, and Vilsack's trip was part of a wide-ranging effort by the Iowa Human Resource Recruitment Consortium. Among those attending a reception Vilsack hosted were several UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduates, including Barney Olson, who's leaving his job as a human resources manager at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Chicago to take a teaching position at Central College in Pella.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0006080281,FF.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, June 8 -- Microsoft officials say they will appeal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's decision to split the company in two as a remedy to anti-trust violations. But HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law and leading anti-trust expert, says it won't be the easy win that Microsoft anticipates. "The government has done a very good job of presenting this case," he said. "I don't think Judge Jackson made too many mistakes that would be reversible, either." This b article also appeared in the June 8 SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN REVIEW.
http://www.spokane.net/news-story-body.asp?Date=060800&ID=s812478&cat=
This Associated Press article also appeared in the June 8 EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER PRESS.
http://www.courierpress.com/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200006/08+microsoft060800_business.html+20000608
This Associated Press article also appeared in the June 8 BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD.
A version of this article appeared in the June 8 AKRON (Ohio) BEACON JOURNAL.

NEW YORK TIMES, June 8 -- In an article on the paper's Web site, Microsoft officials are quoted as saying they will appeal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's decision to split the company in two as a remedy to anti-trust violations. But HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law and leading anti-trust expert, says it won't be the easy win that Microsoft anticipates. "The government has done a very good job of presenting this case," he said. "I don't think Judge Jackson made too many mistakes that would be reversible, either."
This ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared June 8 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
http://www.latimes.com/business/microsoft/20000608/tCB00V0706.html
This Associated Press article also appeared June 8 on THE SALT LAKE TRIBUNE Web site and on THE ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE Web site.

NEW YORK TIMES, June 8 -- An article on the paper's Web site features Simon Estes, opera singer and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate. His new autobiography "Simon Estes/In My Own Voice," describes his growing up in segregated Iowa. The book says Estes worked his way through the University of Iowa, where his mentor was Charles Kellis, a music teacher who noticed the "skinny, sweet, undernourished kid with a remarkable voice." He loaned Estes recordings by Price, Enrico Caruso and other stars, and gave him daily four- to five-hour lessons, at no cost. This ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared June 7 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, June 7 -- A comedian accused of rapes on college campuses throughout the Midwest was sentenced to 40 years in prison for the rape of a Union College student in Lincoln, Neb. The man, Vinson Horace Champ, could also get two life sentences for rapes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at St. Ambrose University.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 7 -- A brief article on the paper's Web page notes that University of Iowa researchers have confirmed that men with eating disorders often suffer more severe consequences than women do. The research showed that men with eating problems had lower bone densities than women with the same condition. "We provide evidence that eating disorders are as common in men as in women, and are perhaps more severe," UI psychiatrist ARNOLD ANDERSEN said in a study in The Lancet medical journal.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0006080061,FF.html

DETROIT NEWS, June 7 -- In a study of patients who had hip replacements 30 years ago, 97 percent say they are still happy with the results. "This study shows that this procedure demonstrates remarkable durability," says JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, a UI professor of orthopaedics and the primary author of the study.
http://detnews.com/2000/health/0006/07/e03-69599.htm

LATINOLINK.COM, June 7 -- The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) futures market for the Mexican Presidential election allows people to buy and sell shares in the three candidates running for President of Mexico. University of Iowa professors developed the markets as a teaching tool. "It is a really great device for teaching students about markets. They get first-hand experience in a situation where they actually have some money at risk, so there is lots of incentive to learn how it works and not lose money. Experience is always the best teacher," said FORREST NELSON, professor of economics at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business.

ABC WORLD NEWS TONIGHT, June 7 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a UI professor of sport, health, leisure, and physical studies, was interviewed for a segment on women and work. Many women are struggling to balance family and career, and a recent study shows that if they could, most women would cut back on work. "I think women, more than any other group in this country, are beginning to feel betrayed by work," Hunnicutt says. "That what they seek at work, this identity, community, meaning, is not being found."
http://www.abcnews.go.com/onair/WorldNewsTonight/wnt000607_CL_workingwomen_feature.html

FOX NEWS.COM, June 7 -- A new testosterone gel was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat men with abnormally low levels of the hormone, a condition known as hypogonadism. Some doctors have suggested the gel can be used as an antidepressant, but Dr. PAUL PERRY of the UI College of Medicine, said that the low doses of testosterone people are likely to get from the gel are unlikely to have significant effects on mood.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/060700/androgel.sml

WASHINGTON POST, June 7 -- A brief item notes that a comedian accused of rapes on college campuses throughout the Midwest was sentenced to 40 years in prison for the rape of a Union College student in Lincoln, Neb. The man, Vinson Horace Champ, could also get two life sentences for rapes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and at St. Ambrose University.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A11045-2000Jun6.html
A version of this ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared in the online edition of the NEW YORK TIMES.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, June 6 -- Munio Takahashi Makuuchi, a poet and artist known for dark etchings and lighthearted origami inspired during his childhood years in World War II detainment camps, died May 29 at age 65. He earned a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

MSNBC.COM, June 6 -- Eating disorders are usually associated with adolescent girls, but men also suffer from anorexia and bulimia and with more severe consequences -- weaker bones. New research by doctors at the University of Iowa showed that men with eating disorders had lower bone densities than women with the same condition. ARNOLD ANDERSEN, a UI professor of psychiatry, says the severe weight loss and lack of essential nutrients, particularly calcium, can cause a deficiency in bone mineral density (BMD) leading to the brittle bone disease osteoporosis.
http://www.msnbc.com/news/415530.asp?cp1=1

USA TODAY, June 5 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA dental student has been formally charged with two hate crimes after allegedly sending racist e-mails that threatened violence against minorities in the dental college. Tarsha Claiborne, 23, who is black, was scheduled to be arraigned June 15.

MSNBC.COM, June 5 -- Experts say the stresses of modern living -- including the demands of juggling motherhood with a career -- can exacerbate postpartum depression, but effective treatments are available. Up to 10 percent of women giving birth suffer from postpartum depression, or PPD, a condition characterized by depressed mood, difficulty concentrating, sleeping problems, fatigue and guilt, says psychologist MICHAEL O'HARA, associate dean of research and development at the University of Iowa College of Liberal Arts, and a leading authority on the disorder. Far more common are the "baby blues," a milder form of emotional disturbance experienced by 40 to 50 percent of women who give birth, O'Hara said. The blues can last mere hours or several days, but usually goes away on its own.

BUSINESS WEEK, June 5 -- Ted Waitt, co-founder of Gateway 2000, is profiled in this piece, which notes that he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but dropped out in 1984 to join a computer retailer in Des Moines. Waitt and friend Mike Hammond later started Gateway in Sioux City, building it to be the sixth largest personal computer maker. Waitt is now worth more than $6.5 billion, but friends say he hasn't been warped by wealth. "He's not much different than the day I met him in Iowa City," says Hammond.

SEATTLE TIMES, June 5 -- Poet and artist Munio Takahashi Makuuchi, who earned a master of fine arts degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, died of a heart attack last May 29 at the Eisenhower Medical Center in Rancho Mirage. Makuuchi, whose work was inspired during his childhood years in World War II detainment camps, made more than 200 etchings with a technique called drypoint, using a steel point to scratch designs onto a copper plate to create grooves that are filled with ink.
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/news/obituaries/html98/obit05m_20000605.html
An ASSOCIATED PRESS Article ran June 5 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE.

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, June 5 -- With race and gender among the dominant concerns on college campuses today, sometimes the need to prove that racism and sexism pervade campus life leads people to fake incidents. For example, this spring faculty and minority students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY were the targets of menacing emails and a bomb threat. In the end, Tarsha Michelle Claiborne, a black dental student, was arrested and confessed to the crimes.
http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/000605/5john.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, June 4 -- An article about touring Grant Wood country in Eastern Iowa notes that Wood was an instructor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-0006030003,00.html

MIAMI HERALD, June 4 -- MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, professor of political science at the University of Iowa, says that voting-intention questions this early in the presidential campaign "are just notoriously bad predictors" of who will ultimately win. Lewis-Beck is one of a cluster of political scientists who predict presidential elections with uncanny precision. He pegged Bill Clinton's margin of re-election in 1996 within one-tenth of one point and has a perfect record since the 1980s.

MIAMI HERALD, June 4 -- In an article about the 2000 elections, UI political science professor MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK is quoted about his early forecast that Al Gore will win with 56.2 percent of the vote. Lewis-Beck uses a statistical model that compares elections since 1948 to several factors, chiefly the growth of the economy and the popularity of sitting presidents. Lewis-Beck pegged Clinton's margin of re-election in 1996 within one-tenth of one point and has a perfect record since the 1980s. ''I'll be surprised if Gore loses,'' he says. ''There is no issue more important, year in and year out, than the economy."
http://www.herald.com:80/content/sun/docs/004335.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, June 4 -- University of Iowa history professor DAVID SCHOENBAUM, who is working on a social history of the violin, wrote an article about the University of Cincinnati's new musical conservatory. He highlights the work of Kurt Sassmannshaus, the chairman of the conservatory's string department. On arriving in Cincinnati in 1982, Mr. Sassmannshaus began developing and combining a clientele extending from 6-year-olds to concert performers with networks extending from the Ohio Valley to China. "What an economist might call Mr. Sassmannshaus' vertically integrated violin multinational is one of the conservatory's comparative advantages," Schoenbaum writes.
http://www.nytimes.com/00/06/05/artleisure/new-conservatory.html

WASHINGTON POST, June 4 -- OSHA GRAY DAVIDSON, an adjunct associate professor at the University of Iowa, comments on the National Rifle Association's (NRA) political efforts during the current campaign season. In the piece, he contrasts the NRA's actions supporting the right to bear arms in light of gun control advocates recently winning more mainstream sentiment.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A58626-2000Jun3.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, June 4 -- In a commentary about the difficulties women face in sports, CHRISTINE GRANT, director of women's intercollegiate athletics at the University of Iowa, is quoted about taboos regarding sexual preferences. "Homophobia in women's sports is like the McCarthyism of the 1950s. The fear is paralyzing.'' Grant was originally quoted in NEWS AND OBSERVER, Raleigh, N.C.
http://www.sfgate.com:80/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/06/04/ED52558.DTL

CAPITAL PRESS, (Salem, Ore.), June 2 -- DAVID SOLL, a biological sciences professor at the University of Iowa, will use a $97,000 grant to bombard hog manure with sound waves to reduce -- or remove -- the stench. "I can't even tell you what the chances for success are ä but if we hit, it will have a tremendous impact," Soll said. He plans to bombard manure with everything from microwaves to ultrasound during the next year. The idea is that the sound waves will change the composition of manure, also changing the odor.

REUTERS HEALTH, June 2 -- Eating disorders like anorexia and bulimia are known to weaken bones in women, but the results of a new study suggest that the same may be true in men. And while eating disorders disproportionately affect women, their impact on bones may be more severe in men, researchers report. In a study of 380 people treated for eating disorders at the University of Iowa 46 (14 percent) were men. Compared with the bones of men who did not have eating disorders, bone density in the spine was substantially lower in men with eating disorders, according to Dr. ARNOLD ANDERSEN, UI professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Programs.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000602/hl/men_bones_1.html.
Similar stories ran June 2 on the MSNBC web site at
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/415530.asp?cp1=1
and on the BBC site at
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_774000/774900.stm

SPACE.COM, June 2 -- The northern and southern lights, or auroras, are caused by a gigantic, magnetic wrestling match that unleashes not solar, but earthly particles, to create the brilliant night displays, scientists said Thursday. The process relies, they say, on "reconnection," a union of solar and Earthly magnetic fields that lets the solar wind -- a flow of charged particles from the sun -- punch through sections of the Earth's magnetic shell. Until recently, scientists disagreed about the cause of auroras, with some promoting the theory of reconnection. But recently, NASA's Polar spacecraft flew through a region on the sunlit side of Earth to witness reconnection directly. JACK SCUDDER, a UI professor of physics and astronomy, says the way to understand the new discovery is to think of Earth's magnetic shell, or magnetosphere, as a cocoon around the planet. "There are often times when the solar wind creates tears in this cocoon, allowing charged particles and energy from the sun to enter the space around Earth," he said. "This tearing -- reconnection -- is what we directly observed with Polar."
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/solarsystem/aurora_cause_000531.html

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, June 2 -- This summer in Seattle, four new organs will make their musical debuts, including the Rosales organ at St. James Cathedral. The first concert on the Rosales organ will be performed by cathedral organist Joseph Adam, who earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.seattlep-i.com/classical/clas02.shtml

ACCESSLIFE.COM, June 1 -- PETER BLANCK, UI College of Law professor, called for a compromise to proposed federal legislation that would allow businesses 90 days to make workplace modifications that would bring them into compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. Disability rights advocates say such a law would allow business owners to skirt the law until they are charged with violating it. "My main thought is, let's keep a level head here," Blanck said. "The ADA has made great progress in enhancing accessibility. I think that this may serve as a shot across the bow to both sides that more vigilance has to be observed in the implementation of this law. I do think it's premature to propose any amendment at this point." But Blanck said that if the amendment does become law, it should be accompanied by another amendment to increase the penalties for those businesses that remain noncompliant in spite of the 90-day notice. "If it passes and in fact a notice requirement is put into place, then I think it would be equally fair to say that where a case has been noticed and a complaint is brought and the defendants lose, there should be higher sanctions," he said. "That might be the middle ground," Blanck said.
http://www.accesslife.com/news/20000526-LAW-ADA-DirtyHarry.html

FOX MARKET WIRE, June 1 -- Among the Web sites that provide a fun way to learn how the markets work is the Iowa Electronic Markets, developed by the faculty at the UI COLLEGE OF BUSINESS as a teaching and research tool. The core of the IEM is the U.S. Political Markets, which allow you to bet on the outcome of upcoming elections by buying futures contracts representing specific candidates.
http://foxmarketwire.com/053100/investingfun.sml

AUSTIN (Texas) BUSINESS JOURNAL, June 1 -- A story on entrepreneur Katherine Hammer, chairman, president and CEO of Evolutionary Technologies International Inc., says the Shreveport, La., native received a doctoral degree in linguistics from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PASSIONFRUIT, June 2000 -- JOCELYN CULLITY, who is completing a master's degree in Women and Development, focusing on Asia, at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the author of an article about her experience learning to teach English in China.

NEW CASTLE BUSINESS LEDGER, (Neward, Del.), June 2000 -- Henry B. Tippee, who has donated $30 million to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS, which now carries his name, will be serving as chairman of two companies following the death last month of John W. Rollins Sr. Tippie, who lives in Austin, Texas, will chair Delaware-based Dover Downs and Rollins Truck Leasing Corp. He was vice chair of both companies.

ABOVE & BEYOND MAGAZINE, June 2000 -- The book "Ice: A Journey to Antarctica," written by Stephen J. Pyne and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986, is reviewed. "This is a dense book, in width as well as depth, packed with paradoxes. It focuses on the simplest of the continents, Antarctica, and shows how incredibly complex it is."

SBN MAGAZINE, Pittsburgh, Pa., June 2000 -- In a story comparing the flurry of investments in dot-com companies with the flurry of investments that followed the advent of the railroad, CHARLES ABBOTT at the University of Iowa said: "John Train, who writes books about the great stock pickers, has pointed out that rather than buying rail shares during the rail boom, another shrewd tactic would have been to buy land in Chicago, since so many of the railroads funneled economic activity into Chicago."

FAST COMPANY, June 2000 -- Curtis Sittenfeld, a former Fast Company writer who is now a graduate student in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, is the author of an article on Michael Ray of the Stanford Graduate School of Business who teaches an offbeat class called "Personal Creativity in Business."

SMART COMPUTING, June 2000 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry suggests that computers may be addictive for some people. Even though subjects in the study admitted excessive computer use interfered with family, friends and work, cutting back the screen time actually made one-third of them feel anxious.

DISCOVER MAGAZINE, June 2000 -- A story on the vagaries of weather quotes University of Iowa Professor JOHN S. WESTEFELD. Westefeld says he has seen lots of strange neuroses in his 22-year career as a counseling psychologist but few strike him as odd as those exhibited by patients who become agitated and anxious as soon as they hear predictions of storms. As the bad weather gets closer, they get more and more upset, calling in sick to work, hunkering down indoors with their eyes glued to the Weather Channel, and even refusing to leave the house to pick up their kids at soccer practice. "They are immobilized by fear," he says. "Even if the danger is way down the line." Westefeld has a name for them: Severe-Weather Phobics.
http://www.discover.com/current_issue/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

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