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CONTACT: WINSTON BARCLAY
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0073; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: winston-barclay@uiowa.edu

Release: June 30, 2000

CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

KLAM READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' JULY 10 -- Matthew Klam will read from his new collection of humorous short fiction, "Sam the Cat and Other Stories," at 8 p.m. Monday, July 10 in the Prairie Lights Bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Anson Lang wrote, "The stories in 'Sam the Cat' are narrative acts of self-exposure, intimate confessions of the type you might hear from a friendly stranger over drinks in a dark room."

Klam, who has been called a "foot soldier in the battle of the sexes," told Canada's National Post that his stories are "strong medicine" about attempts to keep relationships together: "And they're all fairly honest about the fact that men's crap -- virility and ambition and jealousy and getting ahead -- are also tied into sex and aggression.

"Men are cretins and they really do need to get laid, and the other stuff can hopefully help to keep things good -- being mindful and dedicated to another person. I'm a progressive guy, I respect this person, but what's back in there is primitive wiring. and you can't fake it."

In 1999 Klam was named one of the 20 best young fiction writers in America by The New Yorker. He is an O. Henry Award winner, and his nonfiction has been featured in Harper's and the New York Times Magazine.

Learn more about Klam at his official website: <http://www.matthewklam.com>. For UI arts information, visit <www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr> on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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MACKLIN READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' JULY 11 -- New York poet Elizabeth Macklin, the author of "A Woman Kneeling in the Big City," will read from her new collection, "You've Just Been Told," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, July 11 in the Prairie Lights Bookstore at
15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Writing for the New York Times Book Review, Deborah Weisgall described the book's selections about loss and memory as "poems of abrupt perception and rigorous lyricism."

Poet Richard Howard wrote, "Her new poems are ripe with the surprises to which she has -- surprisingly -- accustomed us, which means she has a style: It is oblique, even deflected, and in the shocks of memory and memorializing Elizabeth Macklin gets away with some very daring music."

Macklin's poems, essays and translations have appeared in The New Yorker, The Nation, the Threepenny Review, Lyra, Southwest Review and other periodicals. From 1989 to 1991, she was the poetry editor of the monthly magazine Wigwag, and she has been the recipient of an Ingram Merrill Foundation Award and a Guggenheim Fellowship.

For UI arts information, visit <www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr> on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.

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ANDERSON READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' JULY 13 -- War reporter and novelist Scott Anderson will read from "The Man Who Tried to Save the World: The Dangerous Life and Mysterious Disappearance of Fred Cuny," his new account of the crisis in Chechnya, at 8 p.m. Thursday, July 13 in the Prairie Lights Bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The free reading is part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" broadcast series, originating on UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM.

Cuny, who earned the nickname "The Master of Disaster" for his relief projects throughout the world, has been described as "a larger-than-life character who could have come straight from a Le Carre novel -- a flawed hero who habitually lied about his past but to whom hundreds of thousands of disaster victims owed their lives."

When Cuny disappeared after traveling to a border town in Chechnya that was under heavy Russian bombardment, Anderson was sent to write a newspaper story, but that assignment led to a three-year quest. In the chronicle of his attempts to discover Cuny's fate, Anderson describes the savagery and complexity of the Chechnyan conflict.

Sebastian Junger, the author of "The Perfect Storm," wrote of Anderson's book, "This is war at its most brutal, and war reporting at its finest. Scott Anderson's tour through Chechnya in search of a lost American humanitarian ranks as one of the most thrilling stories I've ever read. That Anderson made it out alive is incredible, but this is not just an adventure story, but a mystery of the first order."

Anderson's work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Harper's and several other national publications. He is the author of the acclaimed novel "Triage" and co-author of "War Zones" with his brother, Jon Lee Anderson.

For UI arts information, visit <www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr> on the World Wide Web. To receive UI arts news by e-mail, contact <deborah-thumma@uiowa.edu>.