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CONTACT: MELVIN O. SHAW
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0010; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: melvin-shaw@uiowa.edu

Release: June 26, 2000

Movie director, screenplay writer, UI alumnus donates papers

IOWA CITY, Iowa -- University of Iowa alumnus Nicholas Meyer, who became famous as a Hollywood movie director and screenplay writer of blockbuster hits such as "Star Trek VI," has donated more of his personal papers to the Libraries' special collections department.

Contained in the 12 recently received boxes are screenplays from "Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country," "Vendetta," a 1998 Home Box Office movie, storyboards from various films, and movie set pictures of some of film's most recognizable actors. Meyer's recent donation to the special collections department follows several others made in 1984 and later.

The Meyer collection is significant because it gives aspiring screenplay writers, movie buffs and the general public a chance to read material that shows how movies are developed and produced. Other items in the current gift include market research memoranda that show how audience opinions influence film production and character development.

Meyer followed up on the success of his first book, "The Love Story Story " with the 1976 best-seller, "The Seven-Per-Cent Solution," which earned him an Academy Award nomination for his screen adaptation of the novel wherein Sherlock Holmes meets Sigmund Freud.

He made his directing debut in 1978 with "Time After Time" (for which he also wrote the screenplay), and since then, he has gone on to write and sometimes direct a number of films, including Star Trek sequels II, IV and VI, and the movie "Sommersby." He has published a number of novels, including "The West End Horror" and "Confessions of a Homing Pigeon."

In 1976 Meyer was honored with the UI's Distinguished Young Alumni Award and later became a member of the Presidents Club. He also established the Nicholas Meyer Playwriting Scholarship.