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July 2000

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ARIZONA DAILY STAR, July 31 -- The impact of pregnant women's workaday stress on fetal growth and development is quietly becoming a highly charged issue. As women's status in the work force rises, they're working in more stressful jobs and staying on the job later in pregnancy. A nine-month pregnancy is a brief moment in the 30- to 40-year working lives of most women. Fully 70 percent of mothers return to the same jobs after childbirth, says a study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Creighton University.
http://www.azstarnet.com/public/dnews/000731WORKFAMILY.html

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, July 30 -- Julie Bechtel, circulation manager for the Lincoln Journal Star since 1998, has been promoted to the new position of operations manager. In her new role, Bechtel will oversee the circulation, production, marketing, financial services and technical services departments at the paper. Prior to beginning her newspaper career, Bechtel worked for AT&T Information Systems and was a pre-law and political science student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/business?story_id=113&date=20000730&past=

PLAYWRIGHT FINN INVITED TO IWP (Limerick Leader Online, July 29, 2000)
A top Limerick playwright has earned a place among the cream of international scriptwriters at one of the most prestigious writer's projects in the world. Mike Finn, author of the hit play, Pigtown, has been awarded an all-expenses paid trip to the IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM for three months courtesy of the American Ambassador. Mike will be the first Irish writer to win a place on the project in 15 years. The online edition of the Limerick Leader is a weekly selection of items from the print editions of the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle newspapers, which cover the mid-West of Ireland.
http://www.limerick-leader.ie/issues/20000729/news13.html

TORONTO GLOBE & MAIL, July 29 -- One of the hottest stock market trends these days is the creation of so-called tracking stocks, which allows a company to sell a separate class of shares that track the performance of a single division. The experience with many tracking stocks hasn't been great for investors. Many of them have tended to underperform the markets and their independent peers, and have often done worse than pure spinoffs. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study released this spring said 19 of 28 tracking stocks that were studied underperformed benchmarks, and only five outperformed. Four had mixed returns against various market and industry benchmarks.

CNBC, July 28 -- In the network's program Market Week with Maria Bartiromo, which focused on stocks and the possible impact of the presidential election on the stock market, guest Professor Jeremy Siegel of Wharton refers to the Iowa Electronic Markets at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Anyone can go online and actually put money down on whether you think (Al) Gore is going to win or (George W.) Bush is going to win and there's a lot of money on that. The government has OK'd this because it's used for studies ä It's fascinating to watch it go up and down. Actually, it's been a very good predictor of what's going to happen."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 28 -- For fiscal year 2000, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received a number of federal grants, including: $10 million from the Department of Transportation, awarded to a corporation that is building the equipment for the National Advanced Driving Simulator, which will be used by university researchers in a university-owned building; $3 million to be shared with seven universities, from the Department of Defense, for engineering research to improve the design of tanks, trucks and other vehicles; $1.565 million, to be shared with Iowa State, from the Department of Agriculture for the Iowa Biotechnology Consortium, to conduct research on recycling wastes from agricultural processing and reducing their impact on municipal waste-treatment systems.

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, July 28 -- University of Iowa political science professor ARTHUR MILLER was interviewed on National Public Radio's Morning Edition for a story that expanded upon poll numbers showing people's attitudes toward government and election campaigns.

KANSAS CITY STAR, July 28 -- Television viewers can expect to start being bombarded with ads for political candidates very soon. Some critics charge that all political ads are full of lies. Another view comes from G.R. (Bob) BOYNTON, a University of Iowa political scientist and an expert on political advertising. "Very few political ads are outright lies," he said. "But they are misleading. They take statements out of context. In that sense, they distort."
http://www.kcstar.com/item/pages/home.pat,local/3774a361.727,.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 28 -- The show will go on, but MARC LINDER says the smoking must stop. The University of Iowa law professor is demanding that actors be barred from smoking on-stage during campus theatrical productions. "I don't want to be breathing in secondhand smoke," he complained to the Associated Press after a university performance of Edward Albee's "A Delicate Balance" a few weeks ago. "We can't do realistic portrayals of people unless we have the possibility of tools showing how they are," said Eric Forsythe, artistic director of the Iowa Summer Repertory Theatre, the professional troupe that performed the play. Forsythe said that in the play, smoking is used to show how one character is "a needy, orally fixated person."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i47/47a01001.htm

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, July 27 -- PETER BLANCK, a University of Iowa professor of law, was interviewed for a segment on All Things Considered about the Americans With Disabilities Act and mental illness.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, July 27 -- The California Board of Equalization for the first time has voted to grant head-of-household tax status to a lesbian who is supporting her partner and non-biological child. The couple who brought the legal challenge at first couldn't find a lawyer to take their case, but then were assisted by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law professor who specializes in tax law for unmarried, especially gay, couples.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/hotnews/stories/27/tax.dtl

MORNING CALL, (Allentown, Pa.), July 27 -- When the results of a two-year study on gun violence in the Lehigh Valley are released this fall, the findings promise to be "very controversial," says the study's chief investigator. Since the study began in late 1998, researchers at St. Luke's Regional Trauma Center have been tracking gun injuries in Lehigh and Northampton Counties as part of the Firearm Injury Control program at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. Among the participants in the $600,000 study funded by the Joyce Foundation, based in Chicago, are St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Youngstown, Ohio, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITAL in Iowa City, Iowa. The three facilities have been sharing data and collaborating on preventive programs.
http://www.mcall.com:80/html/news/regional/b_pg002b2_gunstudy.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, July 27 -- In a legal document filed yesterday, Microsoft argued that the government's antitrust case is "completely unsuitable for direct appeal" to the Supreme Court because it is complex and because the trial judge made "serious and substantive procedural errors." "The government will say that Microsoft's monopoly is imposing a significant social cost while this case is on appeal and no remedies are in place," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school. "It will say that not taking the case is a costly act, and that this is exactly the kind of case that was meant to go directly to the Supreme Court."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/07/biztech/articles/27soft.html

INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY, July 26 -- University of Iowa College of Law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who has done some work for the plaintiff states in their case against software giant Microsoft, says the judge in the case made a clear ruling that swept away the underbrush and left a big issue -- whether Microsoft violated the Sherman Act by using monopoly power to muscle others out of competing.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 26 -- Dr. RICHARD C. JOHNSTON, a University of Iowa orthopedist, did hip replacements for 262 patients between July 1970 and April 1972 and was able to contact 51 of those patients 25 years later to evaluate their attitude toward their hips. He found that 97 percent were satisfied with the outcome of their procedures. "Few operations have been evaluated for their results more than 25 years later," said Dr. JOHN J. CALLAGHAN, a University of Iowa orthopedist who co-authored the study with Johnston. "This study shows that this procedure demonstrates remarkable durability."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-0007260490,00.html

USA TODAY, July 26 -- Citing the "unfettered discretion" of the Supreme Court's powers to review other court cases, Microsoft asked the nation's highest tribunal Wednesday to send its antitrust case to a federal appeals court before the high court considers the case. Microsoft lawyers wrote dismissively of government arguments that it has violated the nation's antitrust laws and launched a stinging attack on Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, who they suggested may have been biased against the company from the start. HERB HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa who advised the government on its case, says the outcome is far from certain. Appeals courts, he says, traditionally winnow down cases that have a large number of legal issues into proceedings with just a handful. "The facts that are reasonably in dispute I do not believe are voluminous," Hovenkamp says. "I don't think Microsoft is going to have any success in getting any court to dispute Jackson's fact finding. The bigger issues are those of law and those are well defined. This is a case that is well defined."
http://www.usatoday.com:80/life/cyber/tech/cti285.htm

WALL STREET JOURNAL, July 26 -- The impact of pregnant women's workaday stress on fetal growth and development is quietly becoming a highly charged issue. As women's status in the work force rises, they're working in more stressful jobs and staying on the job later in pregnancy. A nine-month pregnancy is a brief moment in the 30- to 40-year working lives of most women. Fully 70 percent of mothers return to the same jobs after childbirth, says a study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Creighton University.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB964569556108423425.djm

IRISH TIMES, July 26 -- Microsoft on Wednesday was to ask the Supreme Court to let a lower tribunal hear the company's appeal of antitrust violations first, a strategy aimed at avoiding a verdict to split the software giant. University of Iowa College of Law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who has done some work for the plaintiff states, says Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson made a clean ruling that swept away the underbrush and left a big issue -- whether Microsoft violated the Sherman Act by using monopoly power to muscle others out of competing.
http://www.ireland.com:80/newspaper/finance/2000/0726/fin10.htm
The same Reuters article ran July 25 on ZDNET.
http://www.zdnet.com/zdnn/stories/news/0,4586,2607368,00.html
The same Reuters article ran July 25 on CNET.
http://news.cnet.com:80/news/0-1003-200-2341099.html
The same Reuters article ran July 25 on the PCWORLD Web site.
http://www.pcworld.com:80/pcwtoday/article/0,1510,17826,00.html
The same Reuters story ran July 25 on the ABC NEWS Web site.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/tech/DailyNews/microsoft000725.html
The same Reuters story ran July 25 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/07/biztech/articles/26soft.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, July 25 -- White defendants in federal capital cases are more likely than blacks to negotiate plea bargains that spare their lives, according to an analysis of 146 cases prosecuted since Congress reinstated capital punishment. Sixty percent of white defendants avoided capital punishment through a negotiated settlement in cases in which the Justice Department chose to pursue the death penalty. Typically, those plea bargains result in either life sentences or long prison terms. For black defendants in those cases, 41 percent reached an agreement with prosecutors, according to the Federal Death Penalty Resource Counsel Project, a private group that receives federal funding to track federal capital cases. "This raises a red flag," said DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who has studied race and the death penalty. "The sample on the plea agreements isn't so small at all, and the magnitude of the disparity is very strong."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB964483915445712014.djm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran July 24 on the CNN Web site.
http://www.cnn.com/2000/LAW/07/24/deathpenalty.ap/index.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 24 -- White defendants are more likely than black defendants to work out plea bargains saving them from the death penalty in federal cases, according to an analysis of 146 cases prosecuted since Congress reinstated federal capital punishment in 1988. DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who has studied race and the death penalty, says, "This raises a red flag. ... The sample on the plea agreements isn't so small at all, and the magnitude of the disparity is very strong."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0007240177,FF.html

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, July 24 -- A review of University of Iowa professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM's new book "Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America" describes the book as a "model of sociological reportage and personal journalism." The book is an account of a vicious clash between the residents of a small, intensely Christian town and the group of Lubavitcher Jews who open a highly successful kosher slaughterhouse there.

YAHOO! FINANCE, July 24 -- Microsoft on Wednesday will ask the Supreme Court to let a lower tribunal hear the company's appeal of antitrust violations first, a strategy aimed at avoiding a verdict to split the software giant. University of Iowa College of Law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP, who has done some work for the plaintiff states, says Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson made a clean ruling that swept away the underbrush and left a big issue -- whether Microsoft violated the Sherman Act by using monopoly power to muscle others out of competing.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/000725/n2488909.html

THE NEW YORKER, July 24 -- MARK LEVINE, who teaches poetry at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop, contributed an article on bass player Edgar Meyer, "who may be the most remarkable virtuoso in the relatively unchronicled history of his instrument." Levine's most recent book of poems, "Enola Gay," came out in April.

NEWSLINK, July 24 -- White defendants in federal capital cases are more likely than blacks to negotiate plea bargains that spare their lives, according to an analysis of 146 cases prosecuted since Congress reinstated capital punishment. Sixty percent of white defendants avoided capital punishment through a negotiated settlement in cases in which the Justice Department chose to pursue the death penalty. Typically, those plea bargains result in either life sentences or long prison terms. For black defendants in those cases, 41 percent reached an agreement with prosecutors, according to the Federal Death Penalty Resource Counsel Project, a private group that receives federal funding to track federal capital cases. "This raises a red flag," said DAVID BALDUS, a University of Iowa law professor who has studied race and the death penalty. "The sample on the plea agreements isn't so small at all, and the magnitude of the disparity is very strong." NEWSLINK is the Web presence of the Ogden Newspapers chain.
http://www.oweb.com/newslink/national/DeathPenaltyP0234.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article also ran July 24 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com/national/072400/death_gap.sml
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the ABC Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com/national/072400/death_gap.sml
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN Web site.
http://www.austin360.com/shared-cgi/stories/show.cgi?id=aponline-menus-data/National.AP.V0255.AP-Death-Penalty.story&menu=National.html
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=82177750
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2000/jul/24/072400255.html
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the WACO TRIBUNE-HERALD Web site.
http://www.accesswaco.com/shared/news/ap/ap_story.html/National/AP.V0255.AP-Death-Penalty.html
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL Web site.
http://www.jsonline.com/news/nat/ap/jul00/ap-death-penalty072400.asp
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/206/nation/Federal_death_sentences_highli:.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/a/AP-Death-Penalty.html
The same Associated Press article ran July 24 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/07/24/national0540EDT0472.DTL

NEW YORK TIMES, July 23 -- A story about Rebecca Gilman, whose racially charged play "Spinning Into Butter" is in great demand in theaters across the country, says the 35-year-old writer graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's playwriting program.

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, July 22 -- Ten years ago this month, Congress passed the Americans with Disabilities Act -- legislation to protect disabled Americans in the workplace and to provide access to facilities and services. David Wright, host of NPR's Weekend All Things Considered, interviewed PETER BLANCK, head of the Law, Health, Policy and Disability Center at the University of Iowa, about where the ADA has had the greatest impact, and where legal challenges have limited its scope.

NEW YORK TIMES, July 22 -- Bill T. Jones's solo dance "The Breathing Show" was commissioned by the HANCHER AUDITORIUM of the University of Iowa and the National Endowment for the Arts. In the 90-minute piece, Jones emphasized unions of thoughts and actions and words and deeds.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, July 22 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in a story about a proposal to stage the Passion Play in Newton, Iowa. To make the multimillion-dollar Iowa project a reality, members of the non-profit organization backing it said they may seek $100,000 from Iowa's Community Attractions and Tourism fund. That idea has set off alarms among some residents and civil libertarians, who say such funding would violate the 1st Amendment. "We're certainly not opposed to them creating something like this; it's just the taxpayers have no obligation to support a religious enterprise," said Ben Stone, executive director of the Iowa Civil Liberties Union. But Leo Van Elswyk, a leading supporter of the project and a Jasper County supervisor, countered that the project would not be the first time the state has paid for spiritual pursuits. "If you go to the University of Iowa, for instance, you could take a course in religion, and the teacher is paid by subsidies from the state," he said.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=BIBL22&date=22-Jul-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 21 -- A segment in the Peer Review column features Florida Atlantic University's efforts to bring ballet dancer Edward Villella to campus as an artist-in-residence. The school first had to renovate its largest theater to make the visit worthwhile. The roof no longer leaks, and the lighting is to be improved by this fall. That's when Villella, founding artistic director of the Miami City Ballet, begins a yearlong stint at Florida Atlantic. The winner of a 1997 National Medal of Arts, he's taught over the years at the U.S. Military Academy, George Mason University, the University of California at Irvine, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

THE HINDU, India, July 20 -- History was made in biology when the rough draft of the human genome was released on June 26, years ahead of schedule. Mapping genes causing blindness was of vital importance to the Human Genome Project. About 1,000 inherited eye diseases affect both the anterior compartment comprising of cornea, iris and lens and the posterior comprising of vitreous and retina. In landmark events, Ted Dryja at Harvard and ED STONE at the University of Iowa in the U.S. identified the first retinitis pigmentosa and glaucoma genes, respectively. More than 15 genes causing cataracts at the time of birth (congenital) have been identified.
http://www.indiaserver.com:80/thehindu/2000/07/20/stories/08200004.htm

TIMES OF INDIA, July 20 -- As Republicans and Democrats gear up for their national conventions, several new polls show Vice President Al Gore cutting the lead of Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential race, raising expectations of a close and bitter contest. University of Iowa political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK is set to issue his final prediction next week and said it would be for a comfortable Gore win largely based on the strength of the economy and the popularity of the outgoing Clinton administration. "What drives the electorate is not the campaign but deeper factors like the economy and the performance of the party in power. The campaign is like a play -- if everyone plays their part, it brings the electorate around to the predicted result," he said.
http://www.timesofindia.com/today/20worl13.htm

SPOKANE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, July 19 -- University of Iowa English professor DORIS WITT was among a group of food historians who spoke at "Grits, Greens and Everything In Between," a conference sponsored by the Culinary Historians of Chicago. The two-day symposium, billed as the first national conference on soul food, was held in late June at the Chicago Historical Society and Roosevelt University, one of the event's sponsors.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=071900&ID=s827922&cat=

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, July 19 -- Leaders of three University of California labor unions have criticized the Board of Regents for ordering an overhaul of UC's investment strategies, saying they fear the move might put workers' pensions at risk. But UC spokesman Chuck McFadden said UC employees need not worry about the safety of their pensions. He said UC's pension consulting firm -- Wilshire Associates -- is highly regarded and advises, among other institutions, the universities of Wisconsin and IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/2000/07/19/NEWS10777.dtl

HALFTHEPLANET.COM, July 18 -- California Gov. Gray Davis recently announced his decision to withdraw his state's appeal in the case of Dare v. Department of Motor Vehicles, pending an out of court settlement. In the case, the state claimed that Congress lacked the constitutional authority to apply the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to state governments and was defending its decision to charge a $3 annual fee for parking placards for people with disabilities. "In light of this shot across the bow, disability rights advocates should be making sure that state laws are strong," said PETER BLANCK, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who specializes in ADA law. HalfThePlanet.com is an Internet portal for people with, or somehow affected by, disabilities.
http://www.halftheplanet.com/archive/000718_departments_news_article10.html

YAHOO! NEWS, July 18 -- As Republicans and Democrats gear up for their national conventions, several new polls show Vice President Al Gore cutting the lead of Texas Gov. George W. Bush in the U.S. presidential race, raising expectations of a close and bitter contest. An aggregate of five national opinion polls issued in July shows Bush, the Republican candidate, leading his Democratic rival by an average of 46 percent to 42 percent in a two-man race. But not everyone believes the race will be close. Political scientists who build statistical models that predict election results overwhelmingly point to a Gore victory on Nov. 7. University of Iowa political scientist MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK is set to issue his final prediction next week and said it would be for a comfortable Gore win largely based on the strength of the economy and the popularity of the outgoing Clinton administration. "What drives the electorate is not the campaign but deeper factors like the economy and the performance of the party in power. The campaign is like a play -- if everyone plays their part, it brings the electorate around to the predicted result,'' he said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000718/pl/campaign_polls_dc_5.html
The same REUTERS article ran July 18 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/elections/071800/gore_polls.sml

SALON, July 18 -- STEPHEN BLOOM, who teaches medical reporting and Internet writing at the University of Iowa, reports about the marketing of Prozac, under its new name, Sarafem, approved earlier this month by the FDA to treat PMS.
http://www.salon.com/health/feature/2000/07/18/pms/index.html

WASHINGTON POST, July 17 -- The first year of the new century has already become a time of historic political change: Voters have toppled once-invincible parties in Mexico and Taiwan, an enigmatic leader has taken over in Russia and longtime foes have bearhugged each other at a summit in the Koreas. JAMES LINDSAY, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute in Washington, said the unfortunate thing about unexpected change is that it can also cut the other way. "People are singing 'Happy Days are Here Again' over events in Mexico, Taiwan and especially North Korea," said Lindsay, also a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Our optimism today may prove to be as misplaced as our pessimism was six months ago."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/world/latestap/A55414-2000Jul17.html

SPACE.COM, July 17 -- By the end of the year, four spacecraft are scheduled to be circling the Earth at thousands of miles per hour looking for invisible invaders from the sun. Dubbed the "Cluster " because they will fly in formation like Star Wars spaceships, the four identical pilotless craft will be trying to detect billions of invisible solar particles that constantly bombard our planet. The Cluster 2 scientific community includes more than 200 scientists from the European Space Agency with its 14 member states, the United States, Canada, China, the Czech Republic, Hungary, India, Israel, Japan and Russia. One of the key scientific tools on board is the U.S. Wide Band Data instrument (WBD) which was designed and built at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA through funding provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. It's designed to provide high-resolution measurements of both electric and magnetic fields in selected frequency bands. A sidebar on "related links" includes a link to the University of Iowa.
http://www.space.com:80/scienceastronomy/planetearth/cluster_science_000711.html
A separate story on the Space Cluster which mentions the UI-designed Wideband Plasma Wave Investigator ran July 14 on the FLORIDA TODAY Web site.
http://www.flatoday.com:80/space/explore/stories/2000b/071400c.htm

DETROIT NEWS, July 17 -- A story about the physiques of comic book characters quotes Dr. ARNOLD ANDERSEN, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa and the author of Making Weight, a guide for men having body image problems. "What's happening today is there's been more emphasis put on looking like these characters rather than acting like them," says Andersen. "We're becoming more externally oriented. I think kids are becoming frustrated because there's less and less chance we're ever going to look like these ideals."
http://detnews.com:80/2000/features/0007/17/d01-91964.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, July 17 -- The first year of the new century has already become a time of historic political change: Voters have toppled once-invincible parties in Mexico and Taiwan, an enigmatic leader has taken over in Russia and longtime foes have bearhugged each other at a summit in the Koreas. JAMES LINDSAY, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute in Washington, said the unfortunate thing about unexpected change is that it can also cut the other way. "People are singing 'Happy Days are Here Again' over events in Mexico, Taiwan and especially North Korea," said Lindsay, also a political science professor at the University of Iowa. "Our optimism today may prove to be as misplaced as our pessimism was six months ago."
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran July 17 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran July 17 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/07/17/international0152EDT0435.DTL

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, July 16 -- At least two-thirds of divorce suits are filed by women. Researchers who have interviewed divorcing couples have repeatedly found that, in cases where the divorce is not mutually desired, women are more than twice as likely to be the ones who want out. After the split, women are typically happier than their exes. This trend has inspired what is probably the first paper in the American Journal of Law and Economics ever to be named after a Nancy Sinatra song. In "These Boots Are Made for Walking: Why Most Divorce Filers Are Women," MARGARET F. BRINIG and Douglas Allen, both economists, analyze all 46,000 divorces filed in one year, 1995, in four different states: Connecticut, Virginia, Montana and Oregon. "Some women file for divorce because they're exploited in really bad marriages," said Dr. Brinig, a professor of law at the University of Iowa. "But it seems to be a relatively small number, probably less than 20 percent of the cases."

DESERET NEWS, Utah, July 15 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in a story about a proposal to stage the Passion Play in Newton, Iowa. To make the multimillion-dollar Iowa project a reality, members of the non-profit organization backing it said they may seek $100,000 from Iowa's Community Attractions and Tourism fund. That idea has set off alarms among some residents and civil libertarians, who say such funding would violate the 1st Amendment. "We're certainly not opposed to them creating something like this; it's just the taxpayers have no obligation to support a religious enterprise," said Ben Stone, executive director of the Iowa Civil Liberties Union. But Leo Van Elswyk, a leading supporter of the project and a Jasper County supervisor, countered that the project would not be the first time the state has paid for spiritual pursuits. "If you go to the University of Iowa, for instance, you could take a course in religion, and the teacher is paid by subsidies from the state," he said.
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,175019404,00.html?

YAHOO! NEWS, July 14 -- The 'thickness' of some liquid antibiotics might be making it hard for parents to give their children the full course of medicine that their doctor prescribed, a study has found. "In the past, parents have complained that they have not received enough medication to complete a drug's treatment course. We wanted to find out how widespread a problem this was," lead author of the study Dr. LOIS B. DUSDIEKER, from the University of Iowa College of Medicine, told Reuters Health. The investigators presented 61 pharmacies around Iowa City with prescription orders that said to give "a 10-day supply" of two commonly used antibiotics -- penicillin and Bactrim. Dusdieker's team found that, on average, pharmacies dispensed roughly the right total amount of penicillin and Bactrim for the 10-day course. But when they simulated taking the daily doses of Bactrim out of the bottle, using a medicine cup and syringe, they only got an average of 8 days worth of medicine. This problem was in large part due to the thickness of the liquid preparation of this drug, according to Dusdieker. Thicker liquids are more likely to stick to the sides of the medicine cup and medicine bottle, which leads to wastage. This means that parents are likely to run out of their children's medicine prematurely.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000714/hl/liquid_drugs_1.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 14 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in a story about a proposal to stage the Passion Play in Newton, Iowa. To make the multimillion-dollar Iowa project a reality, members of the non-profit organization backing it said they may seek $100,000 from Iowa's Community Attractions and Tourism fund. That idea has set off alarms among some residents and civil libertarians, who say such funding would violate the 1st Amendment. "We're certainly not opposed to them creating something like this; it's just the taxpayers have no obligation to support a religious enterprise," said Ben Stone, executive director of the Iowa Civil Liberties Union. But Leo Van Elswyk, a leading supporter of the project and a Jasper County supervisor, countered that the project would not be the first time the state has paid for spiritual pursuits. "If you go to the University of Iowa, for instance, you could take a course in religion, and the teacher is paid by subsidies from the state," he said.
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-0007140045,00.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran July 13 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran July 13 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran July 13 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.
http://news.excite.com:80/news/ap/000713/12/religion-today

LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 14 -- In the fall of 1949, Sally Fitzgerald's life became permanently entwined with that of a quiet, sandy-haired young woman with penetrating blue eyes who joined her rural Connecticut household as a boarder. The young woman, Flannery O'Connor, would become one of America's most cherished writers. O'Connor had graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP and was finishing a fellowship at Yaddo, an artists' community in New York, when she came to the Fitzgeralds. She lived with them for a year and half while she worked on her novel.

INFOSCIENCE, Paris, July 14 -- L'un des problËmes mathÈmatiques les plus ardus qui soit a ÈtÈ rÈsolu ‡ l'aide d'une lÈgion d'ordinateurs reliÈs par Internet. Rente-deux ans aprËs son Èlaboration, nug30 a enfin ÈtÈ rÈsolu par quatre membres de L'UNIVERSIT… D'IOWA et du laboratoire national Argonne Etats-Unis). Quelque mille ordinateurs, rÈpartis aux quatre coins du monde et reliÈs les uns aux autres par Internet, ont dû plancher pendant un peu moins de sept jours pour venir ‡ bout de ce problËme mathÈmatique des plus complexes. Pour rÈsoudre nug30, KURT ANSTREICHER, Nathan Brixius, Jeff Linderoth et Jean-Pierre Goux, du laboratoire Argonne, ont dû utiliser des outils mathÈmatiques peu orthodoxes. Ils ont ÈlaborÈ un algorithme de type branch-and-bound (sÈparation-Èvaluation). Il permet de simplifier le problËme en Èliminant petit ‡ petit tous les groupes de combinaisons qui ne pourront jamais mener ‡ un positionnement optimal des services.
http://www.infoscience.fr/articles/articles_aff.php3?Ref=473

WASHINGTON POST, July 13 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in a story about a proposal to stage the Passion Play in Newton, Iowa. To make the multimillion-dollar Iowa project a reality, members of the non-profit organization backing it said they may seek $100,000 from Iowa's Community Attractions and Tourism fund. That idea has set off alarms among some residents and civil libertarians, who say such funding would violate the 1st Amendment. "We're certainly not opposed to them creating something like this; it's just the taxpayers have no obligation to support a religious enterprise," said Ben Stone, executive director of the Iowa Civil Liberties Union. But Leo Van Elswyk, a leading supporter of the project and a Jasper County supervisor, countered that the project would not be the first time the state has paid for spiritual pursuits. "If you go to the University of Iowa, for instance, you could take a course in religion, and the teacher is paid by subsidies from the state," he said.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/nation/latestap/A36632-2000Jul13.html

USA TODAY, July 13 -- A University of Iowa law professor wants to snuff out smoking on stage. MARC LINDER says smoking should not be allowed during theatrical productions when it's not allowed in other campus buildings. The university's code of conduct says smoking is permitted for artistic purposes in theater department productions. Linder says the school should be doing all it can to discourage smoking.

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, July 13 -- Dr. MICHAEL WINNIFORD, a professor of internal medicine in the University of Iowa College of Medicine, was scheduled to be a guest on National Public Radio's "Fresh Air" with Terry Gross. The program was to air locally on WSUI AM-910 at 11 a.m. July 13 and to be rebroadcast at 10 p.m. The show, taped Wednesday, will focus on issues relating to prescription medications, drug treatments and related matters.

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, July 12 -- Taking medication to relieve post-stroke depression may have a beneficial side effect, says a report in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers in the United States and Japan have discovered that nearly three-fourths of the patients who received anti-depressant drug treatment in clinical trials recovered some mental abilities that were lost after having a stroke. Dr. ROBERT ROBINSON of the department of psychiatry at the University of Iowa said 74 percent of the patients in the study responded favorably to anti-depressant drug treatment. "Our findings provide another compelling reason to evaluate all stroke patients for depression and to treat depression aggressively when it is found," Robinson said.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, July 12 -- In its Daily Report -- e-mailed to subscribers Monday through Friday -- the Chronicle summarizes an article in the July issue of Money magazine that features CARL KLAUS, who taught for 42 years, more than 30 in the English department at the University of Iowa. He retired in 1997. "I figured it would be an easy transition," Klaus wrote in his journal as his last day approached. But the shift proved full of unexpected pain, according to the magazine's account, written by Lisa Reilly Cullen, a staff writer. The article is not available online, but information about the magazine may be found at http://www.money.com/

YAHOO! NEWS, July 11 -- Vice President Al Gore is trying to ignore the challenge of consumer activist Ralph Nader but polls show the Green Party presidential nominee poses a considerable threat to Gore's White House hopes. In recent national polls, which have generally shown Gore, the Democratic presidential candidate, trailing Republican candidate George W. Bush, Nader is gaining around 6 percent of the vote. But that disguises the fact that his support is disproportionately concentrated in states Gore has to win if he is to triumph in the Nov. 7 election. University of Iowa pollster ARTHUR MILLER said most of Nader's support appeared to come from young voters attracted by his environmental message and from trade unionists angered by Gore's support of free trade agreements." Nader will have an impact, and it looks at this point as if he will hurt Gore disproportionately. But ultimately, I feel that much of his support will evaporate,'' Miller said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000711/pl/gore_nader_dc_1.html

NEW YORK TIMES, July 11 -- At least two-thirds of divorce suits are filed by women. Researchers who have interviewed divorcing couples have repeatedly found that, in cases where the divorce is not mutually desired, women are more than twice as likely to be the ones who want out. After the split, women are typically happier than their exes. This trend has inspired what is probably the first paper in the American Journal of Law and Economics ever to be named after a Nancy Sinatra song. In "These Boots Are Made for Walking: Why Most Divorce Filers Are Women," MARGARET F. BRINIG and Douglas Allen, both economists, analyze all 46,000 divorces filed in one year, 1995, in four different states: Connecticut, Virginia, Montana and Oregon. "Some women file for divorce because they're exploited in really bad marriages," said Dr. Brinig, a professor of law at the University of Iowa. "But it seems to be a relatively small number, probably less than 20 percent of the cases."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/regional/071100ny-col-tierney.html

BEACON JOURNAL, Ohio, July 11 -- Want to know what it's like to cope with macular degeneration? Canton ophthalmologist Dr. Frank Weinstock suggests reading The Hole in My Vision (2000, Penfield Press) by LEE ALLEN, a 90-year-old ophthalmology artist at the University of Iowa who has macular degeneration.

USA TODAY, July 10 -- Members of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's Students Against Sweatshops staged demonstrations to protest stores they say sell apparel made in sweatshops. The group passed out leaflets and held rallies in front of stores Saturday in West Des Moines, Williamsburg, Cedar Rapids, Coralville and Davenport.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, July 10 -- A problem proposed 32 years ago to challenge computers has finally been solved by a group of Midwest-based researchers using more than a thousand computers around the world working on it. Researchers from Northwestern University, Argonne National Laboratory and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA used software developed at the University of Wisconsin to link the computers. Even though experts didn't think the current generation of computers is advanced enough to solve the problem, the machines did the job in just under a week once they were harnessed to work on the same problem. The problem concerns discovering the best way to locate 30 facilities, each at a separate site, so that transferring materials from one location to another will take the least effort. This is a common type of problem faced by designers of factories, hospitals or other buildings where a lot of material is regularly transferred from one spot to another.
http://www-unix.mcs.anl.gov/metaneos/nug30/trib.html

SAVANNAH (Ga.) MORNING NEWS, July 10 -- A story on women of achievement from Savannah, Ga. includes Flannery O'Connor, who entered the WRITERS WORKSHOP AT THE STATE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and got a master's of fine arts degree.
http://www.savannahmorningnews.com:80/smn/stories/071000/LOCachievement.shtml

EVANSVILLE (Ind.) COURIER & PRESS, July 10 -- Taking medication to relieve post-stroke depression may have a beneficial side effect, says a report in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Researchers in the United States and Japan have discovered that nearly three-fourths of the patients who received anti-depressant drug treatment in clinical trials recovered some mental abilities that were lost after having a stroke. Dr. ROBERT ROBINSON of the department of psychiatry at the University of Iowa said 74 percent of the patients in the study responded favorably to anti-depressant drug treatment. "Our findings provide another compelling reason to evaluate all stroke patients for depression and to treat depression aggressively when it is found," Robinson said.
http://www.courierpress.com:80/cgi-bin/view.cgi?200007/10+health071000_features.html+20000710

TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, July 10 -- A story about Millie Benson, author of the Nancy Drew detective series and a columnist at the Toledo Blade, says she was the first woman to earn a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM (in 1927), and the first person -- male or female -- to receive the school's master's degree.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/edit/0g10bens.htm

BARRONS, July 10 -- A story about the national political scene cites the predictions of University of Iowa professor of political science MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, "who has a superior record in calling presidential elections since he built his special crystal ball (a/k/a forecasting model) back in the early 'Eighties. The good prof expects Gore to win hands down. Key elements in the Lewis-Beck model are GDP growth, the President's job-approval rating, as measured by Gallup, and the public's feeling about which party will do better in the peace-and-prosperity department." The author describes Lewis-Beck as "an engaging fellow with a self-deprecating sense of humor alien to most academics."
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB963010821653846188.djm

COLUMBUS (Ohio) DISPATCH, July 9 -- Ohio University President Robert Glidden will continue to lead the school through 2004. OU trustees recently voted to give Glidden, president since 1994, a 5.2 percent raise and extend his contract for four years. The raise will increase Glidden's salary to $268,260, from $255,000. Under Glidden's leadership, money for research at OU has increased by more than 30 percent to $40 million. Gifts to the university have risen to $35 million this year from $17.8 million in Glidden's first year. OU's 19th president, Glidden has a bachelor's, master's and doctorate degree, all in music, from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Before coming to OU, he worked at Florida State for 15 years, serving as a professor, dean of the school of music, provost and vice president of academic affairs.
http://www.dispatch.com:80/news/newsfea00/jul00/343311.html

WASHINGTON POST, July 9 -- FRED ANTCZAK, a professor of political rhetoric at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush's ability to take jabs at Democratic candidate Al Gore without appearing negative. "When he is focused, he is very disciplined and stays on message," said Antczak. "But it's too early now to make any kind of inferences about what is going to stick with the overall electorate."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A6826-2000Jul8.html

ACCESSLIFE.COM, July 7 -- PETER BLANCK, UI College of Law professor and director of the Law, Health, Policy and Disability Center, said he believed the Americans with Disabilities Act will survive judicial challenges under the Commerce Clause and the 14th Amendment. He said the law might be altered, but that did not mean the ADA would not survive. "Survival is the key word. I'm not so sure how narrow or broad the decision will be. I think there's a good chance that the court might distinguish the ADA from other cases in this area," Blanck said.
http://www.accesslife.com/scripts/saisapi.dll/catalog.class/resources/20000707-ADA-ADADOWN.html

USA TODAY, July 7 -- Fluoxetine, which is sold as Prozac for the treatment of depression, on Thursday became the first drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration for severe premenstrual syndrome. Eli Lilly will market the drug under the name Sarafem for the treatment of premenstrual dysphoric disorder, or PMDD, which causes mood changes and physical symptoms such as bloating and breast tenderness. Symptoms appear a week or two before a woman's menstrual period begins. SUSAN JOHNSON, a University of Iowa College of Medicine obstetrician-gynecologist, calls Sarafem's approval "an enormous step forward. It means the FDA believes PMS exists." When she first began treating PMS, Johnson says, doctors told many patients that their symptoms were all in their heads.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, July 7 -- A story about ESPN Classic network's signature show, "SportsCentury," says the producer of the original "SportsCentury" series was Mark Shapiro, a Chicago native and UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate who got his start at ESPN producing the "Talk2" show with Jim Rome that was on ESPN2. Shapiro worked on the "SportsCentury" project for two years, and his reward was a promotion to vice president and general manager of ESPN Classic. "One thing we want to do is have a set lineup, so viewers will know what to expect when," Shapiro said. "And we want to do more original programming, like 'SportsCentury' and 'Classic Sports Reporters.' We want to make ESPN Classic so compelling that viewers who can't get it will call their cable operators and demand it."

YAHOO! NEWS, July 7 -- Faced with physical and mental disability after stroke, many patients develop depression. Now, U.S. and Japanese researchers report that using an antidepressant to treat post-stroke depression often shows an unexpected benefit--in addition to relieving depression, patients show an improvement in mental abilities impaired by stroke. In a study, published in the July 7th issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association, Dr. ROBERT G. ROBINSON of the University of Iowa in Iowa City and colleagues evaluated data collected from stroke patients who were treated for depression. "For the first time, we have shown that treatment of depression following stroke improves recovery from intellectual deficits associated with stroke," Robinson explained to Reuters Health.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000707/hl/stroke_1.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, July 7 -- With the first anniversary of the death of cookbook writer Richard Olney approaching in August, his four brothers and two sisters decided to hold a memorial dinner party for him in the village of Sollies-Toucas, France. The article refers to Olney as "the cookbook writer's cookbook writer, an inspiration for other food writers, chefs and amateur cooks alike," and notes that while he was enthusiastic about cooking as a boy in Marathon, Iowa, he really began teaching himself to cook only after he moved to Paris in 1951. Before that, he attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, to please his father, and the Brooklyn Museum School of Art, to please himself.

WIRED, July 6 -- Using networking software, researchers combined the computing power of more than 1,000 Net-connected PCs and workstations -- idle computers spread across 30 different research facilities -- to solve a vastly complex, 32-year-old math problem called NUG30 that would've taken more than seven years to complete on a single, super-fast computer workstation. The team included researchers from Northwestern University, the University of Iowa, and Argonne National Laboratory. In order to solve NUG30, each of its 30 assigned factors has to be assessed against every variable of every other factor assignment until the correct combination of all 30 is found. While that might seem like something computers could easily do, it isn't, said researchers. "You might think that with a fast computer, you could just check all the possible assignments and choose the best one," said KURT ANSTREICHER, a researcher at the University of Iowa. "But the number of assignments is so large that even if you could check a trillion per second, this process would take more than100 times the age of the universe."
http://www.wired.com/news/technology/0,1282,37414,00.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, July 6 -- Researchers at several institutions, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have solved a problem that has bedeviled mathematicians and computer scientists for more than 30 years. The problem, a quadratic assignment problem known as NUG30, was solved over a seven-day period on a collection of more than 1,000 computers around the world. It was believed only a year ago to be out of reach.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0706BC-WI--PROBLEMSO&date=06-Jul-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, July 5 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is mentioned in a story about a proposal to stage the Passion Play in Newton, Iowa. To make the multimillion-dollar Iowa project a reality, members of the non-profit organization backing it said they may seek $100,000 from Iowa's Community Attractions and Tourism fund. That idea has set off alarms among some residents and civil libertarians, who say such funding would violate the 1st Amendment. "We're certainly not opposed to them creating something like this; it's just the taxpayers have no obligation to support a religious enterprise," said Ben Stone, executive director of the Iowa Civil Liberties Union. But Leo Van Elswyk, a leading supporter of the project and a Jasper County supervisor, countered that the project would not be the first time the state has paid for spiritual pursuits. "If you go to the University of Iowa, for instance, you could take a course in religion, and the teacher is paid by subsidies from the state," he said.

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, July 3 -- PETER BLANCK, professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa, says a proposed "ticket to work" program to move people with disabilities to payroll from Social Security has "great potential but the devil is always in the implementation. It's not a panacea."

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, July 2 -- A listing of local entertainment events includes the Duck's Breath Mystery Theatre, the zany improv group that arrived in the 1970s. Duck's Breath was founded in "a cloud of dim purpose and vague desire" by UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students who moved to the Bay Area by 1975.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/07/02/PK48580.DTL

TOLEDO BLADE, July 1 -- An article about a newly endowed chair in Catholic thought at the University of Toledo notes that similar Catholic studies programs have been started at several universities, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.toledoblade.com/editorial/religion/0g01cath.htm

WRITER'S DIGEST, July 2000 -- The magazine ranked the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA No. 1 among schools with MFA programs in writing.

MONEY, July 2000 -- CARL KLAUS, professor emeritus of the University of Iowa's English department, discusses the difficulties he faced finding ways to make life meaningful after he retired. "I thought it would be an easy transition," Klaus says in a journal excerpted in the article "Free at last" from meetings and classes. "Free to tend my garden, to read what I want, write when I want, to go fishing, visit the children and grandchildren, to travel to all those alluring places in the glossy brochures that clutter our mailbox." Instead, he wrote, "I can't ever remember myself having such ups and downs, such highs and lows."

BETTER ROADS, July 2000 -- WILFRID NIXON of the University of Iowa suggested several Web sites on winter road maintenance during a recent snow conference. Among these was Nixon's own winter maintenance course web page at
http://www.uiowa.edu/~c053195a/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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