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UI in the News

January 2000

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USA TODAY, Jan. 31 -- Microsoft Corp. is adding to its roster of powerful allies in its antitrust trial, with former White House counsels and two former U.S. attorneys general set to argue that the software giant didn't violate any federal laws. An industry trade group, the Washington-based Association for Competitive Technology, confirmed it has been invited to file a "friend of the court" brief on behalf of Microsoft. A Justice Department official declined to comment on the trade association's arguments. The government did not identify whom it invited to write its brief. Experts have speculated on former federal judge Robert Bork, University of Iowa professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP or Washington antitrust lawyer Richard G. Taranto.
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/tech/cth245.htm

BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD, Jan. 31 -- Foreign students, especially from Asian nations, are an increasingly important source of revenue for American universities. School officials fear the governmental monitoring will send an unwelcome message -- and might even drive some students to seek out other countries. "Students are going to know that these reports are going in on a rolling basis," said GARY ALTHEN, former president of the Association of International Educators and an administrator at the University of Iowa. "If I were in that situation, I would feel like I was being watched very closely -- that I was being treated as a suspicious person."
http://www.bergen.com:80/ed/visa2200001312.htm

SPACE.COM, Jan. 31 -- A story about the first U.S. satellite, which was launched into space 42 years ago by the U.S. Army Ballistic Missile Agency, says the satellite was built and developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, under the leadership of William Pickering. JAMES VAN ALLEN, a physicist of the State University of Iowa, and his graduate student, Wei Ching Lin, developed the scientific instruments carried in the satellite ... a set of cosmic ray Geiger counters.
http://www.space.com:80/space/explorer_anniversary_000127.html

THE BUSINESS PRESS, Ontario, Calif., Jan. 31 -- A story on the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONICS MARKETS, run by professors in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, says the IEM allows investors to buy and sell units in the prospects of candidates in the 2000 presidential race.

MIAMI HERALD, Jan. 31 -- William A. Salgado has joined Bilzin Sumberg Dunn Price & Axelrod in Miami, Fla. as an associate in the corporate department. He is a graduate of the University of Florida and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://www.herald.com:80/content/tue/business/florida/digdocs/071882.htm

THE BUSINESS PRESS, Jan. 31 -- Professors at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business are running a handful of "quirky" online futures markets, among them a market in which traders can buy and sell units in the prospects of candidates in the 2000 presidential race. The IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS are used as an instructional tool, but it's a real-money market, and outsiders are welcome to ante up from $5 to $500 to trade.

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 31 -- Richard J. Solomon, a technology policy expert, and Michael E. Bloom, a veteran telecommunications consultant and industry analyst, proposed in a paper that cable and phone companies agree to create some kind of entity -- "governmental, quasi-governmental, a private corporation with a set of rules" -- that would own or manage a broadband network, or both. NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a former member of the Federal Communications Commission who teaches law at the University of Iowa, said the precedent for such an arrangement was "the Internet itself, before it was sold off by the government." "The government built it, made it available," Johnson said. "You could move over whatever you wanted to move. There was no content control. It was fully distributed, a flat organization in terms of control, and the thing just ran."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/01/biztech/articles/31digi.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 31 -- Microsoft Corp. is adding to its roster of powerful allies in its antitrust trial, with former White House counsels and two former U.S. attorneys general set to argue that the software giant didn't violate any federal laws. An industry trade group, the Washington-based Association for Competitive Technology, confirmed it has been invited to file a " friend of the court" brief on behalf of Microsoft. A Justice Department official declined to comment on the trade association' s arguments. The government did not identify whom it invited to write its brief. Experts have speculated on former federal judge Robert Bork, University of Iowa professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP or Washington antitrust lawyer Richard G. Taranto.
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/w/AP-Microsoft.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Jan. 31 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site at:
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=0131AP-MICROSOFT&date=31-Jan-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/31/national0152EST0446.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 31 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site at:
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150210222241

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Jan. 31 -- A University of Iowa research team believes that worms, long considered disgusting intruders, may actually be good for their human hosts. JOEL WEINSTOCK'S team has been studying worms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. IBD is almost unheard of in developing nations where people routinely have worms, but has been growing significantly in the United States and other industrialized countries. Previous research has shown that worms modulate the immune system, preventing it from responding so intensely to pathogens. Without worms, Weinstock's team guessed, the immune system might be more likely to overreact, as it does in autoimmune diseases such as IBD. "They've become part of us," Weinstock said of the worms that have lived in our guts through the millennia. "We're the first population never to experience these worms. Suddenly, our immune system is out of balance."

GRAND RAPIDS PRESS, Jan. 30 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa report that most soda pop contains enough fluoride to be considered a significant source of the cavity-fighting substance. "Approximately 12 percent of children ages 2 to 5 years consume 9 or more ounces of carbonated beverages daily," said JUDY HEILMAN of the Dows Institute for Dental Research at the University of Iowa's College of Dentistry.

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, Jan. 30 -- TOM RIETZ, a business professor at the University of Iowa who has studied the impact of stock chat rooms, said it's very possible for heavy online chatter to move the price of a stock, especially the stock of an otherwise little-known company such as e.Digital. Even if there is no illegal or unethical behavior, Rietz said, information that is merely highly optimistic on a stock board can lead people to buy stocks they otherwise wouldn't -- and to pay more. "There are some people that get taken in by it," he said, "and to move the price of a stock, that's what you need."
http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/business/20000130-0010_1n30stock.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 31 -- In a story about the growing number of high school students taking trips during spring break, Candice Snowden of Buffalo Grove, Ill., says she consented last year to a trip for her son, Jory, but only if he changed his itinerary from Mexico to South Padre Island, Texas. Jory, now a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, paid for the trip himself, went with longtime friends and called home often, all of which reduced his mother's anxiety.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/chicago/article/0,2669,SAV-0001300238,FF.html

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Jan. 30 -- A story about the Kootenai Hospital District board of trustees, who have final say on a $146 million operating budget and on many issues affecting Kootenai County, Idaho's largest employer, says one of the candidates for the board is Bret Dirks. Dirks, a native of Moscow, Idaho, and a 1984 University of Idaho graduate, attended the University of Washington School of Medicine, and completed a neurosurgery residency program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1994.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=013000&ID=s737931&cat=

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Jan. 29 -- The Muscular Dystrophy Association recently said it was suspending its financial support for a gene-therapy trial being overseen by the University of Pennsylvania's Institute for Human Gene Therapy. The action was prompted by the federal government's recent decision to temporarily halt eight human gene-therapy trials at Penn's institute because of concerns about patient safety, said R. Rodney Howell, a pediatrician at the University of Miami. While the trial was being led by Ohio State and Penn, it also involved researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City; the University of Rochester in Rochester, N.Y.; Washington University in St. Louis; Vanderbilt University in Nashville; and Emory University in Atlanta. It was not clear whether the collaborating institutions would also lose money.
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/2000/Jan/29/international/PENN29.htm

THE ECONOMIST, Jan. 29 -- A fever chart used to track the share prices of Democratic presidential candidates Al Gore and Bill Bradley is based on the Iowa Electronic Markets, a product of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Business.

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, Jan. 29 -- Heart scans are recommended for men over age 40 and women over 45 who have at least one risk factor for heart disease such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes or a family history of heart disease. "Until we have more data in, you ought not be scanning everybody who comes down the pike," said WILLIAM STANFORD, a professor of radiology at the University of Iowa who has studied CT heart-scanning technology. For people without risk factors, the test is a needless exposure to radiation, he said.
http://www.jsonline.com:80/alive/well/jan00/heart30012900.asp

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Jan. 28 -- A story on W. Ann Reynolds, who after seven years at the center of a political and media firestorm in New York City (and before that, as chancellor of the California State University System) says she has "found a home" as president of the University of Alabama at Birmingham, reports that she received a master's degree and Ph.D. in zoology from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i21/21a03601.htm

ABCNEWS.COM, Jan. 27 -- GERI R. HALL, associate professor and associate director for Outreach, University of Iowa Center on Aging, was among leading medical experts asked by the network to comment on the numerous health care-related proposals mentioned by President Clinton Thursday night in his final State of the Union address. "I feel that we are pricing quality out of the long-term care industry by adding regulations," Hall said. "Several things happen with additional regulations. First, facilities decertify to lower levels, thereby eliminating the need for costly regulatory processes and licensed personnel to oversee care. Second, facilities that do keep their certification use professional staff to maintain regulatory documents. This removes the people with the most training from overseeing patient care where they are needed most."
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/living/DailyNews/stateofunion_health000127.html

NATIONAL POST, Jan. 27 -- TOM LUTZ, an English professor at the University of Iowa, is profiled in an article on his book, Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears. "Tears are sometimes considered pleasurable or profound, and sometimes dangerous, mysterious or deceptive," notes Lutz.

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Jan. 27 -- University of Utah researchers are closing in on the location of a mutant gene that causes a debilitating disease called congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine syndrome (CMD-RSS). Kevin Flanigan, the Utah neurologist-geneticist who led the study, worked with researchers at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Jan. 27 -- A story about video production company D'Elia-Wittkofski says the company has created fund raising and recruitment pieces for other schools, including Drew University, Loyola University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/businessnews/20000127delia1.asp

ROCKY MOUNTAIN (Colo.) NEWS, Jan. 27 -- For the Republicans, Texas Gov. George W. Bush has been about 20 points or more ahead of Steve Forbes in recent Iowa polls. And he was ahead 54 percent to 18 percent in the Heartland Poll by the University of Iowa Social Science Institute. ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Heartland Poll, said previously undecided voters now were picking Gore by a 2-1 margin. And Democrat Al Gore's advantage over Bill Bradley on handling the economy has more than doubled from a 15-point difference in late summer to more than a 35-point difference now. "The thing that really struck me the most is how much shifting around is going on in the closing of the race," Miller said, noting the latest Heartland Poll re-interviewed people questioned in the December poll. NOTE: The article, which appeared Jan. 27 in this issue of the newspaper, was filed by the ASSOCIATED PRESS Jan. 23.
http://insidedenver.com:80/election/0123elec1.shtml

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 26 -- College students were a bright spot in the Iowa Caucuses Monday for Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley, who held the vice president to a draw in Johnson, Story and Poweshiek Counties, the homes, respectively, of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and Grinnell College.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/012600wh-iowa.html

CBS MARKETWATCH.COM, Jan. 26 -- With the help of modern scanners, doctors can now peer into the body, take hundreds of "slices," and have a computer stack the pictures into a 3-D replica that can be rotated, tilted and magnified. Proponents say doctors' greater control over these images versus X-rays or more invasive procedures enables them to catch problems earlier, which could eventually lead to lower cost for consumers. Imaging procedures also have implications for tumor screening, lung and heart valve reconstruction, and assessing whether organs are suitable for transplant, said ERIC HOFFMAN, professor of radiology and biomedical engineering at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. He said advances in imagery have been "steadily progressing" for 25 years but are just beginning to become a reality in clinical practice. Hoffman maintains that imaging is just as accurate as X-rays and said many radiology departments across the country are taking steps to go completely digital over the next five years.

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN REVIEW, Jan. 26 -- College students were a bright spot in the Iowa Caucuses for Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley, who held the vice president to a draw in Johnson, Story and Poweshiek Counties, the homes, respectively, of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State University and Grinnell College.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=012600&ID=s736401&cat=

THE OREGONIAN, Jan. 25 -- As Vice President Al Gore visibly gained energy in the days leading up to the Iowa Caucuses, noted ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, Bill Bradley appeared tired by contrast. He spent much of two days explaining away a minor heart condition.

DAILY TELEGRAPH (London,) Jan. 25 -- ANN BUDD of the University of Iowa is developing a web catalogue and identification guide for every species of marine animal known to have lived in the seas of tropical America over the past 24 million years.

CLARION-LEDGER, Jackson, Miss. Jan. 25 -- JOHN REINHARDT, head of operative dentistry at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry, says that flossing teeth is an easy and quick way for people to maintain healthy teeth and improve self-esteem. "I've never set a stopwatch, but I think I can personally floss in less than 90 seconds," Reinhardt says.

TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, Jan. 25 -- JOHN FOLKINS, associate provost at the University of Iowa, has been named the new provost and vice president for academic affairs of Bowling Green State University. Folkins was named to the university's top academic position by BGSU President Sidney Ribeau. He has been at the University of Iowa since 1977, when he joined the faculty of the department of speech pathology and audiology. He became the department's acting chairman in 1985, taking the job permanently the next year.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/news/0a25bgsu.htm

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Jan. 25 -- As Vice President Al Gore visibly gained energy in the days leading up to the Iowa Caucuses, noted ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, Bill Bradley appeared tired by contrast. He spent much of two days explaining away a minor heart condition.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/nation/docs/dems25.htm

MIAMI HERALD, Jan. 24 -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley is popular among upper-income voters and college students, such as LANA ZAK, student body president at the University of Iowa, who introduced Bradley at a rally in Iowa City with a pitch for his health care plans: ''We are in a position of unparalleled prosperity. Our country is in a position to do more for people."
http://www.herald.com:80/content/today/docs/026214.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 24 -- On Sunday, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley addressed enthusiastic crowds of about 900 people at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City and 700 at Drake University in Des Moines. http://www.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/012400wh-iowa.html

BBCNEWS.COM, Jan. 24 -- A reporter covering the Democratic presidential campaign says in a first-person narrative that he drove from Davenport to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where candidate Bill Bradley held his rally.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/americas/newsid_616000/616327.stm

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Jan. 24 -- Iowans are accustomed to meeting presidential candidates every four years before the Iowa Caucuses, but those meetings are moving away from one-on-one chats and toward speeches to larger audiences. "People see candidates as often as they used to, but there's not nearly as much dialogue," says ARTHUR MILLER, a UI political scientist. Because of the frenetic campaign pace, "candidates think that if they don't have at least 100 people to talk at, an event's not worth it." That precludes long chats with small groups. Miller says his polls show that this shift has caused a change in the ways people make choices about candidates. "The lack of dialogue shifts the emphasis from real content and ideas to personality and the cues people get from candidates," he says.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/01/24/fp1s1-csm.shtml

BOSTON HERALD, Jan. 24 -- Vice President Gore, leading opponent Bill Bradley by a 2-1 margin in the latest Iowa poll, joined volunteers in canvassing a Des Moines neighborhood and later rallied his troops at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "Please do not believe the polls,'' Gore said. "Do not assume that our political process turns on what some of the analysts say or what the poll takers say. The only decision that matters is the one that comes out of the caucuses themselves.''
http://www.bostonherald.com/bostonherald/nat/main01242000.htm

C-SPAN, Jan 24, 4:15 a.m. and 3 p.m. (CST) -- ARTHUR MILLER, UI professor of political science and director of the Iowa Social Science Institute, announced the results of his final pre-caucus HEARTLAND POLL at a press conference in Des Moines. His hour-long event was shown in its entirety.

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 24 -- Sunday night, more than 900 people packed a Bill Bradley rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student union. Iowa City fire officials turned scores more away as supporters sang a campaign song written by a Bradley fan in California that begins, "I haven't felt this way since JFK! We need an honest point of view. Bill Bradley is the man for you."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/24/080l-012400-idx.html

PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE, Jan. 24 -- A new Heartland Poll, conducted by the University of Iowa's Social Studies Institute, suggested that tonight's turnout at the Iowa Caucuses, for both parties, would be low. The percentage of respondents to the survey who say they definitely plan to take part in the caucuses has been declining "dramatically" in recent weeks. "Most people don't think there's anything real exciting going on in these races," said ARTHUR MILLER, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa who directs the survey. "They don't see any burning issues."
http://www.post-gazette.com/headlines/20000124dems4.asp

MCALL.COM, Jan. 24 -- Gerald Stern, who won the 1998 National Book Award for ''This Time,'' will read poetry from his work at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 4 at the First United Church of Christ, 27 N. Third St., Easton, Pa. Stern taught at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP from 1982 until he retired in 1994. Before taking the Iowa position, he taught at the University of Pennsylvania and Temple University. MCALL is the Web site for the Morning Call newspaper in Allentown, Pa.

FOXNEWS.COM, Jan. 24 -- ARTHUR MILLER, a University of Iowa political scientist who studies voting patterns, is quoted in a story about voter apathy during the Iowa Caucuses. "As caucus night gets closer and closer, a lot of people are starting to decide that maybe it wasn't as critical as it seemed maybe a month ago to go out and vote," Miller said. At the same time, he said, many voters don't understand the process. "There is a lot of confusion out there," Miller said.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/elections/012400/apathy_martin.sml

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 24 -- Democratic presidential candidate and Vice President Al Gore showed confidence in his Iowa Caucus win in the final days before voting. At his last pre-caucus rally, Gore looked like a star quarterback taking the field, his fists aloft, as he hustled down a chute of high school cheerleaders to take the floor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA gymnasium. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Jan. 24 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/24/politics2101EST0833.DTL

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 24 -- Exploring the neural mechanisms underlying everyday speech, researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla recently discovered that the brain retrieves words to describe the world around it through a kind of interactive mental dictionary dispersed in many separate parts of the left cerebral hemisphere. Additional networks throughout the brain are activated to help locate and retrieve the different kinds of information that add up to the meaning, construction and pronunciation of a noun. Verbs are orchestrated by entirely separate networks of neurons.
http://www.latimes.com:80/class/employ/healthcare/20000124/t000007551.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Jan. 24 -- Former Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.), who is still well-known and highly regarded among Iowa Democrats, endorsed Democratic presidential candidate and Vice President Al Gore late last fall in Iowa City near the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and last week was named honorary chairman of Gore's Illinois campaign. The Gore campaign booked Simon's sole Iowa appearance in an area that he carried overwhelmingly. In the '88 precinct caucuses, Simon rolled up large pluralities throughout Iowa in university and college communities. He also won a statewide plurality among voters who had attended college.
http://www.suntimes.com:80/output/neal/neal24.html

DETROIT NEWS, Jan. 24 -- A story written on the eve of the Iowa Caucuses quotes pollster ARTHUR MILLER of the University of Iowa Social Science Institute as saying Republican presidential candidate Steve Forbes was unlikely to get much of a boost from his campaigning in Iowa. "What we expect is what everybody expects -- Steve Forbes will end up second. No one will be surprised."

ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS, Jan. 24 -- A poll in the Des Moines Register showed that among Republican presidential candidates, George W. Bush had 43 percent, Steve Forbes had 20 percent, Alan Keyes and Gary Bauer had 8 percent each and John McCain had 6 percent. Among Democrats, the poll showed that Al Gore had 56 percent versus 28 percent for Bill Bradley. Another poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA showed the two front-runners with even bigger leads.

SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, Jan. 24 -- A photo shows Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley and his wife, Ernestine, being greeted by supporters as he arrives for a rally at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

DAILY NEWS (New York), Jan. 23 -- A poll by the University of Iowa had Democrat Al Gore leading 63 percent to 26 percent over Bill Bradley. For the Republicans, George W. Bush led Steve Forbes 54 percent to 18 percent in Iowa. ARTHUR MILLER, director of the poll, said formerly undecided voters now were picking Gore by a 2-to-1 margin.

GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, Jan. 23 -- For the Republicans, Texas Gov. George W. Bush has been about 20 points or more ahead of Steve Forbes in recent Iowa polls. And he was ahead 54 percent to 18 percent in the HEARTLAND POLL by the University of Iowa Social Science Institute.

DETROIT NEWS, Jan. 23 -- Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush are the clear leaders in the Iowa Caucuses. Although the UI HEARTLAND POLL indicates some last-minute shifts by voters, "those two front-runners are far enough ahead so that neither one of them will be either embarrassed or upset," said ARTHUR H. MILLER, the University of Iowa political scientist who directs the Heartland survey.

THE PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL, Jan. 23 -- According to the latest pre-caucus polling information, Vice President Al Gore leads Democratic challenger Bill Bradley by more than 20 points and Texas Gov. George W. Bush holds about the same margin over the closest contender for the Republican nomination. "The thing that really struck me the most is how much shifting around is going on in the closing of the race,'' said ARTHUR MILLER, whose HEARTLAND POLL is the source of this new information. While the front-runners seem to be holding big leads in Iowa, he said, the movement still could offer some surprises in the margins and final order of the candidates.

BEYOND THE BELTWAY, Jan. 23 -- The HEARTLAND POLL predicts low voter turnout for the Iowa Caucuses and the guests on this nationally syndicated radio program discussed reasons for and implications of this voter apathy. The program, based in Chicago and aired on WLS-890 there, is broadcast on more than 65 stations nationwide.

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 23 -- To some degree, the Iowa straw poll replaced the actual caucuses in weeding out the field, according to the story. Republican George W. Bush placed first in the event, followed by Steve Forbes and by Elizabeth Dole, who has since quit the race. The lack of a cliffhanger may explain why the HEARTLAND POLL, made public on Friday by the University of Iowa, found that the number of potential caucus participants was declining. A report examining the survey suggested that many Iowans thought the outcome was "a foregone conclusion." The report went on: "In the absence of any burning issues, a significant number of Iowans will apparently find some other activities more personally demanding or relevant than the caucuses."
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/politics/camp/012300wh-iowa-showdown.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 23 -- A story about "Ravenshead," a chamber opera, says its solo performer, Rinde Eckert, trained as an opera singer. Both his parents, in fact, were freelance opera singers in New York until his father took a teaching position and relocated the family from New Jersey to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. After completing his own vocal undergraduate work there, Eckert went back East and quickly began questioning his allegiance to opera.

DETROIT NEWS, Jan. 23 -- Preliminary data from a study soon to be released by the University of Iowa found that drivers listening to speech-based e-mail took 30 percent longer to hit the brakes than those who were not. "The fact that you're looking at the road does not mean that you're thinking of the road," concluded JOHN LEE, author of the study.
http://detnews.com:80/2000/autos/0001/25/01230025.htm

NEW YORK POST, Jan. 23 -- A new UNIVERSITY OF IOWA poll has Vice President Gore leading Bill Bradley by 63 to 26 percent while Republican George W. Bush led Steve Forbes by 54 to 18 percent. Other polls show large Bush and Gore leads, but not as big.
http://www.nypost.com:80/01232000/news/22738.htm

MSNBC.COM, Jan. 23 -- A story about how Iowa was bracing for Monday's Caucuses includes a photo of Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley greeting supporters at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sunday.

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Jan. 23 -- Among 350 registered Iowa Democrats likely to participate in Monday's caucuses, Vice President Al Gore has jumped to a 63-24 percentage point advantage, compared to a 50-25 edge last month, a new poll Friday by University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER showed.
http://www.sltrib.com:80/2000/jan/01232000/nation_w/20165.htm
The same article appeared Jan. 23 on the FOXNEW.COM Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com:80/elections/012300/bush_abortion.sml

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 23 -- A recent poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SOCIAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE notes that "since December, there has been a large increase in (Alan) Keyes' support," and shows him as the only Republican candidate whose numbers improved over the last month -- even if only from 1 percent to 9 percent among likely caucus-goers. Keyes' backers also poll as highly likely to turn out on caucus night. (As one of his volunteers, Craig Bergman, put it, "It's hard to be motivated for a candidate who's just going to win. Who just has money or a family name.")
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/politics/camp/012300wh-gop-keyes-stalwart.html

REUTERS, Jan. 23 -- ARTHUR MILLER, a political science professor and a pollster at the University of Iowa, said he expected Vice President Al Gore to "win big on Monday'' unless many of Gore's backers just did not bother to show up. "There is a sense that Al Gore is on a roll just at the right time and that Bradley is faltering just at the wrong time,'' said Miller, who helped conduct a survey released last week that showed Gore far ahead, with 62 percent support compared with Bill Bradley's 28 percent. "I think if Gore wins Iowa big and then takes New Hampshire, he will roll through the rest of the (state Democratic) primaries and be the winner,'' Miller said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000123/pl/campaign_gore_3.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 23 -- Former University of Iowa economic professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY's book "Crossing" is reviewed. The story says McCloskey, a renowned economist and now a visiting professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago, was able to sustain a respected career without much of a ripple among colleagues around the world and at the University of Iowa. She writes that throughout the publicity of the sex change (even Iowa's governor was asked to comment), there was never one insulting telephone call or a single piece of hate mail.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/books/article/0,2669,SAV-0001230300,FF.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 23 -- University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO R. DAMASIO's book, The Feeling of What Happens, is featured. The story says that Damasio, head of the department of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, an adjunct professor at the Salk Institute in San Diego and a part-time Chicago resident, focuses on the experience of a self. He argues that all conscious experience depends on the feeling of a knowing self behind the deliverances of the senses.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/books/article/0,2669,SAV-0001230293,FF.html

CNN.COM, Jan. 23 -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley on Sunday urged college students to turn out in large numbers for Monday's caucuses, hosting events at Cornell College, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Drake University.
http://cnn.com/2000/ALLPOLITICS/stories/01/23/iowa.wrap/index.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Jan. 23 -- Bill Bradley urged campaign crowds at two campus rallies on Sunday to ''make that extra effort in the next 24 hours'' and help him try to spring a surprise in the Iowa Democratic caucuses Monday night. "If you think in these times of unprecedented prosperity that there are things that we must do that will set us on the right path for generations to come, then I hope you will go to caucus for me tomorrow night,'' he told hundreds of people at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Sunday night. At the University of Iowa Memorial Union, across the campus from the field house where Vice President Al Gore was appearing two hours later, Bradley told a largely student audience: ''If you're tired of special interests dominating the process, if you want to restore some honor and trust to the system -- then join this campaign.'' The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Jan. 23 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, the NEW YORK TIMES, and in the SEATTLE TIMES at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/23/politics2051EST0829.DTL

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Jan. 23 -- A roundup of election news notes that Vice President Al Gore holds a commanding lead over challenger for the Democratic nomination Bill Bradley. Some polls show Gore leading by as many as 20 points and a new HEARTLAND POLL by the University of Iowa Social Science Institute gave him an even larger lead, 63 percent to 26 percent, over the former U.S. senator from New Jersey.

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 23 -- FRED ANTCZAK, a professor of political rhetoric at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about George W. Bush's speeches. Antczak says that in one speech Bush was responding to the forces of the nominating system, which require GOP candidates to plunge to the right before moving back to the middle in the general election. "I call it activation rhetoric," Antczak said of Bush's efforts to motivate his supporters in a state where only about one in 10 voters are expected to participate in Monday's caucuses.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/23/175l-012300-idx.html
The same article appeared Jan. 22 on the MSNBC.COM Web site.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Jan. 22 -- For the Republicans, Texas Gov. George W. Bush has been about 20 points or more ahead of Steve Forbes in recent Iowa polls. And he was ahead 54 percent to 18 percent in the Heartland Poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SOCIAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/22/politics1350EST0578.DTL

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 22 - ARTHUR MILLER, head of the University of Iowa Social Science Institute, said he sees little difference between this year and Republican Presidential candidate Forbes' 1996 campaign. In 1996, Forbes was poised to come in behind leader Bob Dole in Iowa -- until he was upstaged by conservative firebrand Patrick J. Buchanan, who placed second. "Second place this time rather than third place last time isn't much of an improvement, given the money he's spent," Miller said, alluding to the $60 million Forbes has spent since 1996, most of it his own money. "You do have to give Forbes credit for having a better organization this time. And he's used his money wisely this time."

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 22 - Leading up to the Iowa Caucuses, none of the candidates have turned to negative advertising, perhaps taking a lesson from Steve Forbes, who was hurt in the 1996 election when voters turned against him after his attack ads ran. "He generated a backlash that really hurt him," said ARTHUR MILLER, a University of Iowa political scientist. "This time around he's got to be quite concerned about that."

NANDO TIMES, Jan. 22 - The Iowa Caucuses can not be considered "kingmakers," considering the only candidate to win the caucuses and then the presidency was Jimmy Carter. The caucuses' importance is more subtle, said CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa. "When you look at the big picture, the caucus results tell us who's not going to be president," he said. "No early state is going to ordain a winner, but if you do poorly here, with too many people finishing ahead of you, the media attention will dry up and the campaign contributions will dry up. Iowans tend to winnow the field." This story also notes that the University of Iowa's HEARTLAND POLL found that Gore was backed by 63 percent of the state's Democrats and had a 39-percentage point lead over former Sen. Bill Bradley. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer.
http://www2.nando.net/noframes/story/0,2107,500157910-500196561-500860154-0,00.html
The same article appeared Jan. 23 in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE:
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=IOWA23&date=23-Jan-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

REUTERS, Jan. 22 - Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush appear to be headed for victory in the Iowa Caucuses. "Bradley made significant inroads into Gore's lead between November and December, and it appeared for a little while that he might be able to make a race of it,'' said University of Iowa pollster ARTHUR MILLER. "But he was unable to garner additional support these past few weeks, and his support has plateaued, while Gore has apparently been able to capture much of the critical undecided vote that Bradley needed to pick up," he said.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000121/pl/campaign_iowa_3.html

REUTERS, Jan. 22 -- University of Iowa political scientist ARTHUR MILLER said he did not expect heavy turnout at the Iowa Caucuses this year because no compelling issues had emerged. "There's still a lot of flux out there but you'll end up getting the hard-core activists in both parties who show up," he said.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a0853roptz-20000122&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, Jan. 22 - Vice President Al Gore and Texas Gov. George W. Bush are the clear leaders in the Iowa Caucuses. Although the UI HEARTLAND POLL indicates some last-minute shifts by voters, "those two front-runners are far enough ahead so that neither one of them will be either embarrassed or upset," said ARTHUR H. MILLER, the University of Iowa political scientist who directs the Heartland survey.
http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/story.hts/politics/national/436645

CBS MARKETWATCH, Jan. 21 -- Political future has taken on a whole new meaning this week at the University of Iowa. Professors at the Henry B.Tippie College of Business have set up a web-based futures market trading contracts in presidential political candidates. "It's a pretty good return on investment," said JEANINE PFUNTNER, spokeswoman for the operation, which has been running futures contracts on New York Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton for several months. The Web version of the UPI story can be found at:
http://www.marketwatch.newsalert.com/bin/story?StoryId=CoiFN0bebDxmTCg9SAxrPzMnHBgz1DhvYzxm&FQ=University%20and%20of%20and%20Iowa&ED=20000121&Title=Headlines%20for%3A%20University%20of%20Iowa%0A

ASSOCIATED PRESS, Jan. 21 - According to the latest pre-caucus polling information, Vice President Al Gore leads Democratic challenger Bill Bradley by more than 20 points and Texas Gov. George W. Bush holds about the same margin over the closest contender for the Republican nomination. "The thing that really struck me the most is how much shifting around is going on in the closing of the race,'' said ARTHUR MILLER, whose HEARTLAND POLL is the source of this new information. While the front-runners seem to be holding big leads in Iowa, he said, the movement still could offer some surprises in the margins and final order of the candidates. The same article ran Jan. 22 on the USA TODAY Web site at:
http://www.usatoday.com/news/washdc/ncssat01.htm
The same article appeared Jan. 22 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Jan. 21 -- LOU R. EICHLER, director of mail services at the University of Iowa and vice president of the National Association of College and University Mail Services, called the increases in presorted bulk and periodical rates "absolutely horrible." Most colleges, however, still send the majority of their mail first class and send most of their bulk mail unsorted rather than presorted.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i20/20a03204.htm

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Jan. 21 -- In an article about turnout for the Iowa Caucuses, University of Iowa political science professor ARTHUR MILLER said " [Apathy] is growing as the caucus gets closer. Some of the people probably feel that ... the front-runners are going to win anyway, so what's the big deal. The other thing is they haven't really found the debates all that exciting."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/01/21/fp1s1-csm.shtml

USA TODAY, Jan. 21 -- With the Iowa Caucuses only a few days away, presidential candidates are looking for measures of support, particularly behind Republican front-runner George W. Bush. ''In the last few days, there's clearly a lot of shifting,'' said ARTHUR MILLER, University of Iowa political science professor and director of the Iowa Social Science Institute. Today (Jan. 21) Miller will release final results of the

Heartland Poll, based on interviews with 660 likely caucus participants in October, December and January. A preview: Bush has said he hopes to get at least 37 percent of the vote, Iowa's record in a contested GOP caucus. ''That's definitely within his grasp,'' Miller said. But, according to the article, Bush's high poll numbers could diminish his victory. ''People are thinking, 'This guy has it wrapped up; now I can vote my conscience,''' Miller said.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/e98/e1046.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 21 -- CARY COVINGTON, University of Iowa political science professor, was quoted about labor's impact on the Iowa Caucuses process and how the union members are committed to support a particular candidate. "Think of how unions place pressure on strike breakers," said Covington. "There's a social dynamic at work that encourages conformity."
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/elect2000/pres/lat_labor000121.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 21 -- LIZ STRATTON, a recently retired secretary at the University of Iowa's Labor Center, talked about working with the Al Gore campaign from its local office in Coralville. "When I retired I asked myself, what can I do to make a difference five or 10 years down the road," said Stratton, dressed in a blue "Work Like Al and Goreganize" sweatshirt. "To make a democracy work, it's important for everyone to get involved," she said. The Service Employees International Union Local 199, which recently organized nurses and professional staff at University of Iowa's hospitals, is also mentioned in the article which stressed the importance of unions in the caucuses.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0001210088,FF.html

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Jan. 21-- SUSAN CLAYMON, 61, a founder of the breast cancer patient advocacy movement, died of metastatic breast cancer at her San Francisco home on Tuesday. Claymon earned a fine arts degree from the University of Iowa in 1960.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/01/21/MN12407.DTL

SEATTLE WEEKLY, Jan. 20-26 -- A review of poet JORIE GRAHAM's new book, "Swarm," calls Graham a "reigning poet of her generation; she has won numerous honors, a Pulitzer and a MacArthur 'genius' grant among them, and currently she holds professorships at Harvard and the prestigious Iowa Writers' Workshop."
http://www.seattleweekly.com/features/0003/books-lightfoot.shtml

THE GLOBE & MAIL (Canada), Jan. 20 -- In a groundbreaking study published today in the science journal Nature, researchers at Montreal's Neurological Institute say they have identified a specific area of the brain that specializes in recognizing human voices. The researchers believe this recognition factor may be responsible for decoding the complex emotional cues and unique features of the way we sound, even when we just grunt and sigh. The research "gives a new foundation to our knowledge of how our auditory process works, especially when it comes to voices," said DANIEL TRANEL, a cognitive neuroscientist at the University of Iowa and an eminent brain researcher. "It may help us rehabilitate those with hearing impairments, or language-processing problems, and it may help us do a better job of creating computers that recognize human voices."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 20 -- ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa, said prior to Monday's Iowa Caucuses that Republican presidential candidate Alan Keyes was reaching out to people who "want to put religion first. His oratorical style also is very appealing to those people who are more religious."

FOXNEWS.COM, Jan. 20 -- MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK, a University of Iowa political science professor, commented on how Vice President Al Gore may react to George W. Bush's tax cut plan. The article says that Gore is likely to argue that now is the time to move to extend health insurance to 5 million children who are not currently covered, invest in education and save Social Security. "If that turns out to be the debate, Gore has all the cards," said Lewis-Beck. "What matters is how voters feel and how they see the country moving. If they are happy with the direction, they are less likely to take risks and change things. Cutting taxes has much less appeal to voters in a boom economy," he said.
http://www.foxnews.com/fn99/elections/012000/bush_tax.sml

C-SPAN, Jan. 20 -- TOM RIETZ and GEORGE NEUMANN, professors in the Henry B. Tippie College of Business, discussed the Iowa Electronic Markets at Invista Capital management in Des Moines, showing how the markets work and how people can trade in the web-based trading screens. They also gave an update on the latest prices of the candidates in the 2000 Presidential race.
http://inside.c-spanarchives.org:8080/cspan/cspan.csp?command=dprogram&record=149463732

USA TODAY, Jan. 19 - HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of law and antitrust expert, is quoted on the possibilities for breaking up Microsoft. He says if the breakup involves spinning off control of its operating systems, "the division would have no loyalty to Windows. Its only incentive is to make a buck."
http://www.usatoday.com/life/cyber/tech/cth177.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 19 -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley came to Iowa City, which is dominated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus, to build up support in an area where he does best: college towns, with both students and well-educated voters, two of his best constituencies.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/19/066l-011900-idx.html

KANSAS CITY STAR, Jan. 19 -- This year, Washington credentials may not be what the Republican electorate is searching for in a presidential candidate, said BRUCE GRONBECK, professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa. "In fact, for the last 25 years, it's been pretty easy for a candidate to run against Washington, especially if it's the party out of office," Gronbeck said. "Orrin Hatch is running an awfully low-profile campaign, almost as if he's trying to position himself in a safe corner to pick up the pieces if George W. destructs," he said. "No catchy phrases. Staying away from the Jesus issues. He's trying to be an eminently reasonable, issues-centered politician."
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/home.pat,local/37742a6a.119,.html

CLEVELAND PLAIN DEALER, Jan. 19 -- J. Wayne Colley, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, has been appointed executive vice president and chief operations officer for the national Dairy Mart Convenience Stores Inc. He will oversee operations, merchandising, human resources and maintenance departments. The article appeared on Cleveland Live, the Plain Dealer's Web site, at :
http://www.cleveland.com:80/business/news/f19appts.ssf

USA TODAY, Jan. 18 -- Political scientist ARTHUR MILLER of the University of Iowa said much of the drama in the Iowa caucuses may well come from how well candidates do after the first-place finishers. "They're out creating the expectations so they can exceed them," he said.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 18 -- Political scientist ARTHUR MILLER of the University of Iowa said much of the drama in the Iowa caucuses may well come from how well candidates do after the first-place finishers. "They're out creating the expectations so they can exceed them," he said. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Jan. 18 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site, as well as on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/18/politics1431EST0613.DTL

GO NETWORK, Jan. 18 -- A new poll released Sunday by Personal Marketing Research found George W. Bush leading the Republican field of presidential candidates with 43 percent of likely caucus voters. Among Democrats, Al Gore led Bill Bradley 46-29 percent, with the rest undecided. University of Iowa pollster ARTHUR MILLER said the benchmark to watch was whether Bradley could come within 20 percentage points of Gore. "The baseline for Bradley is getting 35 percent of the vote. Less than that would be an embarrassment,'' he said.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a0846LBY415reulb-20000116&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22university+of+iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

The same article appeared Jan. 18 on the Web site of THE STRAITS TIMES, the Singapore area's oldest English-language daily newspapers. It is the flagship publication of the publicly-listed Singapore Press Holdings group and has a weekday circulation of around 370,000. It also appeared Jan. 17 on the Web site for FOX NEWS at:
http://www.foxnews.com:80/elections/011700/iowa_frontrunner.sml

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, Jan. 17 -- A short item in the magazine reports the most popular campaign literature at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BOOKSTORE: 1) Faith of My Fathers, by John McCain; 2) Gore: A Political Life, by Bob Zelnick; 3) A Charge to Keep, by George W. Bush; and 4) Values of the Game, by Bill Bradley; A Republic, Not an Empire, by Patrick Buchanan; The New Birth of Freedom: Vision for America, by Steve Forbes; and The America We Deserve, by Donald Trump, all tied for fifth place, with zero copies sold.

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 16 -- Like some other Ph.D.s who attended the annual Modern Language Association conference last month in Chicago, APRIL OVERSTREET, 31, is committed to pursuing a tenure-track job in academia. "This is what I love to do, and I believe in the value of what I do," she said of her post as an assistant professor in the Spanish and Portuguese department of the University of Iowa. "Not a lot of people can say that."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/financial/personal/011600personal-scholar.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Jan. 16 -- A story about author Thisbe Nissen's debut collection of short stories, "Out of the Girls' Room and Into the Night," says the book is published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/01/16/RV102486.DTL

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 16 -- A feature about long-time political columnist Jack Germond says his daughter, a physician, is on the faculty and staff at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MEDICAL CENTER.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 16 -- ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist and polltaker at the University of Iowa, said the latest polls indicate that among candidates vying in the Iowa caucuses George W. Bush "is a shoo-in. The real race is who gets second or third." He said a third-place finish for John McCain "would be a huge victory."
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=IOWA16&date=16-Jan-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Jan. 15 -- Henry B. Tippee, vice chairman of Rollins Truck Leasing, donated $30 million to his UNIVERSITY OF IOWA alma mater, making him the top Texas philanthropist in TEXAS MONTHLY's annual "Thanks a Million" feature, published in February 2000.

TOLEDO (Ohio) BLADE, Jan. 15 -- A story stating that former University of Toledo President Frank Horton is coming out of retirement to be interim president of Southern Illinois University says he has held academic and administrative positions at, among other places, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.toledoblade.com:80/editorial/news/0a15hort.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 14 -- A story about Western Digital Corp. says that its chairman, Thomas E. Pardun, received an economics degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 14 -- University of Iowa law professor and antitrust expert HERB HOVENKAMP is quoted in an article about Bill Gates' announcement that he is stepping aside as CEO of Microsoft and appointing his longtime friend, company President Steve Ballmer, to replace him. Gates will remain as chairman and assume a new title, chief software architect, to focus on the task of improving Microsoft's products for the exploding Internet market. If Gates' decision is being driven by the antitrust case against Microsoft, "it's just not obvious to me," said Hovenkamp. "We don't know if there is going to be a breakup and where the fault lines are going to be."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/article/0,2669,SAV-0001140178,FF.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Jan. 14 - MARY J.C. HENDRIX, professor and head of the UI department of anatomy and cell biology, is working on a technique to identify genes that are involved in metastasis, the spread of cancerous tumors throughout the body. She has not yet published her results and so declines to give specifics, but says, "Over the next few years we're going to be able to predict the metastatic potential of different tumors using these molecular data that are currently being generated."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i19/19a02301.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Jan. 14 - A profile of E. Gordon Gee, president of Brown University, quotes JAMES O. FREEDMAN, former president of the University of Iowa, on Gee's qualifications: "When the trustees appointed him, they appointed a person with such experience in such important areas. He comes knowing all the business about the N.C.A.A. and about federal regulations. He has probably worked through budgets until he is brain dead."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i19/19a00101.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 14 -- On the campaign trail, Vice President Al Gore is starting to sound more like challenger for the Democratic nomination Bill Bradley. He no longer talks about mainstream worries such as the traffic congestion of urban sprawl, instead focusing on things like universal health care. "It is in fact intolerable in the midst of unprecedented prosperity that we have so many Americans who do not have health insurance," he moaned to a group of health care workers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/14/083l-011400-idx.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Jan. 14 -- American playwright, poet and screenwriter Naomi Wallace, whose latest work, "The Trestle at Pope Lick Creek," is being staged in Minneapolis, studied playwriting in graduate school at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.startribune.com/viewers/qview/cgi/qview.cgi?template=free_article&slug=stag14

REUTERS, Jan. 13 -- ARTHUR MILLER, University of Iowa political scientist, says Vice President Al Gore has an edge in Iowa in part because the state has been more positive to the administration than is generally true in the rest of the country. In New Hampshire, he said, Democratic challenger Bill Bradley's strength may be partly due to being an Easterner.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a1963roptz-20000113&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 13 -- When Vice President Gore challenged Democrat Bill Bradley to engage in twice-weekly debates rather than exchange a barrage of 30-second ads, Bradley dismissed it as a "ploy." But Gore has become so enamored with the tactic, he plans to issue the same challenge to his eventual Republican opponent. "If I have the privilege of carrying your banner, I will hound that other party's nominee coast to coast and border to border with a challenge to debate twice a week, accepting every format, accepting every invitation within reason," he told Democratic activists at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Tuesday night. "We do not have to accept this insipid approach to having these little meaningless, poll-tested, fuzzy, clever, ultimately destructive messages that demean our democracy," Gore declared.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/13/149l-011300-idx.html

WASHINGTON POST, Jan. 13 -- With time running out, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley seems to still be groping for ways to explain his high-minded ideas. In Ankeny on Tuesday night, Jared Feverhelm, a freshman at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, told Bradley during the question period that challenger and Vice President Al Gore had succeeded in widely spreading the accusation that under Bradley's health insurance plan, Medicaid recipients would be reduced to $150 a month in services. "It sounds frightening," Feverhelm said. "What I am concerned about is I haven't read or heard in any of the debates . . . how you intend to have it work."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-01/13/273l-011300-idx.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Jan. 12 -- Democratic presidential candidate Vice President Al Gore met Tuesday with about 400 supporters gathered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Gore, who also has campaigned as a defender of Medicaid, the government health program for the poor, was stumped Tuesday evening by a hospital social worker at a University of Iowa forum where the vice president spoke with health care workers. "Let me tell you how Medicaid has NOT worked," the woman said, telling Gore about a 12-year-old hepatitis patient who couldn't get an emergency liver transplant under Medicaid. "I don' t know exactly how to remedy this problem, but I think we' re better off building on the coverage that we have and filling those gaps," Gore said.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Jan. 12 -- Democratic presidential candidate Vice President Al Gore met Tuesday with about 400 supporters gathered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Gore, who also has campaigned as a defender of Medicaid, the government health program for the poor, was stumped Tuesday evening by a hospital social worker at a University of Iowa forum where the vice president spoke with health care workers. "Let me tell you how Medicaid has NOT worked, " the woman said, telling Gore about a 12-year-old hepatitis patient who couldn't get an emergency liver transplant under Medicaid. "I don' t know exactly how to remedy this problem, but I think we' re better off building on the coverage that we have and filling those gaps," Gore said.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/12/politics0257EST0472.DTL

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 12 -- Democratic presidential candidate Vice President Al Gore met Tuesday with about 400 supporters gathered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Gore, who also has campaigned as a defender of Medicaid, the government health program for the poor, was stumped Tuesday evening by a hospital social worker at a University of Iowa forum where the vice president spoke with health care workers. "Let me tell you how Medicaid has NOT worked, " the woman said, telling Gore about a 12-year-old hepatitis patient who couldn't get an emergency liver transplant under Medicaid. "I don' t know exactly how to remedy this problem, but I think we' re better off building on the coverage that we have and filling those gaps," Gore said. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Jan. 12 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site, and on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.

BOSTON GLOBE, Jan. 11 -- People with chronic fatigue usually don't know why they have the fatigue, when they will get better or how to treat the fatigue. However, a recent University of Iowa study identifies prognostic characteristics for improvement of chronic fatigue. The study found that certain patient characteristics helped predict which individuals with chronic fatigue would improve, said ARTHUR J. HARTZ, M.D., Ph.D., UI professor of family medicine and the study's principal investigator and lead author. The study also raised questions about the current definition of chronic fatigue syndrome, a subclassification of unexplained chronic fatigue.

USA TODAY, Jan. 11 -- Native Americans seeking to protect a recently uncovered burial site have deployed the ultimate weapon in their quest: They've called in archaeologists. The archaeologists not only will catalog the bones littering the dry floor of Lake Francis Case, near Pickstown, S.D., and the Nebraska line, but will offer insight into the site's history. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Yankton Sioux tribe are fighting over possession of the remains. ''These are human remains, and they should be treated respectfully,'' says archaeologist LARRY ZIMMERMAN of the University of Iowa. In some ways, the dispute exemplifies the long history of archaeology's involvement with the federal government and Native Americans, he says. ''The Corps got burned so bad on Kennewick Man, they may be trying too hard here,'' Zimmerman says.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 10 -- President Clinton will propose $300 million more for transportation research, Transportation Secretary Rodney Slater said Monday. The increase would help complete work this year on a driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "The simulator uses a real person, " said National Highway Traffic Safety Administration acting director Rosalyn Millman. "For example, we' re looking at ways to counter fatigue. Some companies have proposed releasing different kinds of smells to wake drivers up." The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Jan. 10 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web Site and in the NANDO TIMES, a North Carolina-based Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer:
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,500152518-500187115-500788367-0,00.html
The same Associated Press article ran Jan. 10 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/01/10/national1503EST0645.DTL

DETROIT NEWS, Jan. 10 -- Vice-President Al Gore did himself the most good in Saturday's debate with former U.S. Sen. Bill Bradley. Not only was Gore's style more relaxed, but he was better at plucking the strings of likely Democratic caucus voters who must pass judgment on the duo in two weeks. "I think Gore did much better than expected," said RUSSELL ROSS, a retired political science professor at the University of Iowa and a longtime observer of Iowa politics. "He put Sen. Bradley on the defensive from the beginning. I think Gore won it."
http://detnews.com:80/2000/nation/0001/09/01090092.htm

FORTUNE, Jan. 10 -- In the early part of the century, reducing work hours was issue No. 1 for labor unions, culminating in 1938 with the passage of the Fair Labor Standards Act and the 40-hour workweek. "Shorter hours was part and parcel of what people thought was economic progress," says BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a historian of work at the University of Iowa. "Progress meant opening up life beyond the pecuniary--to family, community, the life of the mind." Because productivity gains meant workers could produce the same level of wealth in a shorter span of time, John Maynard Keynes predicted that leisure would become humanity's next great challenge. George Bernard Shaw foresaw a two-hour day by 1980.
http://library.northernlight.com/PN20000105060000452.html?cb=13&sc=0#doc

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Jan. 10 -- University of Iowa political scientist RUSSELL ROSS said Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley needed to bring some "fire" to an upcoming debate in Iowa since Bradley had previously been on the receiving end of attacks by challenger Al Gore.

DAILY NEWS (N.Y.) Jan. 9 -- University of Iowa pollster ARTHUR MILLER said that a key element of Bill Bradley's insurgency in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination is the feeling that Vice President Al Gore can't beat GOP frontrunner George W. Bush. "I think it gives Bradley an in with people who are paying attention," Miller said. "They start to think, 'Hey, Gore might not be able to beat Bush.' It's just natural to start thinking who is the viable candidate."

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 9 -- Caucuses are notoriously hard for insurgent candidates to crack by relying on newcomers, said ARTHUR MILLER, a political scientist and polltaker at the University of Iowa. "There isn't anything to suggest there will be any big pull of new people to the caucuses," Miller said. "That's a pipe dream. If we got 15 percent of the voters, it'd be a pleasant surprise, but there's not a lot of enthusiasm out there."

GO NETWORK, Jan. 9 -- The early start put Iowa on the political map as the first meaningful encounter of the presidential campaign, transforming the caucuses into a mammoth made-for-media extravaganza that plays an early role in the national nominating process -- even though it has no binding effect on the state's own delegate selection. "At least once every four years, the nation learns the difference between Iowa and Idaho,'' said FRED ANTCZAK, a professor at the University of Iowa. The story was written by the REUTERS news service.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a0547LBY660reulb-20000109&qt=
%2BReuters+%2B%22university+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486
The same Reuters article appeared Jan. 10 on the FOX NEWS Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com:80/elections/011000/iowa.sml

REUTERS, Jan. 9 - The Iowa Caucuses started modestly in 1972 and have grown into a full-fledged media extravaganza. Candidates criss-cross the state for a year or more in pursuit of a jump-start on the campaign. "At least once every four years, the nation learns the difference between Iowa and Idaho," said FRED ANTCZAK, a UI professor of rhetoric.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000109/pl/politics_iowa_2.html

ROANOKE (Va.) TIMES, Jan. 9 - Later this spring, the U.S. Supreme Court takes up a case involving the Miranda warning, which is the list of rights a law enforcement official must give before questioning a suspect. Last February, federal judge Jackson Kiser cast the deciding vote in ruling that in certain instances Miranda no longer applies. "It's the hottest constitutional criminal procedural issue in the 20 years I've been teaching law," said JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a UI law professor. Tomkovicz believes Judge Kiser will be reversed, but said, "He's involved in a truly unique case. I give him that credit, that he's done us the service of forcing the issue."
http://www.roanoke.com/roatimes/news/story86161.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Jan. 7 -- The first Sigma Lambda Beta chapter started at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1986, and the organization now has 43 chapters and 20 colonies. (A new Greek group on a campus starts out as a colony before becoming a chapter.) The fraternity says it has grown from 500 members to 1,200 overall in the last five years. "Most Latino students bring with them to college campuses a sense of cultural activism, and the traditional Greek organizations lack in that area," says Juan A. Rodriguez M., a past national president of Sigma Lambda Beta. "That's one of the reasons why Latino fraternities and sororities have blossomed."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i18/18a06001.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 7 -- A video that looks at the game of football and its players both on and off the field -- "NFL Under the Helmet" -- includes a segment about the Falcons' TIM DWIGHT, who went back to the University of Iowa to win a Big Ten sprinting title.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 6 -- A story about the Smithsonian Institution's plans to launch art tours around the country says that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA MUSEUM OF ART will feature "Lure of the West" landscapes, Indian portraits, historical frontier paintings and examples of the southwestern Taos school of painting, with artists including Charles Bird King, George Catlin, Albert Bierstadt and Thomas Moran.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0001060373,FF.html

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Jan. 6 -- Seattle Mayor Paul Schell, who received a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1960, had to clarify for reporters what he meant when he claimed to be a former Iowa linebacker. After reporters checked with University of Iowa officials for a record of Schell playing there, Schell clarified that he only played at Wartburg College in Waverly before attending UI.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/sports/faces06.shtml

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Jan. 4 -- A story about professional wrestling quotes 1972 Olympic gold medal winner DAN GABLE, who compiled a 305-7 record as an amateur before becoming the most successful coach in the sport's history at the University of Iowa, where his squads won 15 collegiate championships in 21 seasons before he retired two seasons ago. "It's always been entertainment and you accept it for that, but now all I see is sex and violence and then, when I look at the crowds and who's watching this stuff, it really bothers me.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0001040345,FF.html

EXCITE NEWS, Jan. 4 -- African-American women with breast cancer are 67 percent more likely to die from their illness than white patients are, according to a report co-authored by MICHELE M. WEST of the University of Iowa. The researchers believe that economic, cultural, and genetic factors contribute to this race-specific difference in death risk. The Reuters Health story ran on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.

COMMERCIAL APPEAL, Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 3 -- MARY HENDRIX, Ph.D., deputy director of the University of Iowa Cancer Center, says a new form of gene therapy may rein in wayward prostate cancer cells and slow the spread of invasive prostate cancer. In animals treated using the therapy, Hendrix and her colleagues introduced genes that produce a naturally occurring protein, E-cadherin, into prostate cancer cells, which slowed their spread.

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Jan. 3 -- In a story on dental hygiene, the assistant executive director of the Arizona Dental Association recommends the Sonicare sonic toothbrush. She cites a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study showing that the Sonicare brush removes 95 percent to 99 percent of bacteria on contact, and 60 percent to 80 percent when held for five seconds at a distance of 3 millimeters from tooth enamel.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Jan. 2 -- A HEARTLAND POLL by the University of Iowa Social Science Institute found that Republican presidential candidate John McCain is creeping up on Steve Forbes in Iowa, and that a fourth of Iowa's Democrats now are undecided -- although Al Gore is still substantially ahead of Bill Bradley. In New Hampshire, McCain and Bradley are both increasingly competitive against their parties' respective front-runners, George W. Bush and Gore. The article ran in the on-line version of the paper at:
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/headlines/20000102prezrace3.asp

WASHINGTON TIMES, Jan. 2 -- MARY HENDRIX, deputy director of the University of Iowa Cancer Center, found that a new form of gene therapy may rein in wayward prostate cancer cells and slow the spread of invasive prostate cancer. A study conducted on animals found that the therapy introduces genes that produce a naturally occurring protein, E-cadherin, into prostate cancer cells.

DAILY OKLAHOMAN, Jan. 2 -- LAWRENCE G. HUNSICKER, a kidney specialist at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article examining the alleged "turf war" among Midwest hospitals over the need for additional liver transplant programs. Hunsicker accuses his fellow transplant professionals of "squabbling like spoiled children."

CLINICAL LAB LETTER, Jan. 1 -- ANIL K. SOOD, M.D., investigator and assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics Division of Gynecologic Oncology, said the analysis of mutations on the p53 tumor suppressor gene for newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients may give physicians important prognostic clues on tumor aggressiveness and the likelihood of spread beyond the peritoneal cavity.

OB.GYN NEWS, Jan. 1 -- JENNIFER NIEBYL, head of the department of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, said women who are capable of becoming pregnant still need to take a folic acid supplement despite a federal requirement that grain foods must be fortified. She told the annual meeting of the Central Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists that the grain fortification effort has not increased women's intake to the recommended level.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Jan. 1 -- Eugene Mather, an internationally known geographer who led field trips in the American Southwest for the National Geographic Society, died Christmas Day. He was 81. Mather, who died at a Las Cruces hospice, had conducted field research throughout the United States, the Andes, the Arctic and the North Pole. He received a bachelor's degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1940, a master's degree from the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana in 1941 and a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin at Madison in 1951.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Jan. 1 -- Some researchers believe the ever-intensifying visual environment, with its rapid-fire television editing and media saturation, is hard-wiring children for faster cognitive processing. The same probably holds true with computer use, though little research has focused on the topic specifically. "I find it quite likely that the kind of stimulation to which children are being subjected through the world of electronic media alters the way in which their neural circuits operate," says University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO. The article appeared on the paper's Web site at:
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB944517815203609985.djm

NEW YORK TIMES, Jan. 1 -- A story about Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush's commercials quotes BRUCE GRONBECK, a communications professor at the University of Iowa. He questions whether the commercials had the impact intended, which was to capture the "magic and power" of Bush speaking to supporters. Even when a candidate appears to be taking a strong stand, Gronbeck said, when "you look at the next guy's, they're pretty much the same."
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/politics/camp/010100wh-ads.html

TECHNOLOGY REVIEW, January/February 2000 -- DuPont's donation of $35 million in patents to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA last year is mentioned in an article about donations of intellectual property to schools.
http://www.techreview.com:80/articles/jan00/benchmark5.htm

ARCHAEOLOGY, January/February 2000 -- An article that posits that Homo erectus may have established itself in eastern China 400,000 years earlier than previously thought is written by the University of Iowa's RUSSELL CIOCHON and ROY LARICK, who have authored a book about early dispersals of Homo erectus for Oxford University Press.
http://www.he.net:80/~archaeol/0001/newsbriefs/china.html

GOOD HOUSEKEEPING, January 2000 -- JOEL SOROSKY, M.D., a professor in the University of Iowa's gynecologic oncology area, oversaw a case in which a 25-year-old woman with a rare form of ovarian cancer underwent chemotherapy while pregnant. Both the mother and the baby survived and remain healthy.

KIPLINGER'S, January 2000 -- Hillary Clinton's stock is falling -- literally -- as a potential Senate candidate in New York State. That's the line from the University of Iowa business school faculty's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, where on-line traders can speculate on the outcome of elections.

MONEY, January 2000 -- Since late October, the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS -- a private futures marketplace created by some University of Iowa professors -- has let a select group of folks put money on the Federal Reserve's interest-rate decision-making. The maximum investment is $500, and, to avoid raising the ire of regulators at the Commodity Future Trading Commission, it's limited to students and academics -- or those who can convince their university-affiliated friends or relatives to play the game for them.

CHOICE, January 2000 -- PETER GREEN, a classics professor at the University of Iowa, critiqued a book titled "Alcibiades and Athens: a study in literary presentation" by David Gribble. "Though well argued and showing exemplary research, Gribble's thesis never fully investigates why Alcibiades was treated as a kind of Superman in competition with the city-state, perhaps because Gribble himself is as dazzled by him as everyone else."

CHOICE, January 2000 -- The Art & Life in Africa CD produced by the Obermann Center for Advanced Studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was recognized as one of Choice magazine's "Outstanding Academic Titles" for 1999.

MEDICINE ON THE NET, January 2000 -- MICHAEL D'ALESSANDRO, M.D., Web director of both the Virtual Hospital and the University of Iowa Health Care Web site, talks extensively about the UI Hospitals' early efforts to get healthcare information on the Web.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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