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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Jan. 28. 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

HARRISON READS FEB. 7 -- University of Iowa Writers' Workshop alumnus Colin Harrison, author of "Manhattan Nocturne," will read from his new novel, "Afterburn," at 8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 7 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The free reading will be broadcast on the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on UI radio station WSUI, AM 910, and simulcast on WOI AM 640 Ames/Des Moines.

"Afterburn" is a thriller set in the closing days of the Vietnam War.

Booklist's review stated, "This is a compelling, thrilling, and intelligent novel with sharply drawn characters." Kirkus Reviews concluded, "The handy cliche alleging that a thriller is so good it transcends its genre has rarely been truer than in the case of this breathtakingly suspenseful meditation on the interwoven ambiguities of life and death .. A practically perfect literary thriller with a bitter lingering 'afterburn' indeed."

Colin Harrison is the deputy editor of Harper's magazine and the author of "Bodies Electric," "Break and Enter" and "Manhattan Nocturne." He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, novelist Kathryn Harrison, also a graduate of the Writers' Workshop.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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MULLEN READS FEB. 8 -- Poet and University of Iowa Writers' Workshop graduate Laura Mullen will read from her latest collection, "After I Was Dead," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 8 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The free reading will be broadcast on the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on UI radio station WSUI, AM 910, and simulcast on WOI AM 640 Ames/Des Moines.

Mullen's previous book, "The Tales of Horror," published in 1999, was a hybrid of fiction and poetry, self-described as a flipbook. Publishers Weekly wrote, "A brilliant, utterly original, fully realized work that wickedly out-tropes horror's cliches and devices . . . Mullen swoops in and out of metaphor to poke fun at the gothic genre, and celebrate its astonishing versatility . . . an exaggerated, rollicking introduction to many of the pre-occupations, rhetorics and methods of experimental poetry."

Laura Mullen's first book of poetry, "The Surface," was a National Poetry Series selection in 1991. Her work has been published in the Paris Review, The New Yorker, and Ploughshares, and anthologized in "The Best Poetry of 1990." She was awarded Ironwood's Stanford Prize in 1983.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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FILM ABOUT CROWN POINT PRESS FEB. 9 -- The documentary film "ink, paper, metal, wood, 35 Years at Crown Point Press" will be shown at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 9 in the University of Iowa Museum of Art

The film showing will be part of the weekly Perspectives series held Wednesdays in the museum. This is the first Perspectives program of the museum's spring season. Perspectives programs are free and open to the public.

The film is being shown in conjunction with "From Hayter to Pettibon: American Workshop Prints," an exhibition at the Museum of Art that traces the development of the print workshop across the United States through noteworthy prints from the last 50 years. This exhibition will be on display in the museum's North and East Galleries Feb. 5 through March 12.

This new documentary, produced by Crown Point Press, a well known San Francisco print workshop, shows many artists at work, including Richard Diebenkorn and Chuck Close. Included as well is footage of John Cage burning his prints on the press bed at Crown Point.

Kathleen A. Edwards, the curator at the UI Museum of Art who organized the current exhibition, commented: "The video is an important document of American print history. The viewer gets a real feeling for the environment of a professional print workshop. Crown Point Press has a Zen-like approach and it is quite enlightening to view some of the most successful artists of their time working out ideas and making prints."

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1999-2000 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. the day of the Perspectives program. Admission is free.

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FRAZIER READS FEB. 9 -- Ian Frazier -- essayist, humorist, National Public Radio voice, and author of "The Great Plains" -- will return to Iowa City to read from his new book, "On the Rez," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 9 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The free reading will be broadcast on the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on UI radio station WSUI, AM 910, and simulcast on WOI AM 640 Ames/Des Moines.

In "On the Rez," Frazier recounts time spent on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota. The New York Times Book Review cover-story review stated, "I can't imagine another way in which Frazier could have written this book. It has a quality of necessary expression."

Tony Hillerman proclaimed, "No citizen interested in reservation life -- or in human kindness and human troubles -- should fail to read Ian Frazier's gripping story."

Ian Frazier lives in Montclair, N.J. He grew up in Ohio, graduated from Harvard and the Lampoon in 1977, and was a New Yorker staff writer. Previous books include "Great Plains" (1989), "Family" (1994) and "Coyote v. Acme" (1996).

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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BERRY READS FEB. 10 -- Venise Berry, an associate professor of journalism and mass communications at the University of Iowa, will read from her second novel, "All of Me," at 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 10 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The free reading will be broadcast on the "Live from Prairie Lights" series originating on UI radio station WSUI, AM 910, and simulcast on WOI AM 640 Ames/Des Moines.

In response to "All of Me," Eric Jerome Dickey wrote, "Magnificent and honest, Venise Berry's writing comes from her soul."

Berry's debut novel, "So Good," was a Blackboard bestseller and an alternate selection of the Literary Guild. In a review of "So Good," Publishers Weekly reported that the book "Re-creates the subtle complexity of the contemporary African-American professional woman's world, flavored with mother wit and home truths . . . Characters are real and appealing enough to demand a sequel."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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ANALYSIS OF POPULAR BALLAD FEB. 11 -- Michael Buchler, a faculty member in music theory at the University of Iowa School of Music, will speak on "Laura and the Essential Ninth: Were They Only a Dream?" at 1:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11 in Room 1027 of the Voxman Music Building on the UI campus.

Buchler's lecture, which is free and open to the public, is part of the Music Theory and Musicology Colloquium series at the School of Music.

Buchler will discus the song "Laura" from the 1944 film of the same name. As part of the discussion, baritone Stephen Swanson, a voice faculty member at the School of Music, will sing "Laura."

Buchler said the song from David Raksin's film score became one of the most popular ballads of the time. However, most of the primary melodic notes in the melody are undermined rather curiously by Raksin's unusual accompaniment, which harmonizes the melodic notes with a bass that is a ninth -- a dissonant note one step larger than an octave -- lower.

"My talk will attempt to grapple with a perplexing question," Buchler said. "Are these ninth chords intended to be stable, or are the seemingly strong melodic tones actually unresolved dissonances, displacing the 'true' melodic tones that never appear?"

Buchler joined the faculty of the UI School of Music in 1996. He holds degrees in music theory from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, the University of Michigan

and the Eastman School of Music. He has presented lectures and scholarly papers at music theory conferences around the United States and by invitation at Northwestern University. He is a reader for the AP test in music theory and this summer will be conducting a workshop on teaching music theory to high school students.

At the UI Buchler teaches music theory courses and seminars, supervises doctoral, masters and honors students in the School of Music and has developed instructional web sites for undergraduate music theory courses.

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PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP FEB. 13 -- The University of Iowa Museum of Art and the printmaking area at the UI School of Art and Art History will present two sessions demonstrating "How Prints Are Made," 1-3 p.m. and 3 -5 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 13 in the printmaking wing of the UI Art Building.

"How Prints Are Made" will be presented by graduate students in lithography and intaglio printmaking at the School of Art and Art History. Due to limited space, participants must register for either session by Feb. 9. Persons interested in attending the workshop should call Keith Achepohl, a professor in the School of Art and Art History, at (319) 335-1766 Mondays or Wednesdays.

The demonstration will be given in conjunction with "From Hayter to Pettibon: American Workshop Prints," an exhibition tracing the development of the print workshop across the United States through noteworthy prints from the last 50 years. This exhibition will be on display at the museum's North and East Galleries Feb. 5 through March 12.