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UI in the News

February 2000

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WASHINGTON POST, Feb. 29 -- A story on surgery for obesity says modern gastric bypass surgery was developed 40 years ago by EDWARD E. MASON, a surgeon at the University of Iowa and the founding president of the bariatric surgeons society. Mason observed that patients who underwent irreversible operations to remove large parts of their stomachs or intestines to treat cancer or severe ulcers lost a lot of weight and remained underweight regardless of what or how much they ate. They also suffered from severe "dumping" every time they ate.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-02/29/020l-022900-idx.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Feb. 29 -- JAMES TOMKOVICZ, a law professor and Fourth Amendment expert at the University of Iowa College of Law, is quoted in an article about a questionable search and seizure case being heard by the U.S. Supreme Court. "We have a case here that is going to test the court's willingness to stand up for the Fourth Amendment," says Tomkovicz.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/02/29/text/p2s1.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Feb. 29 -- Estlin Feigley, who graduated from Wheaton Central High School in Illinois in 1989 and lives on Chicago's North Side, has completed an 80-minute feature film, "Toll Bridge to Iowa." It's about a young veteran who is trying to put his involvement in military operations in Colombia behind him while falling in love. Feigley wrote, directed and stars in the movie. Feigley, a film graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA who pursued an acting career in Los Angeles from 1996 to 1998 before moving back to Chicago, said the movie, which has been screened for close friends, cost about $25,000 to make and was funded by himself and by several investors. He is looking for a distributor.
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-0002290091,00.html

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Feb. 29 -- Some 4,350 traders have invested a total of $113,000 in the Iowa Electronic Markets, a political futures market run by the University of Iowa business school. JOYCE BERG, an accounting professor, expects that amount to more than double by convention time--and it would be much higher if there weren't an individual investment limit of $500. The market has attracted such Wall Street luminaries as Lazard Freres' Steven Rattner, a top Al Gore fund-raiser. He takes time out from billion-dollar deals to monitor his presidential futures account balance, which has climbed from $500 to $613. "I just checked," he says from his New York office. "If this weren't limited to $500, God knows what I would do."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/business/pol29.html

USA TODAY, Feb. 29 -- ANGIE LEE, a player and coach at Iowa for 20 years, resigned Monday as coach in the wake of continued speculation about her future. ''(Iowa) needs to resume its place as one of the top programs in the country,'' said Lee, who will coach the team in the upcoming Big Ten tournament. ''The only way that was going to happen was to start making changes. And the biggest change . . . was me.'' Lee's five-year record is 84-59 with two conference titles, a conference tournament title and three trips to the NCAA tournament. But the Hawkeyes went 12-15 last season and are 9-17 this year, the first consecutive losing records in 17 seasons.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Feb. 29 -- The University Pathology Consortium, a partnership among six top-notch medical schools, promises something unique to the medical community. Aside from listing 11,000 diseases with definition, date of discovery, clinical characteristics, causes, synonyms and recent medical articles, the Web site will contain 70,000 to 80,000 pages of original content written by clinically active pathologists from various medical schools and streamlined into easy-to-read formats. Members of the consortium include departments of pathology and laboratory medicine at Creighton University, Stanford University, the University of California at Davis, the University of California at San Francisco, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Southern California.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/022900/lif/stox

LOG CABIN DEMOCRAT, (Conway, Ark.), Feb. 29 -- "Doodlebug: Jumping Around in Time" will be the topic for the University of Central Arkansas Honors College's Hightables event at 3 p.m. Wednesday in Room 302 in McAlister Hall. The event will focus on the use of flash backs and flash forwards in literature. Presented by Elizabeth Stuckey-French, this will deal with authors' constant struggle presenting the dimension of time to the audience. Ms. Stuckey-French was born in Little Rock. She received a Master of Arts in English from Purdue University and graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Feb. 28 -- The finalists for the 1999 Los Angeles Times Book Prizes, announced Friday in New York, include in the poetry division "The Oval Hour," written by Kathleen Peirce and published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www.latimes.com/living/working/20000227/t000019158.html

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Feb. 27 -- An article about author James Alan McPherson's book "A Region Not Home" says that in 1981 he left a "very bad marriage" and fled a professorship at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville for one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.

WASHINGTON POST, Feb. 25 -- Some 4,350 traders have invested a total of $113,000 in the Iowa Electronic Markets, a political futures market run by the University of Iowa business school. JOYCE BERG, an accounting professor, expects that amount to more than double by convention time--and it would be much higher if there weren't an individual investment limit of $500. The market has attracted such Wall Street luminaries as Lazard Freres' Steven Rattner, a top Al Gore fund-raiser. He takes time out from billion-dollar deals to monitor his presidential futures account balance, which has climbed from $500 to $613. "I just checked," he says from his New York office. "If this weren't limited to $500, God knows what I would do."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-02/25/141l-022500-idx.html

CHRONICLE OF PHILANTHROPY, Feb. 24 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has received a $1.4 million bequest from Albert and Mildred (Ruth) Lindsay of Cedar Rapids, a school superintendent and a schoolteacher, respectively, for scholarships and unrestricted use.

SALON, Feb. 24 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, who teaches medical reporting at the University of Iowa, explores the causes behind flatulence, as well as the stigma attached to it.
http://www.salon.com/health/feature/2000/02/24/farts/index.html

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Feb. 23 -- UI law professor DAVID BALDUS testified for 90 minutes before a Pennsylvania State Senate committee about his 1998 study of capital cases in Philadelphia. His examination of 707 murder cases in the city between 1983 and 1993 revealed that a third of the 94 black defendants from Philadelphia on death row would have received life sentences had they been sentenced at the same rate as non-black defendants. "Black and non-black offenders are not being treated comparably," he said.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/2000/Feb/23/front_page/SDEATH23.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Feb. 23 -- A story on Chile's Alberto Fuguet, described as part of a movement upending older writers' anti-U.S. tradition, says his breakthrough novel, "Bad Vibes," published in 1991, has been compared to "The Catcher in the Rye." It follows the wanderings of an alienated upper-middle-class youth through a repressed but dissipated Santiago of fast sex and heavy drinking in the 1980s. Fuguet eventually landed a spot in the prestigious writing workshop for foreign writers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

CBS.MARKETWATCH, Feb. 23 -- Four UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students told a local newspaper they deserve to win a national "Messiest College Apartment'' contest and its $10,000 prize. Online apartment guide Apartments.com is sponsoring the nationwide search. Iowa sophomores Mike Betts, Sean Geraghty, Scott Schoen and Jason Schwab are saying that Apartments.com shouldn't be duped by imposters who try to dirty up their places just to win the cash. "Ours is naturally a mess," they say, adding proudly, "we're all equally slobs."
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/current/jokeday.htx

THE DAILY RECORD, (Baltimore, Md.), Feb. 22 -- Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson declared Nov. 5 that Microsoft Corp. used monopoly power derived from its widely used Windows operating system to harm consumers, competitors and other companies. His findings of fact stopped short of any legal conclusions. Instead, he set Feb. 22 for oral arguments to help him decide how the law applies to his facts. Many observers think the world's largest software company faces a tough task in convincing Jackson that its behavior was legal. "The market power conclusions are relatively lopsided in favor of the government based on a lot of evidence," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa's College of Law and a co-author of a highly respected treatise on antitrust law.

FOXNEWS.COM, Feb. 22 -- About an upcoming U.S. Supreme Court case that examines police powers and authority to conduct search and seizures, UI law professor JAMES TOMKOVICZ cautions against broad police power to conduct searches. The State of Florida v. J.L. will see the High Court clearly define how much a police officer can rely on an anonymous tip and what "reasonable suspicion" really means. The case, which was scheduled to be heard on Feb. 29, centers on a search of a youth based on an anonymous tip. Police found the youth J.L. to be in illegal possession of a firearm. "If officers could go through the streets frisking everyone they see on a given day, they would prevent certain amount of uses of firearms, just like if they went through everybody's house on a daily basis, they'd find guns, or child pornography or evidence of murder," Tomkovicz said.
http://www.foxnews.com/fn99/national/court/park_022200.sml

FOXNEWS.COM, Feb. 22 -- Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson declared Nov. 5 that Microsoft Corp. used monopoly power derived from its widely used Windows operating system to harm consumers, competitors and other companies. His findings of fact stopped short of any legal conclusions. Instead, he set Feb. 22 for oral arguments to help him decide how the law applies to his facts. Many observers think the world's largest software company faces a tough task in convincing Jackson that its behavior was legal. "The market power conclusions are relatively lopsided in favor of the government based on a lot of evidence," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa's College of Law and a co-author of a highly respected treatise on antitrust law.
http://www.foxnews.com/vtech/022200/trial.sml
The same REUTERS article ran Feb. 22 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site at:
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/02/biztech/articles/22soft.html
The same Reuters article ran Feb. 22 on the YAHOO!NEWS Web site at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000222/ts/microsoft_trial_1.html
The same Reuters article ran Feb. 21 on the MEDIA CENTRAL Web site. Media Central, a Web site based in Kansas City, Mo., provides news and information to professionals in the radio, television and cable, newspaper, magazine, book publishing and Internet publishing industries and educational realms.
http://www.mediacentral.com/channels//allnews/02_21_2000.reuff-story-bctechmicrosoft.html
The same Reuters article ran Feb. 21 on the EXCITE!NEWS Web site at:
http://news.excite.com:80/news/r/000221/12/tech-microsoft

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Feb. 22 -- Because the stakes are so high in the Microsoft antitrust case, the judge may hold off on a final ruling until all hope of a negotiated settlement is gone, said HERB HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa, who has advised the government in the case.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Feb. 22 -- The new law that allows people with disabilities to go to work without loss of medical benefits may make 2000 a banner year for them. The Work Incentives Improvement Act, signed by President Clinton in December, "could potentially help thousands of people with disabilities join or rejoin the work force," said PETER BLANCK, professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa.
http://www.latimes.com/news/health/medicine/20000222/t000017072.html
The same REUTERS story appeared Feb. 21 on the EXCITE!NEWS Web site at:
http://news.excite.com:80/news/r/000221/12/column-workplace

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Feb. 21 -- If ETHAN CANIN didn't punctuate his conversation with an easy chuckle every so often, it wouldn't be too hard to peg him as the gloomiest critically acclaimed author ever to graduate from Harvard Medical School. Come to think of it, laughs or not, Canin probably doesn't have much competition. He spent his formative years in San Francisco (his father, violinist Stuart Canin, was concertmaster of the S.F. Symphony), and still returns to The City often from his current perch as professor in the prestigious UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP. Just now, he is very close to having a movie made from one of his short stories.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/2000/02/21/STYLE1701.dtl

THE OKLAHOMAN, Feb. 21 -- TOM ROCKLIN, a professor at the University of Iowa, wrote "Downloadable Term Papers: What's a Prof to Do?" In the article, Rocklin said the Internet allows students and instructors to have their works published. But at the same time, their hard-researched work is susceptible to those too lazy to do their own work. "Somehow, the student has come to conclude that the goal is to 'beat' the instructor, to fool the teacher," Rocklin wrote.

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Feb. 21 -- A story on the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's debate over whether to offer benefits to same-sex couples says that nationally about 145 educational institutions have created benefits programs for domestic partners since 1993. They include such private schools as Harvard, Princeton, Yale and Stanford universities, and public institutions such as the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, State University of New York and University of Minnesota.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/022000/neb/sto9

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Feb. 21 -- Death penalty opponents have no clear-cut evidence, such as DNA, that anyone was wrongly sentenced to death in Pennsylvania but claim there is anecdotal evidence that there is a problem with the entire system. They point to a 1998 study that determined that blacks from Philadelphia are four times more likely to receive the death penalty than white defendants charged with similar crimes. That study, by DAVID BALDUS of the University of Iowa College of Law, examined 600 capital cases in the Philadelphia courts from 1983 to 1993 and concluded that race was a significant factor in whether a defendant in a capital case was sentenced to death.
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/regionstate/20000221deathpenalty3.asp

PALM BEACH (Fla.) POST, Feb. 20 -- Electronic checkups enabled a Coralville, Iowa, cafeteria worker to return to work after her 93-year-old mother had brain surgery, says Mary Ann Murray, director of operations at resourceLink of Iowa, a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a unit of Cyber-Care, Boynton Beach, Fla. When nurses began giving the mother videoconference check-ups each morning, her daughter was able to return to work.

THE STAR-LEDGER, Newark, N.J., Feb. 20 -- A University of Iowa research team believes that worms, long considered disgusting intruders, may actually be good for their human hosts. JOEL WEINSTOCK'S team has been studying worms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. IBD is almost unheard of in developing nations where people routinely have worms, but has been growing significantly in the United States and other industrialized countries. Previous research has shown that worms modulate the immune system, preventing it from responding so intensely to pathogens. Without worms, Weinstock's team guessed, the immune system might be more likely to overreact, as it does in autoimmune diseases such as IBD. "They've become part of us," Weinstock said of the worms that have lived in our guts through the millennia. "We're the first population never to experience these worms. Suddenly, our immune system is out of balance." The same Knight-Ridder article ran Feb. 9 in the SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE.

BOSTON GLOBE, Feb. 20 -- A story about poverty -- in particular the difficulty low-income people have finding transportation -- says that after studying the problem, University of Iowa urban planner ALAN PETERS concluded that money spent on job training for poor people would be better spent buying them cars. Per capita spending on transportation can run as low as $1.50 in rural areas and as high as $300 in big cities.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/051/metro/maine.htm

MSNBC, Feb. 19 -- A story exploring the question of whether the Internet is addictive cites a new study from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine that found people who spend an excessive amount of time glued to computer screens as they talk in chat rooms or surf the Web often show signs of personality disorders.

NEWS & OBSERVER, (Raleigh, N.C.), Feb. 18 -- A new study by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro offers the best evidence yet that overweight mothers who breast-feed can diet and exercise without stunting their babies' growth. University of Iowa nutritionist PHYLLIS STUMBO said the study convincingly shows that moderate exercise and dieting by overweight mothers can be safe for their babies. The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 17 in the SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER.

CALGARY (Canada) SUN, Feb. 18 -- A story about independent filmmaker Mark Borchardt, the subject of director Chris Smith's "American Movie," says Smith met producer Sarah Price in a film class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1991.
http://www.canoe.ca:80/JamMovies/feb18_american.html

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) MEDICAL GAZETTE, Feb. 17 -- A research team led by a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE discovered that 94 percent of DNA samples from people with Enhanced S-Cone Syndrome (ESCS) showed mutations in NR2E3, a photoreceptor gene also known as PNR (photoreceptor-specific nuclear receptor). The disorder makes those affected sensitive to blue light and susceptive to developing night blindness at an early age.

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Feb. 17 -- A new study by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro offers the best evidence yet that overweight mothers who breast-feed can diet and exercise without stunting their babies' growth. University of Iowa nutritionist PHYLLIS STUMBO said the study convincingly shows that moderate exercise and dieting by overweight mothers can be safe for their babies.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=021700&ID=s744799&cat=
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Feb. 17 on the USA TODAY Web site and on the MSNBC.COM Web site at:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/370949.asp

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Feb. 17 -- A University of Iowa research team believes that worms, long considered disgusting intruders, may actually be good for their human hosts. JOEL WEINSTOCK'S team has been studying worms and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which includes Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. IBD is almost unheard of in developing nations where people routinely have worms, but has been growing significantly in the United States and other industrialized countries. Previous research has shown that worms modulate the immune system, preventing it from responding so intensely to pathogens. Without worms, Weinstock's team guessed, the immune system might be more likely to overreact, as it does in autoimmune diseases such as IBD. "They've become part of us," Weinstock said of the worms that have lived in our guts through the millennia. "We're the first population never to experience these worms. Suddenly, our immune system is out of balance."
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=021700&ID=s744610&cat=

ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, Feb. 17 -- A new study by the University of North Carolina at Greensboro offers the best evidence yet that overweight mothers who breast-feed can diet and exercise without stunting their babies' growth. University of Iowa nutritionist PHYLLIS STUMBO said the study convincingly shows that moderate exercise and dieting by overweight mothers can be safe for their babies.
http://www.ocregister.com/health/17postpar.shtml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Feb. 17 on the MYRTLE BEACH (S.C.) SUN NEWS Web site at:
http://www.thesunnews.com/news/stories/2049451.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 17 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site, and on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/02/17/national0108EST0422.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 17 on the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE Website at:
http://www.sltrib.com:80/2000/feb/02172000/nation_w/26578.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 16 on the NEWSDAY Web site at:
http://www.newsday.com/ap/rnmphs0t.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 16 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site at:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/thrive/2000/feb/16/021600893.html
The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 16 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site and the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.

DAILY INDEPENDENT (Ridgecrest, Calif.), Feb. 16 -- Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, seeking insights into broader questions about how the brain and the nervous system control blood pressure and the heart, decided to study how alcohol could knock people off their feet. They found that alcohol, combined with the stress caused when one stood up, could cause a drop in blood pressure, even among young people who drank a relatively moderate amount (two or three beers an hour). And that, in turn, can lead to faintness. Their findings appeared in the journal CIRCULATION.
http://www.ridgecrestca.com/news/NScexfo32613.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Feb. 16 -- An article about Tennessee Williams says the playwright penned "Spring Storm" for a class at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the late 1930s. It has a cast of 23 characters and follows four people's dysfunctional quest for love in the fictional town of Port Tyler. According to the late Lyle Leverich, who wrote the 1995 Williams biography, "Tom: The Unknown Tennessee Williams," said that the response to "Spring Storm," or lack thereof, from both teacher and classmates to its initial presentation caused Williams to consider another line of work, like waiting tables. Soon after, he experimented with a bold, salacious, alternate ending, which apparently succeeded only in embarrassing the class. "Well, we all have to paint our nudes," the teacher is said to have sniffed.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB950668213321767234.djm

THE STRAITS (Singapore) TIMES, Feb. 16 -- Patients with antisocial personality disorder (APD) are more likely than other individuals to lie, be impulsive and irresponsible, lack remorse, and commit violence. Study findings by Adrian Raine, Robert Wright Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California, suggest that these patients also have less gray matter than normal in the prefrontal cortex, an area at the front of the brain that plays a role in controlling emotions and behavior, according to a report published in the February issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. In an editorial accompanying the Archives of General Psychiatry study, ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, chairman of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, called the findings "persuasive." But the results, he added, should not be construed to mean that antisocial behavior is "located" in the frontal lobe, but rather that the role of the prefrontal cortex is part of a complex neural system involving many brain regions. THE STRAITS TIMES, Singapore's oldest English-language daily newspaper, is the flagship publication of the publicly listed Singapore Press Holdings group and has a weekday circulation of around 370,000.
http://straitstimes.asia1.com/world/wrld15_0216.html
A separate article on the study, and Damasio's editorial, ran Feb. 16 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/02/16/MN98037.DTL

SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, Feb. 16 -- Patients with antisocial personality disorder (APD) are more likely than other individuals to lie, be impulsive and irresponsible, lack remorse, and commit violence. Study findings by Adrian Raine, Robert Wright Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California, suggest that these patients also have less gray matter than normal in the prefrontal cortex, an area at the front of the brain that plays a role in controlling emotions and behavior, according to a report published in the February issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. In an editorial accompanying the Archives of General Psychiatry study, ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, chairman of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, called the findings "persuasive." But the results, he added, should not be construed to mean that antisocial behavior is "located" in the frontal lobe, but rather that the role of the prefrontal cortex is part of a complex neural system involving many brain regions.

QUEST, Feb. 15 -- A story about extreme sports and people with neuromuscular diseases talks about Rachel Sartin, a Scuba diver who earned a master's degree in computer science at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA before getting a job in Silicon Valley.

NEW YORK TIMES, Feb. 15 -- A study by Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that alcohol seems to stop blood vessels from constricting normally, causing blood pressure to drop and the drinker to become faint and possibly fall down.

YOUR HEALTH, Feb. 15 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, Ph.D., a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, said people are working harder and longer today, despite futurists' predictions decades ago that the turn of the century would find us luxuriating in a leisure culture and putting in fewer work days each week as newer technology made life easier.

NATURAL HOME, Feb. 15 -- MARY SWANDER, a creative writing graduate of the University of Iowa, is the author of an article on growing sprouts.

LIFE@WORK JOURNAL, Feb. 15 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor at the University of Iowa at Iowa City who specializes in the history of work, is quoted. "Job-satisfaction studies over the past 20 years indicate that people are looking for identity, purpose and meaning in their work, but very few are finding those things. That's why people are job-hopping, desperately trying to find the work equivalent of the Holy Grail." The quote was excerpted from an article in FAST COMPANY magazine.

NEW YORK TIMES, Feb. 15 -- Patients with antisocial personality disorder (APD) are more likely than other individuals to lie, be impulsive and irresponsible, lack remorse, and commit violence. Study findings by Adrian Raine, Robert Wright Professor of Psychology at the University of Southern California, suggest that these patients also have less gray matter than normal in the prefrontal cortex, an area at the front of the brain that plays a role in controlling emotions and behavior, according to a report published in the February issue of Archives of General Psychiatry. ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, chairman of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, and his colleagues have demonstrated that patients with injuries to certain parts of the frontal lobe often begin to exhibit antisocial behavior, becoming irresponsible, untrustworthy and inappropriate in social situations. In an editorial accompanying the Archives of General Psychiatry study, Damasio called the findings "persuasive." But the results, he added, should not be construed to mean that antisocial behavior is "located" in the frontal lobe, but rather that the role of the prefrontal cortex is part of a complex neural system involving many brain regions.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/health/021500hth-behavior-brain.html
A separate article on the study, and Damasio's editorial, ran Feb. 15 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-02/15/075l-021500-idx.html
A separate article on the study, and Damasio's editorial, ran Feb. 14 on the FOX NEWS.COM Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com/health/0214/h_rt_0214_20.sml
A separate article on the study, and Damasio's editorial, ran Feb. 14 on the ABCNEWS.COM Web site at:
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/living/DailyNews/antisocials000214.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Feb. 15 -- Researchers at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, seeking insights into broader questions about how the brain and the nervous system control blood pressure and the heart, decided to study how alcohol could knock people off their feet. They found that alcohol, combined with the stress caused when one stood up, could cause a drop in blood pressure, even among young people who drank a relatively moderate amount (two or three beers an hour). And that, in turn, can lead to faintness. Their findings appeared in the journal Circulation.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/health/021500hth-vital-signs.html

ONCOLOGY ISSUES, Feb. 15 -- At the Lung Tumors: A Multidisciplinary Database visitors will find interactive diagnostic aids, including a staging tool that allows clinicians to stage their patients, and a nodule tool that helps clinicians predict the risk of malignancy in pulmonary nodules. The site is part of and developed by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE reports the January 2000 issue of Medicine on the Net.

BUSINESSWEEK.COM, Feb. 15 -- MARY SPREEN, the director of MBA admissions and financial aid at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie School of Management, is interviewed extensively about the UI business school in an article that ran in the magazine's on-line edition. Spreen was interviewed via e-mail, and a transcript of the interview is available at the following link:
http://www.businessweek.com/bschools/index.html

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Feb. 14 -- A University of Utah communications and journalism history professor will become president of Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Wash. Jerilyn McIntyre, 57, received bachelor's and master's degrees in journalism from Stanford and attended the University of Washington in Seattle, where she earned a doctorate in communications in 1973, emphasizing journalism history. She taught four years at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sltrib.com/02142000/utah/25929.htm

TIRE BUSINESS, Akron, Ohio, Feb. 14 -- Former Titan Tire Corp. President Gary Carlson left the company at the end of January to pursue other interests. The current president and CEO, Maurice Taylor Jr., said that last he had talked with Carlson "he was considering working either for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA or in human resources for a private company in the seed business."

FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, Feb. 13 -- An article examining "young adult" books says that in 1967, University of Iowa professor G. ROBERT CARLSEN wrote "Books and the Teenage Reader," which set academic standards for the genre. Carlsen said that good young adult books should be about the problems that young adults deal with in their everyday lives. That idea led to the development of a general description of the genre.

TULSA WORLD, Okla., Feb. 13 -- Commenting on a story about the rush by businesses to cash in on genetic research, JEFFREY MURRAY, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and a participant in the national genome project, says: "It's a legitimate concern that they (businesses) will try and retain some of that information in a proprietary way that will prevent a more general group of researchers from accessing and using it."

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, Feb. 13 -- An article on the University of Arkansas master of fine arts program in creative writing "ranks with the biggest names in the field, including those at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and New York's Columbia University. New York literary agent Elyse Cheney describes the recent graduates of the University of Arkansas as the best crop of writers in the country today."

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Feb. 13 -- An article on San Francisco playwright John O'Keefe's latest play, "Bronte," says O'Keefe also wrote "Sisters of the Wind,'' "The Seduction of Charlotte Bronte'' and "Flowers of Fancy,'' produced at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/02/13/PK73217.DTL

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Feb. 13 -- University of Iowa College of Law professor LEA VANDERVELDE said it was Missouri slave Harriet Scott, not her husband Dred Scott, who probably was the true initiator of the Dred Scott v. Sandford case, in which Dred is credited with petitioning the U.S. Supreme Court for his family's freedom. "One very good clue is the fact that Francis Murdoch, the Scotts' first attorney, was from the little town of Bedford, Pa., where Harriet lived with her former master before she met and married Dred Scott," said VanderVelde, who got the idea for the Harriet Scott project while working on the evolution of labor laws, tracing them from the laws of master and servant. VanderVelde's comments came at a ceremony in St. Louis that commemorated Dred Scott's first petition in 1846 for freedom. Some of the former slaves' descendants and various city dignitaries attended the event. VanderVelde is at work on "Mrs. Dred Scott: A Story of Race and Justice on the Frontier," scheduled to be published soon.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Feb. 11 -- A story about author John McNally says he is the winner of this year's Iowa Short Fiction Prize for his collection of short stories, "Troublemakers." Along with the prize comes publication of his manuscript by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, in October. McNally graduated from Iowa's M.F.A. program 11 years ago and recently earned a Ph.D. in creative writing from the University of Nebraska.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i23/23a02201.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Feb. 11 -- Until this year, federal law prohibited universities from sharing information about student drug and alcohol violations with parents unless their children OK'd it. But the federal law changed in 1998. Colleges and universities around the nation are updating their policies about alcohol and drug use on campus, and Minnesota regents are expected to vote on a rule sometime this summer. In the Big Ten, there's no obvious pattern. Penn State University, Indiana University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- institutions that had incidents involving serious alcohol abuse in recent years, including students who died -- have opted for parent notification. Choosing not to notify parents are the University of Wisconsin, Northwestern University, Michigan State University and Purdue University. Minnesota is undecided so far.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=UNIV11&date=11-Feb-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Feb. 11 -- The Chronicle's Daily Report -- an e-mail sent to subscribers -- reports in its "Magazines and Journals" section a dialogue in the winter issue of the "New England Review" between Roy Scheele, poet in residence at Doane College in Nebraska, and poet W.D. Snodgrass. The item says the pair had plenty to talk about, touching on everything from the famed IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP to winter retreats in Mexico. Snodgrass, who won the 1960 Pulitzer Prize for poetry, praises translation as "a wonderful way to discover what makes a poem work"; notes that writing under time limits helped him be "ruthless with [his] first phrasings"; and characterizes his Iowa teachers as brilliant and profoundly influential but, variously, "dangerous," "difficult," and "basically dishonest." The article is not available online, but more information about the journal may be found at
http://webdelsol.com/New_England_Review/index.htm

USA TODAY, Feb. 10 -- People who compulsively use their computers are more likely than the general population to suffer from other psychiatric problems, says a study by University of Iowa researcher DONALD BLACK. The professor of psychiatry in the Iowa College of Medicine studied 21 Iowans who spent an average 27 hours a week in front of the computer screen, playing games, surfing the Net or in chat rooms.

THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE, Riverside, Calif., Feb. 10 -- TOM LUTZ, an English professor at the University of Iowa, is profiled in an article on his book, "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears." "Tears are sometimes considered pleasurable or profound, and sometimes dangerous, mysterious or deceptive," notes Lutz. The same Knight Ridder article ran Feb. 8 in the DAYTON DAILY NEWS.

CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, Feb. 9 -- Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that alcohol impairs the body's ability to tighten the blood vessels, the natural process that maintains proper blood pressure when a person moves from a sitting to a standing position. A person who has had too much to drink loses the reflex that makes the woozy feeling go away, and passes out.

DETROIT NEWS, Feb. 9 -- Researchers from the Mayo Clinic and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have found that alcohol impairs the body's ability to tighten the blood vessels, the natural process that maintains proper blood pressure when a person moves from a sitting to a standing position. A person who has had too much alcohol loses the reflex that makes the lightheadedness associated with standing too quickly go away, and passes out.
http://detnews.com:80/2000/health/0002/09/02090072.htm

CANOE, Feb. 9 -- An image of the brain provided by the VIRTUAL HOSPITAL of the University of Iowa is used to illustrate an article about sleep-deprivation research published in Thursday's issue of the journal Nature. Researchers from the University of California at San Diego showed that the brain tries to compensate for sleep-deprivation by calling in reinforcements. The researchers found to their surprise that when students took a word memory test after 35 hours without sleep, a normally inactive region of the brain sprang to life and helped out. CANOE is an acronym for Canadian Online Explorer, a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site.
http://www.canoe.ca/CNEWSScience0002/09_brain.html

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Feb. 9 -- A new lawsuit against the tobacco industry accuses the companies of price-fixing, but antitrust experts say the lawyers will have to demonstrate more than just uniformity in prices in order to win the case. "There is a certain arbitrariness," said HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of antitrust law. "Courts look at the evidence and say, 'Well, this looks close enough to an agreement [to fix prices] and we'll call it one.' And other courts look at the same evidence and disagree. There is a spotty won-loss record. There are a lot of reversals."

WASHINGTON POST, Feb. 9 -- A new lawsuit against the tobacco industry accuses the companies of price-fixing, but antitrust experts say the lawyers will have to demonstrate more than just uniformity in prices in order to win the case. "There is a certain arbitrariness," said HERB HOVENKAMP, a UI professor of antitrust law. "Courts look at the evidence and say 'Well, this looks close enough to an agreement [to fix prices] and we'll call it one.' And other courts look at the same evidence and disagree. There is a spotty won-loss record. There are a lot of reversals."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-02/09/065l-020900-idx.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Feb. 9 -- Wake Forest University recently held a marketing competition for M.B.A. students and one of the judges for the student teams' marketing plans was a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA marketing professor.

FOXNEWS.COM, Feb. 9 -- Compulsive computer use is becoming more common and those who fall victim to such compulsion often show signs of personality disorders, say researchers including DONALD BLACK, a UI professor of psychiatry. "These people have a hard time controlling their computer use and give the impression of being 'addicted' to their computer causing all types of problems in their work, personal and social life. From what I can tell based on my small sample, I believe the condition is widespread since I had no trouble finding such people, and most of them had other emotional problems - identifiable mood or anxiety disorders, substance abuse or personality disorders," Black said.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/020800/computer.sml

REUTERS, Feb. 9 -- The new law that allows people with disabilities to go to work with no loss of medical benefits may make 2000 a banner year for them. The Work Incentives Improvement Act, signed by President Clinton last December, "could potentially help thousands of people with disabilities join or rejoin the work force," said PETER BLANCK, UI professor of law and medicine.

ABOUT.COM, Feb. 9 -- BURNS WESTON, UI professor emeritus of law, commented on the future of international human rights, his co-edited book of the same title, and the new UI Center for Human Rights, which he says reflects the "university's commitment to a permanent presence for human rights issues and action on its campus." Weston said he has identified three international human rights trends: an increasing focus on the protection of human rights; an increasing recognition of social economic and cultural rights and an increasing recognition of the right to development; and the growing importance of transnational civil society as a major player in the international human rights promotion and protection movement, spurred in part by the availability of Internet technologies. Weston also commented on the pertinence of the 13 essays that make up "The Future of International Human Rights," recently published and co-edited by Stephen P. Marks, professor, Harvard School of Public Health.
http://humanrights.about.com/culture/humanrights/library/weekly/blweston.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Feb. 8 -- Research by STUART L. WEINSTEIN of the department of orthopedic surgery of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics is cited in a response to a question from a reader who got a brace when he or she was 7 to correct idiopathic scoliosis. The reader asked if this is still standard practice. The response, in part, was: "When treatment is called for, a cast or a device called a Milwaukee brace is widely used. A review of studies on scoliosis and its treatment by (Weinstein) found that the Milwaukee brace, which has been in wide use since the late 1940s, has been the subject of few long-term studies to evaluate its results. Dr. Weinstein also noted that most of the studies did not keep track of the progression of the curvature, making it uncertain whether patients with braces would have gotten worse without it."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/020800sci-qa.html

EETIMES.COM, THE TECHNOLOGY SITE FOR ENGINEERS AND TECHNICAL MANAGEMENT, Feb. 8 -- There's no simple answer for how to cope with the current engineering shortage, according to an evening panel that debated the subject at the International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco Feb. 7. The panel, dubbed "Engineering Resources: Train, Buy or Steal?" came to no final agreement about who is to blame for a lack of skilled designers today -- schools, managers or an economy stretched at its seams. While education took some of the rap for the shortage, an academic in the crowd lashed out at industry. "How many companies recruiting at colleges have in fact invested in any college program," asked a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor. "It's up to companies to invest in university programs. There are a few companies doing this today, but not enough."
http://www.eet.com:80/story/OEG20000207S0053

GO.COM, Feb. 8 -- Despite Republican presidential candidate John McCain's success in the New Hampshire primary, the odds still favor a stand-off between Democratic candidate Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush, according to CSFB, a global investment banking and securities firm, currency strategist Peter von Maydell. Von Maydell said he tracks the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a real-money futures market run by the University of Iowa College of Business, in which contract payoffs depend on economic and political events. "Most commentators are surprised about how well McCain did but New Hampshire has a history of being iconoclastic and trying to vote down the frontrunner," he said. "The Iowa futures price, which has been a very good predictor of election results, shows the market is still betting there is an 80 percent chance of Bush getting the Republican nomination and an 87 percent chance of Gore getting the Democratic one." This is a REUTERS article.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a0929reuff-20000202&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22university+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

WASTE NEWS, Feb. 7 -- A story on the decline in the number of medical waste incinerators mentions the decision to close one at the University of Iowa instead of installing $1 million in pollution controls for environmental compliance. "It was a good analysis, and not choosing to upgrade the incinerator was an obvious choice," UI utilities director DUANE DERAAD said.

GO.COM, Feb. 7 -- The new law that allows people with disabilities to go to work with no loss of medical benefits may make 2000 a banner year for them. The Work Incentives Improvement Act, signed by President Clinton last December, "could potentially help thousands of people with disabilities join or rejoin the work force,'' said PETER BLANCK, professor of law and medicine at the University of Iowa. This is a REUTERS story.
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a1763reuff-20000207&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22university+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486
The same article ran Feb. 7 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site.

USA TODAY, Feb. 7 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is considering establishing a river-research site at the Fairport Fish Hatchery. University scientists envision that students and professors from around the world will study the complex and changing river ecosystem there. Construction on the facility will be finished by mid-2001.

FOXNEWS.COM, Feb. 7 -- People who spend excessive amounts of time glued to computer screens surfing the Web, talking in chat rooms and playing games often show signs of personality disorders, according to a new study. "These people have a hard time controlling their computer use and give the impression of being 'addicted' to their computer, causing all types of problems in their work, personal and social life," the study's lead author, DONALD W. BLACK, of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, told Reuters Health. In a study of 16 men and 5 women who spent an average of 27 hours a week of their free time in front of a computer, Black and his colleagues found that many compulsive computer users feel happy, excited or powerful when using computers. Most admitted, however, that their screen time had interfered with family, friends, work or school, the researchers report in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/020800/computer.sml
The REUTERS article also ran Feb. 7 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000207/hl/bha_27.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Feb. 7 -- NICHOLAS JOHNSON, a former member of the Federal Communications Commission who teaches law at the University of Iowa, said the precedent for the merger between America Online and Time Warner was "the Internet itself, before it was sold off by the government." "The government built it, made it available," Johnson said. "You could move over whatever you wanted to move. There was no content control. It was fully distributed, a flat organization in terms of control, and the thing just ran." Johnson says a government-operated network would "keep us two, three, 10 years ahead of the rest of the world, because it would give us the infrastructure we'd really need, and avoid an incredible amount of wasted time and energy."

WASHINGTON POST, Feb. 7 -- Lincoln McIlravy won a gold medal Sunday night along with two other wrestlers to lead the United States to the FILA Freestyle Wrestling World Cup 2000 championship. McIlravy, a three-time NCAA champion, said he wasn't worried when he was behind in the match. "Going through college at the UNIVERSITYOF IOWA, we train for adversity," McIlravy said. "We train for this type of situation. . . . So I know when my body is tired and hurting, I know he's going to be really hurting."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/2000-02/07/132l-020700-idx.html
McIlravy is also quoted in an article about his gold medal win Feb. 7 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE MAGAZINE, Feb. 6 -- An adapted excerpt from the book "Picturing Utopia: Bertha Shambaugh and the Amana Photographers," by Abigail Foerstner, says that in the summer of 1890, Bertha Horack, a nineteen-year-old UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student, set out to photograph the Amana Colonies, the utopian religious community twenty miles northwest that she had visited several times before on summer visits with her family. She later married political scientist Benjamin Shambaugh, who joined with other maverick young professors to reshape the University of Iowa into its modern academic departments.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/tribunemagazine/article/0,2669,SAV-0002060357,FF.html

KANSAS CITY STAR, Feb. 6 -- The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) governing bodies are working toward legislation that would allow athletes to return to college if their professional pursuits fail. "Should they forever lose their eligibility because they misjudged their ability?" asked CHRISTINE GRANT, chairwoman of the NCAA committee spearheading the movement and director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa. "It seems like that's not fair." Instead, the new legislation probably would penalize the athlete a year of eligibility for every year that he or she spent on the professional circuit.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/home.pat,local/37743639.206,.html

NATIONAL POST, Canada, Feb. 6 -- The idea of trading political contracts like pork-belly futures isn't new. Informal markets have run at countless colleges and universities in the past. "Those markets were just entertainment," says FORREST NELSON, economics professor at University of Iowa's Tippie College of Business. "Someone would put an order book on a coffee table and people would sit around buying and selling contracts." In 1988, Tippie College moved the concept onto the university's mainframe, launching the beginnings of what would become the Iowa Electronic Markets. Also mentioned in the article are ROBERT FORSYTHE, a financial economist, and GEORGE NEUMANN, a labor economist.
http://www.nationalpost.com/content/features/e-xchange/0207001.html

INDIANAPOLIS STAR, Feb. 5 -- A story about TOM LUTZ, author of the recently released Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears, says he's an English professor at the University of Iowa. "Tears are sometimes considered pleasurable, or profound, or deceptive," said Lutz. "In all cultures, some tears, like those we call crocodile tears, are a breach not just of etiquette but of ethics."

USA TODAY, Feb. 4 -- Higher starting salaries apparently are luring away Iowa-educated lawyers. Of the 202 members of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW class of 1998, 61 percent took jobs outside the state. Those who stayed in Iowa earned an average starting salary of $33,000 a year, compared with $59,000 for those who went out of state.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Feb. 4 -- Former University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY is quoted in a feature on Stanley Fish, the dean of the University of Illinois at Chicago's College of Liberal Arts who convinced McCloskey to come to his school. "In a commercial civilization, honor follows pay," says McCloskey, whose well-publicized sex change continues to cause a stir in academe. How much "honor" will she have? About $150,000 worth, if the trustees approve her appointment.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i22/22a00101.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Feb. 4 -- According to a study by two communications scholars in Louisiana, music at odds with your mood may irritate rather than soothe. For couples in conflict, slow, loving songs can have the same effect as salt on a wound. The pair's study will appear next year in Attribution, Communication Behavior, and Close Relationships, a volume from Cambridge University Press edited by Valerie Manusov, a communications professor at the University of Washington, and JOHN H. HARVEY, a psychology scholar at the University of Iowa.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i22/22a02001.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Feb. 4 -- The National Association of Collegiate Women Athletic Administrators is circulating letters supporting the current interpretation of Title IX for its members to send to elected officials, and the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Committee on Women's Athletics has called for a two-year promotional campaign to educate the public on the positive aspects of Title IX. The law is "not a quota system," says CHRISTINE A. GRANT, director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa. "It's a federal law to stop discrimination in an educational system."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i22/22a05501.htm

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Feb. 3-- A brief bio on Wall Street Journal columnist Tom King -- who writes Hollywood Journal for the paper, has authored a new book titled "The Operator: David Geffen Builds, Buys, and Sells the New Hollywood" and who also appears as an entertainment commentator on MSNBC television -- says King joined The Wall Street Journal's New York news bureau in 1986 after graduating that year from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve@6.cgi?newsservices/text/wsjie/data/SB947514049399243062.djm/&NVP=&template=atlas-srch-searchrecent-nf.tmpl&form=atlas-srch-searchrecent-nf.html&from-and=AND&to-and=AND&sort=Article-Doc-Date+desc&qand=&bool_query=%22university+of+Iowa%22&dbname=%26name1%3Ddbname%26name2%3Ddbname%26name3%3Ddbname%26period%3D%3A720&location=article&HI=

NEW YORK TIMES, Feb. 2 -- Harvard legal scholar Laurence Lessig told the judge in the Microsoft antitrust case yesterday that the company's decision to bundle its Web browser into the Windows operating system had "obvious benefits" to computer programmers and consumers. But he then proceeded to provide a legally innovative road map for determining that the bundling strategy violated the law. Some antitrust experts say the Lessig filing may give Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson the legal blueprint he needs for concluding that Microsoft did violate tying law. "Lessig's brief supplies the judge with a sensible rationale for finding there were two products and a tying violation," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa. "But that is not to say that Judge Jackson will do that or, if his ruling is appealed, that the appeals court will buy it."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/02/biztech/articles/02soft.html

USA TODAY, Feb. 2 -- For the first time, researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., believe they have uncovered the complex mechanisms that make people stumble to the ground after overindulging in the spirits. "When you make positional changes, such as going from a sitting to standing position, the maintenance of blood pressure depends on vasoconstriction, or narrowing of the blood vessels," said Ryan L. Cooley, a co-author of the study who now is a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Wisconsin Medical School's campus at Sinai Samaritan Medical Center. "But alcohol appears to disrupt this vasoconstriction, resulting in low blood pressure." As a result, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to vital organs such as the brain and the person may pass out, he said. The study, which appears in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, was conducted at the University of Iowa Medical School. The same Associated Press article ran Feb. 1 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

EXCITE NEWS, Feb. 2 -- Despite Republican presidential candidate John McCain's success in the New Hampshire primary, the odds still favor a stand-off between Democratic candidate Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush, according to CSFB, a global investment banking and securities firm, currency strategist Peter von Maydell. Von Maydell said he tracks the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS, a real-money futures market run by the University of Iowa College of Business, in which contract payoffs depend on economic and political events. "Most commentators are surprised about how well McCain did but New Hampshire has a history of being iconoclastic and trying to vote down the frontrunner," he said. "The Iowa futures price, which has been a very good predictor of election results, shows the market is still betting there is an 80 percent chance of Bush getting the Republican nomination and an 87 percent chance of Gore getting the Democratic one." This is a REUTERS article.

DESERET NEWS (Las Vegas, Nev.), Feb. 2 -- Senators seeking to end legalized gambling on college sports on Tuesday also decided to try to end gambling on the Olympics. A bipartisan group of senators led by Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., and Sam Brownback, R-Kan., had long said they would push a bill to end legalized gambling on high school and college sports - and then also added Olympic sports. An interesting supporter of the bill is Kevin Pendergast, who masterminded a point-shaving scheme five years ago involving Northwestern University - where one student even intentionally fumbled a football to keep scores closer than gamblers predicted in a game with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://deseretnews.com:80/dn/view/0,1249,150010815,00.html?

NANDO TIMES, Feb. 1 -- For the first time, researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., believe they have uncovered the complex mechanisms that make people stumble to the ground after overindulging in spirits. "When you make positional changes, such as going from a sitting to standing position, the maintenance of blood pressure depends on vasoconstriction, or narrowing of the blood vessels," said Ryan L. Cooley, a co-author of the study who now is a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Wisconsin Medical School's campus at Sinai Samaritan Medical Center. "But alcohol appears to disrupt this vasoconstriction, resulting in low blood pressure." As a result, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to vital organs such as the brain and the person may pass out, he said. The study, which appears in CIRCULATION, a journal of the American Heart Association, was conducted at the University of Iowa Medical School. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,500161974-500203919-500922048-0,00.html

BBC.COM, Feb. 1 -- For the first time, researchers from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., believe they have uncovered the complex mechanisms that make people stumble to the ground after overindulging in the spirits. "When you make positional changes, such as going from a sitting to standing position, the maintenance of blood pressure depends on vasoconstriction, or narrowing of the blood vessels," said Ryan L. Cooley, a co-author of the study who now is a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Wisconsin Medical School's campus at Sinai Samaritan Medical Center. "But alcohol appears to disrupt this vasoconstriction, resulting in low blood pressure." As a result, the heart is unable to pump enough blood to vital organs such as the brain and the person may pass out, he said. The study, which appears in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, was conducted at the University of Iowa Medical School.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_625000/625846.stm
The same article appeared Jan. 31 on the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL Web site at:
http://www.jsonline.com/alive/well/jan00/faint01013100.asp

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Feb. 1 -- Microsoft Corp. is adding to its roster of powerful allies in its antitrust trial, with former White House counsels and two former U.S. attorneys general set to argue that the software giant didn't violate any federal laws. An industry trade group, the Washington-based Association for Competitive Technology, confirmed it has been invited to file a " friend of the court" brief on behalf of Microsoft. A Justice Department official declined to comment on the trade association's arguments. The government did not identify whom it invited to write its brief. Experts have speculated on former federal judge Robert Bork, University of Iowa professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP or Washington antitrust lawyer Richard G. Taranto.
http://www.azcentral.com:80/business/0201microsoft01.shtml
The same article appeared Feb. 1 on the FOXNEWS.COM Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com:80/vtech/013100/microsoft.sml
The same article appeared Jan. 31 on the FOXMARKETWIRE.COM Web site at:
http://foxmarketwire.com:80/013100/microsoft.sml
The same article appeared Jan. 31 on the ABCNEWS.COM Web site at:
http://abcnews.go.com:80/sections/tech/DailyNews/microsoft000131.html
The same article appeared Jan. 31 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site at:
http://www.latimes.com/business/microsoft/20000131/tCB00V0964.html

ANESTHESIOLOGY NEWS, February 2000 -- Iowa researchers devised a simple computer program that uses billing data to predict optimum relief strategies for scheduling second-shift anesthesia personnel. The Iowa study, headed by FRANKLIN DEXTER, M.D., Ph.D., asked a simple question: Can relief staffing of operating rooms be economically predicted from available data? The answer was yes.

NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, February 2000 -- The "Pulse of the Planet" program, aired locally on WSUI, featured a five-part series on the work of LAURA GRAHAM, University of Iowa associate professor of anthropology, with the Xavante Indians of central Brazil. Descriptions of each segment are available at http://www.pulseplanet.com/Feb00.html
To hear audio recordings of each segment go to
http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/pulseplanet/ and search for Xavante.

L.A. JAZZ, February 2000 -- Trombonist JOHN RAPSON, who recently released an album with the Oddbar Trio of Iowa City titled "Lost Art Cafe," is in charge of jazz studies at the University of Iowa after having spent 10 years (1980-90) as professor of music theory and composition at Westmont College in Santa Barbara, where he founded a jazz studies program, and acquiring a doctorate in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University in 1993.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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