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UI in the News

December 2000

See UI in the New Archive Index

TWO SPACECRAFT AID KURTH'S JUPITER STUDY (Arizona Republic, Dec. 31)
Scientists have long believed that the magnetic field surrounding Jupiter like an invisible bubble is strongly influenced by the solar wind -- streams of energized particles flowing from the sun and buffeting everything, including planets, that stand in their way. By using two spacecraft, scientists can now test that idea. Cassini can measure changes in the solar wind as Galileo simultaneously monitors the planet's magnetic field, or magnetosphere. Until now, "we've had no weather station upstream in the solar wind to tell us how the magnetosphere might be responding," said WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who is running instruments on both spacecraft. The same LOS ANGELES TIMES article ran Dec. 31 in THE COMMERCIAL APPEAL of Memphis, Tenn.

TWO SPACECRAFT AID KURTH'S JUPITER STUDY (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 31)
Scientists have long believed that the magnetic field surrounding Jupiter like an invisible bubble is strongly influenced by the solar wind -- streams of energized particles flowing from the sun and buffeting everything, including planets, that stand in their way. By using two spacecraft, scientists can now test that idea. Cassini can measure changes in the solar wind as Galileo simultaneously monitors the planet's magnetic field, or magnetosphere. Until now, "we've had no weather station upstream in the solar wind to tell us how the magnetosphere might be responding," said WILLIAM KURTH, a planetary scientist at the University of Iowa who is running instruments on both spacecraft.
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/science/20001231/t000124577.html

CANADIAN ARCTIC EXPLORER STUDIED AT UI (Ottawa Citizen, Canada, Dec. 31)
An article about Vilhjalmur Stefansson, considered Canada's greatest Arctic explorer and pioneer ethnologist, mentions that he studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Stefansson is infamous for leading the doomed voyage of the Karluk. Historians have debated whether the brilliant and ambitious Stefansson deliberately abandoned the Karluk just before the ship was crushed in the ice, leaving her scientists and crew to fend for themselves in the frozen Arctic.
http://www.ottawacitizen.com/national/001231/5024992.html

KURTH COMMENTS ON JUPITER DATA (SPACE.COM, Dec. 30)
For the first time in the history of deep space exploration, spacecraft from two independent robotic missions (Galileo and Cassini) are working in tandem, observing Jupiter at the same time from close range. "We're excited about having two spacecraft operational at Jupiter at the same time," said WILLIAM KURTH, of the University of Iowa and co -investigator for plasma wave instruments on both Galileo and Cassini. Kurth said Cassini acts as an upstream weather station. It monitors the solar wind as it rifles toward Jupiter and the Galileo craft that is flying closer to the planet. "We're able to tie what's coming in from the solar wind to the response of the magnetosphere," he said.

KURTH STUDYING DUAL SPACECRAFT DATA (MSNBC.COM, Dec. 30)
Two NASA spacecraft, Cassini and Galileo, are orbiting Jupiter at the same time and providing data in tandem. Magnetic and plasma-wave data from Cassini and Galileo can be combined to "tie what's coming in from the solar wind with what's going on in the magnetosphere," said University of Iowa researcher WILLIAM KURTH.

ADOLPHS STUDIES BRAIN-EMOTION LINK (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 28)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 28 -- A recent University of Iowa study is the first to investigate human emotion processing by the right prefrontal cortex at the level of individual brain cells. "This kind of single-cell study is very rarely performed in humans," said RALPH ADOLPHS, Ph.D., assistant professor of neurology and principal investigator on the study. The findings appear in the January issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience. In addition to Adolphs, other UI investigators involved in the study included HIROTO KAWASAKI, M.D., post doctoral fellow in neurology, MATTHEW A. HOWARD, M.D., associate professor of surgery and neurology and ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, M.D., Maurice Van Allen Professor of Neurology and head of the department.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/News/wires.nsf/StateRegion/440D776AF35F1F8F862569C30062D32E?OpenDocument

UI SURGEON HOWARD CONDUCTS BRAIN STUDY (Yahoo! News, Dec. 28)
YAHOO! NEWS
, Dec. 28 -- A new University of Iowa study gives a rare glimpse of human brain cells in action as they respond to emotionally stimulating images. In the January 2001 issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience, the UI neurologists took advantage of a rare clinical opportunity to get up close and personal with specific brain cells in an awake, alert human. A 48-year-old man was being prepared for neurosurgery in hopes of treating epileptic seizures that had not responded to medication. To isolate the exact region of the brain that was causing the seizures, epilepsy surgeon Dr. MATTHEW HOWARD inserted two depth electrodes into the patient's brain to monitor seizures and pinpoint the problem. While the electrodes were in place, the researchers showed the man happy, neutral and aversive images, the latter including disturbing images of mutilations and war. Howard and his colleagues were stunned to find that while the happy and neutral images provoked little immediate response, the aversive images provoked reactions in as little as 0.12 seconds, probably faster than the patient was consciously aware of the image.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20001228/hl/a_microscopic_view_of_emotion_1.html

KURTH PRESENTED PLASMA WAVE DATA FROM PROBES (MSNBC, Dec. 27)
MSNBC
, Dec. 27 -- A story about two probes currently orbiting Jupiter -- Cassini and Galileo -- says that scientists from two missions were scheduled to present initial findings from their joint studies of Jupiter at a NASA news briefing Wednesday at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. Among the panel members is the University of Iowa's WILLIAM KURTH, co-investigator for plasma wave instruments on both Galileo and Cassini.
http://www.msnbc.com:80/news/508485.asp?cp1=1

KELLY CHALLENGES LANGUAGE STUDY (Newsday, Dec. 26)
NEWSDAY
, Dec. 26 -- KEVIN KELLY, an anthropologist at the University of Iowa, is the co-author of a never-published letter of protest to the journal Nature regarding a controversial study by University of Auckland researchers Russell Gray and Fiona Jordan, who borrowed a method commonly used by evolutionary biologists to compare the DNA of related organisms and adapted it to compare the words of related Austronesian languages. "I have no problem with using these methods," Kelly said of Jordan and Gray's evolutionary biology approach to language trees. "The one thing that troubles me is that I feel that the lab people are thinking they're going to come in and rescue anthropologists by using these methods," an approach he finds patronizing. "But a lot of times they fall into the same circular arguments that the anthropologists have fallen into."
http://www.newsday.com/coverage/current/discovery/tuesday/nd1901.htm

UI GRAD TO HEAD RAMSEY INVESTIGATION (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 26)
LOS ANGELES TIMES
, Dec. 26 -- Four years after JonBenet Ramsey was found beaten and strangled, a new district attorney is about to take over and is expected to take a fresh look at the unsolved case. Mary Keenan, 50, who has worked on the JonBenet slaying as chief deputy district attorney, will be sworn in as Boulder County district attorney on Jan. 9, succeeding Alex Hunter, who was criticized for not filing charges in the slaying of the 6-year-old beauty queen. Hunter did not seek re-election. Keenan earned her law degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and joined Hunter's office in 1985.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20001226/t000123016.html
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 26 on APB NEWS, an on-line news service covering police and crime news, information and entertainment.
http://www.apbnews.com:80/newscenter/breakingnews/2000/12/26/boulder1226_01.html
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 26 on the Web site of the BERGEN RECORD of New Jersey.
http://www.bergen.com/morenews/jonbnt26200012264.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 26 on the Web site of FOX NEWS.
http://www.foxnews.com:80/national/122600/jonbenet.sml
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 25 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20001225/us/boulder_da_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 25 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=1225AP-BOULDER-DA&date=25-Dec-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 25 on the Web site of the WASHINGTON POST.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A50335-2000Dec25.html
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 25 on the Web site of CNN.
http://www.cnn.com/2000/LAW/12/25/boulder.da.ap/index.html

MCCARTHY LEADS STUDY OF SCHOOL NURSES (Los Angeles Times, Dec. 25)
LOS ANGELES TIME
S, Dec. 25 -- With more kids than ever taking medicine at school for chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, a new study is raising questions about just how well they're being served. Half the school nurses who responded to a nationwide survey reported medication errors in the past year--most commonly missed doses, but also too-large doses or the wrong medicine. "The incidence of medication errors is not acceptable," the study concludes. "Ongoing efforts to develop national guidelines must continue." The University of Iowa nurses and pharmacists who conducted the study in the summer of 1999 sought to determine how often medication errors arise and who's administering those medications. "It's a huge issue. The school nurses are out there almost on their own," said lead author ANN MARIE MCCARTHY, an associate nursing professor at the Iowa College of Nursing.
http://www.latimes.com/news/learning/monday/20001225/t000122724.html

BEZANSON QUOTED IN RULING STORY (National Law Journal, Dec. 25-Jan. 1)
NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL
, Dec. 25-Jan. 1 -- The constitutional principle underlying the U.S. Supreme Court ruling that decided the presidential election might have a life as short as the first Bush presidency. If, after expert examination, the 13-page per curiam decision opinion in Bush v. Gore, No. 00-949 wears well depends on "whether the court can justify in principle and succeed in accomplishing the limitation of its equal protection principle to this case and, essentially, only this case," said former high court clerk RANDALL BEZANSON of the University of Iowa College of Law. Bezanson and others believe it can't. The equal protection clause seems to apply to non-presidential elections as a matter of constitutional principle, Bezanson said. If that's true, what he predicted, "What's coming down the pipeline is a very wide array of challenges in future elections to differences in practice, computer software, in programming instructions and in ballot types from count to county and state to state."

JUDGE RULES IN FAVOR OF EMPLOYEES (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 25)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
, Dec. 25 -- University of Iowa Hospitals' employees rights were violated when the administration revised rules about where and when union fliers could be passed out, a state board has ruled. The ruling last week was the second legal victory for the union representing nurses and other health care personnel at the hospital.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/News/wires.nsf/StateRegion/3B4D5925049D2B48862569C000217FE7?OpenDocument

UI HELPED SOVLE NUG30 (Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Dec. 25)
MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL
, Dec. 25 -- A story about Condor -- a leading software program in peer-to-peer computing invented by a University of Wisconsin-Madison computer scientist -- says that the software was used last summer to solve a mathematical problem that had stumped mathematicians and computer scientists for 32 years. The problem -- called "NUG30" -- is so great that if 1 trillion possibilities were checked each second, it would take more than 100 times the age of the universe to figure it out, according to the researchers who solved the problem. But with the help of Condor, the job took scientists from Northwestern University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and Argonne National Laboratory slightly less than one week. http://www.jsonline.com:80/bym/news/dec00/condor26122500a.asp

WARREN LEADS STUDY ON ELDERLY TOOTH DECAY (Bergen Record, Dec. 25)
BERGEN RECORD
, N. J., Dec. 25 -- People never outgrow tooth decay, University of Iowa research suggests. A study of 342 Iowans older than 79 found that nearly all had some dental problems and nearly a quarter had decay that was untreated. The study was published in the Journal of the American Dental Association. "If population projections and health trends prove true," said Dr. JOHN WARREN, a University of Iowa dentist, "this study sample may represent a microcosm of many future elderly dental patients in their 80s who have many of their teeth, who continue to be at risk of dental caries, and who regularly seek dental care."
http://www.bergen.com:80/yourtime/hbriefs25200012259.htm

DRULIS QUOTED IN 'MILK BANK' STORY (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 24)
CHICAGO TRIBUNE
, Dec. 24 -- A story about the rising popularity of "milk banks" -- a resource for donated breast milk -- quotes JEAN DRULIS, program associate at the Fomon Infant Nutrition Unit at the University of Iowa. Drulis said a milk bank is being planned to serve infants at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, which may open as early as January, depending on funding. "Our ultimate goal is to supply all preemies in Iowa," said Drulis, but there are no plans to ship milk nationally.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0012240320,FF.html

UI SUMMER WRITING PROGRAM CITED (Bergen Record, Dec. 24)
BERGEN RECORD
, N.J., Dec. 24 -- At 89, Henry J. Magaziner has just published his first book. Appropriately, it is about iron. Magaziner, a native Philadelphian and noted architect, is an ironman himself. He didn't start the project until he was 81, and he spent the next eight years researching and writing his coffee-table book, "The Golden Age of Ironwork," published by Skipjack Press. Every summer, he attends a writers' seminar at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, staying with his daughter.
http://www.bergen.com:80/yourtime/ironman20001224.htm

BLOOM'S BOOK 'POSTVILLE' REVIEWED (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 24)
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
, Dec. 24 -- University of Iowa journalism professor STEPHEN G. BLOOM's book Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America is reviewed.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/12/24/RV129918.DTL

MURDER VICTIM WAS UI GRAD (San Jose Mercury News, Dec. 24)
SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS
, Dec. 24 -- A story about the mysterious murder in San Jose, Calif., of a former star schoolgirl athlete and Beijing native, Ping Wang, says Wang married Xuming Chi in 1982, the same year she graduated with a degree in physical education from the Beijing Institute of Physical Education. Chi, a professor, accepted a teaching post in Iowa and the couple moved to the United States in 1987. Wang had enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and earned a master's degree. Later, her family moved to Missouri, then Arizona, where the couple worked at colleges.
http://www0.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/local/docs/pingwang24.htm

HENDRIX HELPS NIH NET DOUBLE-DIGIT FUNDING RAISE (Science, Dec. 22)
MARY HENDRIX
, president of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology and a biomedical researcher in the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in a story reporting that the National Institutes of Health got $2.5 billion in additional funding from Congress. "It's a wonderful outcome . . . when you think of everything we've been worried about over the last several weeks," says Hendrix, one of the leaders of the effort to double NIH's budget. The double-digit increase is the agency's third in a row, Hendrix noted.

SENATOR GRASSLEY IS PROFILED (Wall Street Journal, Dec. 22)
A profile of Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), the incoming chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, notes that "until he ran out of funds, he pursued a doctorate in political science as a young man at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA." "He has a great deal more intellect than he wants to let on," says his professor, Russell Ross," an emeritus professor of political science at the UI.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve@2.cgi?newsservices/text/wsjie/data/SB977441907205252934.djm/&d2hconverter=display-d2h&NVP=&templ

UI ADVISES RUSSIAN CLINICS (New York Times, Dec. 22)
NEW YORK TIMES
, Dec. 22 -- A story about capitalism's impact on health care in Russia says that Meditsina, a 10-story complex a mile north of the Kremlin that is staffed by Russian doctors and American advisers, has opened American-style family-practice clinics in its headquarters and on the suburban campus of Moscow State University – and plans 25 more such clinics. They are advised by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which has sent faculty members and medical residents to work here and trained Meditsina physicians in Iowa. Dr. Sergei A. Rasskazov, the director of family practice, has trained at Harvard University as well as Iowa. He said the clinics aim to combine the talent of Russian doctors with the management know-how of Americans. "Step by step," he said, "we're moving in the proper direction."
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/22/world/22CLIN.html?pagewanted=all

LEE STUDIES CELL PHONE DISTRACTION (USA Today, Dec. 22)
USA TODAY
, Dec. 22 -- A story about the risks posed by talking on cell phones while driving quotes JOHN LEE, a professor who studies cell phone distraction at the University of Iowa. "In general, people have this impression that it isn't dangerous," says Lee. "A lot of people think one of the primary dangers is dialing and then holding the phone with one hand off the wheel. But that's not true." Instead, Lee says the ability to concentrate on the road diminishes because talking on the phone takes more of the brain's processing power. Wireless industry supporters agree that cell phone use is distracting. However, they say it's just a varying degree of distraction.
http://www.usatoday.com:80/life/cyber/tech/cti935.htm

WARREN: ELDERLY AT RISK OF DENTAL DECAY (Sacramento Bee, Dec. 20)
A study of 342 Iowans older than 79 found that nearly all had some dental caries and nearly a quarter had decay that was untreated. "If population projections and health trends prove true, this study sample may represent a microcosm of many future elderly dental patients in their 80s who have many of their teeth, who continue to be at risk of dental caries and who regularly seek dental care," said DR. JOHN WARREN, a University of Iowa dentist.

UI GRAD NOW ABC REPORTER (ABC News, Dec. 20)
ABC NEWS, Dec. 20
-- A story on the network's web site says that Tappy Phillips, a reporter with affiliate WABC Channel 7 in New York, graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA with a bachelor's degree in mass communication and philosophy. Among other accomplishments, Phillips won an Emmy Award for her coverage of the Bensonhurst trial verdict.
http://abcnews.go.com/local/wabc/bio/36426_582000.html

VAN VOORHIS COMMENTS ON EMBRYO DONATIONS (Detroit Free Press, Dec. 19)
DETROIT FREE PRESS, Dec. 19 -- About 5 million to 6 million people of childbearing age battle infertility annually in the United States. Unknown thousands of their embryos are frozen in the nation's 335 or so fertility clinics. Slowly, in a smattering of clinics and through adoption agencies in metro Detroit and elsewhere, doctors are matching unwanted embryos with infertile couples who long for children. Florida and Texas have statutes recognizing embryo donations and making the recipient couple the parents, says Dr. BRAD VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology and infertility at the University of Iowa. Van Voorhis' clinic in Iowa is among those in the United States with the most experience with embryo adoption and has set its own guidelines. http://www.freep.com/news/health/embryo19_20001219.htm

UI IS MENTIONED IN STORY ON DEER CONTROL (Kansas City Star, Dec. 19)
KANSAS CITY STAR, Dec. 19 -- While Kansas City-area officials debate how best to control an overabundance of deer, a college town to the north is taking action. Professional sharpshooters will kill as many as 500 deer this winter in Iowa City, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. They'll do it at night, one at a time, with a single shot to the head from rifles equipped with sound suppressors.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/printer.pat,local/3774ff91.c19,.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES WALDNER BOOK (Boston Review, Dec. 19)
BOSTON REVIEW, Dec. 19 -- A review of the book "A Point Is That Which Has No Part," by Liz Waldner, says it was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu:80/BR25.6/swensen.html

STORY ON SNOW REMOVAL CITES UI CLASS (KELO-TV, Dec. 18)
KELO-TV, N.D.,
Dec. 18 -- A story on the science of snow removal says that there is a graduate level course on snow removal at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A transcript of the report is available on the station's web site.
http://www.kelotv.com/News/Detail.cfm?ID=5404&NewsSet=HomePage

BEZANSON COMMENTS ON HIGH COURT RULING (National Law Journal, Dec. 18)
NATIONAL LAW JOURNAL, Dec. 18 -- When the 2000 presidential election is finally consigned to history's care, will the role of the U.S. Supreme Court be merely a footnote? Maybe, but then again, maybe not. The justices' unsigned opinion on Dec. 4 -- which essentially vacated a Florida Supreme Court ruling and asked for clarification of that ruling in the Gore-Bush recount battle -- was "a perfectly brilliant example of political expediency," whether intentional or not, says former high court law clerk and constitutional law scholar RANDALL BEZANSON of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW. The justices produced a unanimous opinion without resolving the case's federal questions, which clearly and seriously had divided them during oral arguments, explains Bezanson. "I think it's fair to say they did all this for the right reasons and in all the right ways," says Bezanson.

GUSSIN: CONTROVERSY FEEDS DISCUSSION (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 18)
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Dec. 18 -- A columnist reports receiving more than a hundred responses to an earlier column about noted geneticist James Watson, who shared a Nobel Prize for unraveling the structure of DNA. As The Chronicle first reported on Nov. 13, faculty and students at a University of California-Berkeley lecture were flabbergasted when Watson made assertions about the supposed biochemical links between sexuality and skin color, fat and ambition. GARY GUSSIN, a UI professor of biological sciences, wrote that the good thing about the controversial comments is that they "stimulated an awful lot of good discussion that, properly conducted, can teach both students of biology and the public how to distinguish speculation, hypothesis, sound experimentation and rigorous conclusion.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/12/18/BU143282.DTL

LINDER COMMENTS ON OVERTIME LAWS (Columbus, Ohio, Dispatch, Dec. 17)
A story about the toll excessive overtime is taking on workers quotes MARC LINDER, a professor of labor law in the University of Iowa College of Law. "This is an issue that cuts across union and non-union lines and across all types of businesses," Linder said. Under federal law, nothing prevents most employers from demanding that workers put in overtime. The main exception is for workers such as train conductors and airline pilots who, if fatigued, could cause mass catastrophes. "The law says only that after 40 hours, the employer has to pay time-and-a-half," said Linder, author of Moments are the Elements of Profit, which discusses overtime laws.

WARREN SPEAKS ON DENTAL CARE FOR ELDERLY (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 17)
CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 17 -- People never outgrow tooth decay, University of Iowa research suggests. A study of 342 Iowans older than 79 found that nearly all had some dental caries and nearly a quarter had decay that was untreated. The study was published in the Journal of the American Dental Association. "If population projections and health trends prove true," said JOHN WARREN, a UI dentist, "this study sample may represent a microcosm of many future elderly dental patients in their 80s who have many of their teeth, who continue to be at risk of dental caries, and who regularly seek dental care."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0012170466,FF.html

UI MUSEUM HELD DARGER SHOW (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 17)
CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 17 -- A Sunday magazine article about the artist Henry Darger notes that Darger has been the subject of numerous shows, most notably "The Unreality of Being" curated in 1996 by the University of Iowa MUSEUM OF ART.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/tribunemagazine/article/0,2669,SAV-0012170413,FF.html

64-YEAR-OLD STUDENT GRADUATES FROM UI (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 17)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 17 -- At the age of 46, Coralville resident Janet White Cramer enrolled in classes at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, taking one class a semester over the next 18 years. She graduated Saturday with a diploma in liberal studies at the age of 64. "I didn't believe that it was ever going to enhance my career," said Cramer, who worked for 25 years at University Hospital School. "I had a job that I liked very much, so I was really doing this for my own interest."
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/1E66037C1699B66D862569B8007212CD?OpenDocument

UI STUDENTS WANT VOICE ON COUNCIL (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 17)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 17 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student group wants a voice on the City Council. Students for Local Politics began its campaign for the November 2001 council election last week by advertising to journalism students over e-mail the need for a candidate and campaign positions. Council members "aren't really looking at students, the way I see it, so I plan to change that," said freshman Kate Chisholm, of Grand Rapids, Mich., a member of Students for Local Politics. John Lohman, John Calvin Jones and Allen Stroh were all students when they ran for the council in 1997. They all lost in the primary election, each receiving less than 9 percent of the vote.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/294173ADEDD3F1E8862569B90008E237?OpenDocument

IRISH AUTHOR IS WRITER-IN-RESIDENCE (Limerick Leader Online, Dec. 16)
A feature on playwright Mike Finn, who spent three months at the IOWA INTERNATIONAL WRITING PROGRAM on a scholarship, says he was to return to the University of Iowa this February as writer-in-residence for one semester. The writer of the hit play Pigtown was picked to return to the university from among 17 people from around the world who were on the Iowa Writing Program. "I'll primarily be writing, but I will also be there in an ambassadorial capacity. I will travel within the state of Iowa talking to people about the writing program which has been running for the past 30 years and has brought thousands of writers to Iowa," he said. The online edition of the Limerick Leader is a weekly selection of items from the print editions of the Limerick Leader and Limerick Chronicle newspapers, which cover the mid-West of Ireland.
http://www.limerick-leader.ie/issues/20001216/news02.html

COLEMAN: UI TO TRACK Ph.D. RECIPIENTS (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 16)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 16 -- University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN has told the Board of Regents, State of Iowa that officials at the school plan to track the number of doctorate recipients who get academic jobs within six months of graduation. Coleman said the strategic plan will be in effect from 2000 through 2005 and will be used to gauge the university's success.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/AE7788F579558EAD862569B7007206C6?OpenDocument

OLD CAP CLOSED FOR REPAIRS (St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Dec. 16)
ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, Dec. 16 -- The Old Capitol Museum on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA campus will be closed for about a month for repairs. The museum will be closed from Monday through Jan. 16 for maintenance and preservation work, officials said.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/AE7788F579558EAD862569B7007206C6?OpenDocument

UI STUDY EXAMINES TRACKING STOCKS (Savannah Morning News Dec. 16)
SAVANNAH MORNING NEWS, Ga.), Dec. 16 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as equity shares in the same industry. Furthermore, shares of a tracking stock cannot be acquired if another company buys the operations they reflect. Therefore, tracking stock shareholders can never receive the often-large premiums takeovers generate for equity shareholders.
http://www.savannahmorningnews.com:80/exchange/stories/121600/INVstreetwise.shtml

VIJH STUDY IS CITED (CBS Marketwatch, Dec. 16)
An oft-cited 1997 study by University of Iowa finance professors Timothy Loughran and ANAND M. VIJH looked at 947 companies between 1970 and 1989, studying the performance of their stocks five years after acquisitions. Companies that engaged in stock-based transactions saw their value sink 25 percent on average, while companies that used cash rose 62 percent. Also, hostile takeovers tended to fare better than friendly deals. According to Vijh, acquirers involved in stock-based transactions appear more likely to "overpay," cutting deals when their stocks may be overvalued.

UI LAW LIBRARY RANKED NO. 2 IN NATION (National Jurist, Dec. 15)
The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW'S LIBRARY was ranked second in the nation out of 178 law school libraries, coming in just under Harvard Law School's library. The publication said the University of Iowa "held its own in most collection and comfort categories -- in addition to offering the most professional staff help weekly with 104 hours." The law libraries were ranked by number of books, space and staffed hours.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 15 --
An article about author Flannery O'Connor said she left Milledgeville, Ga., in 1945 to study journalism at the State University of Iowa (now the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA). Once there, she dropped journalism and joined the Iowa Writers' Workshop. Throughout her four years in Iowa, she kept abreast of goings-on by maintaining a subscription to her hometown newspaper and corresponding with her mother on a daily basis. O'Connor left Iowa with a master's degree in 1948.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i16/16b01401.htm

HOLDEN FAMILY DONATION CITED (Chronicle of Higher Education, Dec. 15)
CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION
, Dec. 15 -- The paper's Gifts and Bequests column includes the $25 million gift to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA CANCER CENTER by the Holden family.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i16/16a04503.htm

BILLETT, VIJH STUDY TRACKING STOCKS (Journal Record, Oklahoma City, Dec. 14
In a study published last March, MATTHEW BILLETT and ANAND VIJH, of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, analyzed the returns of 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999. The researchers found that on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year for the first three years after their issue, while the return of an index of their peers was far higher: 18.1 percent per year. The overall market trounced them all, rising 21 percent a year, on average.

TEMPLE LED INNER-CITY SERVICE PROJECT (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dec. 14)
ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH
, Dec. 14 -- A service project led by a psychologist now with University of Iowa Health Care is providing insight into how counseling helps inner-city youth better deal with bereavement associated with violence and how other interventions might help reduce the violence altogether. The project was conducted in conjunction with an anti-crime group in Kansas City, Mo. SCOTT D. TEMPLE, Ph.D., UI associate professor (clinical) of psychiatry since 1999, led the service project from 1994 to 1997 while he was on the faculty of the University of Kansas Medical Center. Temple published a paper on the community and policy implications of his clinical experience in the November issue of the Journal of Community Psychology. http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/5D0B741A0576B701862569B5005F7782?OpenDocument

VAN VOORHIS LEADS STUDY ON POLYPS (Yahoo! News, Dec. 14)
YAHOO! NEWS, Dec. 14 -- As they near menopause, some women who suffer abnormal menstrual bleeding may not benefit from the hormone pills or surgery most doctors recommend. New research suggests the bleeding, one of the most common symptoms in the years leading up to menopause, may be the result of endometrial polyps, normally benign growths that develop within the uterus, usually in women over age 35. Many experts now believe that when polyps do cause the bleeding, which can be heavy and last more than 14 days each month, all that's necessary is a relatively simple, in-office procedure to remove them. That's the conclusion of researchers at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, whose new study is published in the December issue of Obstetrics and Gynecology. "We retrospectively analyzed 58 women who had been diagnosed with both dysfunctional uterine bleeding and endometrial polyps," says study co-author Dr. BRADLEY J. VAN VOORHIS, director of reproductive endocrinology at the medical school.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20001215/hl/polyps_can_cause_menopause_symptom_1.html

UI RESEARCHERS STUDY TRACKING STOCKS (The Age, Dec. 13)
THE AGE, (Melbourne, Australia), Dec. 13 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as shares of other companies in the same industry. Tracking stocks can pose risks for investors and for the parent companies.
http://www.theage.com.au:80/business/2000/12/13/FFX64ZRFMGC.html

BILLETT, VIJH ON TRACKING STOCKS (International Herald Tribune, Dec. 13)
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE
, Dec. 13 -- University of Iowa academics found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as shares of other companies in the same industry. And tracking stocks can pose other risks for investors and for the parent companies. In a study published in March, MATTHEW T. BILLETT and ANAND M. VIJH of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business analyzed the returns of 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999. They found that on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year in the first three years after their issuance, while the return of an index of their peers was far higher: 18.1 percent a year. The overall market trounced them all, rising 21 percent a year, on average.
http://www.iht.com:80/articles/4213.htm

BEZANSON COMMENTS ON HIGH COURT RULING (New York Times, Dec. 13)
NEW YORK TIMES
, Dec. 13 -- In the national spotlight as it has not been in many years, the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday night gave the country a decision that seemed to end one man's quest for the presidency while exposing itself to unusually harsh criticism. RANDALL BEZANSON, University of Iowa College of Law constitutional law expert, said there was a "certain strange ironic twist" to the decision because it was based on the Supreme Court's determination that the Florida Legislature intended all election contest battles to be completed by Dec. 12, the date under federal law when election contests are to be completed. That federal law says that if a state makes its final selection of electors by Dec. 12, that decision will be considered definitive if there is a battle later in Congress. But Bezanson said the United States Supreme Court based its decision in part on the previous decisions of the Florida Supreme Court, which the justices in Washington had overturned.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/13/politics/13LAW.html

UI STUDENT DIED OF HEART CONDITION (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dec. 13)
ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH
, Dec. 13 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA junior found dead in his dorm room died of a heart condition, the Johnson County medical examiner said in closing the investigation into the death. Justin Reschly, 20, of Wayland was found dead in his bed by his roommate on Sept. 25. Medical examiner T.T. Bozek on Tuesday said that Reschly likely suffered from a previously undetected abnormal heart rhythm.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/A43B3F6EE2D1AC4A862569B4007D3F8C?OpenDocument

GURNETT TO PRESENT AT CONFERENCE (St. Louis Post Dispatch, Dec. 13)
ST. LOUIS POST DISPATCH
, Dec. 13 -- The most distant human-made object, NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft, and its twin, Voyager 2, are providing information about a part of space never explored before, and scientists will be reporting some of that information at a meeting in San Francisco from Dec. 15 to 19. Research that will be presented during the fall meeting of the American Geophysical Union include the detection of microscopic dust particles in the outer heliosphere that likely come from comets or from interstellar space, research that will be presented by Dr. DONALD GURNETT and others at the University of Iowa.
http://www.postnet.com/postnet/news/wires.nsf/StateRegion/5E0CB3076242B31E862569B50009AD79?OpenDocument

UI STUDENT GOVERNMENT COMMENTS ON FEES (Yahoo! News, Dec. 13)
YAHOO! NEWS
, Dec. 13 -- A federal judge has declared unconstitutional the University of Wisconsin's mandatory student fees to support campus groups. U.S. District Judge John Shabaz -- a former Republican state legislator and the judge who had struck down the fee system in the first round in 1996 -- struck it down once again on December 8, declaring that the elected student representatives were acting as "government officials" with insufficient boundaries on their discretion in funds distribution to ensure its viewpoint neutrality. THE UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S STUDENT GOVERNMENT believes it is safe from the concerns Shabaz has raised because it allows students the option of contributing $2 to $5 less than the usual $17.50 mandatory contribution towards general student organizations -- an option only a handful use each year. (UI also does not fund groups supporting political candidates or referenda.) Planet Out is a section on the Yahoo! News web site where news of interest to gays and lesbians is compiled.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/po/20001212/co/judge_nixes_uw_student_fees_1.html

UI ALUM 'INTERPRETS' DENNIS MILLER (San Francisco Chronicle, Dec. 13)
SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE
, Dec. 13 -- With a notepad in hand and the VCR rolling, Locke Peterseim springs into place in front of his television on Monday nights during the NFL season. Peterseim is the Britannica.com arts and entertainment editor whose job is to interpret Dennis Miller's obscure references on "MNF" and post them the next day on his employer's "The Annotated Dennis Miller" online section. Peterseim, who has been a fan of Miller's stand-up routine from his college days at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, created "The Annotated Dennis Miller" as one of Britannica.com staff's content projects.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/12/13/SP162250.DTL

ZEBROWSKI IN VIDEO TO HELP STUTTERERS (Sidney Daily News, Dec. 13)
A new video designed to help parents, teachers and speech-language pathologists assist elementary school-age stutterers features PATRICIA ZEBROWSKI, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa. The video features students from first through sixth grade, some of whom talk about their experiences with stuttering. They talk openly about the teasing they face from classmates and how their stuttering sometimes makes them feel about themselves.

UI STUDY: PSYCHOTHERAPY AIDS DEPRESSION (Sacramento Bee, Dec. 13)
Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA studied the effects of psychotherapy on 99 postpartum women with major depression. About 40 percent of the women who received psychotherapy recovered from their depression by the end of 12 weeks, compared to about 14 percent of those on a waiting list. The study was one of the few to assess the effectiveness of psychotherapy as an alternative to antidepressant drugs.

UI RESEARCHERS STUDY TRACKING STOCKS (St. Petersburg Times, Dec. 13)
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA
researchers found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as shares of other companies in the same industry. Tracking stocks can pose risks for investors and for the parent companies.

UI POLITICAL MARKET CITED (Business 2.0, Dec. 12)
A story about the many opportunities for wagering on the outcome of future events says there are political markets that allow "investing" in candidates, and that the best known market is at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

BILLETT, VIJH STUDY TRACKING STOCKS (Palm Beach Post, Dec. 12)
University of Iowa academics found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as shares of other companies in the same industry. And tracking stocks can pose other risks for investors and for the parent companies. In a study published in March, MATTHEW T. BILLETT and ANAND M. VIJH of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business analyzed the returns of 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999. They found that on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year in the first three years after their issuance, while the return of an index of their peers was far higher: 18.1 percent a year. The overall market trounced them all, rising 21 percent a year, on average.

BILLETT, VIJH STUDY TRACKING STOCKS (New York Times, Dec. 12)
NEW YORK TIMES
, Dec. 12 -- University of Iowa academics found that tracking stocks do not perform as well as shares of other companies in the same industry. And tracking stocks can pose other risks for investors and for the parent companies. In a study published in March, MATTHEW T. BILLETT and ANAND M. VIJH of the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business analyzed the returns of 28 tracking stocks issued before 1999. They found that on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year in the first three years after their issuance, while the return of an index of their peers was far higher: 18.1 percent a year. The overall market trounced them all, rising 21 percent a year, on average.
http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/12/business/12PLAC.html

PHOTO FEATURES UI' SETTERQUIST (The Monitor, Dec. 12)
THE MONITOR
, McAllen, Texas, Dec. 12 -- The paper ran an Associated Press photo, with a caption, of SHARON SETTERQUIST, who works at the JOHN W. ECKSTEIN MEDICAL RESEARCH BUILDING at the University of Iowa, riding her bike down a snow-covered street. The caption said the university remained opened in spite of the snow, while area schools were closed because of a winter storm that affected large portions of the state.

UI OFFERS SNOW, ICE TIPS VIA WEB (New England Construction, Dec. 11)
Interested in discussing the merits of various de-icing and anti-icing chemicals or the latest in snow and ice control methods and materials? You can find all of this and more on the Snow and Ice List Serve maintained by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The List Serve currently has about 400 subscribers, many of whom work for state, city and county agencies.

UI PHARMACY GRADUATE IN BIG DEMAND (Crain's Chicago Business, Dec. 11)
Months before pharmacist Craig Daggett graduated from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in May, 25 drugstores, retailers and other companies were bombarding him with job offers. Many tried to lure him with signing bonuses as high as $20,000.

UI'S PRICE NOTES TAX DISPARITIES FOR GAYS (Detroit News, Dec. 11)
DETROIT NEWS, Dec, 11 -- Federal tax laws, in effect, force gay and lesbian couples into a reporting stance that is not reflective of their day-to-day lives, notes PATRICIA CAIN, a University of Iowa law professor in a 16-year lesbian relationship. Cain is taking a leading role in spotlighting the extra burdens that gay couples must shoulder because the tax code insists on the fiction that the partners are single. In the article, she lists several examples that illustrate how the tax codes favor legally married couples. http://www.detnews.com/EDITPAGE/0012/11/price/price.htm

STONE STUDIES MACULAR DEGENERATION (Albuquerque Journal, Dec. 11)
ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL
, (N.M.), Dec. 11 -- Macular degeneration will become increasingly widespread with the aging of the population. From an estimated 2.7 million cases in the United States in 1970, the number of cases is expected to soar to 7.5 million by 2030. "It's not somebody else's problem. It's our problem," said Dr. EDWIN STONE, director of the Iowa Center for Macular Degeneration and professor of ophthalmology at the University of Iowa. "It's going to become a really catastrophic social problem." Stone's focus has been on genetic research for macular degeneration -- that's where many scientists suspect a lot of promise may lie for treatment and prevention.
http://www.abqjournal.com:80/health/196610health12-11-00.htm

GPS UNITS COULD HELP COLLECT ROAD TAX (Cleveland Plain Dealer, Dec. 10)
People are using Global Positioning System (GPS) units now to find their way through unfamiliar cities. But the devices could be modified to collect tax data as well, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the UI. With the maps in the GPS unit's database, the computer could keep a record of how many miles each car or truck traveled. Drivers could be required to periodically download that data to a government computer network, perhaps at terminals installed in gas stations, Forkenbrock said. Then a central government clearinghouse would analyze the data and mail all drivers bills assessing them a tax for miles driven in each state. Similar articles appeared Dec. 10 the Grand Rapids (Mich.) Press, the Bergen Record (Bergen County, N.J.).

VAN ALLEN COMMENTS ON PIONEER 10 SPACECRAFT (Baltimore Sun, Dec. 10)
BALTIMORE SUN
, Dec. 10 -- A story about the Pioneer 10 spacecraft, a project NASA shut down 25 years after it was launched, quotes JAMES VAN ALLEN, the noted University of Iowa physics professor. "As far as headquarters are concerned, it's considered dead," says Van Allen, who has been involved with the Pioneer 10 mission for more than 30 years. Van Allen helped design the first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, and discovered the radiation belts around Earth that now bear his name. Yet the 86-year-old astrophysicist says Pioneer 10 holds a special place in his heart. "It's been my old friend all these years, the most important part of my professional life since 1969," he says. http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150520209023

BUSH ATTORNEY'S SON ATTENDS UI (Chicago Tribune, Dec. 10)
CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Dec. 10 -- A feature on Chicago attorney Phil Beck, who was asked to join the legal team of Texas Gov. George W. Bush in his battle for the presidency, says that Beck's increased visibility since appearing on TV has had an effect on his family. "My 16-year-old claims he should be able to stay home from school to watch me," Beck said. And his 19-year-old "frat boy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was apparently sitting there whooping and hollering at his dad."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/columnists/warren/article/0,1122,SAV-0012100280,00.html

UI GRAD/ARTIST CATLETT FEATURED (Sacramento Bee, Dec. 10)
SACRAMENTO BEE, Dec. 10 -- Included among the capsule biographies of five notable African American artists whose work will be on display at the Crocker Art Museum in Sacramento is Elizabeth Catlett (1915- present), who earned a master of fine arts degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she studied with regionalist painter Grant Wood.
http://www.sacbee.com:80/lifestyle/news/lifestyle17_20001210.html

NATHAN QUOTED IN STORY ABOUT GAMBLING (Sun-Herald, Dec. 10)
SUN-HERALD, Biloxi, Miss., Dec. 10 -- A story about the rise in gambling quotes PETER NATHAN, a University of Iowa professor who has done substance abuse studies for the alcohol and beverage industries. The story says government-sponsored research has come up with lower estimates of pathological gambling in the country than studies by the National Center for Responsible Gaming. "I have never worked with an industry more careful and more committed to leaving the scientists room to do their thing," Nathan says.
http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net:80/business/docs/inside121000.htm

BLOOM'S BOOK 'POSTVILLE' REVIEWED (Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Dec. 8)
FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, Dec. 8 -- "It sounded like a Jackie Mason joke, a crack about the unlucky thirteenth tribe of Jews," STEPHEN G. BLOOM recalls in 'Postville: A Clash of Cultures in Heartland America.' "Hasidic Jews, in their long black coats and black hats, in rural Iowa where pigs outnumber people by almost five to one?" When Bloom, a University of Iowa faculty member, read about a group of Lubavitchers who had established a successful kosher slaughterhouse in a small town, the former reporter saw more than an intriguing story -- he saw a chance to reconnect with others of his Jewish heritage.
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:FAITH3/1:FAITH31208100.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 8 --
A story about last week's meeting of the Knight Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics says members were very interested in the National Basketball Association's plans to start a minor league for college-age players. MARY SUE COLEMAN, a panelist and the president of the University of Iowa, raised a question during the meeting: "Why not take 18-year-olds" straight out of high school? That would give athletes with no interest in college another option, she said.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i15/15a04301.htm

SUN HERALD (Biloxi, Miss.), Dec. 7 --
Only about 1 percent of the nation's 2.7 million pathological gamblers are seeking treatment for their affliction, experts believe, a rate far lower than the 10 percent of alcoholics who seek help for their addiction. "The data on alcoholism is sobering," PETER NATHAN, a psychology professor at the University of Iowa, told academics, researchers and clinicians attending a conference on gambling disorders this week at the MGM Grand hotel-casino in Las Vegas. "The data on pathological gambling is even less encouraging. Most alcoholics who do recover do so on their own, with neither treatment nor participation in AA (Alcoholics Anonymous)," Nathan told some 200 attendees at the conference. "Probably we can assume similar mechanisms are taking place with pathological gambling." But researchers are uneasy about drawing conclusions based on suspected links between substance abusers and pathological gamblers. "I'm uncomfortable with it because we're dealing with substances that affect chemistry in the brain," Nathan said.
http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net/business/docs/problem120700.htm

DOW JONES NEWSWIRE, Dec. 6 --
A story about the European Central Bank and the struggling euro says that politics may further undermine the currency. Kenneth Landon, senior currency strategist at Deutsche Bank, says that the George W. Bush and Al Gore futures contracts traded on the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET (IEM), which has given accurate predictions for U.S. presidential election results in the past, currently indicates a Bush victory. Landon said that a Bush victory would be very bullish for the dollar against the yen, provided that Bush appoints a U.S. Treasury Secretary who favors a strong-dollar policy. A Bush victory, according to Landon, would be good for business, and make the investment environment in the U.S. more appealing to foreign investors.

WASHINGTON POST, Dec. 6 --
A Naval Academy midshipman whose attention was diverted when he began dialing his cellular telephone might as well have been driving while intoxicated, an expert witness testified yesterday in the first-ever U.S. vehicular homicide trial involving a driver distracted by a cellphone. JOHN LEE, a professor at the University of Iowa who has written dozens of articles about driver distraction, said that the demands of trying to hold a conversation on a cellphone, coupled with racing down a highway, clearly exceed a motorist's capabilities. "I believe that cellphones pose a threat to drivers," said Lee, who holds a doctorate in mechanical engineering. "It's comparable to being intoxicated."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A29414-2000Dec5.html

HARUF STUDIED AT WRITERS' WORKSHOP (Boston Herald, December 2000)
BOSTON HERALD
, December 2000 -- For its book of the month club for December, the paper selected "Plainsong," by Kent Haruf. A brief bio of the author says Haruf received a fellowship to study at the IOWA WRITERS WORKSHOP.
http://www.bostonherald.com/bostonherald/book_club.html

UI PRESS PUBLISHES 'EMBODIED MEMORY' (American Theatre, Nov. 15)
AMERICAN THEATRE, Nov. 15 -- A story about the book Embodied Memory: The Theatre of George Tabori, by Anat Feinberg, says the book was published by the UNVIERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

REITZ COMMENTS ON ELECTION (Albuquerque Journal, Nov. 7)
ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL, Nov. 7 -- With opinion polls suggesting the presidential election is too close to call, another barometer of voter sentiment is looking equally murky: Wall Street. There are two basic theories of how the stock market affects voters, explains TOM RIETZ, a University of Iowa professor. The first is that Americans vote according to their pocketbooks, and incumbents benefit when voters have a lot to spend and are feeling prosperous. "The alternate theory is that ... how people vote depends on how confident they are in the future of the economy and stock market," said Reitz, who also believes the presidential race is too tight to predict. "If you believe that the stock market reflects how people feel about the future, then you should see a correlation between its performance and the vote."

RABINOVITZ STUDIED AMUSEMENT PARKS (Chicago Sun-Times, Nov. 6)
CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Nov. 6 -- LAREN RABINOVITZ, professor of American studies at the University of Iowa, conducted a two-year, $175,000 study of amusement parks and their effect on society. "They are a link to our past and future, so that we can view where we've been and where we're going," Rabinovitz concluded.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Nov. 5 --
A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study of 28 tracking stocks issued before the end of 1998 reported less than impressive results. The study found, on average, tracking stocks earned 11.7 percent a year, compared to 21 percent for the overall market. With Sprint PCS, the tracking stock's annual average fell to 5.7 percent. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 5 in the COMMERCIAL APPEAL of Memphis, Tenn., and the STAR-LEDGER of Newark, N.J.

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Dec. 5 --
Even if Illinois' tollways remain fee-based, carrying around dimes and quarters and subscribing to I-PASS someday might be unnecessary. The agency overseeing the system recently began discussing an idea that would enlist satellites and onboard vehicle computers to electronically tally the number of miles driven on toll roads, and charge people based on the mileage and roads used. Many state agencies want to know more about the idea because they are concerned gas tax revenues will dry up as cars become more fuel efficient and rely on alternative fuels, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/news/toll05.html

BALTIMORE SUN, Dec. 5 --
Overseas betting houses do a thriving business when U.S. elections roll around, and this year has been no different -- except for the fact that payoffs have been tied up for almost a month. Millions of dollars are being held in limbo as lawyers for Al Gore and George W. Bush duke it out in court, while bookies in England, Ireland, Antigua and Australia are fielding calls from customers impatient for their winnings. Perhaps the only futures market not embroiled in the current political crisis is at the University of Iowa business school's nonprofit Iowa Electronic Market. The market, which allows investors to speculate on the outcome of elections and other political issues (to a maximum of $500), shut down on Nov. 10. Those with winnings have already collected. But that's because the school, which has government approval to run the market for research purposes, had the foresight to limit its definition of winner. Their victor? Al Gore. "It's the first reported popular vote," says THOMAS RIETZ, an associate professor of finance. "We decided that specifically so we wouldn't have this kind of mess."
http://www.sunspot.net/content/archive/story?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150520206323

ENGLE'S REVIEW BOLSTERED BROOKS' CAREER (New York Times, Dec. 5)
NEW YORK TIMES, Dec. 5 -- A story about the death of Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Gwendolyn Brooks at the age of 83 quotes her as saying her reputation was bolstered by a review in the Chicago Tribune of her poetry collection "A Street in Bronzeville." The review was written by PAUL ENGLE, a poet and founder of the IOWA WRITERS SCHOOL. Engle maintained that Brooks' poems were no more "Negro poetry" than Robert Frost's poetry was "white poetry."

FORKENBROCK QUOTED ON TOLL ALTERNATIVE (Chicago Sun-Times, Dec. 5)
Several Midwest states are studying the feasibility of a project that would use satellites and onboard vehicle computers to electronically tally the number of miles driven on toll roads, and charge people based on the mileage and roads used. Many state agencies want to know more about the idea because they are concerned gas tax revenues will dry up as cars become more fuel efficient and rely on alternative fuels, said DAVID FORKENBROCK, director of the Public Policy Center at the University of Iowa.

ANDREASEN WINS LIEBER PRIZE FOR RESEARCH (Newsday, Dec. 4)
The National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression, a Great Neck, N.Y.-based non-profit organization, recently hosted its Gala Awards dinner, raising $800,000 for research. NANCY ANDREASEN of the University of Iowa College of Medicine received the organization's Lieber Prize for schizophrenia research.

HOVENKAMP COMMENTS ON MICROSOFT JUDGE (Computer World, Dec. 4)
HERB HOVENKAMP
, a law professor at the University of Iowa and an antitrust expert, says that if the courts impose a breakup of Microsoft, the details will be worked out by the two parties. But trial judge Thomas Penfield Jackson "would become effectively the manager, while [the] parties develop a breakup proposal," Hovenkamp said.

PASCARELLA COMMENTS ON UNDERGRADUATE STUDY (Time, Dec. 4)
TIME
, Dec. 4 -- Backed by a grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts, researchers have designed a questionnaire to probe the frequency with which students engage in activities that studies have shown to be important to learning. By establishing a set of comparative standards, the researchers hope to change the subject of the college conversation from status -- based on popular rankings -- to quality. So far, they seem to be succeeding. "They're getting closer to the actual kinds of things that go on in a person's undergraduate life, and that's important," says University of Iowa professor ERNEST PASCARELLA.
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,89547,00.html

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT, Dec. 4 --
A special report on the best Web sites cites The Hardin Meta Directory, which the magazine calls the "healthcare list of lists." It says The Directory holds massive catalogs of medical Web sites. "Mine them for advice, including preferred treatment for athlete's foot and referrals for hospice nurses," the article says. "The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA group that runs Hardin will list a site only if 80 percent of its links are active and relevant -- a sign the site is well maintained."

TIME, Dec. 4 --
Two Americans working in the Alps come up with a plan to merge two widely used scanning devices--the PET and the CT--into one. Electrical engineer Ronald Nutt and physicist David Townsend, working at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, had just taken the cover off their newly developed metabolic-imaging machine and were admiring its innards when an oncology surgeon happened by. "You have a lot of space between those detectors," he offered. "You ought to try to put something in there that would be useful." Last October the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the marketing of a combination PET/CT machine, the first medical-imaging device that simultaneously and clearly reveals both anatomical details and metabolic processes within the body. By early next year the new scanners will be installed at Manhattan's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Indiana University, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and other medical facilities.
http://www.time.com:80/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,89549,00.html

VIRGINIAN-PILOT, Dec. 4 --
A story about plans to move the battleship Wisconsin to the Hampton Roads Naval Museum in Nauticus, Va., next to the National Maritime Center, says curator David Kohnen of the USS Wisconsin Foundation at Nauticus is a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://www.pilotonline.com/military/ml1204bio.html

USA TODAY, Dec. 3 --
Twelve individuals from six scientific disciplines received the National Medal of Science on Dec. 1. Created by Congress in 1959, the medal is administered by the National Science Foundation. Among the recipients was NANCY C. ANDREASEN of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Andreasen pioneered studies that capture images of brain activity during mental processes such as memory and creativity. http://www.usatoday.com/weather/science/prizes/ntlmedal120300.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 4 on the YAHOO NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ap/20001201/us/medal_winners_1.html
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 1 on the Web site of the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE.
The same Associated Press article ran Dec. 1 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/12/01/national1858EST0806.DTL

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Dec. 3 --
Josh Emmons, currently at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, reviews two books by author Payne Aivia, Frisco Pigeon Mambo and Revolting Youth.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/12/03/RV75623.DTL

SUN-HERALD, Biloxi, Miss., Dec. 3 --
Dr. Roy L. Irons, dentist and owner of Gulf Coast Dental Center in Gulfport, has been named to the Tougaloo College Hall of Fame in the field of medicine. A native of Corinth, Miss., Irons is a 1972 chemistry graduate of Tougaloo. He received his doctor of dental surgery degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY in 1976. http://vh60009.vh6.infi.net:80/living/docs/goodnews120300.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, Dec. 2 --
A story about the new Bellevue Art Museum in Washington State says that the architect -- New York-based, Bremerton-bred architect Steven Holl's domestic projects range from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. http://archives.seattletimes.nwsource.com:80/cgi-bin/texis/web/vortex/display?slug=pholl03&date=20001202

YAHOO! NEWS, Dec. 2 --
A story about the latest poll asking the public whom they think really won the election says that MICHAEL LEWIS-BECK of the University of Iowa, a maker of forecasting models, predicted that Al Gore would win the presidency with an electoral victory of 398-140. http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/ucrr/20001202/cm/what_s_wrong_with_al_gore_1.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Dec. 1 --
The New Brighton woman arrested in the killing of her mother Wednesday has a troubled past, including a suicide threat and alcohol problems, police records say. Police said they are reviewing the 44-year-old suspect's history for clues that might explain the fatal shooting of Marcella Wieczorek, 81. The suspect's sister Jane Massie was shot in the chest. Last April, police notified the woman that her older son, a student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, had killed himself.
http://webserv6.startribune.com:80/stOnLine/cgibin/article?thisSlug=HOMI01&date=01-Dec-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 1 --
James O. Freedman, identified as president emeritus of Dartmouth College and of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is the author of an article on anti-Semitism on the campuses of elite colleges and universities.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i14/14b00701.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Dec. 1 --
Next year, the NCAA will have to face a former football player, Michael Bowers, at trial to decide whether he was denied the chance to play college football because of learning disabilities. The federal disabilities law forbids discrimination against people with physical or mental difficulties in public places, whether they be universities or private clubs. In this case, Bowers sued the NCAA, Temple University, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, among other parties, because he believed the universities stopped recruiting him in 1995 because of his disabilities.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v47/i14/14a04702.htm

UIHC, HANCHER MEETING DRAWS (The Meeting Professional, Dec. 2000)
A story recommending locations for business meetings around the country says that The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CENTER brings many medical conferences to Iowa City and the university's HANCHER AUDITORIUM attracts a wide range of internally known performers. The Meeting Professional is a monthly publication based in Dallas, Texas.

SKY & TELESCOPE, December 2000 --
A story about a site in Arizona favored by amateur astronomers in the Southwest quotes Dean Ketelsen, who after graduating from high school enrolled at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There he learned the fundamentals of astronomy from JAMES VAN ALLEN, the famous discoverer of Earth's radiation belts.

 

 

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