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April 2000

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MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, April 30 -- Tracking stocks, which are tied to the performance of a single business within a company, aren't always a good deal, according to a recent study by a pair of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS professors. From 1984 to 1998, the annualized gain for tracking stocks was 11.71 percent -- and only percent if you exclude the extraordinary performance of Sprint's wireless tracking stock, Sprint PCS. By comparison, the overall stock market had a much more robust annualized gain of 21.02 percent. "These are surprisingly small returns, considering that most tracking stocks were issued during the 1990s," when the stock market posted unprecedented gains, the study says. In addition, tracking stocks haven't performed nearly as well as outright spin-offs, where a company sets up a separate company for a particular business. And tracking stocks usually don't do much to boost the long-term performance of the parent company either, the study says. This is a Wall Street Journal article.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 30 -- Tracking stocks, which are tied to the performance of a single business within a company, aren't always a good deal, according to a recent study by a pair of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS professors. From 1984 to 1998, the annualized gain for tracking stocks was 11.71 percent -- and only 5.68 percent if you exclude the extraordinary performance of Sprint's wireless tracking stock, Sprint PCS. By comparison, the overall stock market had a much more robust annualized gain of 21.02 percent. "These are surprisingly small returns, considering that most tracking stocks were issued during the 1990s," when the stock market posted unprecedented gains, the study says. In addition, tracking stocks haven't performed nearly as well as outright spinoffs, where a company sets up a separate company for a particular business. And tracking stocks usually don't do much to boost the long-term performance of the parent company either, the study says.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB956688359620816789.djm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, April 30 -- Tracking stocks, which are tied to the performance of a single business within a company, aren't always a good deal, according to a recent study by a pair of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS professors. From 1984 to 1998, the annualized gain for tracking stocks was 11.71 percent -- and only percent if you exclude the extraordinary performance of Sprint's wireless tracking stock, Sprint PCS. By comparison, the overall stock market had a much more robust annualized gain of 21.02 percent. "These are surprisingly small returns, considering that most tracking stocks were issued during the 1990s," when the stock market posted unprecedented gains, the study says. In addition, tracking stocks haven't performed nearly as well as outright spin-offs, where a company sets up a separate company for a particular business. And tracking stocks usually don't do much to boost the long-term performance of the parent company either, the study says. This is a Wall Street Journal article.

WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 30 -- Tracking stocks, which are tied to the performance of a single business within a company, aren't always a good deal, according to a recent study by a pair of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BUSINESS professors. From 1984 to 1998, the annualized gain for tracking stocks was 11.71 percent -- and only 5.68 percent if you exclude the extraordinary performance of Sprint's wireless tracking stock, Sprint PCS. By comparison, the overall stock market had a much more robust annualized gain of 21.02 percent. "These are surprisingly small returns, considering that most tracking stocks were issued during the 1990s," when the stock market posted unprecedented gains, the study says. In addition, tracking stocks haven't performed nearly as well as outright spinoffs, where a company sets up a separate company for a particular business. And tracking stocks usually don't do much to boost the long-term performance of the parent company either, the study says.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB956688359620816789.djm

ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, April 30 -- A recent study by a pair of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA business professors indicates that tracking stocks aren't always such a great deal. From 1984 to 1998, the annualized gain for tracking stocks was 11.71 percent -- and only 5.68 percent if you exclude the extraordinary performance of Sprint's wireless tracking stock, Sprint PCS. By comparison, the overall stock market had a much more robust annualized gain of 21.02 percent. The same story ran April 30 in the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN in Texas.

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, April 29 -- With its proposal yesterday, filed in a federal district court in Washington, the government has formally opted for drastic surgery, a split-up of Microsoft into two companies and a litany of restraints on its business practices for three years. But HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa Law School, says that in the end it's up to the judge to decide the remedies in the case. "He's not bound by the recommendations of either side on remedies," said Hovenkamp. "And the result could be that his ultimate remedy does not closely resemble the proposals of either side."
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/ases29.shtml

NEW SCIENTIST, April 29 -- An astronaut's life is already fraught with danger, but two recent studies show that attempts to help astronauts who are injured in space may put them at even greater risk. A study with monkeys suggests that emergency surgery within hours of returning to Earth could prove fatal, while an international team of anaesthetists claims that medical equipment on the space shuttle for keeping an astronaut breathing in an emergency is inadequate. Only the healthiest people can become astronauts. But during lengthy spells in space, for example on the International Space Station or on a mission to Mars, serious health problems and accidents are inevitable. "Send a few more John Glenns up there and someone is going to have a [heart attack]," says MICHAEL TODD, an anaesthetist at the University of Iowa in Iowa City and the editor of the journal Anesthesiology.
http://www.newscientist.com:80/news/news_223626.html

USA TODAY, April 28 -- In a story about the risks of skin cancer, ROGER CEILLEY, M.D., clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa, says: "Some studies have shown that people get 80 percent of their sun damage before they're 18 or 20 years old. Every sunburn during childhood significantly increases your risk of skin cancer."MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 28 -- An editor's notes at the beginning of a tongue-in-cheek article about the lure of antihistamines among "allergics" mentions that UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving. The study was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=DEPA28&date=28-Apr-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

NEW YORK TIMES, April 27 -- An analysis piece about the proposed breakup of Microsoft says the software maker argues that any such proposal would be an extreme and radical step. In criminal cases, the courts apply the common-sense notion that the punishment should fit the crime. And in federal antitrust cases, the courts, a legal expert noted, try to ensure that the remedies are "a good fit" with what the monopolist did. "But the role of the remedy in a case like this is not to punish Microsoft but to restore competition," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school and a leading antitrust authority, who has occasionally been consulted by the government on legal matters.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/04/biztech/articles/27split.html

YAHOO! NEWS, April 28 -- Conventional wisdom in Washington says Microsoft Corp. wants to drag out the U.S. antitrust suit against it because a Republican president -- George W. Bush (news - web sites) might be more sympathetic to the business powerhouse. But some analysts say Microsoft and others who pin their hopes on a Bush presidency are grasping at straws. "It would be quite extraordinary for a president to intervene in a case that is as far along as this one,'' said HERB HOVENKAMP, professor of law at the University of Iowa. "The fact findings, decisions and some or all of the remedies are likely to be in place by then ... when the government is winning and it's simply on appeal, that would be quite extraordinary.''

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 28 -- Mike Doman may be a first-year teacher at Naperville Central High School, but he knows the ropes of the Theater Department like an old pro. Doman, a 1992 graduate of the school, returned to his alma mater this year to teach English and help direct the school's theatrical productions. Doman took a break from theater while studying English at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, but his interest was renewed while he was working toward his teaching certification. His first year of teaching took place in Carmel, Ind., and he said he jumped at the chance to move back to Naperville.
http://chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-0004280342,FF.html

CHRISTIAN NEWS SERVICE, April 28 -- A civil rights complaint against the University of Iowa has been filed with the U.S. Department of Education after a top official at the school called white men "the root of most evil." University of Iowa Vice President for University Relations ANN RHODES said April 20 that she thought the suspect in a series of alleged campus hate incidents "was going to be a white guy between 25 and 55 because they're the root of most evil," prompting the complaint, which was filed by the California-based European/American Issues Forum. The suspect in the case was a black female student at the university's College of Dentistry. In apologizing for the comment last week, Rhodes said her characterization of white men as the root of most evil "reinforces the kinds of stereotypes we have been working to dispel." She also called her remarks "a poor attempt at humor," and said it was "inappropriate to joke about such a sensitive issue." U.S. Education Department spokesperson Rodger Murphey said federal law requires the department's Office of Civil Rights to look into and enforce laws prohibiting discrimination based on race, religion, age, sex or disability. Also a factor in the inquiry will be whether the university receives any federal tax money to help pay for its operations. During the most recent period for which information is available, the University of Iowa received $167.2 million in federal tax money, grants and contracts, according to university spokesman STEVE PARROTT.
http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewCulture.asp?Page=/Culture/archive/CUL20000428b.html

BOSTON HERALD, April 27 -- A story predicting that the initial public offering market was expected to shine April 27 as AT&T offered up a tracking stock for its wireless division refers to a study by two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professors that found 19 out of 28 tracking stocks underperformed compared to three different benchmarks.

THE BLADE, Toledo, Ohio, April 27 -- The writer of an analysis of the presidential election's impact on the stock market says that, looking at charts of the market indexes over the primary season, he can see no correlation "with the ups and downs of the candidates for the Democratic and Republican nominations as tracked by the Iowa political futures markets operated by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF BUSINESS."

CHRISTIAN NEWS SERVICE (CNS), April 27 -- The University of Iowa has closed the matter of a top official there who called white men "the root of most evil," according to a university spokesman who said the institution's position on the case goes no further than the official's apology. Interim Director of University Relations STEVE PARROTT refused to say whether university officials had discussed the April 20 comment by ANN RHODES, the vice president for university relations. When asked if the University of Iowa considered the matter closed, Parrott said, "as far as we're concerned, it is. We're just not going to talk anymore about it," Parrott told CNSNews.com. "Ann apologized. That's the university's position."
http://www.cnsnews.com/ViewEducation.asp?Page=/Education/archive/EDU20000427c.html

WASHINGTON POST, April 27 -- A majority of the 19 states suing Microsoft are expected to join the Justice Department in seeking to split the software giant in two, but the rest are split between more lenient and more aggressive approaches to remedying Microsoft's antitrust wrongs. HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa antitrust scholar and government adviser in the case, said the government's side could be hurt if some states advocated a more limited remedy. "It would not be helpful for them to present less than a united front," Hovenkamp said.
http://washingtonpost.com:80/wp-dyn/articles/A20281-2000Apr26.html
The same article ran April 27 on the SEATTLE TIMES Web site.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/business/html98/micr27_20000427.html

THE BLADE, (Toledo, Ohio), April 27 -- A study of U.S. tracking stocks by a pair of professors at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa found that their long-term return was generally subpar, compared with various market benchmarks. In the words of the study, "tracking stocks earn negative buy-and-hold excess returns during a three-year period following the issue date." Parent companies of tracking stocks didn't seem to get any boost in stock-market returns afterwards, either. The study looked at all tracking stocks issued in the U.S. through the end of 1998. The Iowa study's authors concluded that they were "unable to explain the market's preference for tracking stocks." MATTHEW T. BILLETT, who along with ANAND VIJH performed the study, said in an interview, "I don't understand" why tracking stocks get issued, though he suspects that recent issuers are "playing to the hype" about the Internet. A preliminary version of the study was distributed last month. Another version of the story ran May 7 in the MIAMI HERALD.

BBC.COM, April 27 -- The US Government is putting the finishing touches to its proposal for action against software giant Microsoft after the company was found guilty of breaking anti-trust laws. The key element of the proposal is to split the company in two. The government will either submit a single memorandum containing its preferred remedies, or it may attach affidavits from its advisors, including HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor with the University of Iowa, and Carl Shapiro, an economist at the University of California Berkeley.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/business/newsid_727000/727560.stm

ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION, April 27 -- Tracking stocks like AT&T Wireless Group are intended to track the performance of a specific business that a company owns. Their own performance has been lackluster, according to a study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The long-term return on tracking stocks has been "generally subpar, compared with various market benchmarks," Dow Jones reported this week, citing the study.

FORBES.COM, April 27 -- A story about the pending initial public offering of AT&T's wireless business says some investors aren't diving into the IPO because they are not enthusiastic about tracking stocks. Tracking stocks mirror the performance of a business unit, but don't give investors real control. AT&T will still own more than 80% of AT&T Wireless Group. "I've never owned one,'' says Phil Orlando, chief investment officer with ValueLine Asset Management in New York, of tracking stocks. He refers to a study done by two UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professors that shows tracking stocks performed below comparable market indexes.
http://biz.yahoo.com/fo/000427/mu2623.html

NATIONAL REVIEW, April 27 -- An article questions University of Iowa Vice President for University Relations ANN RHODES' statement -- a comment made in jest and for which Rhodes later apologized -- in response to a reporter asking who she thought was responsible for e-mail threats against minority Dental School students. The article mentions Rhodes' apology and a letter sent out the next day by University of Iowa President MARY SUE COLEMAN calling for members of the university community to "judge each other as individuals" in light of the e-mail threats, for which a black, female dental student has been charged. Asked whether Rhodes will face disciplinary action for her comments, STEVE PARROTT, director of University Relations, said: "We don't comment on personnel actions. But Ann has apologized."
http://www.nationalreview.com/comment/comment042700c.html

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 26 -- College and university counselors say that more and more students are seeking help for depression and suicidal inclinations but see no concurrent spike in the number of campus suicides. JOHN WESTEFELD, a professor at the University of Iowa, found in a recent study of four schools that 53 percent of students said they had experienced depression at some point in college, and 8.5 percent said they had thought of committing suicide.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/2000/Apr/26/national/SUICBAR26.htm

MODESTO BEE, April 26 -- Researchers estimate that 5 million Americans suffer from eating disorders, about 90 percent of them women. Experts say that in recent years more and more men are being diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia and can spend years wandering aimlessly through the nation's health-care system. Few eating-disorder programs treat men. Those that do, like the Renfrew Center in Philadelphia, severely restrict the programs offered to males. "The problem with all of these treatment centers is that they are gender-biased," said ARNOLD ANDERSEN, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Programs at the University of Iowa and an expert on anorexia and bulimia. "They either exclude males or claim they don't know how to treat them."
http://www.modbee.com/living/story/0,1155,154284,00.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 26 -- Under one plan to split Microsoft, Microsoft's Office software business would be spun off. The new company, in an attempt to compete aggressively with the existing Microsoft, could attempt to widen its market share by making its products available to those who write Linux applications, for instance, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law professor at the University of Iowa College of Law.

YAHOO! NEWS, April 26 -- Gulf War veterans are more likely than non-deployed troops to report symptoms suggestive of multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) syndrome, a controversial diagnosis given to some people who appear to be sensitive to usually benign environmental exposures. In the current issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, researchers report that among almost 3,700 soldiers surveyed in 1995, Gulf War veterans were twice as likely as others to report MCS symptoms. More than 5% said they were sensitive to chemicals such as pesticides, car exhaust, cosmetics, and cigarette smoke; about 2.5% of non-veterans reported such symptoms. In addition, soldiers with MCS symptoms were far more likely to have a history of psychological problems such as depression, report DONALD W. BLACK of the University of Iowa College of Medicine and colleagues. In an interview with Reuters Health, Black said that some researchers have suggested that the range of health problems known as Gulf War syndrome is a form of MCS. However, he added, this study was not intended to validate the existence of MCS, nor link it to Gulf War syndrome.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000426/hl/gulf_vets_1.html

LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR, April 25 -- Harvey Perlman, former dean of the University of Nebraska College of Law, will cut short his return to the classroom to become interim chancellor of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. University officials announced Monday that Perlman will fill the job until a replacement can be found for James Moeser, who is leaving to become chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Perlman first joined the law school faculty in 1967 and taught there until 1974, when he joined the University of Virginia Law School faculty. He also has taught at the University of Chicago Law School, Florida State University College of Law, University of Puget Sound Law School and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF LAW.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/042500/loc/sto5

USA TODAY, April 25 -- A story about a vote among New York University's 1,400-plus graduate research and teaching assistants on whether to unionize includes a sidebar that says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is among other universities that have recognized unions formed by graduate teaching and research assistants.

CBS MARKETWATCH, April 25 -- A recent phenomenon on Wall Street, tracking stocks trace their origin to General Motors' Electronic Data Systems division, which kicked off the tracking trend in the mid-'80s. The tracking-stock train has picked up steam since then. Executives hail tracking stocks as a way to unlock the value of specific assets within a company, but a study by University of Iowa professors ANAND VIJH and MATTHEW BILLETT pointed out the weakness in the move. "They've seen quite anemic returns," Vijh told CBS.MarketWatch.com. The study by Vijh and Billett points out that 19 of the total of 28 stocks underperformed three benchmarks based on broad, size-weighted returns for the market; the return of the company's industry; and returns for similar-sized stocks.
http://cbs.marketwatch.com/news/current/ipo_rep.htx?source=htx/http2_mw

KANSAS CITY STAR, April 25 -- A feature on Walter Hiersteiner, a lawyer, community volunteer and vice chairman of Tension Envelope Corp. in Kansas City, says the Des Moines native went to Harvard Law School after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. While an undergraduate, he was visiting in Cedar Rapids when he met his future wife, Jean Newburger, who was 17 at the time.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat,fyi/377468a6.421,.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 25 -- A study of U.S. tracking stocks by a pair of professors at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa found that their long-term return was generally subpar, compared with various market benchmarks. In the words of the study, "tracking stocks earn negative buy-and-hold excess returns during a three-year period following the issue date." Parent companies of tracking stocks didn't seem to get any boost in stock-market returns afterwards, either. The study looked at all tracking stocks issued in the U.S. through the end of 1998. The Iowa study's authors concluded that they were "unable to explain the market's preference for tracking stocks." MATTHEW T. BILLETT, who along with ANAND VIJH performed the study, said in an interview, "I don't understand" why tracking stocks get issued, though he suspects that recent issuers are "playing to the hype" about the Internet. A preliminary version of the study was distributed last month.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB956608328242982895.djm

RALEIGH (N.C.) NEWS & OBSERVER, April 25 -- A story on Carolina Premier Medical Group's plans to cut some of its ties with Kaiser Permanente -- the financially troubled management company that helped it form one of the Triangle's largest independent medical practices last year -- says Carolina Premier has hired a new executive director, Deborah Sundberg, who previously ran a primary-care physician practice for the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.news-observer.com/daily/2000/04/25/biz05.html

LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR, Neb., April 24 -- A University of Iowa professor wants the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to tighten restrictions on a widely used pesticide. JAMES MERCHANT, professor and dean of Iowa's College of Public Health, is one of 12 scientists who signed a letter that was sent to EPA Administrator Carol Browner. Among those signing the letter were leading pediatric environmental experts, including two former EPA officials. The scientists want to reduce the agricultural use of chlorpyrifos, commonly known by the brand name Dursban, and ban its application in residential areas and near schools and child-care centers. Studies suggest chlorpyrifos may pose a risk to infants and children.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/042300/loc/sto4

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 23 -- Across the country, speech-language pathologists have been leaving their jobs at skilled nursing facilities and nursing homes. Some report that they can no longer support themselves and their families on their clinical SLP earnings, according to a 1999 American Speech-Language Hearing Association study. School districts in urban centers are offering signing bonuses to SLPs, said RICHARD HURTIG, head of the University of Iowa's department of speech pathology and audiology. Hospitals are launching national--and even international--recruiting campaigns to nab applicants. Academic posts for faculty in communication disorders departments are, in some cases, remaining unfilled. "There is right now a tremendous shortage--only to get worse--in terms of filling those academic positions," Hurtig said.
http://www.latimes.com/class/employ/clcareer/20000423/t000038198.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 21 -- A string of racist threats at the University of Iowa's College of Dentistry that had deeply troubled the campus was apparently the work of a black dental student, local authorities said Thursday. University public safety officers arrested Tarsha Michelle Claiborne, 23, early Thursday morning. She is accused of sending a series of e-mail messages that culminated in a threat to bomb the Dental Science Building on Tuesday and of leaving a bowl of spaghetti on the doorstep of a dental student with a note saying the noodles were "dead black man's brains." STEVE PARROTT, a university spokesman, said police traced the first two e-mail messages to a campus computer lab and then set up a video camera to monitor the building. When they reviewed the tapes after the third threat had been made, they identified Ms. Claiborne and obtained a warrant for her arrest.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2000/04/2000042102n.htm
Another version of the story ran April 21 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
The same article ran April 21 on the PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER Web site.
http://www.phillynews.com/inquirer/2000/Apr/21/national/THREAT21.htm
The same article ran April 21 on the SALT LAKE TRIBUNE Web site.
http://www.sltrib.com:80/04212000/nation_w/42990.htm

FRESNO (Calif.) BEE April 21 -- A black dental student was charged Thursday in a series of racist and threatening e-mails directed at her minority classmates. Prosecutors blamed Tarsha Michelle Claiborne, 23, for a three-week period of threatened violence that frightened students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY and forced the closing of the school's main building on Wednesday. Claiborne, of Baton Rouge, La., was arrested early Thursday. The same Tribune News Services story ran April 21 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, MIAMI HERALD, DETROIT NEWS, INDIANAPOLIS STAR, COMMERCIAL APPEAL, ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, THE TENNESSEAN and the SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS.

DETROIT FREE PRESS, April 21 -- A black female dental student, suspected of being the source of a string of death and bomb threats against minority students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was being held on Thursday on harassment and criminal trespass charges, police said. Tarsha Claiborne, 23, was caught on videotape allegedly sending the most recent computerized e-mail threat, Iowa City police said. Claiborne, a student at the university's dental school, was suspected of sending e-mail to fellow students and faculty that threatened violence if minority students were not removed from the campus. This is a REUTERS wire service article. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 21 in the ATLANTA JOURNAL, the FORT LAUDERDALE SUN-SENTINEL, the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN, the SEATTLE TIMES, the ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE and the TIMES-PICAYUNE of Louisiana.

NEW YORK TIMES, April 21 -- A black dental student was charged Thursday in a series of racist and threatening e-mails directed at her minority classmates. Prosecutors blamed Tarsha Michelle Claiborne, 23, for a three-week period of threatened violence that frightened students at the University of Iowa's College of Dentistry and forced the closing of the school's main building on Wednesday. Claiborne, of Baton Rouge, La., was arrested early Thursday. According to court records, the second-year dental student confessed when faced with allegations. ANN RHODES, vice president of university relations, said she was not aware of any ill feelings Claiborne had toward the college. Rhodes said authorities, including the FBI, located the computer that was used early in the investigation. Authorities then set up a surveillance videotape at the site, a few blocks from the dental school.
The same Associated Press article ran April 21 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=81588006
A shorter version of the Associated Press article ran April 21 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/112/nation/Alleged_Nazi_guard_faces_deportation+.shtml
The same article ran April 21 on the ARIZONA DAILY STAR Web site.
The same article ran April 21 on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE Web site.
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-0004210233,00.html
The same article ran April 21 on ACCESS ATLANTA, the Web site of the ATLANTA JOURNAL CONSTITUTION.
The same article ran April 21 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2000/apr/20/042000344.html
The same article ran April 21 on the NEWSDAY Web site.
The same article ran April 21 on the FOX NEWS Web site.
http://www.foxnews.com/national/042000/race_threat.sml
The same article ran April 21 in NANDO TIMES, the Web site of the RALEIGH NEWS AND OBSERVER newspaper in North Carolina.
The same article ran April 21 on the APB NEWS Web site.
http://www.apbnews.com:80/newscenter/breakingnews/2000/04/20/racialthreats0420_01.html
The same article ran April 21 on the COURT TV Web site.
http://www.courttv.com:80/national/2000/0420/dental-school_ap.html
The same article ran April 21 on CANADIAN ONLINE EXPLORER, a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site.
The same article ran April 20 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/04/20/national1210EDT0572.DTL
The same article ran April 21, 2000 on the BALTIMORE SUN Web site.
http://www.sunspot.net/cgi-bin/gx.cgi/AppLogic+FTContentServer?section=archive&pagename=story&storyid=1150330204964

YAHOO! NEWS, April 21 -- A black female dental student, suspected of being the source of a string of death and bomb threats against minority students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was being held on Thursday on harassment and criminal trespass charges, police said. Tarsha Claiborne, 23, was caught on videotape allegedly sending the most recent computerized e-mail threat, Iowa City police said. Claiborne, a student at the university's dental school, was suspected of sending e-mail to fellow students and faculty that threatened violence if minority students were not removed from the campus. This is a Reuters wire service article.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000420/ts/crime_threats_1.html

THE RECORD, Hackensack, N.J., April 21 -- A black dental student was charged Thursday, April 20 in a series of racist and threatening e-mails directed at her minority classmates. Prosecutors blamed Tarsha Michelle Claiborne, 23, for a three-week period of threatened violence that frightened students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA'S COLLEGE OF DENTISTRY and forced the closing of the school's main building on Wednesday. Claiborne, of Baton Rouge, La., was arrested early Thursday. According to court records, the second-year dental student confessed when faced with allegations.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 21 -- A story about the first meeting of the Worker Rights Consortium -- "a seat-of-the-pants collective of students and labor-rights activists connected by an e-mail list, and little else" -- says that at several institutions, including Tulane University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, students have held sit-ins to demand that their institutions leave the Fair Labor Association and belong only to the WRC. The consortium has grown rapidly, from only five institutions in mid-February, to 44. The 10 campuses of the University of California system joined the day before the conference.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i33/33a04101.htm

KANSAS CITY STAR, April 20 -- G.S. Sharat Chandra, an internationally renowned poet and writer and a professor of English at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, died Thursday at 64 after suffering a brain hemorrhage. Chandras attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s famous WRITERS’ WORKSHOP in the late '60s, where he earned a master's degree in fine arts.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat?file=fyi/37746839.420

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, April 20 -- A story on poets and independent booksellers Christine Deavel and John Marshall of Open Books in Wallingford, Wash., says the store carries 8,000 titles, an eclectic selection often influenced by customer requests. There is no "right" poetry or "wrong" poetry to them. With one exception. Deavel and Marshall drew the line recently at stocking the popular poetry collection written by Jewel, the pop star. Perhaps it was their master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that made them do it ("her stuff is like strong high school poetry," proclaims Marshall), but they decided to take one small stand for quality poetry, even if it did cost them a few sales.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/books/open20.shtml

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, April 19 -- A story on Evelyn Birkby, who wrote a column for the Shenandoah, Iowa, newspaper for 50 years, says her writing career has expanded to books. Two have been published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS and received national attention.

BBCNEWS.COM, April 19 -- The latest research from a team at the University of Iowa suggests that some tumors may be able to produce primitive blood channels of their own by genetically manipulating cancer cells. If this is true, then the current crop of research drugs that interfere with angiogenesis may not be as effective in starving tumors as previously hoped. The latest study, led by Dr MARY HENDRIX, and presented at a biology conference in the U.S. this week, suggested that aggressive prostate cancers could form their own "primitive microcirculatory networks." These open channels, formed in rat and human cancers grown in the laboratory, might allow blood to pass around the tumor, supplying it with the necessary nutrients.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_719000/719311.stm

ZDNET INTERACTIVE WEEK, April 18 -- Unions are having an easier time building relationships with each other because of the Internet, says LAURIE CLEMENTS, director of the Labor Center at the University of Iowa in Iowa City. And the United Steelworkers of America, which isn't typically considered on the cutting edge of technology, is doing more than most unions, he says. During a recent strike against Continental General Tire in Charlotte, N.C., for instance, the USWA targeted the tire distributors, which included Wal-Mart Stores. To let shoppers know about its strike, the USWA posted its signs, brochures and fliers online -- in four languages -- so any union could download the material and use it. The unions didn't have to go to the printer and didn't have to ship the literature; it was easily available at the touch of a button. Suddenly, there were simultaneous demonstrations hitting distributors, helping the union gain more leverage by increasing pressure on target companies, Clements says.
http://www4.zdnet.com:80/intweek/stories/news/0,4164,2551836,00.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, April 17 -- Internal conflict is common among career changers, says BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. "[Work] is the place for community, where we're going to find meaning in life, where we're going to be able to establish an identity."
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/2000/04/17/fp15s1-csm.shtml

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 17 -- The Amana name is ubiquitous on refrigerators, microwaves and other appliances made by the Iowa-based manufacturer, but the origin of the name is less well-known. Wilmette journalist Abigail Foerstner explores the founding of the utopian community of German immigrants who gave Amana its name in 1855 in a new book from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, Picturing Utopia: Bertha Shambaugh and the Amana Photographers (148 pages, $34.95).
http://www.suntimes.com/output/business/amana17.html

WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 17 -- A feature story on Michael A.V. Ward, founder of Combustion Electromagnetics Inc., an ignition-systems company, says he was born Archimedes Vlachos in 1943 in Kampala, Uganda, where his Greek-born father was a road builder. Informally adopted after his father's death by a Connecticut couple named Ward, he says, he came to the U.S. at age 11. He went on to major in physics at Rutgers and earn a master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in 1968 before heading for Harvard. (He says he formally changed his name in 1970.)
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB955381792152320134.djm

NEW YORK TIMES, April 16 -- Gaines Post Jr. fears that he belongs to a generation of spectators. As children, he and his contemporaries watched an older generation liberate the world from Hitler; as adults, they watched a younger generation transform society through protests and rebellions. But what did they do? In ''Memoirs of a Cold War Son,'' Post, an emeritus professor of history at Claremont McKenna College, has produced an apologia for his generation's apparent inactivity -- he argues that they were cheated by history. Since they came of age during the cold war, a time of stalemate, there was nothing of significance for his generation to do: history ''passed us over.'' At the same time, however, Post asserts that his generation still acted nobly. The book was published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/books/00/04/16/bib/000416.rv105321.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 16 -- If you've scarcely heard of Iowa City as a place for writers, just remember that the famous IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, a two-year graduate program, is offered by the University of Iowa and that notable graduates include Flannery O'Connor, Raymond Carver and Jane Smiley. "There has been a renewed interest in writing within the general population," said PEGGY HOUSTON, who has guided the Iowa Summer Writing Festival since its start in 1987. "It seemed like a natural to offer short-term, not-for-credit opportunities for people to hone their skills. Hence, the Iowa Summer Writing Festival was born." More than 1,600 writers, from poets in their 70s to single moms, descended upon serene Iowa City and the lovely University of Iowa campus last summer for the Iowa Summer Writing Festival.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=GETA0416&date=16-Apr-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 16 -- The University of Iowa's HANCHER AUDITORIUM features music, dance, theater, international artists and programming for families. Also on the campus is the MUSEUM OF ART, displaying 20th-century European and American painting and sculpture, and a collection of African art.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=GETB0416&date=16-Apr-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

TOPEKA CAPITAL-JOURNAL, Kan., April 16 -- A test measuring Kansas students' mastery of the three R's -- reading, writing and arithmetic -- underwent a security transformation this year. The Kansas State Department of Education added multiple versions of state-mandated tests and will stop giving teachers and administrators information about the percentage of students who miss specific questions. Officials won't say the emphasis on security was a response to tampering, but mistakes and at least one case of cheating have caused the scores from five schools, including Quincy Elementary School in Topeka, to be invalidated since 1998. MIKE KOLEN, an education professor at the University of Iowa and member of the Kansas assessment advisory board, said test security is a national issue. "My impression is because of the standards movement, there is a big push for assessments in all states," Kolen said. "Tests are being used for more high-stakes decisions for students, schools or school districts. Security issues then become much more of a problem."
http://cjonline.com/stories/041700/kan_testing.shtml

ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL, N.M., April 16 -- Farmington, N.M., school officials want to eliminate cheerleading in eighth grade, in favor of a spirit squad of both girls and boys, like an old-fashioned pep club. Kevin Molloy, varsity cheerleading coach at Farmington High, one of the city's two high schools, says the plan "isn't going to help my program." Molloy, who cheered at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA from 1988 to 1992 and has been coaching at Farmington High for two years, says at least 50 colleges give full scholarships for cheerleading and many more offer some financial help. He says one of his students was offered a scholarship to cover books at the University of New Mexico, although he ultimately attended another school.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 16 -- Many disabled people are discovering the freedom afforded by the Internet. They are logging on to trade stories and to join clubs for disabled people with interests from hunting deer to hunting for a relationship. More and more, they are also doing business. PETER BLANCK, director of the University of Iowa's Disability Law Research Center, said the Internet has had a profound effect on the employment picture. It has given people with disabilities "more of a level playing field" and helped employers gain access to millions of people who want to work.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,2669,SAV-0004160437,FF.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 16 -- Two of Illinois resident Linda Strauch's children -- a son and daughter -- attend the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and her youngest son, now in high school, also is planning to attend Iowa in the fall.

THE ECONOMIST (London, England) April 15 -- The magazine continues to feature in its "Primary Colour" column a box depicting the daily prices of New York Senate candidates Rudy Giuliani and Hillary Clinton as traded in the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. This graph shows that Giuliani's stock was trading slightly higher than Clinton's in mid-April.

THE ECONOMIST, April 15 -- A chart based on data from the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS shows the gap between New York Senate candidates Rudy Giuliani and Hillary Clinton narrowing in April.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 14 -- Nike Inc. has moved to terminate its contract to supply sports uniforms and equipment for the men's and women's ice-hockey teams at Brown University. The company says it would not comply with a code of conduct, pushed by student activists, that excludes manufacturers from any role in monitoring the working conditions at factories where collegiate apparel is made. While the action applies only to Brown, it sends a warning to other colleges that are thinking about joining the Worker Rights Consortium, which was to hold its founding conference last week in New York. Student activism has increased around the country in an effort to convince administrators to join the consortium before its conference. At Purdue University, students were in the second week of a hunger strike last week. Protests or sit-ins also were held at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, the University of Kentucky, the University of Oregon, Tulane University, and Yale University, among other campuses.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i32/32a05401.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, April 13 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa are experimenting with a cochlear implant device that may be able to restore only high-frequency sounds without destroying the patient's ability to hear other sounds. The UI device was designed by Dr. BRUCE GANTZ, head of the university's department of otolaryngology and head and neck surgery. In three implants completed as part of a feasibility study, he said, the natural hearing of low-frequency sounds was maintained while the patients' ability to recognize consonants was improved. "We don't know if we'll be able to integrate that into helping them understand words," Gantz said. "If it will, it would be a major advancement for people with moderate to severe hearing loss that have very poor word understanding."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/00/04/circuits/articles/13next.html

KANSAS CITY STAR, April 13 -- The FBI has been asked to investigate racist and threatening messages sent to minority dental students at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Since March 28 harassing e-mail messages have been sent by someone using the name MinorityRid. On Tuesday, hundreds of university students joined administrators and residents for a rally downtown before marching to the dentistry college to link up with students there. The same Associated Press article ran April 13 in the ASBURY PARK PRESS of Neptune, N.J., the DALLAS MORNING NEWS and the BUFFALO NEWS in New York.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 13 -- A former " Star Search" comedian accused of several sexual assaults at college campuses throughout the Midwest has been found guilty of the 1997 rape of a student in Lincoln, Neb. A Lancaster County District Court jury returned its verdict against Vinson Horace Champ, 38, of Los Angeles, late Tuesday after about eight hours of deliberations. Earlier this month in Iowa, Johnson County authorities charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping for a September 1996 rape of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City. The kidnapping charge carries a mandatory life sentence.

USA TODAY, April 13 -- On campuses all over the country, students are demonstrating against the manufacturing of apparel with university logos in sweatshop conditions. But some students are getting tired of the constant harangue. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA group called Students Against the Methods of Students Against Sweatshops sprang up after anti-sweatshop demonstrators stormed one of school president Mary Sue Coleman's "fireside chats," an ongoing opportunity for students to discuss issues. "We're not disagreeing with their goal," sophomore Joe Obrycki, a math major, says of the demonstrators. (But) "they were essentially harassing her for half an hour."

APBNEWS.COM, April 12 -- The online crime news Web site carries an Associated Press story about racist email being sent to the UI dental school. "We've got so many leads that we're following, but it remains to be seen if any of them are solid," said CHUCK GREEN, the university's public safety chief.
http://www.apbnews.com/newscenter/internetcrime/2000/04/12/email0412_01.html

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 12 -- The paper ran a photo of University of Iowa College of Dentistry Dean DAVID JOHNSEN, law professor WILLARD BOYD and UI President MARY SUE COLEMAN leading "Walk the Walk" marchers in response to racist e-mails directed at minority dentistry students.

EDUCATION WEEK, April 12 -- Openly gay students now have a college-scholarship program in Iowa. Full tuition and fees will be provided to three gay students each year who show merit and want to attend one of the state's public institutions -- the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls, Iowa State University in Ames, and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City -- according to The Associated Press. The scholarships, announced late last month, are being provided by a foundation started by Rich Eychaner, an openly gay businessman who ran unsuccessfully for Congress in the 1984 Republican primary.
http://www.edweek.org:80/ew/ewstory.cfm?slug=31briefs.h19

LAS VEGAS SUN, April 12 -- The FBI has been asked to investigate racist and threatening messages sent to minority dental students at the University of Iowa. Since March 28 harassing e-mail messages have been sent by someone using the name MinorityRid. On Tuesday, hundreds of university students joined administrators and residents for a rally downtown before marching to the dentistry college to link up with students there. "We've got so many leads that we're following, but it remains to be seen if any of them are solid," said CHUCK GREEN, the university's public safety chief. "We are taking it very seriously," DAVID JOHNSEN, the college dean, said Tuesday. Dental students have been advised to let friends know they are going to be alone and officials have stepped-up security.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2000/apr/12/041200388.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 12 on the NEWSDAY Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 12 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 12 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 12 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 12 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/04/12/national0428EDT0475.DTL

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT GAZETTE, April 12 -- The University of Arkansas' exhaustive national search to fill the new post of provost has come to an end with the hiring of a University of Connecticut official, UA officials announced Tuesday. Robert V. Smith, 58, will begin work July 1 as provost, a new position that will include the duties of vice chancellor for academic affairs. Between 1968 and 1985, Smith held professorships in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Texas at Austin.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 12 -- A former " Star Search" comedian accused of several sexual assaults at college campuses throughout the Midwest has been found guilty of the 1997 rape of a student in Lincoln, Neb. A Lancaster County District Court jury returned its verdict against Vinson Horace Champ, 38, of Los Angeles, late Tuesday after about eight hours of deliberations. Earlier this month in Iowa, Johnson County authorities charged Champ with first-degree kidnapping for a September 1996 rape of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City. The kidnapping charge carries a mandatory life sentence. Johnson County Attorney J. Patrick White said Tuesday that his office intended to pursue the case against Champ as soon as Nebraska authorities are finished with him.
The same Associated Press article ran April 11 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.

NAPERVILLE SUN, Ill., April 12 -- A story about plans to build a "Millennium Carillon" in Naperville quotes Alan Poole, director of public works, who took 31 civil engineering students and five professors from his alma mater, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, for a tour of the carillon recently. The bell tower was the last stop in the class's annual three-day spring field trip that included tours of the Springbrook Water Reclamation Plant and the Wheatland Prairie Landfill. Poole said that the carillon was chosen as one of the stops because of its unique architecture and engineering. "We are attracted to the carillon because it's an interesting structure," said Poole, who has watched its construction from his office window in the nearby municipal center. "I thoroughly enjoy the project. I think it's terribly exciting."

TIMES OF INDIA, April 12 -- PHILIP LUTGENDORF, professor of South Asian studies at the University of Iowa, writes to the paper that: "I have been teaching the Ramayana for years and have found that it serves as an excellent window to American students, giving them a glimpse to the great vistas of Indian civilisation." Lutgendorf explains that the grand epic is more than a book-- it is a tradition of story-telling. For 2,000 years, the Ramayana has ranked among the most important literary texts of South Asia.
http://www.timesofindia.com/today/12mbom14.htm

FOX NEWS.COM, April 11 -- RALPH ADOLPHS, assistant professor of neurology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, together with colleagues there and elsewhere, evaluated more than 100 patients diagnosed with specific brain injuries to determine which brain areas are involved interpreting the emotion behind facial expressions. Their study showed that the ability to recognize emotions from facial expressions lies in a part of the brain known as the right somatosensory-related cortex - a part of the brain also known to process information sensed by nerve endings throughout the body. "The surprising finding here is that damage to parts of the brain involved in perceiving one's own body - like the sensation of touch - are also important to judge how other people feel,'' said Adolphs in a statement. "For subjects to retrieve knowledge regarding the association of certain facial configurations with certain emotions, we presume it is necessary to reactivate circuits that have been involved in the learning of past emotions situations of comparable category,'' the researchers write in the current issue of the Journal of Neuroscience.
http://www.foxnews.com/health/0411/h_rt_0411_8.sml
The same Reuters Health article ran April 11 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000411/hl/bha_46.html

BALTIMORE SUN, April 11 -- A story about award-winning author Gail Godwin, whose books include "A Mother and Two Daughters," published in 1982; "The Finishing School," published in 1985; and "Evensong," published last, says that at the age of 30 she entered a graduate writing program at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where she studied with novelist Kurt Vonnegut.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 11 -- Paul Schoenfield's four-month-old "Four Music Videos" proved an exciting, sometimes riveting experience at the close of the Ahn Trio's latest local appearance Sunday afternoon in Schoenberg Hall at UCLA. Written for the trio and commissioned by HANCHER AUDITORIUM and the University of Iowa, "Four Music Videos" is a complex, driving work combining pop and classical styles with abundant craft. It disappoints only when it runs out of imagination -- as in the conventional and lengthy slow movement, "Film Score." Its brightness is undeniable, however.

WASHINGTON POST, April 11 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A53467-2000Apr11.html

SALON, April 11 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, an associate professor in the University of Iowa's School of Journalism and Mass Communication, recounts his first sexual conquest while vacationing with his parents in Miami Beach.
http://www.salon.com/health/sex/urge/2000/04/11/facts_of_life/index.html

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, April 10 -- A story about jewelry designer Kiff Slemmons -- whose 1996 piece titled "Overruled" is a miniature tool case containing 13 rings, each with a different piece of yellow ruler set in silver --says she earned her BA in French and Art in 1969 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, April 10 -- By cultivating marijuana and testing the most promising of its more than 100 ingredients, a British pharmaceutical company hopes to develop drugs for a variety of ailments, a company official said at the first national conference for health professionals about the medical uses of marijuana. The privately owned company, GW Pharmaceuticals Ltd. of Salisbury, England, is "trying to turn an illegal plant into a pharmaceutically regulated product" by developing cannabis-based medicines that are not smoked, said Dr. David C. Hadorn, the company's North American medical director. The University of Iowa's Colleges of Nursing and Medicine sponsored the two-day conference to help health care professionals and providers learn how to obtain and properly use medical marijuana. MELANIE C. DREHER, the nursing school's dean, said the conference was needed because thousands of Americans use marijuana medically even though it is illegal in most states. Voters in at least seven states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington) have approved initiatives intended to make marijuana legal for medical purposes. But many doctors are afraid to recommend it because the federal government has threatened to prosecute them.

DESERET NEWS, April 10 -- Five UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to make college-logo clothing were arrested after officers said they refused to leave a campus building. About two dozen members of the Students Against Sweatshops were removed from Jessup Hall by Department of Public Safety officers late Saturday. University officials say the removal was prompted by concerns raised by a safety engineer following a walk through the building earlier Saturday. The five were arrested on misdemeanor charges of criminal trespass after they refused to leave, officers said. The student protesters had been camped out in the building since Tuesday.
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,155016754,00.html?
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on COURT TV ONLINE.
http://www.courttv.com:80/national/2000/0410/sweatshop_protest_ap.html

NEW YORK TIMES, April 10 -- By cultivating marijuana and testing the most promising of its more than 100 ingredients, a British pharmaceutical company hopes to develop drugs for a variety of ailments, a company official said at the first national conference for health professionals about the medical uses of marijuana. The privately owned company, GW Pharmaceuticals Ltd. of Salisbury, England, is "trying to turn an illegal plant into a pharmaceutically regulated product" by developing cannabis-based medicines that are not smoked, said Dr. David C. Hadorn, the company's North American medical director. The University of Iowa's Colleges of Nursing and Medicine sponsored the two-day conference to help health care professionals and providers learn how to obtain and properly use medical marijuana. MELANIE C. DREHER, the nursing school's dean, said the conference was needed because thousands of Americans use marijuana medically even though it is illegal in most states. Voters in at least seven states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington) have approved initiatives intended to make marijuana legal for medical purposes. But many doctors are afraid to recommend it because the federal government has threatened to prosecute them.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/041000sci-marijuana.html
The same New York Times article ran April 10 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/04/10/MN68960.DTL

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 10 -- The University of Iowa's Medical School and College of Nursing this past weekend held the nation's first-ever medical conference on the therapeutic use of marijuana. The conference attracted about 150 people to the school's Iowa City campus. Hundreds of others attended across the nation via satellite link-up at other colleges and medical centers, according to MELANIE DREHER, one of the event's organizers and the dean of the University of Iowa's College of Nursing. "We are united in a single issue -- how to get marijuana for the patients who need it," Dreher said. She, along with other presenters, estimated that thousands of people use marijuana in the United States for medical reasons. "We need to give people what they need to translate it into practice," she said. "We can't just keep looking the other way."
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=81553343

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 10 -- MTS Systems Corp. of Eden Prairie, Minn., was a major participant in the $60 million NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR that will officially begin operation in June at the University of Iowa. "This is one of the most complicated devices we've ever built," said Bill Beduhn, vice president of advanced engineering for MTS, which has built test systems ranging from giant earthquake simulators to tiny load-testers that measure the strength of wires used in microchips. He said MTS' share of the project totaled $14.8 million. MTS supplied all the mechanical components in the system -- the devices responsible for creating realistic motion as the test vehicle goes through simulated turns, skids, spins and normal driving actions such as braking and lane changes. The driving simulator, called NADS, will be used by government and private industry to improve vehicle and highway design and to test driver reaction to medications, alcohol or various distractions such as cell phones.
http://www2.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisStory=81547215

ARIZONA STAR NET, April 10 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to make college-logo clothing were arrested after officers said they refused to leave a campus building. About two dozen members of the Students Against Sweatshops were removed from Jessup Hall by Department of Public Safety officers late Saturday. University officials say the removal was prompted by concerns raised by a safety engineer following a walk through the building earlier Saturday. ARIZONA STAR NET is the Web site of the ARIZONA DAILY STAR newspaper.
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the Web site of the BOSTON GLOBE.
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.
The same Associated Press article ran April 10 on the Web site of NEWSDAY.
The same Associated Press article ran April 9 on the Web site of the LAS VEGAS SUN.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2000/apr/09/040900361.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 9 on the Web site of the NEW YORK TIMES.
The same Associated Press article ran April 9 on the Web site of the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/04/09/national2053EDT0596.DTL

TRIBUNE-REVIEW, Pittsburgh, Penn., April 10 -- A story about the University of Phoenix's plan to open four sites in the Pittsburgh area quotes Anne Gillespie, director of the first such campus. Gillespie, who has bachelor's and master's degrees in business administration from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, will oversee the Robinson campus and the eventual three learning centers north, south and east of Pittsburgh.
http://www.tribunereview.com/news/rpho0410.html

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 10 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA education experts recently attended the International Conference on Learning With Technology at Temple University, where they said early results from a three-year study of laptop use among fifth-graders found teachers must receive appropriate training or the students will use the machines only for word processing, instead of as tools that extend learning opportunities.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/features/article/0,2669,SAV-0004090136,FF.html

BUSINESS WEEK, April 10 -- According to the University of Iowa Electronic Futures Market, where "speculators" and "traders" sell presidential futures, the odds are currently 50 percent that Democrat Al Gore will be elected president, and 46 percent that Republican George W. Bush will win the Oval Office. "We're trying to learn more about how markets work and motivate students at the same time," said University of Iowa economics professor ROBERT FORSYTHE.

CLARION-LEDGER, Jackson, Miss., April 10 -- Five UNIVERSITY OF IOWA students protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to make college-logo clothing were arrested after officers said they refused to leave a campus building. About two dozen members of the Students Against Sweatshops were removed from Jessup Hall by Department of Public Safety officers late Saturday. University officials say the removal was prompted by concerns raised by a safety engineer following a walk through the building earlier Saturday. The five were arrested on misdemeanor charges of criminal trespass after they refused to leave, officers said. The student protesters had been camped out in the building since Tuesday.

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE, Worcester, Mass., April 10 -- By cultivating marijuana and testing the most promising of its more than 100 ingredients, a British pharmaceutical company hopes to develop drugs for a variety of ailments, a company official said at the first national conference for health professionals about the medical uses of marijuana. The privately owned company, GW Pharmaceuticals Ltd. of Salisbury, England, is "trying to turn an illegal plant into a pharmaceutically regulated product" by developing cannabis-based medicines that are not smoked, said Dr. David C. Hadorn, the company's North American medical director. The University of Iowa's Colleges of Nursing and Medicine sponsored the two-day conference to help health care professionals and providers learn how to obtain and properly use medical marijuana. MELANIE C. DREHER, the nursing school's dean, said the conference was needed because thousands of Americans use marijuana medically even though it is illegal in most states. Voters in at least seven states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon and Washington) have approved initiatives intended to make marijuana legal for medical purposes. But many doctors are afraid to recommend it because the federal government has threatened to prosecute them.

THE TRUCKER, Little Rock, Ark., April 9 -- A drug common to over-the-counter allergy medicines used by millions might affect drivers more than liquor, a study suggests. University of Iowa researchers tested 40 allergy sufferers in a driving simulator. They found that the standard dose of antihistamine contained in Benadryl and similar medicines had a greater effect than a few drinks on driving "coherence" -- the ability to match the speed of the vehicle ahead. The antihistamine, diphenhydramine, also had an effect similar to alcohol on steering stability and the likelihood of crossing into the oncoming lane, according to the study in the Annals of Internal Medicine. ''We were quite surprised to find that diphenhydramine may have an even greater impact on the complex task of operating an automobile than does alcohol,'' said JOHN WEILER, a University of Iowa medical professor. ''That sends a chilling message. You would not want to be on the road when someone is driving at you who is taking these."

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH, April 9 -- A program designed to change the way children are taught science is co-directed by GEORGE D. CAIN of the University of Iowa. One second-grade class in Missouri took part in a pilot program on butterflies. In the test, the children hatched larvae into butterflies and then wrote about the experience.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 9 -- The author of an article on potential conflicts of interest when reporters write books recalls Star Tribune religion writer Nolan Zavoral's three-month leave in 1997 to write a book about UNIVERSITY OF IOWA wrestling coach Dan Gable. Near the end of his leave, Zavoral attended a press conference where Gable announced his retirement. Zavoral told me, "My attendance was mandatory for the book, but I also felt an obligation to write a news story for the Star Tribune. I culled a few of the better quotes for the newspaper. I didn't regret my decision. The paper, after all, was holding open a reporting position for me. And some of the information I used in the book came from previous assignments covering Gable for the Star Tribune."
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=RR09&date=09-Apr-2000&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, April 8 -- In a story on the allure of sweepstakes, DONALD BLACK, a University of Iowa psychology professor who has studied gambling, says "It's part of the American system that we can become millionaires. Because of the booming economy, our goals are much greater. Instead of a $100,000 prize, we expect to become a millionaire."

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, April 8 -- A story about the fight against bacteria resistant to antibiotics quotes RONALD JONES, a pathology professor at the University of Iowa who says development of a new class of antimicrobial drugs faces at least two obstacles. He says magainins, unlike other antibiotics -- have an extremely high molecular weight beyond what normally is administered intravenously, and they can't be absorbed through the digestive tract, making oral treatment difficult.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 7 -- The paper ran an excerpt of Memoirs of a Cold War Son, written by Gaines Post Jr., a professor emeritus of history at Claremont McKenna College, and being published this month by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i31/31b01101.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 7 -- In recent weeks, colleges and universities have been asked to choose between two programs -- the Fair Labor Association (F.L.A.) and the Worker Rights Consortium (W.R.C.)-- that would help them ensure that the clothing and goods that carry the college logo are produced in accord with fair labor practices. In fact, no inherent incompatibility between those programs exists. For example, Brown University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have chosen to join both the F.L.A. and the W.R.C.. In the past several months, however, five major universities -- Georgetown University, Indiana University at Bloomington, the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, the University of Pennsylvania, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison -- have yielded to student demands that they not participate in the F.L.A.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i31/31b00501.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 7 -- The Gifts & Bequests column says the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA received $1.5 million from the estates of Albert and Mildred (Ruth) Lindsay for scholarships.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i31/31a04103.htm

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, April 7 -- Security has been stepped up at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA after another death threat was delivered to a black student this week, school officials said on Thursday. The unidentified student found a threatening note and a box outside his apartment door.

ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE, April 6 -- Couples who work odd shifts so they can watch their own children are a rarity. In talking to parents working different shifts, sociology professor JENNIFER GLASS of the University of Iowa said she did not find many who defied the clock for the sake of family child care. "Very few of them said they changed their work schedules so their spouse or partners could watch the children," Glass said. "It's a major stress."

TAMPA (Fla.) TRIBUNE, April 6 -- Six Purdue University students protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to manufacture college-logo clothing entered their ninth day of a hunger strike Wednesday in West Lafayette, Ind., while 12 students in Kentucky were arrested during a sit-in over the same issue. Demonstrations also were held at Tulane University in New Orleans and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Purdue students are demanding that Purdue join the Workers Rights Consortium, a sweatshop monitoring group.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 6 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 6 in the WALL STREET JOURNAL, April 1 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE, March 31 in the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL and March 30 in the DETROIT FREE PRESS, DENVER POST, TIMES-PICAYUNE (New Orleans, La.), PLAIN DEALER (Cleveland, Ohio), COLUMBUS DISPATCH (Ohio) and THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE of Riverside, Calif.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 6 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?" gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.

LINCOLN JOURNAL STAR, Neb., April 6 -- A former traveling comedian currently on trial for a rape in Nebraska has been charged with a second Iowa attack. Assistant Johnson County Attorney Anne Lahey said Tuesday that her office quietly charged Vinson Champ with first-degree kidnapping months ago for a September 1996 rape of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/040600/loc/sto1

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, April 6 -- Five Purdue University students protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to manufacture college-logo clothing entered their ninth day of a hunger strike Wednesday in West Lafayette, Ind., while 12 students in Kentucky were arrested during a sit-in over the same issue. Demonstrations also were held at Tulane University in New Orleans and at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Purdue students are demanding that Purdue join the Workers Rights Consortium, a sweatshop monitoring group.

YAHOO! NEWS, April 6 -- Security has been stepped up at the University of Iowa after another death threat was delivered to a black student this week, school officials said on Thursday. The unidentified student found a threatening note and a box outside his apartment door on Tuesday. "This really ratchets it up in terms of the security because this was an action taken at someone's home," University of Iowa Vice President ANN RHODES said of the latest incident. Students from the University of Iowa business school are signing a letter of support to be sent to the dental school. "People, by signing the card and showing their support, show they actually do care," said BEN FAGERLIND, a business student.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000406/ts/rights_school_1.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, April 6 -- The Chronicle's daily digest, sent via e-mail to subscribers, and the "Today's News" feature on the paper's Web site say that Philip Fisher, a professor of English and American literature, and Elaine Scarry, a professor of aesthetics and the general theory of value, both of Harvard University, have been selected as this year's winners of the Truman Capote Award for Literary Criticism. The prize, administered by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, carries a cash prize of $50,000, which will be shared by the winners.
http://chronicle.com/daily/2000/04/2000040602n.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 6 -- A story about campus protests of sweatshops says students at the University of Michigan, the University of Wisconsin, the University of Pennsylvania and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have staged protests in recent months. It also says that Iowa is one of several Big Ten Conference universities that have joined the Workers Rights Consortium.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/2000/04/06/national0356EDT0483.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the FOX MARKETWIRE Web site.
http://www.foxmarketwire.com/wires/0405/f_ap_0405_56.sml
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on NEW JERSEY ONLINE, the Web site for THE STAR-LEDGER and THE TIMES.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/2000/apr/06/040600330.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on ALABAMA LIVE, a Web site developed in cooperation with THE BIRMINGHAM NEWS, MOBILE REGISTER and THE HUNTSVILLE TIMES.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on the NEWSDAY Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on CANADIAN ONLINE EXPLORER, a news, sports, entertainment, finance and business Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 6 on MERCURY CENTER, the Web site of the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS.

NEW YORK TIMES, April 5 -- The University of Iowa is holding a three-day conference on the therapeutic use of marijuana. Billed as the first of its kind, organizers say the conference is being held in response to a report last year by the Institute of Medicine. A report by the federal advisory panel said marijuana can help fight pain and nausea and should be tested further in scientific trials. "If there can be some enlightenment, that would be wonderful," said MELANIE DREHER, dean of Iowa's College of Nursing and a former board member of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. "I think that people need to know the whole picture of marijuana. That, in fact, it's not just a recreational drug but has medicinal value."

NANDO TIMES, April 5 -- Protesting the alleged use of sweatshops to manufacture college-logo clothing, a group of Purdue students entered their ninth day of a hunger strike Wednesday. In Kentucky, 12 students were arrested during a sit-in over the same issue. Demonstrations were also held at Tulane University in New Orleans and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Purdue protesters are demanding that Purdue join the Workers Rights Consortium, a sweatshop monitoring group. Elsewhere, 30 Iowa students staged a sit-in outside their president's office to support the Purdue strikers. The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.

NANDO TIMES, April 5 -- The University of Iowa is holding a three-day conference on the therapeutic use of marijuana. Billed as the first of its kind, organizers say the conference is being held in response to a report last year by the Institute of Medicine. A report by the federal advisory panel said marijuana can help fight pain and nausea and should be tested further in scientific trials. "If there can be some enlightenment, that would be wonderful," said MELANIE DREHER, dean of Iowa's College of Nursing and a former board member of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. "I think that people need to know the whole picture of marijuana. That, in fact, it's not just a recreational drug but has medicinal value." The Nando Times, based in North Carolina, is a Web site for the Raleigh News & Observer newspaper.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the OGDEN NEWSPAPERS Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the NEWSDAY Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the ALABAMA LIVE Web site. Alabama Live is developed in cooperation with three Alabama newspapers: The Birmingham News, Mobile Register and The Huntsville Times.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on NEW JERSEY ONLINE, the Web site for THE STAR-LEDGER and THE TIMES.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site.
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/thrive/2000/apr/05/040500290.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 5 on OREGON LIVE, a Web site affiliated with The Oregonian newspaper.

MODESTO BEE, Calif., April 5 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA education experts recently attended the International Conference on Learning With Technology at Temple University, where they said early results from a three-year study of laptop use among fifth-graders found teachers must receive appropriate training or the students will use the machines only for word processing, instead of as tools that extend learning opportunities.

NEW YORK POST, April 5 -- The Justice Department is considering a plan to seek immediate punishment of Microsoft to prevent the software giant from using the appeals process to consolidate its hold over the high-tech industry, The Post has learned. A defiant Microsoft Chairman Bill Gates signaled that it would be business as usual while Microsoft appeals federal Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson's blockbuster ruling this week that the company violated antitrust laws with its hardball business practices. The Justice Department and 19 states, including New York, that sued Microsoft are considering plans to stop Gates in his tracks by year-end. "I do expect the government to ask for some intermediate relief," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor who has been consulting for the government on the case.
The same Reuters article ran April 4 on the YAHOO!FINANCE Web site.
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/000404/48.html
The same Reuters article ran April 4 on the YAHOO!NEWS Web site.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, April 5 -- With the guilty verdict in the Microsoft Corp. antitrust trial, the relatively easy part is over for the federal judge who heard the case. Now U.S. District Court Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson, with help from lawyers from the Justice Department and the 19 states that brought the lawsuit, must figure out how to redress the alleged harm caused by the software giant's anti-competitive behavior. Jackson will probably allow both sides to present witnesses during the next phase of the case. The government hasn't tipped its hand on what it will seek, other than its general insistence on desiring the most effective cure, thus leaving the door open to requesting a breakup of the company. If Jackson decides to go that route, the challenge becomes just how to dismantle the firm to make the high-tech sector more competitive. In the annals of antitrust cases, some breakups were less than brilliant in execution, said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust law expert at the University of Iowa College of Law. "The Supreme Court has made some pretty serious mistakes in breaking up companies. It's broken them up in the wrong way." For instance, in a 1966 case, it broke up a silent-alarm company whose technology required the company to have sole control over the systems in numerous cities. But the order forcing the company to sell some operations wound up creating two firms with monopolies instead of one. "If the remedy's going to be a breakup, you have to be pretty careful to break it up in a way that creates competition," Hovenkamp said. "It takes some fairly creative thinking to break them up in the right way."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,2669,SAV-0004050278,FF.html

WASHINGTON POST, April 5 -- Saying that Microsoft put an "oppressive thumb on the scale of competitive fortune," U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson gave the Justice Department and 19 states near-total victory in their lawsuit. "Microsoft mounted a deliberate assault upon entrepreneurial efforts that, left to rise or fall on their own merits, could well have enabled the introduction of competition into the market for Intel-compatible PC operating systems," Jackson said. Microsoft vowed a vigorous appeal. But by separating the findings of fact from the conclusions of law, Jackson inoculated a good portion of his verdict from being overturned. "Microsoft has its work cut out for them if they are going to try to get this thrown out," said University of Iowa law professor HERB HOVENKAMP, who has advised the government in the case.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 5 -- A former traveling comedian currently on trial for a rape in Nebraska has been charged with a second Iowa attack. Assistant Johnson County Attorney Anne Lahey said Tuesday that her office quietly charged Vinson Champ with first-degree kidnapping months ago for a September 1996 rape of a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA student in Iowa City.

NEWSDAY, April 4 -- Microsoft Corp. violated antitrust law by leveraging the monopoly power of its Windows operating system to control the Web browser market, and by unlawfully "tying" the browser to Windows, a U.S. District Court judge ruled April 3. "The bottom line is that Microsoft faces not only aggressive relief in this court, but many, many private lawsuits, unless it can get every single conclusion of law reversed," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and professor at the University of Iowa Law School who has advised the government in the suit and whose work was cited by the judge. "That's not going to be an easy thing to do."

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 4 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.
http://www.suntimes.com/output/business/slop04.html

SEATTLE TIMES, April 4 -- Roughly 120 private antitrust suits have been filed against Microsoft in state and federal courts since Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson entered his findings of fact in the government's antitrust case in November. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa whose books on antitrust law were repeatedly cited in the judge's ruling yesterday, said Jackson's conclusions that Microsoft has violated antitrust laws in certain respects means "many of the private plaintiffs will not have to prove the violation a second time." "However, (1) they will still have to prove that the violation caused their harm, and they will still have to prove damages; and (2) the acts that injured them must be the same acts as the ones Jackson found to be unlawful."
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/local/html98/suit04_20000404.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, April 4 -- For years, major research universities across the country have imported experts in everything from Middle Eastern anthropology to advanced plant breeding using a visa program that allows U.S. employers to hire highly specialized foreign workers for as much as six years at a time. But the number of "H-1B" visas that the government grants for such professionals is limited. And with high-tech companies increasingly competing for the same visas for their own foreign job candidates, academia is feeling the squeeze. Deborah Spector, professor of biology at UC San Diego, said that with no more visas available this year, she is trying desperately to figure out a way to keep Chinese biologist Ming Ye in the lab. Ming, a post-doctoral fellow who received a student visa extension while he completed his graduate studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, needs an H-1B visa to stay in the country beyond August.
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/20000404/t000031409.html

SYDNEY MORNING HERALD, Australia, April 4 -- Commenting on the Microsoft anti-trust case, Nicholas Economides, an economist at New York University, said he likes the idea "of having a uniform price list for all customers" to prevent price discrimination by Microsoft. But others see significant pitfalls. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa who serves as an occasional consultant for the state and federal governments in this case, notes that there are myriad ways Microsoft could continue rewarding friends and punishing others, even with a uniform price list. The company could make special joint marketing arrangements with preferred customers, or give them special terms in technical-support contracts. "One of the things we know about pricing is that firms are extremely creative about evading price restrictions," Hovenkamp said.
http://www.smh.com.au:80/news/0004/01/text/business10.html
The same Associated Press article ran April 2 in the Web version of the DESERET NEWS of Utah.

BERGEN RECORD, N.J., April 3 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.
http://www.bergen.com/biz/sloppe03200004032.htm
The same Associated Press article ran April 2 on the BALTIMORE SUN We site.
The same Associated Press article ran March 31 on the USA TODAY Web site.

KANSAS CITY STAR, April 4 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers.
http://www.kcstar.com:80/item/pages/fyi.pat,fyi/37745c89.403,.html

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, April 4 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers. The same Associated Press article ran April 3 in the BOSTON HERALD and March 30 in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS.

SEATTLE TIMES, April 4 -- Saying that Microsoft put an "oppressive thumb on the scale of competitive fortune," U.S. District Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson gave the Justice Department and 19 states near-total victory in their lawsuit. "Microsoft mounted a deliberate assault upon entrepreneurial efforts that, left to rise or fall on their own merits, could well have enabled the introduction of competition into the market for Intel-compatible PC operating systems," Jackson said. Microsoft vowed a vigorous appeal. But by separating the findings of fact from the conclusions of law, Jackson inoculated a good portion of his verdict from being overturned. "Microsoft has its work cut out for them if they are going to try to get this thrown out," said University of Iowa law professor HERB HOVENKAMP, who has advised the government in the case. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran April 4 in the PROVIDENCE (R.I.) JOURNAL.

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, April 3 -- Researchers estimate that 5 million Americans suffer from eating disorders, about 90 percent of them women. Experts say that in recent years more and more men are being diagnosed with anorexia or bulimia and can spend years wandering aimlessly through the nation's health-care system. Few eating-disorder programs treat men. Those that do, like the Renfrew Center in Philadelphia, severely restrict the programs offered to males. "The problem with all of these treatment centers is that they are gender-biased," said ARNOLD ANDERSEN, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorder Programs at the University of Iowa and an expert on anorexia and bulimia. "They either exclude males or claim they don't know how to treat them."

FORBES.COM, April 3 -- In a scathing 45-page opinion, a federal judge said Microsoft smothered competition by bullying computer makers and Internet service providers to protect its Windows software, which is used on 90 percent of the world's personal computers. It is too early to predict the judge's remedies, but legal experts say the harsh nature of his verdict could presage major changes at Microsoft. "If the judge believes the problem is structural, he may opt to split up the company," says HERBERT HOVENKAMP, professor of antitrust law at the University of Iowa and a consultant for the federal government and 19 states. "If he deems the problem behavioral, then he could alter its business practices. Of course, there is the 'house of horribles' option: The Supreme Court or another court could throw out the case and we would start all over again," he adds.

FOXNEWS, April 3 -- Frequent use of marijuana reduces blood flow to some parts of the brain, U.S. researchers report. But regular pot use does not appear to change brain structure or size, they note. "Although marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug,

surprisingly little attention has been given to the impact of frequent marijuana use on the structure or function of the human brain,'' lead researcher ROBERT BLOCK, an associate professor in the department of anesthesia at University of Iowa Health Care, said in a statement. Two studies on the effects of marijuana on the brain were recently published in the journal NeuroReport.
The same Reuters Health article ran April 3 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/20000403/hl/ada_30.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, April 3 -- The paper reprinted a New York Times feature on the National Advanced Driving Simulator (NADS) at the University of Iowa. "NADS is different because it's so incredibly realistic," said GINGER WATSON, the NADS branch chief of human factors and highway safety research at the University of Iowa. "We can expose people to a set of procedures when they are on a drug or off, with a device like a cell phone or without. Then we can put those same variables together over multiple drivers and record the results." "The possibilities are really endless for NADS," said the director of the simulator project, LEA DER CHEN. "If we could reduce the number of overall fatalities by even 1 percent, that would be a significant saving of lives."

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, April 3 -- WILLIAM BUSS, a University of Iowa professor of constitutional law, said the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to consider Nebraska's law banning a late-term abortion procedure could test a similar law passed in Iowa. "This decision is going to have huge implications for other places," Buss said. "When they decide the so-called partial-birth abortion issue, they are going to have decided it, and they don't want to decide it 20 times."

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, April 3 -- TOM LUTZ, an English professor at the University of Iowa, is profiled in an article on his book, "Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears." "Tears are sometimes considered pleasurable or profound, and sometimes dangerous, mysterious or deceptive," notes Lutz. The same article ran March 20 in the AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN.

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, April 2 -- A story on the Iowa Electronic Markets, run by the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, quotes JOYCE BERG, a University of Iowa accounting professor and one of the market's directors. She said market traders don't necessarily make a good cross-section of voters but that the market asks what traders think will actually happen; polls ask what people want to happen.

DAYTON DAILY NEWS, Ohio, April 2 -- A story about the high number of retiring university professors nationwide quotes BOB WILEY, who retired in January from the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. He said he listened to the ideas of younger, visiting professors, heard about their research projects and knew he was closing in on retirement. "It involves so many new and different techniques and ideas that I have a hard time relating to," said Wiley. "I think the science that I would have to offer is kind of dated, and it's not fair to expose students to science that's not really first-class." The same Associated Press article ran April 2 in the MORNING CALL of Allentown, Pa., the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL and the LEXINGTON HERALD-LEADER, in Kentucky.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, April 2 -- Electronic checkups enabled a Coralville, Iowa, cafeteria worker to return to work after her 93-year-old mother had brain surgery, says Mary Ann Murray, director of operations at resourceLink of Iowa, a joint venture between the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and a unit of Cyber-Care, Boynton Beach, Fla. When nurses began giving the mother videoconference check-ups each morning, her daughter was able to return to work.

DESERET NEWS, Utah, April 2 -- A story about the high number of retiring university professors nationwide quotes BOB WILEY, who retired in January from the University of Iowa College of Pharmacy. He said he listened to the ideas of younger, visiting professors, heard about their research projects and knew he was closing in on retirement. "It involves so many new and different techniques and ideas that I have a hard time relating to," said Wiley. "I think the science that I would have to offer is kind of dated, and it's not fair to expose students to science that's not really first-class."
The same Associated Press article ran April 2 on the LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 1 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 1 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site.
The same Associated Press article ran April 1 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site.

BERGEN (N.J.) RECORD, April 2 -- A story on compulsive shoppers quotes DONALD BLACK, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa who studies compulsive spending. "It's more and more being viewed as a medical problem," says Black. As with other compulsive disorders, experts bestow the designation on people whose actions disrupt their lives, causing marital, legal, or professional problems or forcing them into bankruptcy. One of Black's patients, for example, needed a conservator appointed to manage her money. Compulsive shopping is also, not surprisingly, a disease of affluence, he says. "Compulsive shopping is almost exclusively a disorder in developed countries," the professor notes.
http://www.bergen.com:80/biz/spenders200004021.htm

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, April 2 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA has published "Of Cabbages and Kings County: Agriculture and the Formation of Modern Brooklyn," by MARC LINDER and Lawrence S. Zacharias. This timely study of the effects of unchecked suburban sprawl charts the transformation of turn-of-the-century Brooklyn from a rural community into a tightly packed urban center.

THE ECONOMIST, April 1, March 18 -- The magazine continues to feature in its "Primary Colour" column a box depicting the daily prices of presidential candidates Al Gore and George W. Bush as traded in the University of Iowa's IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS. In graphs run March 18 and April 1, shares in Gore were selling for slightly more than shares in Bush.

STAR-LEDGER, Newark, N.J., April 1 -- Experts say people who communicate via computer are becoming increasingly informal -- and sloppy. E-mail is routinely strewn with typos, grammatical errors and various shortcuts, such as no capital letters. "A student wouldn't walk into a professor's office asking a question using bad English. Why would they send me that kind of mistake in an e-mail?'' gripes KENNETH BROWN, an assistant professor at the University of Iowa business school. An avid tracker of e-mail etiquette, Brown says he regularly chides students for sending sloppy e-mails to him and even prospective employers. The same Associated Press article ran April 1 in the OMAHA WORLD-HERALD and March 30 in the DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, THE STATE of Columbia, S.C., the SARASOTA HERALD-TRIBUNE, the PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and THE NEWS-TRIBUNE of Tacoma, Wash.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, April 1 -- The recent rankings of graduate schools by U.S. News & World Report were criticized by a number of deans, including N. WILLIAM HINES, the University of Iowa law college dean. "I don't think anybody who understand higher education well thinks that you can quantify the most important things," such as quality of teaching and faculty research, he said.

MORNING CALL, Allentown, Pa., April 1 -- Gov. Tom Vilsack and the mother of Matthew Shepard announced the establishment of a college scholarship program in Shepard' s name for openly gay high school students. Three scholarships a year will be given to gay high school graduates who want to attend one of Iowa' s three state universities. The scholarships will cover tuition, fees and books at the University of Northern Iowa, Iowa State University or the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.

PRESS-ENTERPRISE, (Riverside, Calif.), April 1 -- Commenting on the Microsoft anti-trust case, Nicholas Economides, an economist at New York University, said he likes the idea "of having a uniform price list for all customers" to prevent price discrimination by Microsoft. But others see significant pitfalls. HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law at the University of Iowa who serves as an occasional consultant for the state and federal governments in this case, notes that there are myriad ways Microsoft could continue rewarding friends and punishing others, even with a uniform price list. The company could make special joint marketing arrangements with preferred customers, or give them special terms in technical-support contracts. "One of the things we know about pricing is that firms are extremely creative about evading price restrictions," Hovenkamp said.

CLINICAL LABORATORY NEWS, April 2000 -- MICHAEL PFALLER, M.D., professor of pathology and public health at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is the author of an article on the diagnosis and management of infections diseases using new molecular biological methods. Pfaller is also co-director of the Clinical Microbiology Laboratory.

UPSCALE, April 2000 -- Self-identity is the theme of a long-overdue and much anticipated follow-up book by popular University of Iowa journalism professor and author VENISE BERRY. "All of Me" "is the windy city-based tale of a successful African-American broadcast journalist, Serpentine Williamson, who has suffered from a lifetime of woes about weight. So intense is her battle against the bulge and obsession to remain gorgeous for her boyfriend and fans that she eventually suffers a nervous breakdown and is hospitalized." Berry''s novel also is reviewed on March 27 in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, in the January-February 2000 issue of BLACK ISSUES BOOK REVIEW, the December 1999 issue of LIBRARY JOURNAL, the Nov. 1, 1999 issue of BOOKLIST and Oct. 25, 1999 in PUBLISHERS WEEKLY.

THE WRITER, April 2000 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS announces the Iowa Poetry Prize contest, open to writers who have published at least one volume of poetry. The deadline is May 31.

INFECTIOUS DISEASE NEWS, April 2000 -- RONALD N. JONES, M.D., lead investigator for the Community Respiratory Tract Micro Surveillance Program, is quoted in a story about how antibiotic resistance for respiratory tract infections has made its way from the hospital into the community. "Preliminary results show that antibiotic resistance is likely to be as troublesome a force to be reckoned with in the community as it has been in the community," said Jones, director of the Anti-infectives Research Center at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, department of pathology, medical microbiology division.

COMPUTERS IN LIBRARIES, April 2000 -- The University of Iowa has announced that J. DAVID MARTIN, head of the Marvin Pomerantz Business Library, is the first recipient of the Arthur Benton Excellence in Reference Services Professional Development Award. The $1,000 award is given biannually to a UI Libraries professional staff member who has demonstrated outstanding commitment in providing reference services for the UI community.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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