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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: April 21, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

KRONOS AND UPSHAW FEATURED ON KSUI MAY 1 -- Recordings by the Kronos Quartet and soprano Dawn Upshaw will be featured on a special program at 1 p.m. Monday, May 1 on University of Iowa classical-music radio station KSUI, 91.7 FM.

The program, hosted by Steve Slezak, will preview the Kronos/Upshaw premiere of their new world folk-music collaboration, "Tonight is the Night," at 8 p.m. Wednesday, May 3 in the UI Hancher Auditorium.

The Millennium Festival concert coincides with the release of the new Kronos CD "Caravan," featuring several works performed by the quartet last fall in Hancher.

Since its inception in 1973, Kronos has emerged as a leading voice for new work, without boundaries. More than 400 works have been written or arranged for Kronos, including numerous works commissioned by Hancher Auditorium for Iowa premieres. The quartet's "Pieces of Africa" CD, which became the largest selling string-quartet recording in history, originated in an
African-theme concert in Hancher.

Upshaw has become one of the world's most celebrated singers -- spanning opera, art-song recitals, popular songs, musical theater, recordings and television broadcasts -- noted for her commitment to performances of new music. She starred on the recording of the Henryk Gorecki Symphony No. 3, which sold more than a million copies.

Tickets for the May 3 concert are available from the Hancher box office, (319) 335-1160 or toll-free, 1-800-HANCHER.

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ARNOLD READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' MAY 1 -- Craig Arnold, winner of the 1999 Yale Younger Poets Award, judged by W.S. Merwin, will read from his collection "Shells" at 8 p.m. Monday, May 1 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Merwin called Arnold's poems "a gifted collection of daring writing," and critic Allan Jalon wrote in the Washington Post that Arnold's book "contains, like a brilliant shell, its own marvelous balance of fluidity and form."

Former Iowa Writers' Workshop faculty member Mark Doty wrote, "Craig Arnold's poems are as edgy as they are elegant, and possessed of a dark briny savor. Haunted by food -- which so often stands here for desire, and for the intractable fact of physicality -- Arnold's poems are energized by a deep nervousness about the body, a heady mixture of relish and horror about our common flesh."

Arnold, who has served as an editor at Quarterly West magazine, received the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship in 1996. His poem "Hot" was featured in The Best American Poetry 1998 and his work has also appeared in periodicals including Poetry, the Paris Review, the Yale Review, and the New Republic

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WOMEN'S CHORALE MAY 1 -- The Women's Chorale from the University of Iowa School of Music will present "A Classical Affair," a concert of classical choral music from Haydn to Stravinsky, at 8 p.m. Monday, May 1 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The concert, under the direction of choral conducting graduate assistant Rebecca Seeman, will be free and open to the public.

The Hadyn on the program will not be the well-known composer Joseph Haydn, but his brother, Johann Michael Haydn, who was a court musician and cathedral organist in Salzburg and a long-time friend of the Mozart family. The Women's Chorale will perform Haydn's Vesper in
F major, one of several works Haydn wrote for the choir boys of the Salzburg Cathedral. Haydn's Vesper will be performed with soloists from the chorale and a small instrumental ensemble.

Next on the program the Women's Chorale will perform three part-songs for female voices by Franz Schubert. The performance will conclude with Stravinsky's Cantata, for women's choir with soprano and tenor soloists. Tim Stalter, the director of choral activities at the School of Music, will be the tenor soloist, performing with soprano Cecilia M. Francis, an undergraduate member of the chorale. A small instrumental ensemble will accompany the performance.

Keyboard accompaniment for the concert will be by Koi Hin Samuel Kwok, a graduate student in choral conducting in the UI School of Music.

Stalter joined the UI faculty as director of choral activities in 1999. He directs Kantorei, the premier choral ensemble of the School of Music, teaches graduate conducting courses, and administers the graduate program in choral conducting. In addition to conducting and teaching choral music, Stalter is active as a tenor soloist in the United States and abroad. A specialist in the music of the Renaissance, Baroque and Classical periods, he is known for his performances as the Evangelist in the Passions of J.S. Bach and Heinrich Schuetz. He has appeared as tenor soloist with the North Carolina Symphony, the Robert Shaw Chamber Choir in Atlanta, the Classical Music Seminar and Festival in Eisenstadt, Austria, and the Shenandoah Valley Bach Festival. He has recorded as tenor soloist with conductor Robert Shaw on two compact discs.

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ROBERT SAYRE READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' MAY 2-- University of Iowa emeritus faculty member Robert Sayre will read from the recent anthology he edited, "Recovering the Prairie," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

"Recovering the Prairie" features articles by many authors, including UI faculty members Joni Kinsey, Ed Folsom, Tom Lutz, Rebecca Roberts and Shelton Stromquist. The book celebrates and examines the perspectives of artists, writers, native peoples, ecologists, and landscape architects -- Willa Cather, Aldo Leopold, Jens Jensen, Alexander Gardner, and many others -- who recognized the unique beauty of the prairie.

"Prairie enthusiasts will be delighted to read how diverse and interesting the human meanings of the prairie have been. 'Recovering the Prairie' is attractive, accessible, and eloquent," wrote Donald Worster of University of Kansas and author of "Nature's Economy."

Annick Smith, filmmaker and author of "Big Bluestem: Journey into the Tall Grass" wrote, "Like a prairie's landscape, these essays, together with the photographs, visual art, and illustrations, present a dense and varied interconnected whole, from roots to flowers to the beings who perceive and inhabit the land."

Sayre, who taught English and American literature at the UI, is also the editor of the anthology "American Lives" and of several other books, including "Take This Exit: Re-Discovering the Iowa Landscape."

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JAZZ LAB BAND AND UI DANCERS MAY 2 -- The Jazz Lab Band from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a free program in collaboration with the UI dance department at
8 p.m. Tuesday, May 2 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The Lab Jazz Band is under the direction of John Rapson, head of the jazz studies area of the UI School of Music. A student ensemble featuring instrumentation of the swing band and big band eras, the group plays a repertory that combines classic works from the jazz stars of the '20s through the '40s with contemporary big band charts and arrangements representing the works of diverse contemporary artists.

For the May 2 concert, the Lab Band will open with a Prologue of four jazz classics from a variety of styles: Jelly Roll Morton's "King Porter Stomp," W.C. Handy's "Bugle Call Rag," "Range" by Kim Richmond, and "Moanin'" by Charles Mingus.

The remainder of the program will be a reprise of a collaboration with the UI dance department, a work choreographed by graduate student Simone Ferro and performed on an MFA Thesis Concert earlier this month. Ferro, a Master of Fine Arts candidate in choreography from
Sao Paulo, Brazil, created a piece for an ensemble of 14 dancers and an actress entitled "Club Prive au-dessus de tout soupcons" (Private club above all suspicions).

Using music by a variety of jazz composers -- including Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman and Bob Mintzer -- Ferro imagines a nightclub where everyday people realize their fantasies of fame and romance, if only for a night.

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HAHN READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' MAY 3 -- Chilean poet Oscar Hahn, a faculty member of the University of Iowa, will read from his new collection, "Stolen Verses," at 8 p.m.

Wednesday, May 3 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Ray Olson wrote in Booklist, "The Chilean Oscar Hahn is a genuine surrealist wizard, capable of rousing uneasiness with memorable imagery that is pregnant with violence and lust. . . . A powerful and beautiful collection."

Hahn's other books include "Arte de morir," "Mal de amor," "Imagenes nucleares," "Estrellas fijas en un cielo blanco," and "Tratado de sortilegios."

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UNIVERSITY AND CONCERT BANDS PERFORM MAY 3 -- The University and Concert Bands from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a joint concert at 8 p.m. Wednesday,
May 3 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus. UI faculty member Matthew Sintchak will be featured as saxophone soloist. The concert will be free and open to the public.

Sintchak will play "Diversion" for alto saxophone and band by Bernhard Heiden with the Concert Band under the direction of Kevin Kastens, a member of the School of Music faculty and director of the Hawkeye Marching Band. "Diversion" was written during World War II when Heiden, a native German and immigrant to the United States, was serving as assistant bandmaster with the 445th Army Service Forces Band.

The Concert Band will also perform the concert overture "Festivo" by British composer Edward Gregson; "Variations on a Shaker Melody" by Aaron Copland, a band version of the variations Copland had written on the Shaker tune "Simple Gifts" for his ballet "Appalachian Spring"; "Four Scottish Dances" by British composer Malcolm Arnold; and "The Invincible Eagle" by John Philip Sousa.

The University Band will be conducted by Chris Nicholas, a graduate assistant in the School of Music, in five works: "Signature" by Belgian composer Jan Van der Roost, one of a new generation of European composers writing music for wind ensembles; "Pastorale Setting: Llwyn Onn," an arrangement of the Welsh folk song known to Americans as "The Ash Grove," by Australian composer Brian Hogg; Ralph Vaughan Williams "Sea Songs," written in 1924 for British military bands; two movements of "Cajun Folk Songs" by Frank Ticheli; and John Philip Sousa's "Black Horse Troop March."

A visiting professor at the UI, Sintchak has previously taught at the University of Hartford; Nazareth College and Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, N.Y.; and at the Eastman School of Music, where he won a 1996-97 Teaching Prize. An avid performer of contemporary music, Sintchak has also given traditional solo recitals across the United States and performed with the Hartford and Portland symphonies and the Rochester Philharmonic, and with the Eastman Wind Ensemble on two tours to Japan.

Before coming to the UI in 1998 Kastens served five years at the University of Missouri, where he directed the marching band, Marching Mizzou, and the pep band for men's basketball

games, Mini Mizzou. Kastens has presented workshops and clinics on marching band techniques and computer drill design and appeared as guest conductor at band clinics throughout the Midwest and Canada. He has had numerous articles published on instrumental music education in the Music Educators Journal and other professional publications. A leader in the field of computer-assisted marching band drill design, he helped develop "Drill Quest," a drill-writing software program.

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UPSHAW PRESENTS VOICE MASTERCLASS MAY 4 -- Opera and art-song diva Dawn Upshaw will present a voice master class at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, May 4 in Clapp Recital Hall on the University of Iowa campus. The public is invited to observe, free of charge.

The master class will follow the world premiere the night before of "Tonight is the Night," Upshaw's collaboration with the Kronos Quartet, commissioned in part by the UI Hancher Auditorium for its Millennium Festival.

Upshaw has become one of the world's most celebrated singers -- spanning opera, art-song recitals, popular songs, musical theater, recordings and television broadcasts -- noted for her commitment to performances of new music. She starred on the recording of the Henryk Gorecki Symphony No. 3, which became the largest-selling recording of contemporary classical music ever, with sales of more than a million copies.

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LIPMAN READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' MAY 4 -- Elinor Lipman will read from her new comic novel of American manner, "The Ladies Man," at 8 p.m. Thursday, May 4 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM
-- is free and open to the public.

A Kirkus Reviews article called the book "a romantic comedy of errors by the novelist whose previous labors in this vineyard have established her as a master hand."

Arthur Golden writes, "Elinor Lipman is that rarest of things, a charming and funny writer who is also very wise. But your spouse will hate you for reading this book; you'll stay up late nights, shaking the bed with laughter."

Lipman is also the author of "The Way Men Are," "Into Love and Out Again," "Isabel's Bed," "Then She Found Me" and "The Inn at Lake Devine." Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Salon, the Boston Globe, Cosmopolitan, Self, Ladies' Home Journal, Yankee, Wigwag and Playgirl. She has taught writing at Simmons, Hampshire, and Smith Colleges.

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HARRISON & REARDON READ 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' MAY 5 -- University of Iowa Writers' Workshop alumna Kathryn Harrison, author of the controversial incest memoir "The Kiss," will read from her new novel, "The Binding Chair," at 8 p.m. Friday, May 5 in the Prairie Lights bookstore at 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From

Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

She will be joined by playwright and fiction writer Lisa Reardon, who will read from her new mystery, "Blameless."

A Kirkus Reviews critique of "The Binding Chair" called the book, "an engrossing tale contrasting the lives of a young Caucasian and her Chinese step-aunt. Harrison is a powerful, hypnotic writer fascinated by the psychosexual elements of a secretive human life. . . A deft weaving together of sexuality and the macabre into a rich fictional tapestry." A Booklist review described Harrison as "a novelist of sure powers with a taste for the erotic, the taboo, and the macabre."

Harrison is also the author of the novels "Thicker Than Water," "Exposure" and "Poison."

Reardon, who teaches in the Gotham Writers Workshop, has taught creative writing and playwriting at the Circle Repertory School, and she currently runs a weekly writing group for the Adolescent After School Program at St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital.

Her first novel, "Billy Dead," was named one of the Top 20 First Novels of 1998 by Booklist. It has been translated into four languages and adapted for the screen by Madonna's MadGuy Films.

Her play "The Sweet Trade" was commissioned by the Manhattan Theatre Club and won the Berrilla Kerr Grant for Playwriting, and her play "Blush at Nothing" was chosen by Jeff Daniels for the inaugural production of his Purple Rose Theatre in Chelsea, Mich. She is the recipient of a 1992 Van Lier Playwriting Fellowship.

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CHORAL CONCERT BY KANTOREI MAY 5 -- Kantorei, the premiere vocal ensemble of the University of Iowa School of Music, will present a free concert under the direction of UI choral conducting graduate student John S. Spomer at 8 p.m. Friday, May 5 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The first half of the concert will be based on J.S. Bach's well known Easter cantata, "Christ lag in Todes Banden" (Christ lay in the bonds of death). It will open with the chorale "Christ ist erstanden" (Christ is arisen), which served as a model for the chorale melody "Christ lag in Todes Banden," one of several chorale melodies written by Martin Luther. The chorale will be followed by a performance of Bach's cantata, which uses Luther's choral tune in each movement.

The second half of the concert will be an eclectic mix of old and new choral pieces, ranging from the Renaissance to the 1960s. Works performed on this portion of the program will be "Ascendit Deus" by Peter Phillips; "Annerle, wo warst du?" (Annerle, where were you?) by Heinrich Poos; Trois Chansons (Three songs) by Claude Debussy; and "Walking on the green grass" by Michael Hennagin.

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UNDERGRADUATE DANCE CONCERT MAY 5-6 -- New choreography by undergraduate students in the University of Iowa dance department will be featured in the spring Space/Place

Concert at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, May 5-6 in the Space/Place Theatre of UI North Hall.

The contemporary-dance works, selected by a faculty adjudication panel, range from a mysterious jazz piece to an exploration of relationships, and even an abstraction of three sheep cavorting to Handel's "Messiah."

The student choreographers are Tarek Halaby, Kerrie Anne Thoma, Jessica vanDusen, Rebecca Marcotte, Rachel Urie and Emily Price.

Admission will be $5 ($4 for students and senior citizens) at the door.

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CAMERATA SINGERS PRESENT MIXED CHOIR PROGRAM MAY 6 -- The Camerata Singers from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a program of music for mixed choir under the direction of UI doctoral choral conducting student Koi Hin Samuel Kwok at 8 p.m. Saturday, May 6 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

A choral ensemble of the UI School of Music, Camerata is made up of both UI students and community members. The group includes approximately 60 singers. Their concert will be free and open to the public.

The first half of the concert will be devoted to a single work, the Missa Brevis (short mass) in D major, K. 194, by W.A. Mozart. The performance will feature soloists from the group and an instrumental ensemble, including cellist Amos Yang from the Maia String Quartet.

After intermission a group of madrigal singers from Camerata will sing three pieces by Thomas Morley, one of the leading composers of Elizabethan England: "Fyer, fyer," "April is in my mistress' face," and Morley's best known madrigal, "Now is the month of maying."

Other works on the program will include Kwok's setting of Psalm 100, "Like as the Hart Desirith the Waterbrooks" by Herbert Howells, and "O Clap Your Hands" by Ralph Vaughan Williams.

Keyboard accompanists for the concert will be Richard Bloesch from the School of Music faculty, and UI graduate students Hannah Lee and Forte Zhang.

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STUDENT PRINT SALE MAY 7 -- Graduate students in the printmaking area of the University of Iowa School of Art and Art History will have work on sale from noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, May 7 in the printmaking studio area of the UI Art Building.

An annual event, the sale will include prints by more than 20 graduate student artists from around the United States. Works will be available in a wide variety of printmaking media. Prices, described by the students as "bargains," customarily cover a wide range, but are usually less than the cost of comparable works by established professional artists.

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UNIVERSITY CHOIR SINGS MAY 7 -- The University Choir from the University of Iowa School of Music will sing a free concert under the direction of graduate choral conducting student Gregory Milliron at 8 p.m. Sunday, May 7 in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The concert will feature works by three composers that Milliron considers "arguably three of the most important composers of the 20th century: Benjamin Britten, Aaron Copland and Paul Hindemith."

Two sacred works by Britten will be included on the concert program, "Hymn to St. Peter" and the "Te Deum" in C major. Both sacred and secular works by Copland will be performed: "Thou, O Jehovah, abidith," "Help Us, O Lord," and "The Promise of Living." Hindemith's "Six Chanson on poems by Rainer Maria Rilke" will also be performed.

In addition to these featured works, the choir will sing works by the Italian Renaissance composer Giovanni Perluigi da Palestrina and the 20th-century Swedish composer Hugo Alfven.