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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: April 14, 2000

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

CULTURAL HISTORIAN GUILBAUT WILL SPEAK APRIL 18 -- Serge Guilbaut, a renowned cultural historian and chair of the department of fine arts at the University of British Columbia, will speak on America's cultural invasion of Europe at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 18 at the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

Guilbaut is speaking at the UI as the annual Bette R. Spriestersbach Distinguished Lecturer at the museum. His lecture, "Playing Cow-Boys and Gauls in 1955 Paris: Breton, Estienne and the American Cultural Invasion," will be free and open to the public.

Guilbaut is best known for his book "How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom and the Cold War," a provocative reinterpretation of the political and cultural history of the early cold war years. In this widely read book, as well as in his other works, Guilbaut maintains an aggressively confrontational stance as he explores the complicated, intertwining relationships among art, politics and ideology.

According to a critic in the New York Times Book Review, "by insisting that art, even art of the avant-garde, is part of the general culture, not autonomous or above it, he forces us to think differently not only about art and art history but about society itself."

Guilbaut has written many scholarly books and articles in English and in French, including "Reconstructing Modernism," which is soon to be published in a French edition. He has been awarded the French title of "Chevalier des Palmes Academiques" and was selected as cultural consultant for the city of Marseille, France, including the assessment of the art historical program of the University of Aix en Provence. He has received the Killam Faculty Research Fellowship from the University of British Columbia three times, and the University's Killam Research Prize.

The annual Spriestersbach Lecture at the Museum of Art honors Bette R. Spriestersbach, a museum docent and a former program associate in the Child Health Specialty Clinics in the UI Hospital School. She is the wife of former UI Vice President Duane C. Spriestersbach, who endowed the lecture in 1992 through a gift to the University of Iowa Foundation.

The UI Museum of Art is located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

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D'ESASMO READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' APRIL 24 -- First novelist Stacey D'Erasmo will read from "Tea" at 8 p.m. Monday, April 24 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

D'Erasmo, who was an editor and essayist for the Village Voice, made her first novel a coming-of-age tale, following her character from girlhood to early 20s.

A review in the San Francisco Chronicle proclaimed, "written with a strength and daring that makes reading it a breathtaking pleasure... 'Tea' will no doubt be remembered as one of the significant novels of the year."

UI Writers' Workshop graduate Michael Cunningham, who won the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for "The Hours," wrote, "Tea is a pure and profound book; a ravishing book. After I'd finished reading it I couldn't start reading anything else for a while-- it just didn't seem necessary. Stacey D'Erasmo is, simply, the real thing, and this book is a work of art."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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WALDNER READS 'LIVE FROM PRAIRIE LIGHTS' APRIL 25 -- Liz Waldner, poet in residence at Cornell College, will read from her Iowa Poetry Prize-winning volume, "A Point is That Which Has No Part," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, April 25 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City. The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Poet Bin Ramke wrote, "The elegance and passion which gleams from the pages of Liz Waldner's collection is unlike any other poetry being written now, but is also and oddly like much that is being thought in various other fields -- this is a book about strangeness, the making strange of the vision so that Truth will reveal itself. . . . The music of the mind is brought into congruence with the music of the page, of the arbitrary but beautiful and delicate words themselves -- and the sense is left to fend for itself."

Waldner's first book was "Homing Devices."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series' web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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FILM SCREENING AT UI MUSEUM OF ART APRIL 26 -- "Los Ninos Abandonados," a 1975 film by photographer and filmmaker Danny Lyon, will be shown at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 26 in the University of Iowa Museum of Art.

The screening is part of the weekly Perspectives series held Wednesdays at the museum and is presented in conjunction with the exhibition "Danny Lyon and Nathan Lerner," on display at the museum through Aug. 6. Admission is free to both the museum and the series.

"Danny Lyon and Nathan Lerner" presents photographs from the museum's permanent collection, showing the contrast between the two artists' styles.

The film follows the daily existence of a group of children abandoned in the streets of Santa Marta, Columbia, and the subculture they create for themselves. The children portrayed in the film live outside the institutions of society. Abandoned by the society around them, they learn, out of necessity, to cope and survive in a world of absolute freedom.

Lyon has documented disenfranchised groups since the mid-1960s. Considering himself an "advocacy journalist," he develops long-term relationships within groups on the fringes of society. His renowned book "The Bikeriders" (1968) focuses on the Chicago Outlaws, a motorcycle gang Lyon rode with during 1965 and 1966. Lyon has also photographed and filmed in small towns in New Mexico, Columbia and Haiti, and more recently within Native American reservations in the western United States.

The UI Museum of Art, located on North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of the film screening. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1999-2000 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

For information on the UI Museum of Art, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~artmus on the World Wide Web. Information is available on other UI arts events at http://www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr.