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UI in the News

September, 1999

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AUSTRIA KULTUR, September/October 1999 -- DAVID GOMPPER, director of the Center for New Music and an associate professor of composition at the University of Iowa, authored an article on Austria's music tradition and on a new generation of Austrian composers, including Klaus Johns.

DECISION IN IMAGING ECONOMICS, September/October 1999 -- With funding from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Van Buren County Hospital in Keosauqua, Iowa, started using teleradiology in 1992. Today, radiologic technologists at Van Buren use a sophisticated digitizer to scan films and transmit diagnostic-quality images via a T1 line to radiologists at the University Hospital School almost 100 miles away.

SATURDAY EVENING POST, September/October 1999 -- INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, said many women who suffer from incontinence during sports or other activities are unaware that help exists. "It's important not to give up exercise, since one risk factor for stress incontinence is being overweight," says Nygaard, whose study of 290 female exercisers ages 17 to 68 found that one in three leaked during exercise.

HEALTHY LIVING, September/October 1999 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, Ph.D., a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about a 1967 prediction that by the year 2000 people would work no more than four days a week and less than eight hours a day. "Work has become a form of religion," Hunnicutt said. "We've lost community, and it's unrealistic to think we can find it in the workplace."

APBNEWS.COM, Sept. 30 -- The National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, which began its annual conference in Philadelphia Thursday, has cited a study by a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA law professor that the group says found that blacks are "40 percent" more likely to receive a death sentence than non-blacks. APBNEWS.COM is an on-line news service covering police and crime news, information and entertainment.
http://www.apbnews.com:80/newscenter/breakingnews/1999/09/30/death0930_01.html

FOXNEWS.COM, Sept. 29 -- A specific gene mutation, found in about 1 in every 33 Americans tested, greatly increases the likelihood of having a deaf child, researchers report, including study co-author RICHARD J.H. SMITH of the University of Iowa. These findings "change the information we can provide to parents if they (already) have a deaf child,'' Smith said when he presented the findings at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery, held this week in New Orleans.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/health/wires2/0929/h_rt_0929_27.sml

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 29 -- Photogen Technologies Inc. received an option from MARY J.C. HENDRIX of the University of Iowa Cancer Center to form a new company. Photogen said Wednesday it would provide $3 million and own 85 percent of Photogen Biotechnologies Inc., the new company. The company would focus on commercializing diagnostic and therapeutic products for diseases such as prostate and breast cancer. Photogen is a development-stage company. The story, which ran on the Wall Street Journal Web site, was from Dow Jones Newswires.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=BT-CO-19990929-002912.djml

THE OREGONIAN, Sept. 29 -- A feature about DEE WALSH, executive director of REACH Community Development Corp., says she became interested in housing when, as a junior at the University of Iowa, she left life in the dormitories only to discover there was a huge housing shortage in Iowa City that she blamed largely on a failed urban renewal project. The situation created unaffordable housing costs, she said, leaving many students on the outside looking in.
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/news/99/09/st092913.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Sept. 29 -- A feature on Robert Homma, a partner in Dimson Homma, a Manhattan shop that sells Ming furniture, celadon porcelain and rare live birds, says the 51-year-old, third-generation Japanese-American studied painting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in the 1970s.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/09/29/HO94602.DTL

BBCNEWS.COM, Sept. 29 -- Sniffing DNA from bacteria might help prevent asthma attacks and scientists are now looking to develop inhalers containing genetic material for sufferers, say researchers from the University of Iowa, including lung specialist JOEL KLINE. The researchers, from the University of Iowa, reckon such a product might be available within five years, even though they have only so far tested their theory on mice.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_461000/461138.stm

REUTERS HEALTH, Sept. 29 -- A specific gene mutation, found in about 1 in every 33 Americans tested, greatly increases the likelihood of having a deaf child, researchers report, including study co-author RICHARD J.H. SMITH of the University of Iowa. These findings "change the information we can provide to parents if they (already) have a deaf child,'' Smith said when he presented the findings at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Otolaryngology -- Head and Neck Surgery, held this week in New Orleans.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19990929/hl/dea12_1.html

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Sept. 27 -- Despite a strong year for many investors, the University of Iowa Foundation lost at least $5 million on investments in the last fiscal year, said UI Foundation President MICHAEL NEW. The endowment supports departments throughout the university by paying for student scholarships and special teaching appointments, among other things. The loss comes after an eight-year average gain of nearly 14 percent.

THE NEW YORKER, Sept. 27 -- CLARA OLESON of the University of Iowa Labor Center is quoted in a story about the public's disinterest in the presidential candidates' platforms this early in the campaign. "I'd give (Democrat) Bill Bradley a solid six on a one-to-ten scale," said Oleson, who watched speeches in Iowa by both Bradley and Vice President Al Gore. "People like him, but he lacked the sort of passion that connects with this sort of crowd. And Gore? A four and a half."

HISTORY CHANNEL, Sept. 27 -- The NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR (NADS) at the University of Iowa was featured in an hour-long special about simulators titled "Modern Marvels" Monday night. The segment included an animation depicting what the NADS simulator will look like once construction is completed.

USA TODAY, Sept. 27 -- Despite a strong year for many investors, the University of Iowa Foundation lost at least $5 million on investments in the last fiscal year, said foundation President MICHAEL NEW. The endowment supports departments throughout the university by paying for student scholarships and special teaching appointments, among other things. The loss comes after an eight-year average gain of nearly 14 percent.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

BUSINESS WEEK, Sept. 27 -- University of Iowa business professor TODD HOUGE is quoted on a story titled "Building the Perfect Shareholder: IPO issuers want to use the Net to weed out stock-flippers." Says Hogue: "I haven't made a trade in nine months. But if I had an IPO with a 300 percent return in one day, I can't say I wouldn't sell it."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 24 -- University of Iowa English professor BROOKS LANDON is quoted in an article about SparkNotes, a Web-based service that offers free, student-written summaries of some 40 works of English and American literature, together with a message board for questions. "The technology is simply making available, in new forms, shortcuts that have always been there," Landon said. "As long as the students are looking for the shortcuts, they'll take advantage of it. It's not a Web issue per se. If this technology can help a kid who is not prepared to pass a test, it's not an indictment of the Web, but of us as teachers."
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i05/05a03701.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 24 -- Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears by University of Iowa associate professor of English TOM LUTZ is reviewed. "The book is an engaging study of how, when, and why we weep, linking the views of philosophers, physiologists, psychologists, and anthropologists with the experiences of colicky babies, morose lovers, sniffling filmgoers, and other accomplished boo-hooers," the review says.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i05/05a02401.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 24 -- An article about the decline in the number of diplomatic historians mentions that the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is among schools that have either not replaced departing senior scholars or have filled their spots with junior people less inclined toward the archival work that is the field's mainstay.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i05/05a00101.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 24 -- The article says that one of the many innovations of the postwar university was the creation of M.F.A. programs designed to teach aspiring fiction writers how to write. The idea was simple: At places like the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, students would learn how to cultivate their narrative voices, first by reading great works of fiction and then by writing stories.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i05/05b00801.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 24 -- Educators say the U.S.-visa process is inconsistent and even slipshod, preventing many prospective Chinese students from attending U.S. schools. "This system now shows the worst face of the U.S. government," says GARY ALTHEN, director of the Office of International Students and Scholars at the University of Iowa. Most visa interviews with Chinese applicants, he notes, last only a few minutes. Consular officials often give no explanation when denying a visa request, other than to say that the applicant failed to prove that he or she would return to China. And students say that their success depends less on objective criteria than on the attitude of the person behind the desk.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i05/05a05901.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 23 -- JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa has conducted experiments on animals that suggest that widespread exposure to intestinal worms in the early part of this century provided protection against development of IBD (intractable bowel disorders) and that loss of this exposure through improved sanitary conditions has led to the onslaught of bowel disease. Moreover, Weinstock and his colleagues have demonstrated in early experiments that infecting IBD patients with these worms--called helminths--can lead to remissions in patients with otherwise intractable bowel disorders. His team is now gearing up to perform much larger clinical trials of the technique.
http://www.latimes.com/HOME/NEWS/STATE/t000085318.html

MIAMI HERALD, Sept. 23 -- RONALD JONES, Ph.D., of the University of Iowa, which tracks drug resistance, said the first super-strength enterococcal infection appeared in 1989, but the problem grew so fast that in the first six months of this year, 18 percent of all enterococcal bloodstream infections were vancomycin-resistant, affecting thousands of people.
http://www.herald.com:80/content/wed/news/national/digdocs/035382.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 22 -- RON JONES, a pathologist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in a story about the Food and Drug Administration's approval Tuesday of the first alternative in three decades to the one antibiotic that works when standard drugs do not. Jones said some hospitals--once infected with the resistant bacteria--can find it extremely difficult to eradicate. Patients who harbor the infection, which lives in the gastrointestinal tract, can expose others by contaminating hospital floors and surfaces, despite infection control procedures, he said. "The vast majority of medical centers do not have this problem," he said. "But, for those that do, this drug will be a godsend."
An ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the article appeared Sept. 22 on the (Chicago) DAILY SOUTHTOWN Web site at:
http://www.dailysouthtown.com/southtown/dsnews/229nd1.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 22 on the CHICAGO TRIBUNE Web site at:
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-9909220135,00.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 22 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site at:
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/w/AP-New-Antibiotic.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 22 on the MIAMI HERALD Web site at:
http://www.herald.com:80/content/today/docs/038623.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 22 on the LEXINGTON (Ky.) HERALD-LEADER Web site at:
http://www.kentuckyconnect.com:80/heraldleader/news/092299/nationaldocs/22antibiotic.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 22 on the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Web site at:
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/national/drug22.shtml
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 21 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site (link no longer active) and on the NANDO TIMES (N.C.) Web site at:
http://www2.nando.net:80/noframes/story/0,2107,500036311-500058664-500038277-0,00.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 21 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/09/21/national1215EDT0631.DTL
The same Associated Press article appeared Sept. 21 on the WASHINGTON POST Web site at:
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/19990921/aponline161404_000.htm

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Sept. 22 -- RON JONES, a pathologist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in a story about the Food and Drug Administration's approval Tuesday of the first alternative in three decades to the one antibiotic that works when standard drugs do not. Jones said some hospitals--once infected with the resistant bacteria--can find it extremely difficult to eradicate. Patients who harbor the infection, which lives in the gastrointestinal tract, can expose others by contaminating hospital floors and surfaces, despite infection control procedures, he said. "The vast majority of medical centers do not have this problem," he said. "But, for those that do, this drug will be a godsend."

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 21 -- A story about a new collection of old short stories by Kurt Vonnegut -- "Bagombo Snuff Box: Uncollected Short Fiction" -- says the author once taught writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-2bin/texis.mummy/web/vortex/display?storyID=37e7df2751&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

USA TODAY, Sept. 21 -- NICHOLAS COLANGELO, director of the Connie Belin &Jaqueline N. Blank International Center for Gifted Education and Talent Development at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about university-based searches for talented "whiz kids." "The biggest thing talent searches have done is shown there are a lot of students who don't fit the mold" and who can do far more than what is expected, Colangelo said. The Belin-Blank Center's Web site is mentioned in a sidebar to the story.

The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Sept. 22 in the INDIANAPOLIS STAR, the TELEGRAM & GAZETTE of Worcester, Mass., THE STATE of Columbia, S.C., the ORLANDO SENTINEL in Florida, the BALTIMORE SUN, the FRESNO BEE in California, the ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER in California, the LAS VEGAS REVIEW-JOURNAL, the HARTFORD COURANT, the DAILY RECORD in New Jersey and the VIRGINIAN-PILOT.

SYDSVENSKAN (Malmo, Sweden), Sept. 20 -- University of Iowa journalism professor CAROLYN DYER is featured in an article about the Nancy Drew series, which is the subject of her research. In Sweden, the main character is called "Kitty."

SPOKANE SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Sept. 20 -- IAN SMITH of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics did a study that showed the good and bad sides of driving by the elderly. They drive shorter distances at slower speeds and they drive less at night. They make fewer lane changes and avoid rush hours. But, he adds, 90 percent of sensory information needed for driving is visual. And 50-year-olds with good eyesight need twice the amount of light as 20-year-olds.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=092099&ID=s637029&cat=

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Sept. 19 -- An article about how women are carving a niche for themselves in the construction trades mentions that the International Union and International Masonry Institute have stepped up recruitment of women, and colleges, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, are advertising female-oriented construction courses.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 19 -- "Learning by Heart: Contemporary American Poetry About School," edited by Maggie Anderson and David Hassler, has recently been published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 19 -- BENJAMIN KLINE HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa and author of "Work Without End" and "Kellogg's Six-Hour Day," is the author of an article on a new book by James Gleick titled "Faster: The Acceleration of Just About Everything."

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Sept. 19 -- RICHARD D. WILLIAMS, professor and chairman of urology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said in an article on Tour de France cyclist and testicular cancer survivor Lance Armstrong that young people "don't even put cancer on their radar screen as an issue to be concerned about, because they're young -- and in their minds -- invincible."

ARIZONA REPUBLIC, Sept. 19 -- Scientists are feeling the pressure of the increasingly legal and political climate surrounding animal intelligence research and fear it's affecting the way their results are being interpreted. "Sometimes these studies are used to perpetuate the wrong ideas," said MARK BLUMBERG, who studies animal behavior at the University of Iowa. "Some of this is clearly the politics of the animal rights movement." The same article appeared Sept. 19 in the ASBURY PARK PRESS.

BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Sept. 18 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's HARDIN META DIRECTORY, which can be accessed at http://www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/index.html, is called an effective gateway to other medical directories. "This site is catalogued by specialty, but it is more than just a simple (and extensive) collection. The webmaster has gone to the trouble of checking that the links within the target directories are functioning, and Hardin is quite choosy about whom it includes (see www.lib.uiowa.edu/hardin/md/submit.html). If you cannot find what you are looking for in Hardin, there is a list of other similar collections. This site allows the user to locate specific good quality information quickly."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 17 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA LIBRARY ranked 25th in 1997-98 among university research libraries in the United States and Canada in the number of holdings it has, up from a ranking of 34 in 1992-93.

DESERET NEWS (Utah), Sept. 16 -- Many doctors do not make use of the hundreds of guidelines available to help diagnose asthma. When UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCHERS tested doctors' understanding of the guidelines, a group of 108 doctors -- 20 of them asthma specialists -- got a mean score of just 60 percent.
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/1,1249,115009201,00.html

SLATE, Sept. 16 -- A bar chart using information from the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKETS (IEM) at the University of Iowa is paired with commentary about Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley's campaign. The commentary says that "the Bradley bull market is on." Citing the IEM figures, the story reports that "having climbed from a low of 23.5 cents Sept. 4, to 30 cents Tuesday, Bradley was trading at 35 cents by Thursday afternoon." The on-line news site said in an earlier article that it plans to make IEM results part of its ongoing political coverage of the 2000 presidential election.
http://www.slate.com/Office2K/99-08-24/Office2K.asp
SLATE also ran an article Sept. 16 explaining how the IEM works. It can be found at:
http://www.slate.com/OfficePool/99-09-16/OfficePool.asp

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Sept. 16 -- PETER GREENBERG, a microbiologist from the University of Iowa, says in a story on "biofilm" that bacteria that lack the ability to make chemical messengers cannot form functional communities. "This communication system is critical to the defense system of bacteria," Greenberg said.
http://www.sltrib.com/09161999/science/24144.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 16 -- Korea's new "Posdaq" market is fashioned on the same principles as the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET (IEM), a computerized futures market created by four University of Iowa professors that offers various contracts on candidates' election chances. Posdaq is an Internet game that lets players offer up mock shares that represent South Korean politicians in an on-line "stock market'' that mimics the real thing.

YOUR MONEY, Sept. 15 -- Iowa City, home to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, is listed among 12 of "tomorrow's hottest retirement destinations." "Iowa is a Big Ten school and also offers continuing education," the magazine reports. "Basically, it's a hip place" whose amenities include a "writer's colony and one of the best performing arts calendars in the country."

WALL STREET JOURNAL, Sept. 15 -- Korea's new "Posdaq" market is fashioned on the same principles as the IOWA ELECTRONIC MARKET (IEM), a computerized futures market created by four University of Iowa professors that offers various contracts on candidates' election chances. Posdaq is an Internet game that lets players offer up mock shares that represent South Korean politicians in an on-line "stock market'' that mimics the real thing.
http://interactive.wsj.com/archive/retrieve.cgi?id=SB937365768770278756.djm
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 14 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site at:
http://www10.nytimes.com/aponline/i/AP-Trading-Politicians.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 14 on the FOXNEWS.COM Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/news/international/0914/i_ap_0914_80.sml
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 14 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES and on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site (links no longer active). The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 14 on the USA TODAY Web site at:
http://www.usatoday.com:80/life/cyber/tech/ctg121.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 14 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/09/14/international0110EDT0424.DTL
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 14 on the YAHOO!NEWS Web site (link no longer active).

DETROIT NEWS, Sept. 15 -- CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, comments in an article about what some consider Republican presidential hopeful Elizabeth Dole's failure to capitalize on the momentum and visibility she generated earlier in her campaign. As an example, the article -- reprinted from USA TODAY -- cites Dole's decision to go on vacation after she placed third in the Aug. 14 Iowa Straw Poll. "It seems like an unusual choice," says Covington. "There certainly was a window of opportunity opening up for her. She might have done a better job of capitalizing on that."
http://detnews.com:80/1999/nation/9909/15/09150182.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 15 -- The book ''Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears" by University of Iowa English professor TOM LUTZ is reviewed. "Lutz's accumulation of detail is extraordinary, with a bibliography ranging from Aeschylus to the Journal of Genetic Psychology."
The same review ran Sept. 13 on the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER Web site at:
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/books/boox133.shtml
The review originally appeared Sept. 12 on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site at:
http://www10.nytimes.com/books/99/09/12/reviews/990912.12campbat.html

ABCNEWS.COM, Sept. 15 -- The termite's ability to eat wood has become rich fodder for JARED LEADBETTER, a University of Iowa microbiologist. Leadbetter's laboratory studies of how wood-eating termites digest their fibrous food may eventually help us slow global warming by reducing the greenhouse gas effect. Termites digest food in a highly productive way, so they emit less methane -- a potent greenhouse gas -- into the atmosphere than other land-dwelling animals.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/science/MadRad/madrad990910.html

ASBURY PARK PRESS (Neptune, N.J.), Sept. 15 -- A list of notable Web sites includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, which contains hundreds of books and brochures for health care providers and patients. Information that, until recently, was available only in print form in far-away libraries.

GRAND RAPIDS (Mich.) PRESS, Sept. 14 -- Alumni of high schools that were using the Tigerhawk logo expressed disappointment with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's decision to tell them they could no longer use the image.

ASBURY PARK (Neptune, N.J.) PRESS, Sept. 14 -- ARNOLD ANDERSEN, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa who is considered a pioneering researcher in the field, is quoted in an article about men with eating disorders. "Understanding and treating these disorders is difficult because it is widely believed that they affect females almost exclusively,'' said Andersen.

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, Sept. 14 -- ARNOLD ANDERSEN, a psychiatrist at the University of Iowa who is considered a pioneering researcher in the field, is quoted in an article about men with eating disorders. "Understanding and treating these disorders is difficult because it is widely believed that they affect females almost exclusively,'' said Andersen.

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE, Sept. 14 -- SAMUEL J. FOMON, professor emeritus at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and a member of an expert panel convened by the Life Sciences Research Office under contract with the FDA to study infant formula standards, is quoted in an article on the subject. "So far as we know, the baby getting formula today will either get all the essential nutrients he needs or will be able to make them out of what he gets," said Fomon. "It's not as good as breast milk, and can never be breast milk. But it can be a healthy alternative and is always being improved."
http://www.post-gazette.com:80/healthscience/19990914hformula2.asp

MODERN HEALTHCARE, Sept. 13 -- TOM GAMMIERE, who earned his master's degree in healthcare and hospital administration at the University of Iowa, has been recognized by the magazine as one of its "Up & Comers," a group of extraordinary young healthcare professionals. Gammiere, 38, is a senior vice president and regional administrator for the ScrippsHealth system in San Diego.

WILMINGTON (N.C.) MORNING STAR, Sept. 13 -- Affirmative action is a valid remedy to past discrimination in higher education, said UI law professor ADRIEN WING, speaking as a guest lecturer at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Wing said affirmative action provided opportunities for her that she might not have had otherwise. She said the "policy isn't what earned her good grades, degrees or her position as a professor. Once the door's open, everyone in this (lecture) room knows you have to perform. Once you're in, you take it where you want to take it."

BUSINESS WEEK, Sept. 13 -- E. PETER GREENBERG, a microbiologist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says that scientists are beginning to unravel the genetic basis of biofilms -- bacterial "communities" that can appear almost anywhere, fouling machinery, clogging pipes and contributing to human disease. "The ultimate goal is to identify a biofilm's pressure points," said Greenberg.

USA TODAY, Sept. 13 -- CARY COVINGTON, a political scientist at the University of Iowa, comments in an article about what some consider Republican presidential hopeful Elizabeth Dole's failure to capitalize on the momentum and visibility she generated earlier in her campaign. As an example, the article cites Dole's decision to go on vacation after she placed third in the Aug. 14 Iowa Straw Poll. "It seems like an unusual choice," says Covington. "There certainly was a window of opportunity opening up for her. She might have done a better job of capitalizing on that."

HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, Sept. 13 -- CARY COVINGTON, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa, says that a string of events -- from Watergate to Gary Hart's womanizing -- soured the public on insiders who wanted to be a U.S. president. "There became a real . . . honest need for something different,'' said Covington.

BOSTON HERALD, Sept. 12 -- RICHARD D. WILLIAMS, professor and chairman of urology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, said in an article on Tour de France cyclist and testicular cancer survivor Lance Armstrong that young people "don't even put cancer on their radar screen as an issue to be concerned about, because they're young -- and in their minds -- invincible.

HARTFORD (Conn.) COURANT, Sept. 12 -- Gaffes by front-runners matter because "there's more for them to lose,'' said CARY COVINGTON, associate professor of political science at the University of Iowa.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Sept. 10 -- JUDITH R. BROWN, manager of advanced research computing at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about how top research institutions and high-technology companies have led the way in involving artists in research, not only to create innovations in multimedia technology, but also to help visualize processes in biology, chemistry, and engineering. "It certainly has become understood that design advice from artists and having them work on a scientific-visualization project are very valuable," says Brown, who also leads the Association for Computing Machinery's Special Interest Group on Computer Graphics, or SIGGRAPH.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i03/03a03401.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 10 -- Recently resigned University of Illinois-Chicago Chancellor David Broski had presided over the hiring of several high-profile scholars, including former Duke University English department chair Stanley Fish, who as dean of the college of liberal arts and sciences recently hired University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY as a visiting professor. McCloskey has undergone a sex-change operation and wrote a book about her transformation scheduled for extensive publicity in October.

ATLANTA CONSTITUTION, Sept. 10 -- H.D. HOOVER, a University of Iowa professor who is senior director of the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS), is quoted in a story about comments by the Atlanta school superintendent that half the city's third-graders could flunk next spring. The ITBS scores students on a "bell curve," and by definition half the test takers should score above the norm and half below, said Hoover. That's why it should not determine who gets held back, he said.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE (Internet Edition), Sept. 9 -- Meganne Britton, a 16-year-old from Aurora, Ill., who would like to present baton twirling as a sport, is hoping to parlay all her years of training into a four-year majorette scholarship at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- one of only a handful of colleges that still offer full scholarships to baton twirlers. If Britton wins a spot as a "Golden Girl," she would lead the university marching band and secure a free teaching degree.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/metro/dupage/article/0,2669,SAV-9909090286,FF.html

USA TODAY, Sept. 8 -- Virtual Hospital, a service of UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE, contains hundreds of brochures for health care providers and patients, reports a listing of health-related Web sites.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 8 -- A story about high school students who use the College-Level Examination Program mentions one student who took the test last school year and brought 12 credits with him to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,SAV-9909080245,00.html

INVESTOR'S BUSINESS DAILY, Sept. 8 -- Ingesting eggs of the helminth, an intestinal worm, led to remission of Crohn's disease in a small trial, said UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers.

THE OREGONIAN, Sept. 8 -- University of Iowa researcher CYNTHIA A. BONEBRIGHT recently reported finding that ''workaholics'' -- people who work long hours, whether out of enthusiasm for the job or not -- have more conflicts between work and family, and less satisfaction and purpose in life. The same article appeared Aug. 31 in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL.

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Sept. 7 -- JOHN DELANEY, a labor professor at the University of Iowa who studies pilot unions, is quoted in an article about the one-year anniversary of the Northwest pilots' strike. "Pilots have so much power in the industry, and they're trying to get whatever extra they can get at this point in time," Delaney said in the article, which originally ran in the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS. "Pilots know this is a cyclical business and that airlines won't always make these record profits; they know this is the window to get what they think they're owed."

USA TODAY, Sept. 7 -- Two laboratories -- including one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- have been unable to confirm that rabies killed a bear cub that as many as 400 tourists played with at a petting zoo and a barn dance last week in Clermont, Iowa. Initial tests at Iowa State University in Ames indicated that the 5-month-old bear died of rabies on Aug. 27, prompting health officials to try to reach people as far away as Australia to tell them they could be at risk for the fatal disease. While rabies has not been ruled out as the cause of death, the Iowa Department of Public Health said that labs at the University of Iowa and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were unable to replicate the positive test result.
Another version of the article ran Sept. 7 in the CHICAGO TRIBUNE.

DESERET NEWS, Sept. 7 -- Six people injured Monday when a house exploded in Richland, Iowa, were taken to the burn unit of UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS in Iowa City.
http://www.deseretnews.com/dn/view/1,1249,115007559,00.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Sept. 7 -- A follow-up story about a house explosion that killed seven people in Richland, Iowa, on Labor Day says that other people injured in the event were sent to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS AND CLINICS. The story says investigators are now looking at a possible propane leak as the cause of the explosion.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/251/nation/Propane_suspected_in_Iowa_explosion+.shtml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 8 in the ARIZONA DAILY STAR (link no longer active) and the TOPEKA (Kan.) CAPITAL-JOURNAL at:
http://cjonline.com/stories/090899/new_blast.shtml
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 8 in NEWSDAY, the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, and the TAMPA BAY (Fla.) TRIBUNE (links no longer active) and Sept. 7 on the FOX NEWS Web site (link no longer active) and in the LAS VEGAS SUN at:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/1999/sep/07/090800783.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINEL at:
http://www.jsonline.com/news/nat/ap/sep99/ap-house-explosion090799.asp
An earlier version of the Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 in the SEATTLE TIMES at:
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/nation-world/html98/hous_19990907.html

ABC NEWS, Sept. 7 -- People injured in a house explosion in Richland, Iowa, Monday were taken to the burn unit at UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS. The explosion destroyed a ranch-style house, killing seven people and injuring six others who had gathered for a party.
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/us/DailyNews/iowa_houseblast990907.html
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 7 in USA TODAY, in the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, in the BOSTON GLOBE, in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEW, in NEWSDAY, in THE (Trenton, N.J.) TIMES, in the New Jersey STAR-LEDGER, on the ALABAMA LIVE Web site (which represents the BIRMINGHAM NEWS, the MOBILE REGISTER and the HUNTSVILLE TIMES) and on the TAMPA BAY TRIBUNE Web site (links no longer active) and Sept. 6 on the MSNBC Web site (linke no longer active). The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 on the CALGARY HERALD NEWS Web site at:
http://www.southam.com/calgaryherald/newsnow/cpfs/world/990907/w090707.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 in the OTTAWA CITIZEN at:
http://www.southam.com/ottawacitizen/newsnow/cpfs/world/990907/w090707.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 in the VANCOUVER SUN at:
http://www.vancouversun.com/cgi-bin/newsite.pl?adcode=w-mm&modulename=world%20news&template=international&nkey=vs&filetype=fullstory&file=/cpfs/world/990907/w090707.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 in the LAS VEGAS SUN at:
http://www.lasvegassun.com/sunbin/stories/nat-gen/1999/sep/07/090700003.html
The same Associated Press article ran Sept. 7 on the FOX NEWS Web site at:
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/news/national/0907/d_ap_0907_33.sml

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL-STAR, Sept. 7 -- An article on the Iowa-Nebraska football game this weekend mentions that there's more to Iowa City than football, including activities at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The article says that the Iowa Memorial Union, in the heart of the Hawkeye campus, features four restaurants and a bookstore.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Sept. 7 -- BILL CASEY, publisher of the Daily Iowan, the University of Iowa student newspaper, comments on the Gazette's recent announcement that it would begin publishing an Iowa City edition of its paper, going head-to-head with the Press-Citizen. "This is all very interesting," Casey said. "I think the biggest problem may be finding people to deliver all these papers."
http://www.chicago.tribune.com/version1/article/0,1575,ART-34003,00.html

FOX NEWS, Sept. 6 -- Investigators, led by ANDREW J. MANIOTIS, M.D., of the University of Iowa, examined aggressive melanoma cells from patients and melanoma cells grown in culture. They found that these aggressive skin cancers are capable of building primitive types of blood vessels. The new finding helps explain why some advanced tumors fail to respond to conventional chemotherapy, according to a report on the research published in the September issue of the American Journal of Pathology.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/health/090699/tumors.sml
The REUTERS story also ran on the YAHOO NEWS Web site Sept. 3 (link no longer active).

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 6 -- CHRISTOPHER SIBILIA, a costume craftsman with the Guthrie Theater in Minneapolis and teacher at the University of Iowa, is profiled in a story about people with old-fashioned jobs in an increasingly high-tech economy. "I love the constant deadlines," he said. "You start, you finish and then you move on. I love all those endings and beginnings."

SCIENCE WORLD, Sept. 6 -- GINGER WATSON, a simulation researcher at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about immersive thrill rides or simulator rides. Explaining the science behind the ride, Watson says, "When you're in a car, your sense of how fast you're going comes from visual cues you get from the side. But vision alone doesn't give you that much sense of motion. The only way your inner ear senses motion is from real motion."

DESERET NEWS, Sept. 5 -- Every investor wants to get hold of hot new stock issues. Unfortunately, most initial public offerings don't fit that description. According to a study conducted by professors Jay Ritter of the University of Florida and TIM LOUGHRAN, formerly of the University of Iowa, the average IPO issued between 1970 and 1990 returned just 3 percent annually over the next five years, vs. 11.3 percent for the S&P 500.

BOSTON GLOBE, Sept. 5 -- Business school professors from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's TIPPIE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS and Northwestern University's Kellogg Graduate School of Management published a study in the journal Economics and Politics last year suggesting that candidates who raise large sums do more than fill their coffers. They also lead voters to conclude that they have large amounts of popular support.

TORONTO STAR, Sept. 5 -- A patient who suffered brain damage to the amygdala -- the part of the brain that controls the fear response -- was studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, which found that when the woman was shown faces exhibiting a variety of expressions she was able to identify all the emotions except when faces were fearful.

FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, Sept. 4 -- The book ''Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears" by University of Iowa English professor TOM LUTZ is reviewed. "Lutz's accumulation of detail is extraordinary, with a bibliography ranging from Aeschylus to the Journal of Genetic Psychology."

OMAHA WORLD HERALD, Sept. 4 -- Two laboratories -- including one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- have been unable to confirm that rabies killed a bear cub that as many as 400 tourists played with at a petting zoo and a barn dance recently in Clermont, Iowa. Initial tests at Iowa State University in Ames indicated that the 5-month-old bear died of rabies on Aug. 27, prompting health officials to try to reach people as far away as Australia to tell them they could be at risk for the fatal disease. While rabies has not been ruled out as the cause of death, the Iowa Department of Public Health said that labs at the University of Iowa and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were unable to replicate the positive test result.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Sept. 4 -- Two laboratories -- including one at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- have been unable to confirm that rabies killed a bear cub that as many as 400 tourists played with at a petting zoo and a barn dance last week in Clermont, Iowa. Initial tests at Iowa State University in Ames indicated that the 5-month-old bear died of rabies on Aug. 27, prompting health officials to try to reach people as far away as Australia to tell them they could be at risk for the fatal disease. While rabies has not been ruled out as the cause of death, the Iowa Department of Public Health said Friday that labs at the University of Iowa and at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta were unable to replicate the positive test result. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Sept. 4 in the WASHINGTON POST and Sept. 3 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE and the NEW YORK TIMES.

ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, Sept. 2 -- JOHN DELANEY, a labor professor at the University of Iowa who studies pilot unions, is quoted in an article about the one-year anniversary of the Northwest pilots' strike. "Pilots have so much power in the industry and they're trying to get whatever extra they can get at this point in time," Delaney said. "Pilots know this is a cyclical business and that airlines won't always make these record profits; they know this is the window to get what they think they're owed."

MTV.COM, Sept. 2 -- The Goo Goo Dolls will kick off the second leg of the band's two-year-old tour with a performance Oct. 5 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. It will perform with Tonic, which recently scored a hit with its single off the "American Pie" soundtrack, "You Wanted More." Like Alanis Morissette and Tori Amos before them, the Goos will be headlining an MP3.com "Music and Technology" tour. On this go-round, however, a second stage will be set up outside each venue to showcase MP3.com's various local artists, and on-site technology booths and downloadable music displays will be on hand as well.
http://www.mtv.com:80/news/headlines/990902/story15.html

MSNBC, Sept. 2 -- Medical journals, reference guides and entire medical libraries like the VIRTUAL HOSPITAL from the University of Iowa available to anyone, online, for free, patients and doctors agree: the Internet is changing the way each relates to the other. "Traditionally the relationship between the physician and patient has been very unbalanced, the physician has towered over the patient," says MICHAEL D'ALESSANDRO, M.D. "What the Internet has really done is balanced the relationship - leveled the playing field. Now they all draw from the same information sources." The story includes a link to the University of Iowa's Virtual Hospital.
http://msnbc.com/news/307509.asp#BODY

YAHOO! NEWS, Sept. 2 -- JOEL WEINSTOCK, M.D., of the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is identified as the lead researcher in a study in which the eggs of parasitic worms were ingested by patients to treat acute, chronic inflammatory bowel disease. "We produced... under very careful monitoring and control an animal helminth that cannot multiply within the human body and only colonizes for several weeks at most,'' Weinstock told Reuters Health. The parasitic worms used in the study "do not penetrate flesh and cannot spread disease,'' he added.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19990902/hl/worm15_1.html
The same REUTERS story ran Sept. 2 on the LYCOS news page (link no longer active).

SEATTLE TIMES, Sept. 1 -- JAY RUBINSTEIN, assistant professor of otolaryngology at the University of Iowa, says the human ear was not built to withstand the loud, chronic noise of modern life. He said family members are usually the first to notice hearing loss in a loved one. "The television is louder. They are constantly asked to repeat things," he said.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/health-science/html98/hear_19990901.html

FOXNEWS.COM, Sept. 1 -- Many doctors do not make use of the hundreds of guidelines available to help diagnose asthma. When UNIVERSITY OF IOWA RESEARCHERS tested doctors' understanding of the guidelines, a group of 108 doctors -- 20 of them asthma specialists -- got a mean score of just 60 percent. The story also ran Aug. 31 on the LYCOS news page and Sept. 1 on the REUTERS wire service Web page (links no longer active).

NEW YORK TIMES, Sept. 1 -- C. Roland Christensen, an influential Harvard Business School professor who helped create the field of business strategy and was an authority on the use of the case method in teaching, died on Saturday. Christensen, who taught at Harvard for more than 40 years, grew up in Iowa City where his father was a history professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Christensen earned his undergraduate degree at the UI in 1941 and went on to earn his MBA at Harvard in 1943. A Christensen obituary also ran in the Sept. 1 BOSTON GLOBE.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/244/obituaries/C_Roland_Christensen_80+.shtml

DETROIT NEWS, Sept. 1 - SHANNON NELSON, a member of the University of Iowa Animal Rights Coalition, speaks out against an Iowa City plan to have the deer population thinned by sharpshooters. "There are other alternatives, such as educating the public on what kinds of plants deer don't like to eat, or putting more reflectors up on roadways, that should be looked at," Nelson said in this Associated Press article.
http://detnews.com:80/1999/nation/9909/01/09010173.htm

OMAHA WORLD HERALD, Sept. 1 -- Researchers at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA began work a year ago that will seek common threads among Gulf War veterans who became ill during or after their tours of duty.

THE AMERICAN EDITOR, September 1999 -- University of Iowa journalism professors STEPHEN G. BLOOM and HANNO HARDT have launched the Iowa Journalists Oral History Project, the nation's first systematic effort to collect oral histories of rank-and-file journalists in a single state and rural newspaper editors.

INFORMATION RETRIEVAL & LIBRARY AUTOMATION, September 1999-- African art in the context of African society is the subject of a CD-ROM and Web site titled "Art and Life in Africa" from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. The Web site can be reached at www.uiowa.edu/~africart/

JOURNAL OF DENTAL TECHNOLOGY, September 1999 -- CARRIE JACOBI, a senior at the University of Iowa with a double major in journalism and English, is the author of an article about the usefulness of study groups as a source of continuing education.

AMERICAN THEATRE, September 1999 -- Geometry of Miracles, Quebecois director Robert Lepage's latest creation, made its American premiere Sept. 9-11 at HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the University of Iowa.

COMPUTERS IN LIBRARIES, September 1999 -- SHEILA CRETH, University of Iowa librarian, has been named winner of the 1999 Library and Information Technology Association(LITA)/Gaylord award for achievement in library information technology.

FITNESS, September 1999 -- A 1997 study at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE found that when volunteers were faced with a card-playing choice, most started to sweat when they pondered the riskier move. "Their bodies knew when a move was chancy before their brains knew," says Antoine Behara, M.D., Ph.D., lead author of the study. "Intuition guided their decision-making process so they started making safer choices."

REDBOOK, September 1999 -- DAVID WATSON, Ph.D., co-author of a University of Iowa study on "larks" or so-called morning people, says people who awake early tend to get up in a good mood and stay that way. The study of 215 men and women found that larks had more energy and were more satisfied with life than night owls, no matter what time of day. He says biology may account for such differences. "Morning types tend to have more consistent sleep schedules, which makes for better moods," Watson said.

INFORMATION TODAY, September 1999 --SHEILA D. CRETH, University of Iowa librarian, has been named winner of the 1999 Library and Information Technology Association (LITA)/Gaylord award for achievement in library information technology. The award, which carries a $1,000 stipend and recognizes outstanding achievement in the creative use of information technology for improving or enhancing library services, is given annually by LITA, a division of the American Library Association. The article also ran in the September 1999 issue of COMPUTERS IN LIBRARIES.

BETTER HOMES & GARDENS, September 1999 -- ROGER I. CEILLEY, professor of dermatology at the University of Iowa, says that freckles are "the skin's failed attempt to provide pigmentary protection against the sun. The only sure way to prevent freckles -- and the skin damage they're a sign of -- is to stay out of the sun."

DANCE MAGAZINE, September 1999 -- The University of Iowa's Hancher Auditorium is spending nearly $1 million in preparation for its Millennium Festival, which will feature 15 major commissions. Eight are in dance, with the remaining seven divided between theater and music. "I think the international dance community will be bowled over by that kind of money being spent on dance commissions," said WALLACE CHAPPELL, director of Hancher. Hancher's upcoming season will feature new works by a variety of artists, including UI alumnus LAR LUBOVITCH. Lubovitch will pair up with the American Ballet Theatre for performances Nov. 2 and 3.

AMERICAN THEATRE, September 1999 -- "Geometry of Miracles," Quebecois director Robert Lepage’s latest creation, will make its American premiere Sept. 9-11 at the HANCHER AUDITORIUM in Iowa City before visiting Minneapolis, Columbus, Ohio, and New York. The play dramatizes the later years in the life of the great American architect Frank Lloyd Wright.

PLAYBOY.COM, Undated -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's DEPARTMENT OF CINEMA AND COMPARATIVE LITERATURE is included among the magazine's recommendations of "state universities, small technical programs and independent media centers offering students access to the equipment and book smarts to crank out their own" independent films. The section on the UI program says that its alumni include Nicholas Meyer (director, The Deceivers, Time After Time), Mark Johnson (director, Simon Birch; producer, Rain Man), Tom Ackerman (DP, Beetlejuice and Jumanji), Paul Soucek (sound editor, The Sixth Sense), Chris Smith (director, American Movie, top documentary at Sundance)
http://www.playboy.com/oncampus/feature/filmschools/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

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