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UI in the News

October, 1999

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FOX NEWS, Oct. 31 -- An article about Kent Haruf, author of the recently released novel Plainsong, says he fine-tuned his fiction writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "He was a quiet, reserved, but friendly guy and when he said something it had resonance," said novelist Ron Hansen, who studied with Haruf at Iowa. "He was older and seemed more assured about what he wanted to do as a writer."
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/entertainment/103199/haruf.sml

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 31 -- NANCY REISMAN'S book ''House Fires,'' which consists of a title story and three sets of interconnected tales (''Buffalo Series,'' ''Northeast Corridor'' and ''Jessie Stories'') and was recently published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, explores the familiar territory of American domesticity.
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/books/99/10/31/reviews/991031.31orourt.html

NEW YORK TIMES MAGAZINE, Oct. 31 -- Author David Shields, who writes about his passion for sports, says he went to graduate school in Iowa City at the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, "where the most passionate thing I did was attend University of Iowa basketball games." He said that in the spring of 1980, when Iowa beat Georgetown to qualify for the Final Four, he and his friend, Philip, "jumped up and down and cried and hugged each other in a way we wouldn't have dreamed of doing otherwise."
http://www10.nytimes.com/library/magazine/home/19991031mag-lives-sportsfan.html

PRESS & SUN BULLETIN (Binghamton, N.Y.), Oct. 31 -- Geoffrey J. Weidner, M.D., recently joined the staff of Bassett Healthcare's Louis Busch Hager Cancer Center. Weidner is a board-certified radiation oncologist and comes to Bassett from Iowa City, where he was a visiting associate in radiology for the Division of Radiation Therapy at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS. He received his medical degree from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA COLLEGE OF MEDICINE.

SUN-SENTINEL (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), Oct. 31 -- University of Iowa researchers KEN CULP and JANET MANTES are conducting a study of elderly patients in long-term care. They are making fluids more available to an experimental group of patients by encouraging them to drink water, juices and other non-caffeinated beverages during social activities. What they plan to measure is whether increased fluid intake of water-based drinks improves mental capacity. "There are two outcomes of elderly people who don't get enough water," said Culp, an epidemiologist with Iowa's College of Nursing. "One is acute confusion, and the other is urinary tract infections."

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 29 -- Alan Wolfe, director of Boston College's Center for Religion and American Public Life, said he envisions a master of arts program in public intellectualism, "something akin to the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP."

EDMONTON JOURNAL (Alberta, Canada), Oct. 29 -- A study of two adults who as infants suffered injuries in the front portions of their brains has found that their moral reasoning was permanently impaired. The research suggested, the scientists said, that morals may be based in the region of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa's medical school, and his colleagues there, published the study in the November issue of Nature Neuroscience, acknowledging that their sample size was small. But they said they wanted to publicize their intriguing finding in the hope that they would hear about similar cases. The story also appeared Oct. 29 in the TIMES-PICAYUNE in New Orleans, La.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 29 -- A story on proposed NCAA rule changes that would permit college coaches to recruit players with professional experience quotes CHRISTINE H.B. GRANT, chairwoman of the cabinet subcommittee that devised the proposals and director of women's athletics at the University of Iowa. Grant says the act of taking money should not automatically disqualify an athlete from competing in college sports. "I'm from Britain, and I was brought up and indoctrinated with the idea that money must never be associated with sport," she says. "That is a belief I never challenged until the past two years," while working on the subcommittee.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i10/10a07501.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 29 -- A study of two adults who as infants suffered injuries in the front portions of their brains has found that their moral reasoning was permanently impaired. The research suggested, the scientists said, that morals may be based in the region of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa's medical school, and his colleagues there, published the study in the November issue of Nature Neuroscience, acknowledging that their sample size was small. But they said they wanted to publicize their intriguing finding in the hope that they would hear about similar cases.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i10/10a02301.htm

SUN-SENTINEL (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.), Oct. 29 -- A story about the trial of a day-care provider accused of suffocating a 3-month-old boy in 1997 quotes the woman's attorney as saying a prosecution witness -- a doctor from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- states in a report that there is no evidence linking the neglect of the boy and the cause of death. "If the court allows the death in, it will become the highlight," the attorney said. "The trial will be about the death, not about neglect."
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/daily/detail/0,1136,24500000000122499,00.html

NANDO TIMES (N.C.), Oct. 28 -- An article about Kent Haruf, author of the recently released novel Plainsong, says he fine-tuned his fiction writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "He was a quiet, reserved, but friendly guy and when he said something it had resonance, " said novelist Ron Hansen, who studied with Haruf at Iowa. "He was older and seemed more assured about what he wanted to do as a writer."
http://www.nando.com/noframes/story/0,2107,500050738-500083134-500245589-0,00.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Oct. 28 -- "Political cartooning is on the endangered species list," said JOHN SOLOSKI, director of the University of Iowa's journalism school, even though "there's probably no section of a daily newspaper that draws as much reaction day in and day out." Concerned by the state of their art, top cartoonists from around the nation gathered here recently at a public symposium that drew several hundred listeners. The conference honored Times cartoonist Paul Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who began his career at the university paper here.

FOXNEWS, Oct. 28 -- UNIVERSITY OF IOWA researchers found it cost the university's own healthcare plan 67 cents per member, per month to offer all its enrollees infertility benefits, according to a report in the November issue of Fertility & Sterility. Examining three years of cost data from the University of Iowa's self-insured, fee-for-service health plan, researchers showed infertility-specific costs totaled $680,921 -- or 0.79 percent of total healthcare costs incurred by the plan. Total healthcare-related costs for the plan during the period amounted to $86.4 million. The same REUTERS HEALTH story ran Oct. 28 on the YAHOO!NEWS Web site and on the LYCOS NEWS Web site.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 28 -- After hearing about the shooting in Armenia's Parliament, an Armenian graduate student at the University of Iowa said Wednesday that she believes the gunmen's leader is (34-year-old nationalist, former journalist and suspected gunman Nairi) Unanian, a former co-worker of hers. "His name rang a bell in my head. Many reporters there subscribe to the same ideology he believes in," said GAYANE TOROSYAN, 38, who translated articles written in English for the Yerkir, a daily Yerevan newspaper, from 1991 to 1994. Now a journalism graduate student, Torosyan said the Yerevan newspaper is primarily run by members of the Dashnak political organization.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=ARME28&date=28-Oct-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 27 -- An article about KENT HARUF, author of the recently released novel Plainsong, says he fine-tuned his fiction writing at the University of Iowa' s Writers' Workshop. "He was a quiet, reserved, but friendly guy and when he said something it had resonance, " said novelist Ron Hansen, who studied with Haruf at Iowa. "He was older and seemed more assured about what he wanted to do as a writer."
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=1027AP-KENT-HARUF&date=27-Oct-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Oct. 27 in the NEW YORK TIMES and on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site at: http://www.calendarlive.com/apent/19991027/tCB00V0119.html
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 7 on the USA TODAY Web site at:
http://www.usatoday.com/life/enter/books/book363.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 27 -- A story on BARBARA ROBINETTE MOSS, author of the memoir "Change Me into Zeus' Daughter," said she grew up poor but now lives in a sunny, comfortable home with her husband of five years, Duane DeRaad, who is director of utilities for the University of Iowa. Their only poverty is conventional middle-class debt, the result of sending his two daughters and Moss' son through college. Until she quit to write, Moss was director of Project Art for the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, in charge of acquiring and displaying art.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/leisure/columnists/brotman/article/0,1122,SAV-9910270007,00.html

SEATTLE TIMES, Oct. 26 -- An extensive feature on the work of noted University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO is reprinted from the Chicago Tribune.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/health-science/html98/mind_19991026.html

BIRMINGHAM BUSINESS JOURNAL (Ala.), Oct. 25 -- The article says that thanks to the vision of (and generous donations from) world-class venture capitalist John Pappajohn, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "has one of the finest entrepreneurship programs in the country. The John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, housed in the university's College of Business, offers a core of more than 15 entrepreneurial classes in several courses of study leading to an entrepreneurial certificate."

BIRMINGHAM BUSINESS JOURNAL (Ala.), Oct. 25 -- University of Iowa researchers KEN CULP and JANET MANTES are conducting a study of elderly patients in long-term care. They are making fluids more available to an experimental group of patients by encouraging them to drink water, juices and other non-caffeinated beverages during social activities. What they plan to measure is whether increased fluid intake of water-based drinks improves mental capacity. "There are two outcomes of elderly people who don't get enough water," said Culp, an epidemiologist with Iowa's College of Nursing. "One is acute confusion, and the other is urinary tract infections." The same study is cited in another article that ran Oct. 26 in the DETROIT FREE PRESS.

WASHINGTON POST, Oct. 25 -- ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa and colleagues found two subjects who suffered damage to their prefrontal cortices before the age of 16 months. Both children seemed to recover. But as they aged, the two began to behave aberrantly, stealing, lying, verbally and physically abusing other people, poorly parenting their out-of-wedlock children, showing a distinct lack of remorse, and failing to plan for their futures. "In conclusion, early dysfunction in certain sectors of prefrontal cortex seems to cause abnormal development of social and moral behavior, independently of social and psychological factors, which do not seem to have played a role in the condition of our subjects," the researchers write in the November issue of Nature Neuroscience. "This suggests that antisocial behavior may depend, at least in part, on the abnormal operation of a multi-component neural system which includes . . . sectors of the prefrontal cortex."
http://www.washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-10/25/111l-102599-idx.html

USA TODAY, Oct. 25 -- One of the few undeveloped areas on the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA’s central campus will be the home to the school's honors program and its gifted and talented program. The university plans to construct the $10 million building along the T. Anne Cleary Walkway, across from the Chemistry Building.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/states/iamain.htm

BOSTON HERALD, Oct. 25 -- A story about choreographer Paul Taylor says he recently returned to Boston from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he created "Arabesque," which was to appear in Boston on two upcoming programs.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Oct. 25 -- Many universities that have traditionally been strong in men's sports have recently added varsity crew programs. This year, schools with relatively new varsity crew programs, such as Michigan State, Florida State, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, University of Tulsa, and University of Indiana, made an appearance at this weekend's Head of the Charles.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/10/25/text/p2s2.html

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, Oct. 25 -- ARTHUR MILLER, director of the Iowa Social Science Institute at the University of Iowa, is quoted in an article about Texas Gov. and Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush's plans to run ads targeting Iowa's small Hispanic population. "Iowans tend to be open-minded, but there are people among the blue-collar workers even in Iowa that feel we ought to be speaking English. I think it could potentially lose him as much support as it gains for him," he said.
http://www.expressnews.com:80/pantheon/news-bus/state/2605atx_bush_tv_ads_1026nz.shtml

ARKANSAS DEMOCRAT-GAZETTE, Oct. 24 -- John Duke, a graduate of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, was recently hired as vice president of Hometown Financial Center in Springdale, a loan production office of First State Bank of Lonoke, in its Northwest Arkansas office. Duke has been in banking for more than five years, previously serving as assistant vice president and lending officer for Community Bank in Fayetteville.

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 24 -- The book "The Feeling of What Happens," by ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, the Portuguese-educated (University of) Iowa neurologist, is reviewed favorably. "Until now, none have really approached consciousness from the standpoint of why it feels the way it does -- a livelier question to the nonexpert," writes the reviewer. "I formerly dismissed such 'qualia' issues as subject-object confusions engendered by our language habits, but (Damasio), known to half a million readers as the author of 'Descartes' Error,' has now persuaded me to pay attention -- and in a way that few philosophers could have done, by citing many neurology patients with odd limitations, ones that show useful distinctions."
http://www10.nytimes.com/books/99/10/24/reviews/991024.24calvint.html

COLUMBUS DISPATCH, Oct. 24 -- Ohio State University's homecoming festivities this week will feature service projects, a performance by comedian Howie Mandel, the opening of the $9 million alumni center and the annual parade before the football game, this year against the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.dispatch.com:80/pan/localarchive/cnot24nws.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 24 -- In ''Of Cabbages and Kings County'' MARC LINDER, a professor of law at the University of Iowa, and Lawrence S. Zacharias, a management professor at the University of Massachusetts, explore turn-of-the-century Brooklyn. As late as 1879, they report, Kings County was the nation's second county in terms of vegetable production, behind Queens. By 1919, almost nothing was left of a once thriving agricultural economy and the rural community it supported.
http://www10.nytimes.com/books/99/10/24/reviews/991024.24schneit.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 24 -- A study led by ANTONIO DAMASIO at the University of Iowa College of Medicine found that two people who suffered injuries in infancy, when the brain is supposed to be at its most resilient, seemingly lost the ability to tell right from wrong. Raised in good homes, they were otherwise intelligent. But early damage to the prefrontal cortex seemed to have disrupted some kind of morality circuit. If new neurons have indeed been migrating to the decision-making centers of their brains, there is apparently a limit to the curative powers.
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/review/102499brain-review.html

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Oct. 23 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa, says he isn't sure people would use leisure time wisely even if they had more. "Because the mindset of Americans on Saturday is to do personal and family business, I'm not sure we know what to do after taking care of the chores. We may rest or watch TV, but is that leisure? No."

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Oct. 23 -- "The Descent Beckons," performed recently at the Lied Center for Performing Arts in Omaha, Neb., is one of 15 new works commissioned for a season-long Millennium Festival at HANCHER AUDITORIUM, where the show premiered Oct. 8.

FINANCIAL TIMES, Oct. 22 -- THOMAS RIETZ, a financial professor at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie College of Business, is quoted in an article about the Iowa Electronic Markets. Rietz said Republican candidate Elizabeth Dole's decision to opt out of the race was no surprise to the people running the IEM. "She's been out of the race according to our markets for a long time, so this was no surprise at all," he said.
http://www.ft.com/specials/sp2bc6.htm

MSNBC, Oct. 22 -- The cost to go to Iowa's three public universities will be going up next year, as the Board of Regents, State of Iowa made that decision on Thursday. The board agreed to raise base tuition by 4.3 percent at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Iowa State and Northern Iowa, or $120 per semester, based on a 12-hour semester. A separate vote raised student fees at the University of Iowa 2.6 percent, or $154 per semester by 2001-02. The board said the money will be used to upgrade libraries and improve instructional equipment in classrooms.

LONG ISLAND (N.Y.) BUSINESS NEWS, Oct. 21 -- The article says that thanks to the vision of (and generous donations from) world-class venture capitalist John Pappajohn, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "has one of the finest entrepreneurship programs in the country. The John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, housed in the university's College of Business, offers a core of more than 15 entrepreneurial classes in several courses of study leading to an entrepreneurial certificate."

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Oct. 20 -- Scientists have identified rare cases in which injuries to the brain in infancy prevented people from learning normal rules of social and moral behavior in childhood and adolescence. When the infants reached adulthood, they showed no guilt or remorse for bad behavior and seemed destined never to get along in social situations. The new research was carried out by ANTONIO DAMASIO and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and appears in the November issue of the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience. The same NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE article ran Oct. 19 in the DALLAS MORNING NEWS, TAMPA (Fla.) TRIBUNE, MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL, BOSTON GLOBE, APPEAL-DEMOCRAT (Marysville, Calif.) and the SPRINGFIELD NEWS-SUN (Springfield, Ohio).

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Oct. 20 -- The kind of backlash that opponents of genetically engineered foods have fueled in Europe will "absolutely happen here because the industry is not doing anything to inoculate itself," said BABA SHIV, professor of marketing at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa. The same article appeared Oct. 18 in the ST. PAUL (Minn.) PIONEER PRESS.

WIREDNEWS, Oct. 20 -- Researchers at the University of Iowa have found that damage to the prefrontal cortex early in life could be the reason behind antisocial behavior such as delinquency, irresponsibility, and criminal activity. The Iowa team, led by ANTONIO DAMASIO and STEVEN ANDERSON and including assistant professor of neurology ANTOINE BECHARA, found that children who suffered damage to that region of their brains before the age of 16 months were unable to learn and follow social and moral codes of conduct through adulthood.
http://www.wired.com:80/news/technology/0,1282,31989,00.html

>CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 20 - The percentage of college students who reported feeling depressed or having suicidal thoughts declined substantially from 1987 to 1997, according to a new study. But the report, based on the responses of 962 students in 1987 and 1,455 students in 1997, found that the proportion of students who reported having attempted suicide had remained fairly constant. JOHN WESTEFELD, a UI professor of psychological and quantitative foundations and a co-author of the report, said that the declines do not necessarily indicate that students are any happier. "It could be that students have a better understanding of what the term 'clinically depressed' means, and how that differs from just having the blues or being down," he said.
http://chronicle.com/daily/99/10/99102002n.htm

MINNEAPOLIS STAR-TRIBUNE, Oct. 20 - CAROL SCOTT-CONNER, UI professor and head of surgery, is a leader in a field that was all but closed to women when she first started her career. Now she is one of only two women in the United States to lead a surgery department at an academic medical center. For most of her four-year tenure, she was the only woman in such a position.
http://www.startribune.com/cgi-bin/stOnLine/article?thisSlug=sci20

SYDNEY (Australia) MORNING HERALD, Oct. 20 - ANTONIO DAMASIO, UI professor and head of neurology, and his team of researchers believe they have discovered the "moral compass" of the brain - which helps a person to tell right from wrong. The vital brain region is the prefrontal cortex, just behind the eye sockets and above the bridge of the nose, according to the findings published in the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience. Damasio and his team made the discovery by studying two young offenders who suffered damage to this region of their brains as infants.
http://www.smh.com.au:80/news/9910/20/text/pageone9.html

REUTERS, Oct. 19 -- ANTONIO DAMASIO, UI professor and head of neurology, and his team of researchers believe they have discovered the "moral compass" of the brain - which helps a person to tell right from wrong. The vital brain region is the prefrontal cortex, just behind the eye sockets and above the bridge of the nose, according to the findings published in the latest issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience. Damasio and his team made the discovery by studying two young offenders who suffered damage to this region of their brains as infants.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991019/hl/mor10_1.html

SPOKANE (Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, Oct. l9 -- Scientists have identified rare cases in which injuries to the brain in infancy prevented people from learning normal rules of social and moral behavior in childhood and adolescence. When the infants reached adulthood, they showed no guilt or remorse for bad behavior and seemed destined never to get along in social situations. The new research was carried out by ANTONIO DAMASIO and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and appears in the November issue of the scientific journal Nature Neuroscience. This article originally appeared in the New York Times.
http://www.spokane.net:80/news-story-body.asp?Date=101999&ID=s647635&cat=

BBCNEWS.COM, Oct. 19 -- Damage to the part of the brain that learns moral and social rules could cause children to grow up into irresponsible adults and even criminals, new research suggests. The new work by neuroscientists from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA investigated two individuals who had suffered damage to the pre-frontal cortex as babies. The research is published in Nature Neuroscience.

LONDON TELEGRAPH, Oct. 19 -- Scientists believe they have discovered the "moral compass" of the brain -- which helps a person to tell right from wrong -- by studying young offenders who have suffered damage to the region. The findings were published yesterday in the journal Nature Neuroscience by the leading neurologist Professor ANTONIO DAMASIO, his wife Professor HANNA DAMASIO, STEVEN ANDERSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk:80/et?ac=000271261842766&rtmo=farVYVas&atmo=99999999&pg=/et/99/10/19/wmor19.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 19 -- Scientists have identified rare cases in which injuries to the brain in infancy prevented people from learning normal rules of social and moral behavior in childhood and adolescence. When the infants reached adulthood, they showed no guilt or remorse for bad behavior and seemed destined never to get along in social situations. The new research was carried out by ANTONIO DAMASIO and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and appears in the November issue of the scientific journal NATURE NEUROSCIENCE.
http://search.nytimes.com/search/daily/bin/fastweb?getdoc+site+iib-site+27+0+wAAA+%22University%7Eof%7EIowa%22
The same article appeared Oct. 19 on the SUN-SENTINEL Web site at:
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/daily/detail/0,1136,24500000000117516,00.html

THE TIMES OF LONDON, Oct. 19 -- Damage to a key area of the brain in early childhood creates adults who do not know the difference between right and wrong, say scientists. The discovery may explain what turns some people into psychopaths. A team led by ANTONIO DAMASIO of the University of Iowa concludes that the source of moral behaviour lies in the prefrontal cortex.
http://www.the-times.co.uk/news/pages/tim/99/10/19/timfgnusa01006.html?999

IRISH TIMES, Oct. 19 -- Psychopathic behaviour may be due to a traumatic blow to the head, especially in childhood, scientists have found. The research by ANTONIO DAMASIO and colleagues at the University of Iowa has shown that the effects are even more pronounced if the damage occurs when the person is very young, before they have had a chance to learn what is considered appropriate behaviour, according to a report published today in Nature Neuroscience.
http://www.ireland.com:80/newspaper/ireland/1999/1019/hom9.htm

FOXNEWS.COM, Oct. 19 -- A key part of the brain's circuitry for learning moral and social rules lies right behind the forehead, suggests a study by STEVEN W. ANDERSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. The findings were reported in the November issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/scitech/101999/brain.sml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article appeared Oct. 19 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site and on THE RECORD (Bergen County, N.J.) Web site at:
http://www.bergen.com/morenews/morals199910195.htm
The same Associated Press article appeared Oct. 19 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/10/19/national0117EDT0426.DTL
The same Associated Press article appeared Oct. 18 on the ABCNEWS.COM Web site at:
http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/living/DailyNews/moralcompass991018.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Oct. 18 on the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL Web site at:
http://www.jsonline.com/alive/news/oct99/moralcompass101899.asp
The same Associated Press article appeared Oct. 18 on the Web page for OGDEN NEWSPAPERS, on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site and on the Fort Worth, Texas, STAR-TELEGRAM Web site at:
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:BPAGE25/1:BPAGE25101899.html
The same Associated Press article appeared Oct. 18 on the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site and on the MSNBC Web site at:
http://www.msnbc.com/news/324715.asp

WASHINGTON POST, Oct. 19 -- A study of two adults who as infants suffered injuries in the front portions of their brains has found that their moral reasoning was permanently impaired. The research suggested, the scientists said, that morals may be based in the region of the brain known as the prefrontal cortex. ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa's medical school, and his colleagues there, published the study in the November issue of Nature Neuroscience, acknowledging that their sample size was small. But they said they wanted to publicize their intriguing finding in the hope that they would hear about similar cases. The article also appeared in the SUN-SENTINEL (Florida), METROPOLITAN NEWS-ENTERPRISE, THE CINCINNATI ENQUIRER, THE (Spokane, Wash.) SPOKESMAN-REVIEW, THE ECONOMIST, THE NEWS & OBSERVER (Raleigh, N.C.), THE SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE, the DAYTON DAILY NEWS (Ohio) and the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE.

COURIER-JOURNAL (Louisville, Ky.), Oct. 19 -- A key part of the brain's circuitry for learning moral and social rules lies right behind the forehead, suggests a study by STEVEN W. ANDERSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. The findings were reported in the November issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience. The ASSOCIATED PRESS article also appeared Oct. 19 in the OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, THE SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, THE DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, THE SAN DIEGO UNION-TRIBUNE, THE ATLANTA CONSTITUTION and THE PRESS-ENTERPRISE.

CHARLOTTE (Fla.) SUN HERALD, Oct. 18 -- The kind of backlash that opponents of genetically engineered foods have fueled in Europe will "absolutely happen here because the industry is not doing anything to inoculate itself," said BABA SHIV, professor of marketing at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa.

HOUSTON CHRONICLE, Oct. 18 -- Regular doses of worms might help cure people of inflammatory bowel disease by combating the absence of intestinal parasites in our sterile world, according to the results of a study led by University of Iowa professor of internal medicine JOEL WEINSTOCK and published in a recent issue of New Scientist magazine. Researchers fed six inflammatory bowel disease sufferers a drink containing microscopic eggs of a species of intestinal worm that does not normally affect people. The results were so dramatic that he is planning a larger trial later this year. The same article appeared Oct. 20 in the ARIZONA REPUBLIC and the CINCINNATI ENQUIRER.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Oct. 18 -- Researchers from the National Cancer Institute are spending a week in New York to interview residents to try to find out why so many women on Long Island are getting breast cancer. The NCI researchers will attempt to produce a visual image that may link breast cancer incidence with pollution sites on Long Island using Geographic Information Systems, a technology that has been around for decades and is used extensively in community and economic development, emergency management and land and natural resource use. "These applications in health could be very valuable," said GERARD RUSHTON, a professor of geography and adjunct professor of public health at the University of Iowa, who is a consultant on the nearly $5-million project.
http://www.latimes.com/class/employ/healthcare/19991018/t000094152.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Oct. 18 -- Cartoonists gathered for a symposium at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA titled "Drawing the Line: Political Cartooning Under Pressure" joked that they'd like to see Texas Gov. George W. Bush elected president simply because he'd be easier, and more fun, to draw than Vice President Al Gore.

THE MODESTO (Calif.) BEE, Oct. 18 -- The life and career of University of Iowa astrophysicist JAMES VAN ALLEN is chronicled in a lengthy feature article. The article, which originally appeared in the Chicago Tribune, states: "Van Allen, who turned 85 on Sept. 7, is a leader among the cadre of scientists who created the field of space science out of hunch and hypothesis, calculation and miscalculation, pluck and luck."

TIME.COM, Oct. 18 -- The on-line version of the national magazine discusses The Feeling of What Happens, a new book by ANTONIO DAMASIO, chairman of the University of Iowa's neurology department. The article says, "the noted neuroscientist not only argues that human consciousness is comprehensible but also offers an arrestingly original explanation of its workings. What makes his views so noteworthy is that they're grounded not in theoretical musings but in years of clinical research on patients who are epileptic or have suffered brain damage through strokes, disease or traumatic injuries."
http://www.pathfinder.com:80/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,32273,00.html

SEATTLE TIMES, Oct. 17 -- "The Workshop: Seven Decades of the Iowa Writers' Workshop," edited by Tom Grimes (Hyperion, $30), is included in a selection of new titles "by Seattle-area authors, or of local interest." The brief says the collection of writings by graduates of the IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP, "the country's most prestigious writing program," features three Pugetopolis writers: David Shields, Thom Jones and Charles D'Ambrosio.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/entertainment/html98/nwsh_19991017.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 17 -- JOSEPH D'UVA, who is pursuing a master's degree in art at the University of Iowa, was studying at Albuquerque's Tamarind Institute when he created Lithocoal from a powder used there for lithography, a print-making technique. Subsequently, D'Uva and business partner Robert Houston formed D'Uva Fine Artists Materials Inc. to sell the product.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 17 -- A feature article on JAMES VAN ALLEN, a semi-retired University of Iowa physicist, says he has spent most of his

85 years unlocking the sky's mysteries and designing equipment for spacecraft probing the edges of the solar system. But he's perhaps best known for the 1950s discovery that charged particles from the sun are trapped in a ring around the earth by the planet's magnetic field. The discovery was dubbed the Van Allen Radiation Belt and brought him and the University of Iowa international acclaim.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 17 -- University of Iowa researchers KEN CULP and JANET MANTES are conducting a study of elderly patients in long-term care. They are making fluids more available to an experimental group of patients by encouraging them to drink water, juices and other non-caffeinated beverages during social activities. What they plan to measure is whether increased fluid intake of water-based drinks improves mental capacity. "There are two outcomes of elderly people who don't get enough water," said Culp, an epidemiologist with Iowa's College of Nursing. "One is acute confusion, and the other is urinary tract infections."
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-9910160341,00.html

PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER, Oct. 17 -- The kind of backlash that opponents of genetically engineered foods have fueled in Europe will "absolutely happen here because the industry is not doing anything to inoculate itself," said BABA SHIV, professor of marketing at the Henry B. Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa.
http://www.phillynews.com:80/inquirer/99/Oct/17/business/GREENPEACE17.htm

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, Oct. 16 -- An article on the decline of journalism in public schools cites a 1993 study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA that looked at 19 schools with heavily minority student bodies. Half said they didn't have the money to print newspapers; almost half didn't have any interested faculty and couldn't afford to hire outside advisers. Only one-fourth of the schools said they didn't have enough interested students.
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/columnists/rodriguez/docs/jr101799.htm

FOX NEWS.COM, Oct. 16 -- Cartoonists gathered for a symposium at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA titled "Drawing the Line: Political Cartooning Under Pressure" joked that they'd like to see Texas Gov. George W. Bush elected president simply because he'd be easier, and more fun, to draw than Vice President Al Gore.
http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?content=/scitech/wires2/1016/t_ap_1016_1.sml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Oct. 16 on the MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE Web site and on the WASHINGTON POST Web site at:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/aponline/19991016/aponline013016_000.htm
The same Associated Press article ran Oct. 16 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/10/16/politics0118EDT0447.DTL

NORBOTTENS-KURIEN (LuleÂ, Sweden), Oct. 16 -- University of Iowa journalism professor CAROLYN DYER is featured in an article about the Nancy Drew series, which is the subject of her research. In Sweden, the main character is called "Kitty."

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) MEDICAL GAZETTE, Oct. 15 -- By lowering an individual's heart rate, doctors someday may be able to trigger the sprouting of new blood vessels without having to resort to invasive methods, according to results from a UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HEALTH CARE study.

BOSTON REVIEW, Oct. 15 -- Cole Swensen's sixth book, Try, winner of the 1999 UNIVERSITY OF IOWA Poetry Prize, is an extended and considerable meditation on paintings and sculptures ranging from the 14th to the 20th century, including the works of Giotto, Bellini, Joseph Albers, Olivier Debre, Hieronymus Bosch, Rembrandt, Claude Lorrain, Fra Angelico, Titian, Rodin, and Gauguin. Swensen concludes the book with a rose poem on a 20th-century video; however, the majority of the poems concentrate on pre-20th-century work -- especially the 14th through 18th centuries -- and in particular, on depictions of Christ, Joseph, and Mary.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu:80/BR24.5/conoley.html

BOSTON REVIEW, Oct. 15 -- In the Oval Hour (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS), Kathleen Peirce maintains her earmark dedication to clarity within an aesthetic that calls for considerable abstraction. One third of the poems in The Oval Hour are responses to the Confessions of St. Augustine, and although the titles clearly indicate their sources (i.e. Confessions 7.5.7), Peirce's encounter with them is intensely private.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu:80/BR24.5/micropoetry.html

BOSTON REVIEW, Oct. 15 -- Since his death in 1992, all nine of Richard Yates's titles have quietly dropped off the shelves. Andre Dubus, who was his student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, revered him, as does Tobias Wolff, and the jackets of Yates's books are adorned with quotes by the likes of Tennessee Williams and Dorothy Parker, Ann Beattie and Gina Berriault. After JFK's assassination, Yates took a teaching job at the University of Iowa, finding time to co-author the script of the World War II movie The Bridge at Remagen, released in 1969.
http://bostonreview.mit.edu:80/BR24.5/onan.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 15 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is included in a listing of tuition and fees at more than 3,000 colleges and universities. The listing says in-state tuition and fees at the UI were $2,908 in 1998-99, in-state tuition and fees are $3,038 for 1999-2000 and out-of-state tuition and fees are $10,480 for 1999-2000.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 15 -- MARK SHAPIRO, who attended the University of Iowa, is now coordinating producer for "SportsCentury," ESPN's weekly television specials counting down the top 50 North American athletes.

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Oct. 15 -- Three of the Seattle area's strongest literary writers (Thom Jones, David Shields and Charles D'Ambrosio) were scheduled to read from their work in the new anthology celebrating the key UNIVERSITY OF IOWA WRITERS' WORKSHOP.
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/books/book15.shtml

ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL, Oct. 14 -- Between April 1994 and December 1996, 56 patients were put on a waiting list for a heart transplant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS, according to a national report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of that number, 78.5 percent were alive one year later (adjusted for the severity of the patients' illnesses). Between April 1994 and December 1997, 68 patients were put on the waiting list for a heart transplant. Of that number, 47 percent received transplants within one year and 12.9 percent died while awaiting a transplant (with both numbers adjusted for the severity of the illness). In releasing the data, the Department of Health and Human Services cautioned that individual numbers may be misleading; in a few cases, transplant centers failed to provide all appropriate data, for instance. Generally, the more patients, the more reliable the data.
http://www.abqjournal.com:80/health/3transplant10-14-99.htm

ALBUQUERQUE JOURNAL, Oct. 14 -- Between April 1994 and December 1996, 118 patients were put on the waiting list for a liver transplant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS, according to a national report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of that number, 76.9 percent were alive one year later (adjusted for the severity of patients' illnesses). The report also states that between April 1994 and December 1997, 147 patients were put on the waiting list. Of those, 76.4 percent received transplants within one year and 11.6 percent died while waiting for a transplant (with both numbers adjusted for the severity of illness). In releasing the data, the Department of Health and Human Services cautioned that individual numbers may be misleading; in a few cases, transplant centers failed to provide all appropriate data, for instance. Generally, the more patients, the more reliable the data.
http://www.abqjournal.com:80/health/2transplant10-14-99.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 14 -- The weekly publication reports in its daily on-line version that in September the University of Iowa Students for Bush organization requested the institution's e-mail addresses because it wanted to send out information about joining the group. The resulting controversy has prompted the university to review its e-mail policies. Quoted in the article are STEVE PARROTT, interim director of University Communications and Outreach, MARK SCHANTZ, the university's general counsel, and DAVID DOBBINS, associate director of the university's information-technology services.
http://chronicle.com/free/99/10/99101401t.htm

SEATTLE TIMES, Oct. 14 -- A story about the Mercer Island School Board District 2 race says one of the candidates, STEVE TRONER, has taught in the New York City school system and at the University of Iowa, where he earned a doctorate in clinical psychology and went on to a career in banking.

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Oct. 14 -- On June 30, 2001, a Titan IV rocket will be launched, carrying a classified Air Force satellite and IMEX, or Inner Magnetosphere Explorer to study the Van Allen radiation belts, discovered by University of Iowa scientist JAMES VAN ALLEN in 1958. The belts -- magnetic fields that trap radiation in the form of protons and electrons -- are deep inside the Earth's magnetosphere, a big, complex system of magnetic field lines that are generated by the rotation of the molten interior of the planet. The field lines reach hundreds of thousands of miles out into space and protect the Earth from high-speed particles from the sun.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=IMEX14&da

WASHINGTON POST, Oct. 13 -- ANTONIO R. DAMASIO, head of the neurology department at the University of Iowa's College of Medicine, is to present "Exploring the Minded Brain," Tuesday, Oct. 19 at the Carnegie Institution. He will discuss the great advances made in learning biological mechanisms behind mental processes, especially in the areas of emotion, memory and language.

>NEWSDAY, Oct. 13 -- Between April 1994 and December 1996, 56 patients were put on a waiting list for a heart transplant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS, according to a national report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of that number, 78.5 percent were alive one year later (adjusted for the severity of the patients' illnesses). Between April 1994 and December 1997, 68 patients were put on the waiting list for a heart transplant. Of that number, 47 percent received transplants within one year and 12.9 percent died while awaiting a transplant (with both numbers adjusted for the severity of the illness). In releasing the data, the Department of Health and Human Services cautioned that individual numbers may be misleading; in a few cases, transplant centers failed to provide all appropriate data, for instance. Generally, the more patients, the more reliable the data. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Oct. 13 on the TAMPA BAY TRIBUNE Web site; on New Jersey Online, the Web site for THE STAR-LEDGER and THE TIMES, and on the NEW YORK TIMES Web site; and Oct. 12 on the LAS VEGAS SUN Web site, the NEWSDAY Web site and the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.

TAMPA BAY TRIBUNE, Oct. 13 -- Between April 1994 and December 1996, 118 patients were put on the waiting list for a liver transplant at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA HOSPITALS, according to a national report by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Of that number, 76.9 percent were alive one year later (adjusted for the severity of patients' illnesses). The report also states that between April 1994 and December 1997, 147 patients were put on the waiting list. Of those, 76.4 percent received transplants within one year and 11.6 percent died while waiting for a transplant (with both numbers adjusted for the severity of illness). In releasing the data, the Department of Health and Human Services cautioned that individual numbers may be misleading; in a few cases, transplant centers failed to provide all appropriate data, for instance. Generally, the more patients, the more reliable the data. The same ASSOCIATED PRESS story ran Oct. 12 on the BOSTON GLOBE Web site, the NEW YORK TIMES Web site and the LOS ANGELES TIMES Web site.

SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS, Oct. 12 -- INGRID NYGAARD, associate professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa, said many women who experience incontinence during sports or other activities are unaware that help exists. Some wear sanitary pads during exercise and others stop exercising entirely. "It's overweight,'' says Nygaard. For some people, she says, the loss of 20 to 30 pounds can mean the difference between being wet and being dry.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 12 -- University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, whose book "The Feeling of What Happens" was recently published, is profiled extensively.

>BOSTON HERALD, Oct. 12 -- BRADLEY ALLEN, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in a story about the release of Relenza, the first anti-viral medication approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat the two major strains of influenza. "It's a good adjunctive therapy to those that we already have,'' said Allen. "But we still feel that widespread vaccination is our most effective tool right now.''
http://www.bostonherald.com/bostonherald/nat/flu10121999.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Oct. 12 -- An article about the medicine ball's comeback as exercise equipment says the term used to describe its workout -- plyometrics -- was coined in the 1960s by FRED WILT, track coach at the University of Iowa, to describe the East European athletes' "jump training." But more recently it has won wider recognition with the medicine ball's new popularity.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/national/science/health/101299hth-fitness-medball.html

THE JOURNAL RECORD (Oklahoma City, Ok.), Oct. 11 -- The article says that thanks to the vision of (and generous donations from) world-class venture capitalist John Pappajohn, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "has one of the finest entrepreneurship programs in the country. The John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, housed in the university's College of Business, offers a core of more than 15 entrepreneurial classes in several courses of study leading to an entrepreneurial certificate."

DETROIT NEWS, Oct. 11 -- Scientists are feeling the pressure of the increasingly legal and political climate surrounding animal intelligence research and fear it's affecting the way their results are being interpreted. "Sometimes these studies are used to perpetuate the wrong ideas," said MARK BLUMBERG, who studies animal behavior at the University of Iowa. "Some of this is clearly the politics of the animal rights movement."
http://detnews.com:80/1999/religion/9910/12/10120012.htm

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 10 -- LINDA K. KERBER, the author of "No Constitutional Right to Be Ladies: Women and the Obligations of Citizenship" and history professor at the University of Iowa, reviews author Susan Faludi's new book, "Stiffed: The Betrayal of the American Man."

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 10 -- A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study found that babies who were provided a more nutritionally dense formula drank less than babies who were given watered-down versions of the same formula. The human body, particularly one less than a year old, knows when enough is enough.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Oct. 9 -- John Paul Jones, a painter, sculptor and art educator who established the printmaking department at UCLA and taught for many years at UC Irvine, has died. Jones, 74, who earned a master's degree at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, writing his thesis on printmaking, died Sept. 25 at his home in Ashland, Ore., of complications from emphysema. A multifaceted artist, Jones first gained national recognition in the 1960s with his figurative prints, drawings and paintings. In the 1980s, he turned to stark, spare sculptures in wood and bronze.

LYCOS NEWS, Oct. 8 -- University of Iowa political scientist CARY COVINGTON said he assumed Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore was still well ahead in Iowa, although it was difficult to know for sure since polling is notoriously difficult for a state that holds caucuses. "The natural dynamic is for (Democratic presidential candidate Bill) Bradley to move up as he becomes better known and gets more publicity,'' he said. "That could make life difficult for Gore. He could end up winning and yet still lose the spin after the vote.''

LYCOS NEWS, Oct. 8 -- CARY COVINGTON, an associate political science professor at the University of Iowa, is quoted in a story about billionaire New York developer Donald Trump's announcement that he plans to form a presidential exploratory committee. "Trump has no credentials as a serious candidate -- other than he could finance his own race,'' Covington said in the Reuters wire story. The same article ran Oct. 7 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site at:
http://biz.yahoo.com/rf/991007/1l.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Oct. 8 -- DUDLEY ANDREW, a film scholar at the University of Iowa for 30 years, has accepted a position as a professor of comparative literature and film studies at Yale University beginning next fall. A professor of critical studies, with affiliations in comparative literature and film studies, Mr. Andrew had helped make Iowa a major producer of film Ph.D.'s.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i07/07a01401.htm

JANUARY MAGAZINE, Oct. 7 -- An interview with writer Max Allan Collins, whose mystery/science fiction book Majic Man was recently released, mentions that he's a lifelong resident of Muscatine, Iowa, and a graduate "of the renowned WRITERS' WORKSHOP."
http://www.janmag.com/profiles/collins.html

REUTERS, Oct. 7 -- ARTHUR MILLER, a University of Iowa pollster and political scientist, is quoted in an article about Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley's campaign in Iowa. "I have the feeling it's not as close here as in New Hampshire, though Bradley is making some inroads,'' said Miller. "The problem for (Vice President and presidential candidate Al) Gore is that Bradley's people are those who are less content with the status quo and therefore more motivated."

SALON, Oct. 7 -- STEPHEN G. BLOOM, who teaches medical reporting at the University of Iowa, is the author of a first-person account of his efforts to get his back pain treated at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics.
http://www.salon1999.com/health/feature/1999/10/07/hospital_saga/index.html

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Oct. 7 -- ABRAHAM VERGHESE, a physician and best-selling author of The Tennis Partner, attended the University of Iowa's prestigious writing program. The article talks about what Verghese calls the "hole in the heart syndrome," which he said is suffered widely by physicians. "Physicians, especially during their years of training, are exposed to tremendous carnage in the hospital and in the macho environment of medical school," Verghese says. "There is not an outlet for them to talk about what they see and how they feel about it. So they tend to numb themselves."

FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, Oct. 6 -- HERB HOVENKAMP, a University of Iowa law professor who has worked for the government in the Microsoft antitrust case, is quoted in an article that says the prosecution has spent $13.3 million on the case. Hovenkamp said the Justice Department's costs are about the same as minor, privately litigated antitrust cases. In such cases, losing defendants must pay plaintiff fees. The story originated with the SEATTLE TIMES.
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:COMP41/1:COMP41100699.html

CNN.COM, Oct. 6 -- The Army's Tank-automotive and Armaments Command plans to develop multiple Cave Automatic Virtual Environments (CAVES) -- 10-foot walled simulators -- to build a distributed simulation network, as well as use the Transportation Department's driving simulator (NATIONAL ADVANCED DRIVING SIMULATOR, NADS) at the University of Iowa. The article originally ran Oct. 4 in FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK.
http://cnn.com:80/TECH/computing/9910/06/virtual.weapon.design.idg/index.html

>NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO, Oct. 4 -- A new book, "Boomer Girls: Poems by Women from the Baby Boom Generation," published by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, was featured on the NPR news program, "All Things Considered," and reported by Susan Stamberg. In the eight-minute piece, Stamberg says, "These women write about hula hoops, television, Amana kitchens, and growing up in the shadow of the bomb." Sales of the book, which hit bookstores earlier this month, resulted in its ranking 105th out of more than a million books sold by Amazon.com, the online bookseller. Boomer Girls is an anthology of coming-of-age-poems, Stamberg says. The book is edited by Pamela Gemin and Paula Sergi. A review of the book can be read at
http://www.uiowa.edu/~uipress/

DETROIT FREE PRESS, Oct. 4 -- Veteran poll taker ARTHUR MILLER, who directs the University of Iowa's Social Sciences Institute, is quoted in an article on the recent spate of celebrities toying with the idea of running for public office. "Amazing. Just amazing,'' said Miller. "The celebrity phenomenon has penetrated the American psyche.''
http://www.freep.com/news/politics/qceleb4.htm
An ASSOCIATED PRESS version of the article ran Oct. 2 in the SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS. CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 4 --A 1992 study by CLAIBOURNE DUNGY of the University of Iowa found that mothers who, while in the hospital to give birth, received breast pumps breast-fed longer than mothers who received discharge packs containing formula. But in a 1997 study, Dungy found that discharge packs containing formula did not decrease the duration of breast-feeding. Dungy speculates the increasing emphasis by the media and medical profession on the benefits of breast-feeding has protected mothers from the negative influence of formula samples.

BUSINESS RECORD, Oct. 4 -- In an interview about the World Food Prize Foundation, its executive director, Herman Kilpper, said the foundation is planning a full day of meetings at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where support for the prize is growing.

FEDERAL COMPUTER WEEK, Oct. 4 -- The Army's Tank-automotive and Armaments Command plans to develop multiple Cave Automatic Virtual Environments (CAVES) -- 10-foot walled simulators -- to build a distributed simulation network, as well as use the Transportation Department's driving simulator at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.fcw.com:80/pubs/fcw/1999/1004/fcw-newsreality-10-04-99.html

PLAIN DEALER (Cleveland), Oct. 4 -- University of Iowa researcher CYNTHIA A. BONEBRIGHT recently reported finding that ''workaholics'' -- people who work long hours, whether out of enthusiasm for the job or not -- have more conflicts between work and family, and less satisfaction and purpose in life.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 3 -- A recent newsletter produced by Keith Lambrecht, director of Northern Illinois University's sport-management programs, says 1998 NIU graduates with sports-management degrees landed positions with, among other places, the WOMEN'S ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT of the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-9910030076,00.html

DENVER POST, Oct. 3 -- ANN RHODES, vice president for university relations at the University of Iowa and the person who oversees the athletic department, said the university recently turned down a $45,000 Anheuser-Busch beer contract to sponsor its football and basketball coaches shows this year. "We want to get youngsters involved in athletics and our athletic program in a healthy way and in a healthy environment,'' Rhodes said. "They are our future fans and athletes. My husband and I have three kids we like to take to the games. We don't want them in an environment of over-consumption.''
http://www.denverpost.com:80/news/news1003b.htm

THE (Columbia, S.C.) STATE, Oct. 3 -- Veteran poll taker ARTHUR MILLER, who directs the University of Iowa's Social Sciences Institute, is quoted in an article on the recent spate of celebrities toying with the idea of running for public office. "Amazing. Just amazing,'' said Miller. "The celebrity phenomenon has penetrated the American psyche.''

>DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, Oct. 3 -- John Cambier, head of the Basic Sciences Division in the department of pediatrics at National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, received the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA College of Medicine's Distinguished Alumni Award.

>AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Oct. 2 -- Veteran poll taker ARTHUR MILLER, who directs the University of Iowa's Social Sciences Institute, is quoted in an article on the recent spate of celebrities toying with the idea of running for public office. "Amazing. Just amazing,'' said Miller. "The celebrity phenomenon has penetrated the American psyche.''

PRESS-TELEGRAM (Long Beach, Calif.), Oct. 2 -- Veteran poll taker ARTHUR MILLER, who directs the University of Iowa's Social Sciences Institute, is quoted in an article on the recent spate of celebrities toying with the idea of running for public office. "Amazing. Just amazing,'' said Miller. "The celebrity phenomenon has penetrated the American psyche.'' The same article appeared Oct. 2 in the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Oct. 1 -- The life and career of University of Iowa astrophysicist JAMES VAN ALLEN is chronicled in a lengthy feature article. The article states: "Van Allen, who turned 85 on Sept. 7, is a leader among the cadre of scientists who created the field of space science out of hunch and hypothesis, calculation and miscalculation, pluck and luck."

NPR, Oct. 1 -- University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO, author of "The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness," discusses his book in an interview with WBUR in Boston that was broadcast on NATIONAL PUBLIC RADIO (NPR). Information about the interview, and the interview itself in RealAudio, can be accessed at the WBUR's Web site at:
http://www.wbur.org/connection/con_03b.shtml

PT -- MAGAZINE OF PHYSICAL THERAPY, October 1999 -- A list of notable Web sites includes the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 's VIRTUAL HOSPITAL, which contains hundreds of books and brochures for health care providers and patients.

HOSPITAL PHARMACIST REPORT, October 1999 -- RONALD JONES of the department of pathology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, is quoted in an article about the SENTRY Antimicrobial Surveillance Program, a worldwide tracking program that has been collecting data on infectious-disease pathogens for three years and which released new information on antibiotic resistance related to respiratory tract infections. "The key organism we're most concerned about in the 1990s and as we go into the new millennium is the pneumococcus, otherwise known as Streptococcus pneumoniae organism," Jones said.

SESAME STREET PARENTS, October 1999 --- While nobody knows who first popped a pacifier into a baby's mouth, archaeologists have found pottery nipples dating back to 100 B.C. in Roman ruins, according to ARTHUR J. NOWAK, a professor at the College of Dentistry and Medicine at the University of Iowa.

3D MAGAZINE, October 1999 -- ERICH J. ASCHENBRENNER's "Renovated Barn Kitchen" recently won the magazine's award for architectural visualization. The design was "Aschenbrener's first dive into 3D after an introductory class in Alias/Wavefront Studio at the University of Iowa."

EMPLOYMENT REVIEW, October 1999 -- DEANNA STUPP HURST, director of Business and Liberal Arts Placement at the University of Iowa, says that when going over a job proposal, new graduates want to explore what growth potential awaits them in a company. "Students are interested in how quickly they can advance ... and how quickly they will have performance evaluations which may be tied to compensation," says Hurst. "Questions on possible exposure to mentors and/or higher-level managers are also important."
http://www.employmentreview.com/1999-10/features/CNfeat05.cfm

NORTHERN LOGGER & TIMBER PROCESSOR, October 1999 -- A study by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA found that conventional poplar trees effectively reduce high soil levels of atrazine, a farm fertilizer.

PSYCHIATRIC TIMES, October 1999 -- ARNOLD E. ANDERSEN, M.D., professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa College of Medicine and director of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics' eating disorders programs is quoted in an article about a California lawsuit challenging the disparity between physical and mental health coverage provided by HMOs.

FARM JOURNAL, October 1999 -- CHARLES LYNCH, director of a study of prostate cancer rates among farmers, says the study will follow a group of farmers for the next 30 years. Among the things they'll be looking for are potential causes for the higher rate.

MSNBC, Undated -- Fort Madison hospital is not accredited by the National Commission on Cancer but works with Burlington and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA to compare cases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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