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CONTACT: PETER ALEXANDER
100 Old Public Library
Iowa City IA 52242
(319) 384-0072; fax (319) 384-0024
e-mail: peter-alexander@uiowa.edu

Release: Oct. 22, 1999

UI CAMPUS NOTES -- IOWA CENTER FOR THE ARTS

KLAWINSKI READS NOV. 1 -- Rion Klawinski will read from "Chasing The Heretics: A Modern Journey Through Medieval Languedoc," a mixture of history and contemporary travel writing, at 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 1 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Susan Allen Toth, author of "England For All Seasons," writes, "In this unusual book . . . Rion Klawinksi embarks on two intersecting trips. With remarkable clarity and simplicity, he tells his grim but compelling story of the Albigensian Crusade, while at the same time he beguiles the reader with the wonderfully observed details of his own travels through the Languedoc, a part of France often ignored by modern travel writers."

Klawinski lives in Chicago with his wife, Susan, who is often his travelling companion. He took his first trip to Europe in 1971. His travel articles and essays have appeared in a number of publications, including the Robb Report, American Way and "The International Directory of Historic Places."

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

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COLLINS READS NOV. 2 -- Prolific author Max Allan Collins, an alumnus of the University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop, will read from his new detective novel, "Majic Man," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 2 at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the UI radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

"Majic Man" features Collins’ most popular detective, Nathan Heller, this time operating in 1949 with the Red Scare in full bloom. "No one can twist you through a maze with as much intensity and suspense as Max Allan Collins," Clive Cussler writes.

Collins, who lives in Muscatine, is the author of nine previous Nathan Heller novels. He won the Shamus Award for "True Detective" (1983) and "Stolen Away" (1991). His credits also include screenwriting, directing, song-writing and short fiction.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.

PERSPECTIVES, NOV. 3 -- Pamela Trimpe, assistant director and curator of painting and sculpture at the University of Iowa Museum of Art, will present "From Living Room to Gallery: The Elliott Collection" at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 3, in the museum.

Trimpe’s talk and gallery tour will be given in conjunction with a new installation of the museum’s core collection of paintings given by Leone and Owen Elliott to the UI in the mid-1960s. The tour and talk are part of the Perspectives series held Wednesdays at the museum. Admission is free to both the museum and the Perspective events.

This new installation marks the museum’s 30th anniversary. The Elliotts were instrumental to the museum’s founding, and the collection they donated consists of more than 1,500 works of art including paintings, prints and objects of silver and jade. Among the artists represented are Picasso, Henri Matisse, Georges Braque and Lionel Feininger.

In her gallery tour, Trimpe will discuss the significance of paintings as works of art and describe how the Elliots acquired the paintings in their collection.

The UI Museum of Art, located at North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. the day of Trimpe’s talk. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art, Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1999-2000 Perspectives series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

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WOMEN’S CHORALE CONCERT NOV. 5 -- The Women’s Chorale from the University of Iowa School of Music will present a concert of French music at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 5, in Clapp Recital Hall on the UI campus.

The performance, which will be free and open to the public, will be conducted by UI doctoral choral conducting student Rebecca Petra Naomi Seeman. Graduate student Koi Hin Samuel Kwok will accompany the performance on piano and organ, and several members of the Women’s Chorale will be featured as soloists.

Works on the program are by Maurice Durufle, Gabriel Faure and Francis Poulenc.

The concert will open with the Latin motet "Tota pulchra es" (Thou art all fair), one of the Four Motets on themes from Gregorian Chant by Durufle. Like all of Durufle’s music, "Tota pulchra es" is heavily indebted to chant, maintaining both a specific chant melody and the mystical flavor of Gregorian chant.

Next, the chorale will sing two early works by Faure, the "Cantique de Jean Racine," winner of a student composition prize at Louis Niedermeyer’s church music school in Paris in 1865, and the "Mess basse" (Low mass), written in 1881 and revised for two-part women’s chorus, soprano solo and organ in 1906.

The second half of the program comprises three works by Poulenc, presented in celebration of the 100th anniversary of the composer’s birth. They are: "Litanies a la Vierge Noire, Notre Dame de Roc-Amadour" (Litanies to the black Virgin); the "Ave Maria" from the opera "Dialogues of the Carmelites"; and "Petite voix,," a cycle of five children’s poems for three-part treble choir.

Today regarded as one of the century’s most memorable composers, Poulenc took part in the remarkable artistic life of Paris in the 1920s and ‘30s. His interaction with visual artists including Picasso and Braque, and poets including Cocteau and Eluard, affected his musical style as much as did the music of the times. For example, the influence of cubism is evident in his use of repeated musical blocks, and his quirky, often whimsical melodies reflect the spirit of Parisian cafe life in the ‘20s and ‘30s. Other characteristics of his style that are found in all three works are his penchant for unison writing, strong dissonance and the use of ostinato (repeated rhythmic patterns).

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/.

NOTE TO BROADCASTERS: The composers names mentioned in this release are pronounced, approximately maw-reece doo-roo-FLAY (Maurice Durufle); gah-bree-el fwah-RAY (Gabriel Faure) and frahn-see POO-lahnk (Francis Poulenc).

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SMALL JAZZ ENSEMBLES NOV. 6 -- Several small jazz ensembles from the University of Iowa School of Music will perform a free concert at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 6, in Old Brick,
26 E. Market St. in Iowa City.

Appearing on the program will be student combos from the jazz studies area at the School of Music. The program, which each group will announce from the stage, will include original arrangements and compositions by ensemble members as well as jazz standards and ballads from the jazz mainstream tradition.

John Rapson, head of the jazz studies area of the UI School of Music, commented: "The small jazz curriculum in the School of Music is directed toward helping students develop unique repertoires and leadership skills necessary for creating self-sustaining professional ensembles."

For information on UI arts events, visit http://www.uiowa.edu/~uiowacr on the World Wide Web. You may visit the UI School of Music web site at http://www.uiowa.edu/~music/.

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MUSIC IN THE MUSEUM, NOV. 7 -- Violinist Catherine Kennedy and guitarist James Kennedy will give a concert of old-time music at 2 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 7, at the University of Iowa Museum of Art, as part of the monthly Music in the Museum series.

Admission is free to both the museum and the Music in the Museum program.

The Kennedys play a blend of contemporary and mainstream jazz, Latin, and rock/fusion styles influenced by world music. They have performed throughout the Midwest and in Switzerland, Holland and France. One European critic described them as "a charming, delightful, very professional pair appealing to all age groups, who play old favorites with a new twist."

James Kennedy’s music has been featured on the National Public Radio programs "Echoes," "Fresh Air" and "Soundscapes." He has been a guest on Iowa Public Television’s "Take One" and appeared at the Des Moines Art Center and Iowa State Fair as well as the Johnson County Fair and Iowa City’s Riverfest.

The UI Museum of Art, located at North Riverside Drive in Iowa City, is open noon to 5 p.m. Sunday. Admission is free. Public metered parking is available in UI parking lots across from the museum on Riverside Drive and just north of the museum.

M.C. Ginsberg Objects of Art Inc. of Iowa City is the corporate sponsor for the 1999-2000 Music in the Museum series at the UI Museum of Art, through the University of Iowa Foundation.

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WEISSMILLER READS NOV. 9 -- University of Iowa Writers’ Workshop alumna Jan Weissmiller will read from her first collection of poems, "In Divided Light," at 8 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 9, at the Prairie Lights bookstore, 15 S. Dubuque St. in downtown Iowa City.

The reading -- part of the "Live From Prairie Lights" series originating live on the University of Iowa radio station WSUI, 910 AM -- is free and open to the public.

Commenting on Weissmiller’s new book, UI emeritus faculty member Carl H. Klaus writes, "Jan Weissmiller’s luminous presence is a wonder to behold, to overhear, in these exquisitely detailed poems. ‘In Divided Light’ is unified from start to finish by her attentive eye, her restless turn of mind -- her vivid perceptions, her evocative recollections. This beautifully wrought collection bears witness to the art and urgency of seeing what is to be seen -- and not seen -- in every kind of light."

Weissmiller, who attended the Writers’ Workshop in the 1980’s, lives with her family in Iowa City and oversees the poetry section at Prairie Lights.

For more information on the "Live From Prairie Lights" readings, visit the series’ web page at http://www.prairielights.com/livefromplights.htm.