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UI in the News

November, 1999

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FAST COMPANY, November 1999 -- As family, community, and religious ties have broken down, life outside work has become increasingly empty. Meanwhile, workplaces have become more appealing, with teams replacing rigid hierarchies, casual dress supplanting corporate power suits, and employers offering rank-and-file workers previously unimaginable opportunities to make an impact. As a result, more of us are looking to our jobs to satisfy basic emotional needs that, in another era, would have been met by family, religion, and community life. BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor at the University of Iowa at Iowa City who specializes in the history of work, worries that work is fast replacing religion in providing meaning in people's lives. "Work has become how we define ourselves," he says. "It is now answering the traditional religious questions: Who am I? How do I find meaning and purpose? Work is no longer just about economics; it's about identity." http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/29/betrayed.html

EDMONTON JOURNAL, (Edmonton, Alberta), Nov. 29 -- MARGARET F. BRINIG, an economist/law professor at the University of Iowa, co-authored a national study of about 3,600 couples and found a 59-percent higher-than-average risk of divorce among couples who agreed that all the work was fairly divided.

MSNBC, Nov. 29 -- Residents in Plant City, Fla., are mourning the death of Commissioner Sadye Gibbs Martin, who lost her battle with cancer on Saturday. She was 71. Martin, who was elected mayor five times, attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.msnbc.com/local/WFLA/64474.asp
Another version of the ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 29 in the NAPLES (Fla.) NEWS:
http://www.naplesnews.com/today/florida/d274178a.htm
Another version of the Associated Press article ran Nov. 28 in the TAMPA BAY (Fla.) TRIBUNE:
http://www.tampabayonline.net/news/flor101i.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 29 -- At a recent backyard rally in Iowa City, the host, MICHAEL FLAUM, 45, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Iowa, waited with a still-unsigned basketball as Democratic Presidential candidate Bill Bradley chatted with supporters under a white tent. When Flaum was growing up a Knicks fan in New York, he said, Bradley meant "everything to me." Flaum said his idol was a master at scoring "in clutch situations, and I think we should give him the ball now."
http://www.latimes.com/news/nation/19991129/t000108838.html

HEALTHSCOUT, Nov. 29 -- PETER NATHAN, distinguished professor of psychology at the University of Iowa, notes that a recent study on addictions based on gender is a new area of research "that will be of widespread interest. Although preliminary, these data do suggest that involvement in activities, which were simply unavailable a few years ago, like video games and the Internet, relate importantly to age-old activities that also involve risk-taking and sensation-seeking, like gambling."
http://www.healthscout.com/cgi-bin/WebObjects/Af?ap=1&id=87609

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.), Nov. 28 -- On a report that Microsoft Corp.'s shares gained 4.4 percent after a federal judge appointed an arbitrator to seek a settlement in the government's antitrust lawsuit against the software maker, HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa, said: "I think the odds of a settlement have increased dramatically since Judge (Richard) Posner agreed to mediate." The same article appeared Nov. 28 in the POST AND COURIER of Charleston, S.C.

OMAHA (Neb.) WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 28 -- University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, who underwent a highly publicized 1996 sex-change operation, has resigned, saying Iowa administrators have failed to do what is necessary to make the university any more than a "wannabe Michigan or third-rate Harvard."

SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, Nov. 28 -- A story on the decline in the number of students seeking MBAs says that at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie School of Management, where applications dropped by more than a quarter last spring, the acceptance rate rose to 37 percent, from 28 percent in 1998. In response, the school has tripled its advertising budget and continued a recent push to send more unsolicited mail to people who take the admissions test, said MARY SPREEN, the school's director of MBA admissions and financial aid. "It has caused some concern," Spreen said. "When you have a larger applicant pool, you're able to attract a higher-quality class."

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 28 -- A story on the decline in the number of students seeking MBAs says that at the University of Iowa's Henry B. Tippie School of Management, where applications dropped by more than a quarter last spring, the acceptance rate rose to 37 percent, from 28 percent in 1998. In response, the school has tripled its advertising budget and continued a recent push to send more unsolicited mail to people who take the admissions test, said MARY SPREEN, the school's director of MBA admissions and financial aid. "It has caused some concern," Spreen said. "When you have a larger applicant pool, you're able to attract a higher-quality class."
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/national/112899biz-schools-edu.html

SEATTLE TIMES, Nov. 28 -- A new Web site offers a variety of map links, including a link to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's CENTER FOR GLOBAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH, which hosts an extensive collection of maps and geographical data, including tides, time zones, telephone directories and more.
http://archives.seattletimes.com/cgi-bin/texis.mummy/web/vortex/display?storyID=38424ee026&query=%22University+of+Iowa%22

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 28 -- Stephen Greene, an abstract painter whose sensuous brushwork and half-buried symbols synthesized elements of several postwar movements into a distinctive style, died on Nov. 18 at his home in Valley Cottage, N.Y., where he had lived for more than 40 years. He was 82. He briefly attended the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va., and then transferred to the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in Iowa City. There he met Guston, known for his restrained Renaissance-inspired treatment of political themes, who began teaching there in 1941.
http://www.nytimes.com/99/11/29/news/national/obit-s-greene.html

DENVER ROCKY MOUNTAIN NEWS, Nov. 28 -- A sidebar story to a Q&A article with John Frew, president and chief executive officer of Colorado Ski Country U.S.A., says he has bachelor's and master's degrees from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://insidedenver.com:80/business/1128qanda.shtml

SEATTLE TIMES, Nov. 28 -- An article on efforts to fight ovarian cancer says that a number of researchers, including some at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, are trying gene therapy to beef up production of cancer-fighting proteins.
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/health-science/html98/ovar_19991128.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Nov. 27 -- "The divine is nowhere in view," FRANCES FLANNERY-DAILEY, a professor at the University of Iowa, said in her lecture on "Bruce Willis as the Messiah" -- one of a number of papers presented during "Film and the Apocalypse" at the American Academy of Religion's (AAR) annual meeting. Instead of the traditional idea of divine intervention bringing about or stopping an apocalypse, Flannery-Dailey argues that Willis films such as "Armageddon" and "Twelve Monkeys," in both of which Willis' character sacrifices his own life in order to save the world, present human effort as the only way to do so. "The eschaton itself, as well as any hope of salvation, depends entirely on human effort," she said.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=APOC27&date=27-Nov-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

BIRMINGHAM (Ala.) NEWS Nov. 26 -- FRANCES FLANNERY-DAILEY, a UI graduate student in religion, presented a paper on "Film and the Apocalypse'' at the American Academy of Religion's annual meeting. Drawing from a spate of recent movies with apocalyptic themes, she was among five scholars analyzing the ways in which films reflect society's expectation for the upcoming millennium and any apocalyptic events that may accompany it. Flannery-Dailey examined draining the religious meaning from the event in favor of a more human-centered interpretation. "The divine is nowhere in view,'' said Frances Flannery-Dailey in her lecture on "Bruce Willis as the Messiah.'' Flannery-Dailey argues that Willis' films, such as "Armageddon'' and "Twelve Monkeys,'' in both of which Willis' character sacrifices his life to save the world, present human effort as the only way to do so.

CNN, Nov. 26 -- The network's program Inside Politics ran a story on the Iowa Electronic Markets (IEM). The piece included a description of how the markets work and the current trading trends in its political markets, showing Republican George W. Bush and Democrat Al Gore to be the front runners, with traders looking to see how Republican John McCain would perform in coming weeks. ROBERT FORSYTHE, senior associate dean in the Tippie College of Business and one of the IEM directors, said the markets were created to let people express their preferences for candidates by investing in them. The IEM has three times as many traders at this point in the campaign compared to four years ago, he added.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 26 -- University of Iowa neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO's book "The Feeling of What Happens" is featured. The article also mentions Damasio's wife, HANNA DAMASIO, who is also a professor of neurology at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i14/14a02301.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 26 - Some professors say that the influence of computers is having a negative effect on students' writing, but DIANE DAVIS, a UI assistant professor of rhetoric, says that encouraging students to publish their writing on the Web improves their work at all stages. "I've noticed that when students realize their work is going on line, in a Web journal or something similar, they tend to work harder." When students can receive e-mail responses to their posted writings from anywhere in the world, they pay more attention to how they can best express their ideas, and they worry about how poorly written prose may look to their readers, she says. ELIZABETH MCCRACKEN, a visiting faculty member in the UI WRITERS' WORKSHOP, says she combats the wordiness that marks some writing in the computer age by asking students to print out their work. "If you don't print something out, you can forget how long it is, because all you can see is what you see through the keyhole of the screen," she says.
http://chronicle.com/free/v46/i14/14a06701.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 26 - A profile of ANTONIO DAMASIO, UI professor and head of neurology, focuses on the work outlined in his new book, "The Feeling of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness." Damasio and his wife, HANNA, also a professor of neurology at the UI, have spent their careers trying to understand the brain in the ways that many neurologists do. They examine brain-damaged patients, map the damage, and try to find and document the behaviors that are missing or altered. The Damasios have a reputation for maintaining the largest network of brain-damaged research subjects in the country, if not the world. That network has made them dominant in their field.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i14/14a02301.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 26 - UI political science professor BOB BOYNTON, who leads the UI's orientation course "OnLine at Iowa" says there have been a few glitches, but that does not account for more than half of the 1,900 students in the one-credit course receiving midterm F's. Many of those who were failing at the semester's midpoint had not even begun the self-directed course yet. Students have until the last day of classes, Dec. 10, to complete the work. The barrage of F's seems to have sparked at least 300 additional students to start doing the course work, Boynton says. "They got a mid-semester grade report that said, 'You're failing this course,' so that led to action."
http://chronicle.com/free/99/11/99111601t.htm

MIAMI HERALD, Nov. 25 -- "Political cartooning is on the endangered species list," said JOHN SOLOSKI, director of the University of Iowa's journalism school, even though "there's probably no section of a daily newspaper that draws as much reaction day in and day out." Concerned by the state of their art, top cartoonists from around the nation gathered here recently at a public symposium that drew several hundred listeners. The conference honored Times cartoonist Paul Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who began his career at the university's paper. The same article appeared Oct. 31 in the HOUSTON CHRONICLE.

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, Nov. 25 -- University of Iowa researcher CYNTHIA A. BONEBRIGHT recently reported finding that ''workaholics'' -- people who work long hours, whether out of enthusiasm for the job or not -- have more conflicts between work and family, and less satisfaction and purpose in life.

SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS, Nov. 25 -- JOEL WEINSTOCK of the University of Iowa has conducted experiments on animals that suggest that widespread exposure to intestinal worms in the early part of this century provided protection against development of IBD (intractable bowel disorders) and that loss of this exposure through improved sanitary conditions has led to the onslaught of bowel disease. Moreover, Weinstock and his colleagues have demonstrated in early experiments that infecting IBD patients with these worms--called helminths--can lead to remissions in patients with otherwise intractable bowel disorders. His team is now gearing up to perform much larger clinical trials of the technique.

(Fort Worth, Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM, Nov. 23 - An article about an Austin, Texas, production of "Spring Storm" by Tennessee Williams says that back when he was writing his plays at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, Williams could never have anticipated the fuss some of his work would create later in the century.
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:ENTNEWS33/1:ENTNEWS33112399.html

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR, Nov. 23 -- Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering, in Needham, Mass., hasn't been built yet, has no faculty or students, and is not accredited. It is one of the few independent engineering colleges to be built from scratch in decades. Richard Miller, Olin's president of 11 months and an aerospace engineer by training, created a cutting-edge entrepreneurial engineering program while at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.csmonitor.com/durable/1999/11/23/text/p15s1.html

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 23 -- "Approaching Storm," a rare Grant Wood drawing, was sold for $52,500 -- thousands more than expected -- to an unidentified bidder from Dubuque at a weekend auction. Warren Keck, a professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, owned the drawing from 1968 until his death in 1988, when it was inherited by a friend, Loyd Kern. The most recent owner purchased it from the Kern estate this year.

>WASHINGTON TIMES, Nov. 23 -- At least seven suits, including one filed Monday in a state court in San Francisco, have been filed against Microsoft on behalf of computer users in response to a judge's Nov. 5 finding that Microsoft is a software monopolist that routinely bullies high-tech rivals. The judge has since appointed a mediator to explore a settlement, which would make it far more difficult for private plaintiffs to use the judge's findings to build a case against Microsoft. "They'd be well advised to look for ways to settle this case," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa who has consulted with the Justice Department on the case.

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Nov. 22 -- In the latest attack on Microsoft, three California lawyers say they plan to file a class-action lawsuit against the company on behalf of millions of Windows users. Experts say this is the first of what could become a flood of private litigation springing from the Justice Department's antitrust action against the company. "The prospect of a flood of private follow-on cases - with their triple damages in private antitrust cases - are lawsuits with potentials that Microsoft simply cannot ignore," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, UI professor of law. The same article appeared Nov. 22 in the AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN.

KNOXVILLE (Tenn.) NEWS-SENTINEL, Nov. 22 -- At the University of Iowa School of Business, professors were stunned by the results of an experiment using students on mock message boards. The researchers set up an experiment using business students designated as buyers and sellers of investments. The buyers received information from sellers on computer screens, but couldn't verify the accuracy of the reports. In some cases, sellers, who knew the true value of the investment, could exaggerate or even lie. Buyers only knew when sellers were allowed to lie, not whether they would lie. "We found people are very much taken in by what should be non-credible communication," said ROBERT FORSYTHE, the economics professor who co-authored the study.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 22 -- For healthy infants, there is little, if any, difference between generic and brand-name formula, according to SAMUEL FOMON, professor emeritus with the University of Iowa College of Medicine. Fomon was a member of an expert panel convened by the Life Sciences Research Office to propose infant formula standards to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 22 - In the latest attack on Microsoft, three California lawyers say they plan to file a class-action lawsuit against the company on behalf of millions of Windows users. Experts say this is the first of what could become a flood of private litigation springing from the Justice Department's antitrust action against the company. "The prospect of a flood of private follow-on cases - with their triple damages in private antitrust cases - are lawsuits with potentials that Microsoft simply cannot ignore," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, UI professor of law.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/11/biztech/articles/22soft.html
Versions of this article also appeared in the MILWAUKEE JOURNAL-SENTINAL and the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER:
http://www.jsonline.com:80/bym/news/nov99/micro22112199.asp
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/clin22.shtml

SUN-SENTINEL (Florida), Nov. 22 -- At least seven suits, including one filed Monday in a state court in San Francisco, have been filed against Microsoft on behalf of computer users in response to a judge's Nov. 5 finding that Microsoft is a software monopolist that routinely bullies high-tech rivals. The judge has since appointed a mediator to explore a settlement, which would make it far more difficult for private plaintiffs to use the judge's findings to build a case against Microsoft. "They'd be well advised to look for ways to settle this case," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa who has consulted with the Justice Department on the case.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/money/daily/detail/0,1136,24500000000135292,00.html

ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, Nov. 22 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school, said Microsoft has a powerful financial incentive to settle with the federal government out of court. "The prospect of a flood of private follow-on cases -- with their triple damages in private antitrust cases -- are lawsuits with potentials that Microsoft simply cannot ignore," Hovenkamp says.

NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW, Nov. 21 -- Crossing: A Memoir, by former University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, says McCloskey decided at 52 to become a woman and that her book focuses more on the emotional evolution of the crossover than its surgical side.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 21 -- DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, answers a parent's questions about a toddler that is hitting and not obeying. "In these situations, parents need to offer consistent feedback to the child," explains D'Alessandro. She suggests that this mother first figure out why her child is hitting. "Since toddlers don't have enough language to say what they're frustrated or angry about," D'Alessandro says, "a parent can use the negative behavior as a teaching opportunity by helping the child use words like 'I'm angry' instead of hitting." The column also says that the university offers a Web site -- www.vch.vh.org -- with information on children's health care.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/article/0,1051,SAV-9911210037,00.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 21 - As far as holiday gifts go, chocolate is one of the best, a columnist writes. And contrary to popular belief, chocolate does not cause hyperactivity in kids: studies at both Vanderbilt University and the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA have demonstrated this.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/325/south/Chocolate_Tasteful_gift_has_bad_rap+.shtml

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 21 - While in Iowa this weekend, Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley argued that this country has been far too timid in broadening health coverage during an economic boom. "We should be fixing our roofs while the sun is shining," Bradley said at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Despite economic growth, he said, ''I see 44 million Americans living without health insurance.''
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/325/nation/Gore_Bradley_clash_on_health_care_costs+.shtml

SEATTLE TIMES, Nov. 21 - UI law professor HERBERT HOVENKAMP commented on the mediator named by the judge in the Microsoft antitrust case. "He's not going to retry the case, even if his own leanings are toward anti-interventionist," Hovenkamp said. "It is not his job to second-guess the factual findings or rewrite at law. It is his job to force parties to accept the status of the case where they are now and come up with a settlement that is acceptable all around."
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/business/html98/micr_19991120.html

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Nov. 21 -- Former New Jersey senator and presidential candidate Bill Bradley spoke to about 250 people at the University of Iowa's KINNICK STADIUM. He said the United States has been far too timid in broadening health coverage during the economic boom.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 20 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school and a leading antitrust scholar who is advising the government in its antitrust case against Microsoft, said about Friday's ruling against the software giant: "If the judge's goal was settlement, he would have to leave enough ambiguity in the findings of fact so that neither side sees it as in its self interest to fight this to the bitter end." The same article appeared Nov. 10 in the BALTIMORE SUN and SACRAMENTO (Calif.) BEE, Nov. 7 in the ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER and Nov. 6 in the SARASOTA (Fla.) HERALD-TRIBUNE and the CONTRA COSTA (Calif.) TIMES.

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 20 - Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley was in Iowa Saturday and spoke to about 250 people jammed into a tent outside the UI's KINNICK STADIUM, where the Hawkeyes lost 25-21 to Minnesota.
http://www.latimes.com/class/employ/healthcare/19991120/tCB00V0260.html

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Nov. 20 -- Democratic presidential candidate Bill Bradley was in Iowa Saturday and spoke to about 250 people jammed into a tent outside the UI's KINNICK STADIUM,, where the Hawkeyes lost 25-21 to Minnesota.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=1120AP-BRADLEY&date=20-Nov-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same ASSOCIATED PERSS article appeared Nov. 20 in the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/11/20/politics1654EST0624.DTL

SUN-SENTINEL (Florida), Nov. 19 -- Alexis Knapp saw her first bonfire at Texas A&M and was so moved, she changed schools, transferring from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. "I came down for Bonfire in 1993, just because it was supposed to be a big social event," said Knapp, who now works in Houston. "It was freezing cold. It was raining. It was also one of the best times I ever had in my life." Her comments were made in the wake of the deaths of A&M students when a log stack they were building for the annual bonfire collapsed.
http://www.sun-sentinel.com/news/daily/detail/0,1136,24500000000133484,00.html
Knapp is also quoted in another story about the incident that ran Nov. 19 on the ARIZONA DAILY STAR'S Web site at:
http://www.azstarnet.com/public/dnews/080-3320.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 19 -- The paper prints an excerpt from Crying: The Natural and Cultural History of Tears, by TOM LUTZ, associate professor of English at the University of Iowa.
http://chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i13/13b01201.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 19 -- A story about minority recruiting in Texas says that a few out-of-state institutions, including the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, have either opened admissions offices in cities with large minority populations, such as Dallas and Houston, or sent representatives there for extended periods. The University of Iowa also offers a merit-based scholarship, worth $5,000 annually, exclusively for minority students. Students from Illinois, Missouri, and Texas account for nearly all of the 64 recipients of the award this year, university officials say.
http://www.chronicle.com/free/v46/i13/13a00101.htm

RICHMOND (Va.) TIMES-DISPATCH, Nov. 18 -- University of Iowa researchers KEN CULP and JANET MENTES are conducting a study of elderly patients in long-term care. They are making fluids more available to an experimental group of patients by encouraging them to drink water, juices and other non-caffeinated beverages during social activities. What they plan to measure is whether increased fluid intake of water-based drinks improves mental capacity. "There are two outcomes of elderly people who don't get enough water," said Culp, an epidemiologist with Iowa's College of Nursing. "One is acute confusion, and the other is urinary tract infections."

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 17 -- ROBERT CLINTON, a law professor at the University of Iowa and an associate justice of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribal Appellate Court in South Dakota, is quoted in an article about nine American Indians who say a long line of historic federal actions blurred the borders of the Pine Ridge Reservation a century ago. Clinton said both sides in the dispute can point to numerous cases favoring their points of view.

JOURNAL RECORD (Oklahoma City, Okla.), Nov. 17 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who is advising the government, said about a judge's ruling against Microsoft in an anti-trust case: "If the findings show significant abuse of monopoly power, then the appropriate remedy is to break up the monopoly -- not to hobble the company or try to regulate it." He noted that "breaking up" a company is not such an extreme concept for the federal government. Quite often recently, the government has required companies to spin off units to win approval for a merger. The same New York Times News Service article appeared Nov. 10 in the ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER.

SAN FRANCISCO EXAMINER, Nov. 17 -- Tennessee Williams wrote "Spring Storm" at the age of 26 in 1937, while studying playwriting at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA -- just before he wrote the remarkably atypical "Not About Nightingales," also recently rediscovered and triumphantly, brutally staged by Trevor Nunn last year in London and last spring in New York. Technically, it's a play by Thomas Lanier Williams (he hadn't changed his name yet). The script was ruthlessly critiqued by Williams' professor and classmates and rejected by several theaters.
http://www.sfgate.com:80/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/examiner/archive/1999/11/17/STYLE11000.dtl

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 17 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who is advising the states in the government's antitrust suit against software giant Microsoft, said be believes that the attorneys general generally face political pressures "to propose something different from what the federal government does. Otherwise they will seem superfluous." He said those pressures may surface in this case, too.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/businessnews/article/0,2669,SAV-9911170192,FF.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 17 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who is advising the states in the government's antitrust suit against software giant Microsoft, said be believed that the attorneys general generally face political pressures "to propose something different from what the federal government does. Otherwise they will seem superfluous." He said those pressures may surface in this case, too.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/11/biztech/articles/17soft.html
The same article appeared Nov. 16 in the FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM
http://www.star-telegram.com/news/doc/1047/1:COMP39/1:COMP39111699.html

BBCNEWS.COM, Nov. 16 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA will cancel some $440,000 worth of journals and other serials in 2000, blaming insufficient budget rises. "The average cost of a journal purchased by research libraries across all fields has risen nearly 56 percent since 1994. In some fields, however, the increases have been even greater -- biology 60 percent, technology 69 percent, and engineering 66 percent," it said.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/education/features/newsid_521000/521816.stm

SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS, Nov. 16 -- JENNIFER R. NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says, "Pregnant women should be discouraged from using over-the-counter drugs for trivial indications. "Thus, a common cold is best treated with rest, fluids, a humidifier and, if needed, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray like Ocean. Topical medications, like a decongestant nasal spray, are safer than oral ones, and if any cold remedy is used, combination drugs are best avoided. Cough remedies containing iodide should be avoided because they may cause a large goiter in an unborn child.
http://www.sjmercury.com/premium/svlife/docs/brody16.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 16 -- BOB BOYNTON, a professor of political science at the University of Iowa, oversaw an experimental on-line course at the UI. More than half of the 1,900 students received F's on their mid-term report cards. The course is called OnLine at Iowa, and it aims to teach students how to find their way around the campus and how to use the campus computer system. This is the second year the university has offered the elective course, for which students earn one credit if they pass. Boynton took on the course because he is interested in experimenting with on-line teaching. "What I do is set up a tutorial relationship with the 1,900 students," says Boynton. "They stick the CD in, I start talking to them and showing them how to do things, and then they turn around and do them."
http://chronicle.com/free/99/11/99111601t.htm

YAHOO! NEWS, Nov. 15 -- Tennessee Williams' recently discovered play "Spring Storm'' (1939) received its world premiere Wednesday in Austin, Texas, and the director of that production, Michael Bloom, accused the playwright's estate and publisher, New Directions, of censoring one of two endings Williams wrote for the work. Bloom said the original ending, which involves a nude scene, was rewritten by Williams only after the young playwright's professor at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA expressed his strong disapproval. "He wrote the new ending under duress,'' Bloom said. "The first ending is the most powerful scene in the play. It is very similar to the ending in 'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.' It's a shame it will never see the light.'' The article originally appeared in VARIETY.
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991115/re/stage_williams_2.html
The article also ran Nov. 14 in the LOS ANGELES TIMES:
http://www.calendarlive.com/went/19991114/tCB00a2463.html
The same article appeared Nov. 14 in the BOSTON GLOBE:
http://www.boston.com/dailynews/318/variety/Williams_Storm_brewing_controv:.shtml
The same article appeared Nov. 14 on the FOX NEWS Web site.

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 15 -- Richard Miller, who was hired in February as the president of the Olin College of Engineering in Needham, Mass., is the former dean of engineering at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. Olin College, which its founders bill as a rival to the best engineering schools in the nation, is being built from the ground up on 70 acres in Needham next to Babson College. It is scheduled to open in fall 2001 with four new buildings, about 80 students and eight to 12 faculty members. Miller said the college will hand-pick students who, in addition to having combined SAT scores of 1,400 or higher and rigorous math backgrounds, are creative.
http://www.boston.com/dailyglobe2/318/west/Engineering_college_with_a_catch+.shtml

THE TIMES OF LONDON, Nov. 15 -- Simon Armitage, who has been appointed Poet of the Millennium Dome, is about to spend four months next year teaching writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. His appointment as Poet of the Millennium Dome means that he has been commissioned to write a 1,000-line poem on the subject of the millennium, called Killing Time, which is being published by Faber & Faber today. Armitage won a Forward Poetry Prize in 1992 (this year he was a judge, giving the prize to Jo Shapcott) and was Sunday Times Young Writer of the Year in 1993.
http://www.thetimes.co.uk/news/pages/tim/99/11/15/timartart02002.html?999

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 15 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa, is among the academics and consultants working for the states in their case against Microsoft. In an interview last week, he said, "If the findings show significant abuse of monopoly power, then the appropriate remedy is to break up the monopoly -- not to hobble the company or try to regulate it."
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/11/biztech/articles/15soft.html

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 15 -- Elderly people may be easy prey for confidence tricksters and fraudulent advertising because age-related damage to their brains impairs their judgement, according to New Scientist magazine. "Researchers in Iowa have discovered that many older people have localized brain damage that impairs their ability to avoid risky decisions," the magazine said. DANIEL TRANEL and his colleagues at the University of Iowa were studying elderly patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of the brain, which deals with decision making, when they made the discovery. The same article appeared Nov. 9 in the GLOBE & MAIL of Toronto, Ontario.

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.), Nov. 15 -- JENNIFER R. NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says, "Pregnant women should be discouraged from using over-the-counter drugs for trivial indications. Thus, a common cold is best treated with rest, fluids, a humidifier and, if needed, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray like Ocean. Topical medications, like a decongestant nasal spray, are safer than oral ones, and if any cold remedy is used, combination drugs are best avoided. Cough remedies containing iodide should be avoided because they may cause a large goiter in an unborn child." The same article appeared Nov. 14 in the ST. PAUL PIONEER PRESS, the HOUSTON CHRONICLE and the ARIZONA REPUBLIC.

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Nov. 15 -- JENNIFER R. NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says, "Pregnant women should be discouraged from using over-the-counter drugs for trivial indications. "Thus, a common cold is best treated with rest, fluids, a humidifier and, if needed, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray like Ocean. Topical medications, like a decongestant nasal spray, are safer than oral ones, and if any cold remedy is used, combination drugs are best avoided. Cough remedies containing iodide should be avoided because they may cause a large goiter in an unborn child.

PC WEEK, Nov. 15 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, said that in antitrust litigation, inference of harm is just as strong as evidence of actual harm. "The plaintiffs don't have to show the harm has occurred," Hovenkamp said in response to questions about the Microsoft antitrust case.

IN TOUCH, Nov. 15 -- After her doctors suggested a prophylactic mastectomy, a woman whose breast biopsy revealed cell changes sought a second opinion at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and learned about the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial, which tested the effectiveness of tamoxifen as a cancer preventative.

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 14 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who is advising the government, said about a judge's ruling against Microsoft in an anti-trust case: "If the findings show significant abuse of monopoly power, then the appropriate remedy is to break up the monopoly -- not to hobble the company or try to regulate it." He noted that "breaking up" a company is not such an extreme concept for the federal government. Quite often recently, the government has required companies to spin off units to win approval for a merger. The same article appeared Nov. 14 in the Cleveland PLAIN DEALER, Nov. 10 in the AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN and Nov. 6 in the FORT WORTH (Texas) STAR-TELEGRAM.

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Nov. 14 -- An article about the premiere of Tennessee Williams' play "Spring Storm" says he wrote it while a student in the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's PLAYWRITING PROGRAM in 1937-38. Originally titled "April Is the Cruelest Month,'' his Mississippi love story got its first hearing in a seminar led by Elsworth P. Conkle. The response was not good. The discouraged young writer "felt like going off the deep-end. Feared that I might lose my mind.'' Williams had told a friend he thought the play "well constructed'' and "suitable for the commercial stage,'' but a second airing in another Iowa seminar produced the same dispiriting results. Responding to an alternate ending in which Heavenly sheds her clothes, professor E.C. Mabie reportedly sniffed, "Well, we all have to paint our nudes.''
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/11/14/PK46158.DTL

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Nov. 14 -- Listed among works that address the abstract concept of design is "A Potter's Workbook," by Clary Illian (UNIVERSITY OF IOWA PRESS, 112 pages, $22.95). The book is designed both for the beginning student and the skilled craftsperson. Illian, who lives and works in an old Odd Fellows Hall in Ely, Iowa, studied with famed English potter Bernard Leach in 1964-65, and her book serves as a monument to his teaching. The book includes 220 photos, all black and white, by Charles Metzger, and 45 drawings.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=PB14&date=14-Nov-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Nov. 14 -- Some researchers are trying gene therapy to beef up production of cancer-fighting proteins made by a gene called p53. A recent UNIVERSITY OF IOWA study showed that a particular p53 mutation may be especially dangerous in ovarian cancer.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=FORE14&date=14-Nov-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of

NEWSWEEK, Nov. 14 -- "It's like trying to catch a couch as it tumbles down a few flights of stairs," said MATT BOWEN, leading tackler for the University of Iowa, on the difficulty of stopping University of Wisconsin running back Ron Dayne. On Saturday, against Iowa, Dayne broke the major-college career rushing record of 6,279 yards set by Ricky Williams at the University of Texas.
http://www.newsweek.com:80/nw-srv/printed/us/dept/pe/a55106-1999nov14.htm

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 14 -- An article about "Crossing" memoir author and University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY says that twice during the former Donald McCloskey's efforts to have a sex-change operation members of his family had him incarcerated, at first in the University of Iowa Hospital's mental ward.
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/books/99/11/14/reviews/991114.14kumint.html

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 14 -- University of Iowa law professor and antitrust expert HERBERT HOVENKAMP says there are many questions about the fate of Microsoft now that a judge has ruled that the company is a monopoly. He said if the government breaks up the company into a number of "Baby Bills," the firms would be inexperienced. "They wouldn't have a track record."
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/business/A58351-1999Nov12.html

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 11 -- "Freestyle: The Victories of Dan Gable," a documentary about the record-setting University of Iowa wrestling coach, high school and college champion and Olympic gold medal winner, was created in part by the Video Center at the University of Iowa and directed by KEVIN KELLEY.
http://www.calendarlive.com/movies/19991111/t000102857.html

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 12 -- The paper's Gifts & Bequests section mentions a $3 million gift from Roy Karro for UNIVERSITY OF IOWA athletics programs.
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i12/12a04401.htm

NEWSDAY, Nov. 12 -- A lot of people thought the shorter work week was a definition of progress, said BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor of leisure studies at the University of Iowa. "Everyone predicted the coming of a Golden Age of Leisure. What they did not predict was the insatiable appetite of the American consumer," Hunnicutt said. The more that was produced, the more that was consumed. There never came a point when industry had produced enough to satisfy consumers. Hunnicutt said there has been a shift in values and beliefs that has stopped the trend of decreasing hours. "Work has become something like a modern religion. It's our human identity, our meaning in life. Leisure is trivialized. Leisure is a servant to work" -- a way to restore ourselves to work better.
http://future.newsday.com/11/fbak1112.htm

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 12 -- Some of Iowa's private hospitals say they may lose patients because of state-funded University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics' new advertising campaign. But UI spokeswoman ANN RHODES says the ads focus on specialties the other hospitals do not offer. "We're trying really hard not to step on the toes of other hospitals," Rhodes said.

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 11 -- A review of the book "The Feeling of What Happens" by neurologist ANTONIO DAMASIO says he teaches at both the University of Iowa College of Medicine and the Salk Institute in California, and brings an immense amount of knowledge and a wide reading of philosophy and literature to the book.
http://search.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-11/11/187l-111199-idx.html

USA TODAY, Nov. 11 -- A story about DAN GABLE says he was "one match shy of perfection in high school and college, Olympic champ and a dominating coach at the University of Iowa."
http://www.usatoday.com/sports/focus.htm

MSNBC, Nov. 10 -- An article about Kent Haruf, author of the recently released novel Plainsong, says he fine-tuned his fiction writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "He was a quiet, reserved, but friendly guy and when he said something it had resonance," said novelist Ron Hansen, who studied with Haruf at Iowa. "He was older and seemed more assured about what he wanted to do as a writer."
http://www.msnbc.com/news/327748.asp

EXCITE NEWS, Nov. 10 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, who is advising the states, said, "If the (court's) findings show significant abuse of monopoly power (by Microsoft), then the appropriate remedy is to break up the monopoly not to hobble the company or try to regulate it." Hovenkamp noted that breaking up a company is not such an extreme concept for the federal government. Quite often the government requires companies to spin off units to win approval for a merger.

APBNEWS.COM, Nov. 10 -- The UNIVERSITY OF IOWA was one of four four-year colleges ranked 849th in campus crime among 1,497 schools nationally, tying with Blue Mountain College in Blue Mountain, Miss., Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio, and Western Washington University in Bellingham, Wash. APBNEWS.COM is an on-line news service covering police and crime news, information and entertainment.
http://www.apbnews.com/resourcecenter/datacenter/crimecheck/campus/runsearch.asp

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 10 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law who is advising the government, said about a judge's ruling against Microsoft in an anti-trust case: "If the findings show significant abuse of monopoly power, then the appropriate remedy is to break up the monopoly -- not to hobble the company or try to regulate it." He noted that "breaking up" a company is not such an extreme concept for the federal government. Quite often recently, the government has required companies to spin off units to win approval for a merger.
http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/99/11/biztech/articles/10soft.html
The same article appeared Nov. 10 in the SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER:
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/micr10.shtml

THE (Akron, Ohio) BEACON-JOURNAL, Nov. 10 -- Historian and author LINDA KERBER, a professor of history at the University of Iowa, will speak about citizenship and its obligations at a free talk titled "No Constitutional Right to be Ladies: Gender, Citizenship and Military Obligation" at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 11 at the University of Akron. Kerber's talk was this year's George W. Knepper Lecture.
http://www.ohio.com:80/bj/news/docs/011723.htm

WASHINGTON POST, Nov. 10 -- Edna Lingreen, 86, worked as a secretary to a law school dean after graduating from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. A former senior trial lawyer in the antitrust division of the Justice Department, she recalled during a recent conference featuring women who overcame race and gender barriers that she had to take her bar exam in the library of Georgetown University, apart from the men, because that was the only place there was a women's restroom. Lingreen eventually became one of only a handful of women among the 125 lawyers in the antitrust division of Justice. She made her comments last week during a Prince George's Community College forum inspired by the book, "Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years," the 1993 bestseller turned into a successful Broadway play and made-for-television movie.
http://www.washingtonpost.com:80/wp-srv/WPlate/1999-11/10/027l-111099-idx.html

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, Nov. 10 -- "Hibiki," the latest work by the Japanese dance company Sankai Juku, was co-commissioned by HANCHER AUDITORIUM at the University of Iowa.

ROCHESTER (N.Y.) DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE. Nov. 10 -- A key part of the brain's circuitry for learning moral and social rules lies right behind the forehead, suggests a study by STEVEN W. ANDERSON and colleagues at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. The findings were reported in the November issue of the journal Nature Neuroscience.

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 9 -- With a $460,000 investment from the state of Iowa, EnzyMed -- a drug and chemical research company based in Coralville -- will collaborate with the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA on cancer treatment and pain-management efforts.

PCWEEK, Nov. 9 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, an antitrust expert and law professor at the University of Iowa, said nearly half of a plaintiff's resources go toward trying to prove that a company is a monopolist. Now, plaintiffs can point to the judge's recent ruling against Microsoft, without presenting their own case -- provided the decision stands.
http://www8.zdnet.com:80/pcweek/stories/news/0,4153,2390704,00.html
The same ZDNET article appeared Nov. 9 in INTER@CTIVE WEEK ONLINE at:
http://www4.zdnet.com:80/intweek/stories/news/0,4164,2390312,00.html

THE OREGONIAN, Nov. 9 -- RANDALL BEZANSON, a professor at the University of Iowa College of Law, is quoted in a story about a U.S. Supreme Court case involving a challenge to the University of Wisconsin's student fee program. Bezanson responded to another person's comment that a ruling upholding the Wisconsin suit would not just eliminate funding for overtly political groups, but also the visiting lecture series and the student newspaper, because it has editorials. Bezanson said he would be surprised if the Supreme Court went that far. "I can't imagine this Supreme Court saying we're . . . going to define the scope of your educational mission," Bezanson said.
http://www.oregonlive.com:80/news/99/11/st110905.html

SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, Nov. 9 -- "Political cartooning is on the endangered species list,'' said JOHN SOLOSKI, director of the University of Iowa's journalism school. "(Even though) there's probably no section of a daily newspaper that draws as much reaction day in and day out.'' Concerned by the state of their art, top cartoonists from around the nation gathered in Iowa City recently at a public symposium that drew several hundred listeners. The conference honored Los Angeles Times cartoonist Paul Conrad, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner who began his career at the university paper in Iowa City.
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/11/09/MN81299.DTL

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 9 -- JENNIFER R. NIEBYL, head of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Iowa College of Medicine, says, "Pregnant women should be discouraged from using over-the-counter drugs for trivial indications. "Thus, a common cold is best treated with rest, fluids, a humidifier and, if needed, a saltwater (saline) nasal spray like Ocean. Topical medications, like a decongestant nasal spray, are safer than oral ones, and if any cold remedy is used, combination drugs are best avoided. Cough remedies containing iodide should be avoided because they may cause a large goiter in an unborn child.
http://www10.nytimes.com:80/library/national/science/110999hth-brody.html

INFOWORLD, Nov. 8 -- After looking over the findings of fact document released Friday following a judge's ruling against Microsoft, private attorney Dana Hayter, of San Francisco law firm Fenwick & West LLP, and HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa, both suggested Monday that the future looks somewhat bleak for the company, at least, in terms of the software giant continuing in its current incarnation. What remains more questionable in the minds of antitrust experts such as Hayter and Hovenkamp, who advised the Department of Justice in this case, are the remedies, which could be anything from a simple wrist slap to a breakup of the software maker. Assuming that Jackson rules that Microsoft violated antitrust law, the only true remedy would be to break up the monopoly, in Hovenkamp's view.
http://www.infoworld.com:80/cgi-bin/displayStory.pl?99118.enmictroub.htm

DENVER POST, Nov. 8 -- Given the speed of change in cyberspace, critics worry that lawmakers are trying to impose rules on an industry that changes almost before the ink dries on most bills. "Legislation is likely to be poorly designed when you don't know what you are dealing with,'' said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor of law and a technology expert at the University of Iowa. "We've had only a short history with the Internet. ... I think all this congressional activity at this juncture is amazing and unprecedented.''
http://www.denverpost.com:80/enduser/dc1108.htm

NEWSWEEK, Nov. 8 -- The story of DAN GABLE, who as coach led the University of Iowa wrestling teams to win 15 national titles in 21 years, is the subject of a new documentary titled "Freestyle." Though it won't air until Nov. 14 (on HBO Signature Channel), 4,000 Gable cultists have already ordered copies from Direct Cinema of Santa Monica, Calif. The film explores the run-through-walls obsessiveness of a 150-pound wrestler who, at Iowa State University, practiced against a world-class, 450-pound teammate.
http://www.newsweek.com:80/nw-srv/printed/us/so/a59717-1999oct31.htm

CNN.COM, Nov. 8 -- University of Iowa social science professor ARTHUR MILLER, who directs the school's Social Science Institute that does polls on politics, said his research indicates that GOP presidential candidate Gary Bauer is doing a better job of winning the hearts of social conservatives. He said Bauer gets 56 percent of his support from Republicans who call themselves the most conservative. GOP candidate Steve Forbes, however, gets only 23 percent of his support from the most conservative Republicans. George W. Bush gets 9 percent of his support from this constituency. "It looks like Gary Bauer is winning, but it also looks like there aren't enough of them to swing this in his direction," Miller said.
http://cnn.com:80/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/11/08/dmr.social.conservatives/index.Html

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Nov. 8 -- Some believe that, outside of Russia and Romania, the country most affected by the fall of the Berlin Wall was the United States. That's because the events of 1989 removed a formidable enemy that riveted U.S. strategists. "I'd liken it to draining a swamp," said James Lindsay of the Brookings Institution, a former National Security Council official under President Clinton and former UNIVERSITY OF IOWA professor. "Suddenly, all the stones become noticeable."
http://www.sltrib.com:80/1999/nov/11081999/nation_w/45290.htm

LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL STAR, Nov. 8 -- One of two final candidates for a new College of Dentistry dean at the University of Nebraska Medical Center includes JOHN REINHARDT of the University of Iowa. Reinhardt, 50, has been on the Iowa dental faculty for 22 years, reaching the rank of professor in 1990. Since 1988 he has headed the operative dentistry department and was acting assistant dean for patient services two years ago.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/110599/neb/sto2

CHICAGO SUN-TIMES, Nov. 8 -- DONNA D'ALESSANDRO, assistant professor of pediatrics at the University of Iowa, computed the number of hits garnered by the UI's Virtual Hospital before and after the start of Children's Virtual Hospital. They found that the new service drew more users to the Web site.

ORANGE COUNTY (Calif.) REGISTER, Nov. 7 -- MARGARET F. BRINIG, an economist/law professor at the University of Iowa, co-authored a national study of about 3,600 couples and found a 59-percent higher-than-average risk of divorce among couples who agreed that all the work was fairly divided.

TELEGRAM & GAZETTE (Worcester, Mass.), Nov. 7 -- Since the judge's findings of fact in the Microsoft anti-trust case are not a final ruling, a settlement would presumably erase the monopoly finding. "Taking that off the table is the biggest carrot the government has to offer Microsoft," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school. The same article appeared Nov. 7 in THE NEWS & OBSERVER of Raleigh, N.C.

FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM, Nov. 7 -- A story about Tennessee Williams' play "Spring Storm" says he submitted the work for a play-writing contest when he was a 27-year-old student at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.star-telegram.com:80/news/doc/1047/1:STATE12/1:STATE12110799.html

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 6 -- Since the judge's findings of fact in the Microsoft anti-trust case are not a final ruling, a settlement would presumably erase the monopoly finding. "Taking that off the table is the biggest carrot the government has to offer Microsoft," said HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school.
http://www.nytimes.com/learning/general/featured_articles/991108monday.html

THE PHILIPPINE STAR (Manila), Nov. 6 -- A story about the announcement that the 1999 National Artist for Literature is Edith Lopez Tiempo says she got her master's degree in 1949 from the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where from 1947-1950 she was an Iowa International Fellow.
http://www.philstar.com/datedata/m06_nov6/edi6.htm

MIAMI HERALD, Nov. 6 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school and a leading antitrust scholar who is advising the government in its antitrust case against Microsoft, said about Friday's ruling against the software giant: "If the judge's goal was settlement, he would have to leave enough ambiguity in the findings of fact so that neither side sees it as in its self interest to fight this to the bitter end."
http://www.herald.com:80/content/tue/docs/011185.htm

>ST. PETERSBURG (Fla.) TIMES, Nov. 6 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a professor at the University of Iowa law school and a leading antitrust scholar who is advising the government in its antitrust case against Microsoft, said about Friday's ruling against the software giant: "If the judge's goal was settlement, he would have to leave enough ambiguity in the findings of fact so that neither side sees it as in its self interest to fight this to the bitter end."
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/110699/Worldandnation/Microsoft_may_perseve.shtml

The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 6 in the SAN JOSE (Calif.) MERCURY NEWS:
http://www7.mercurycenter.com:80/premium/front/docs/microahead06.htm

ST. PETERSBURG (Fla.) TIMES, Nov. 6 -- An article about Joan Van Bortel, who was killed when USAir Flight 427 crashed outside Pittsburgh, said that her husband, Brett, wanted to start a foundation named after Joan to pay for scholarships for young women who attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, where he and Joan met.
http://www.sptimes.com:80/News/110699/Worldandnation/Putting_a_value_on_th.shtml

NEW YORK TIMES, Nov. 6 -- HERBERT HOVENKAMP, a law professor at the University of Iowa and leading antitrust scholar who is advising the government in its case against Microsoft, says: "If the judge's goal (in the case) was settlement, he would have to leave enough ambiguity in the findings of fact so that neither side sees it as in its self interest to fight this to the bitter end."

SEATTLE POST-INTELLIGENCER, Nov. 5 -- An article about Kent Haruf, author of the recently released novel Plainsong, says he fine-tuned his fiction writing at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA's WRITERS' WORKSHOP. "He was a quiet, reserved, but friendly guy and when he said something it had resonance," said novelist Ron Hansen, who studied with Haruf at Iowa. "He was older and seemed more assured about what he wanted to do as a writer."
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/books/book05.shtml

ALABAMA LIVE, Nov. 5 -- SAMIR BISHARA, a professor of orthodontics at the University of Iowa College of Dentistry, discussed how orthodontists can best correct problems of ankylosis -- that's a tooth too firmly attached to the underlying bone to be moved -- this past weekend during the Southern Association of Orthodontists in Alabama. Alabama Live is developed in cooperation with three Alabama newspapers: The Birmingham News, Mobile Register and The Huntsville Times.
http://www.al.com:80/news/mobile/Nov1999/5-a337079a.html

GRAND FORKS (N.D.) HERALD, Nov. 5 -- Susan Yuzna, winner of two major prizes for poetry and the first artist in the North Dakota Museum of Art's Readers Series studied at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA and the University of Montana, where she was the Richard Hugo Poetry Scholar.
http://www.northscape.com/news/docs00/1105/2768FE9.htm

OMAHA WORLD-HERALD, Nov. 5 -- One of two final candidates for a new College of Dentistry dean at the University of Nebraska Medical Center is JOHN REINHARDT of the University of Iowa. Reinhardt, 50, has been on the Iowa dental faculty for 22 years, reaching the rank of professor in 1990. Since 1988 he has headed the operative dentistry department and was acting assistant dean for patient services two years ago.

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 5 -- If the year-2000 bug bites hard, it's possible that heating and other utilities will fail, forcing some people to leave their homes in search of warmth. In Iowa, three state universities -- including the University of Iowa -- are preparing to offer shelter to thousands if worst-case scenarios become reality. "We're preparing a recreation center, our largest residence hall, and our student union," says STEVEN R. PARROTT, a University of Iowa spokesman. "We could accommodate thousands of people if they had to lie out on the floor in blankets and cots."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i11/11a05501.htm

CHRONICLE OF HIGHER EDUCATION, Nov. 5 -- CELESTA ALBONETTI, who now works for the University of Iowa, wrote the minority report in a Texas A&M case involving accusations of scientific plagiarism and data theft. The minority report challenged the university investigative committee's granting of tenure to one professor embroiled in the controversy. "To me, this was such an open-and-shut case," Albonetti says in the minority report. "This man didn't have any single-authored publications."
http://www.chronicle.com/weekly/v46/i11/11a01801.htm

LOS ANGELES TIMES, Nov. 4 -- A new poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SOCIAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE says George W. Bush has a comfortable lead for the GOP nomination, as does Vice President Al Gore on the Democratic side. In Iowa, Gore was favored by 60 percent of those questioned, while Bradley was favored by 18 percent. Three percent favored other candidates, and 19 percent were undecided. On the Republican side, Bush was favored by 52 percent of those questioned, while publisher Steve Forbes was favored by 13 percent. Arizona Sen. John McCain, who hasn't campaigned in the state, and Gary Bauer each had 6 percent; commentator Alan Keyes had 2 percent; and Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch had 2 percent. The telephone survey was conducted Oct. 18-25 among 493 Democrats and 489 Republicans who said they were likely to attend precinct caucuses. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.
http://www.latimes.com/news/politics/elect2000/pres/wire/19991104/tCB00V0481.html
A portion of the ASSOCIATED PRESS article was used in another article that appeared Nov. 4 in the SAN ANTONIO (Texas) EXPRESS-NEWS:
http://www.expressnews.com:80/pantheon/news-bus/politics/0514atx_bush_debates_1105nz.shtml
A portion of the Associated Press article was used in another article that appeared Nov. 4 on the CNN Web site at:
http://cnn.com:80/ALLPOLITICS/stories/1999/11/04/briefs/index.html

>MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE, Nov. 4 -- A new poll by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA SOCIAL SCIENCE INSTITUTE says George W. Bush has a comfortable lead for the GOP nomination, as does Vice President Al Gore on the Democratic side. In Iowa, Gore was favored by 60 percent of those questioned, while Bradley was favored by 18 percent. Three percent favored other candidates, and 19 percent were undecided. On the Republican side, Bush was favored by 52 percent of those questioned, while publisher Steve Forbes was favored by 13 percent. Arizona Sen. John McCain, who hasn't campaigned in the state, and Gary Bauer each had 6 percent, commentator Alan Keyes had 2 percent and Utah Sen. Orrin Hatch had 2 percent. The telephone survey was conducted Oct. 18-25 among 493 Democrats and 489 Republicans who said they were likely to attend precinct caucuses. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 4.5 percentage points.
http://www.startribune.com/stOnLine/cgi-bin/article?thisSlug=1104AP-PRESIDENTIAL-&date=04-Nov-1999&word=iowa&word=university&word=of
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Nov. 4 on the SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE Web site at:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/news/archive/1999/11/04/politics1619EST0704.DTL

>FOX NEWS, Nov. 4 -- A new poll of likely voters in the Iowa presidential caucuses, scheduled for Jan. 24, 2000, found George W. Bush leading the Republican field with 52 percent, ahead of Forbes with 13 percent. The poll, by the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, carried a 4.5 percent margin of error. The same REUTERS article appeared Nov. 4 on the EXCITE NEWS Web site and Nov. 5 on the GO NETWORK Web site at:
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a2054roptz-19991104&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486
The same REUTERS article appeared Nov. 4 on the YAHOO! NEWS Web site at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991104/pl/politics_debate_21.html

THE BOSTON PHOENIX, Nov. 4-11 -- An article about dance choreographer Paul Taylor says that his "Arabesque" premiered only a few weeks ago at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA, and as it started, Taylor seemed to be simply continuing the line of exacting, eye-catching movement he was pursuing in "Cascade."
http://www.bostonphoenix.com:80/archive/dance/99/11/04/PAUL_TAYLOR.html

REUTERS, Nov. 4 -- Elderly people may be easy prey for confidence tricksters and fraudulent advertising because age-related damage to their brains impairs their judgement, according to New Scientist magazine. "Researchers in Iowa have discovered that many older people have localized brain damage that impairs their ability to avoid risky decisions," the magazine said. DANIEL TRANEL and NATALIE DENBURG and their colleagues at the University of Iowa were studying elderly patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of the brain, which deals with decision making, when they made the discovery. The article appeared on the LYCOS NEWS Web site and the YAHOO! NEWS Web site at:
http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/nm/19991104/sc/aging_risk_2.html
The same article appeared Nov. 4 on the GO NETWORK Web site at:
http://infoseek.go.com/Content?arn=a1915LBY230reulb-19991103&qt=%2BReuters+%2B%22University+of+Iowa%22&sv=IS&lk=noframes&col=NX&kt=A&ak=news1486

CHICAGO SUN TIMES, Nov. 4 -- A roundup of brief news items mixed with commentary includes a quote from BETH INGRAM, University of Iowa associate professor of economics, on what modern employers are looking for: "It's becoming apparent that a college degree is no guarantee of a high-wage job. You need the skills to analyze technical information and be able to communicate your findings, as well."
http://www.suntimes.com/output/quicktakes/qt04.html

BEAUFORT (S.C.) GAZETTE, Nov. 4 -- An article on a North Carolina film festival mentions that the films have been awarded prizes at other fests, including THAW 99 at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.beaufortgazette.com/localnews/story/0,1458,112734,00.html

MEMPHIS (Tenn.) BUSINESS JOURNAL, Nov. 4 -- The article says that thanks to the vision of (and generous donations from) world-class venture capitalist John Pappajohn, the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA "has one of the finest entrepreneurship programs in the country. The John Pappajohn Entrepreneurial Center, housed in the university's College of Business, offers a core of more than 15 entrepreneurial classes in several courses of study leading to an entrepreneurial certificate."

CHARLOTTE (N.C.) OBSERVER, Nov. 3 -- The Quill and Scroll Society at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA is judging "Pasta Tales," a national essay writing contest.

EXCITE NEWS, Nov. 3 -- Elderly people may be easy prey for confidence tricksters and fraudulent advertising because age-related damage to their brains impairs their judgement, according to New Scientist magazine. "Researchers in Iowa have discovered that many older people have localized brain damage that impairs their ability to avoid risky decisions," the magazine said. DANIEL TRANEL and NATALIE DENBURG and their colleagues at the University of Iowa were studying elderly patients with damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex of the brain, which deals with decision making, when they made the discovery.

CHICAGO TRIBUNE, Nov. 3 -- A story about the death Monday of Marguerite Johns at the age of 88, who suffered from Alzheimer's disease, says that in the 1920s she married Wahan Hovhaness, who as a young man found Johns as a toddler in 1915 wandering the streets of Baghdad, eating food out of garbage cans. It was assumed that she was a survivor of a savage massacre the Turkish had launched against nearly 1.5 million Armenian people in 1915 and 1916. When the couple married, Hovhaness was attending the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/obituaries/article/0,2669,SAV-9911030156,FF.html

AUSTIN (Texas) AMERICAN-STATESMAN, Nov. 3 -- A story about Tennessee Williams said he once attended the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA.
http://www.austin360.com:80/entertainment/xl/features/1999/11/04williams_2.html

60 MINUTES 2, CBS, Nov. 2 -- Internationally noted University of Iowa neurologists HANNA and ANTONIO DAMASIO were featured on the national news magazine, which focused on their studies of patients with brain damage that interfered with memory. A transcript of the interview can be found on CBS's Web site at:
http://www.cbs.com:80/flat/story_199084.html

>SALON, Nov.. 2 -- Chris Smith, the 29-year-old director, writer, cinematographer and co-producer of the festival favorite "American Movie," enrolled in engineering school near Philadelphia before switching to art studies at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA. There, he had access to the school's production equipment and made his first film -- an animated short about two Twinkies who flee a bakery and find a new life, which won him $10,000 in a Hostess Twinkies contest.
http://www.salon1999.com/ent/movies/int/1999/11/02/smith/index.html

SALT LAKE TRIBUNE, Nov. 2 -- JOSEPH D'UVA, who is pursuing a master's degree in art at the University of Iowa, was studying at Albuquerque's Tamarind Institute when he created Lithocoal from a powder used there for lithography, a print-making technique. Subsequently, D'Uva and business partner Robert Houston formed D'Uva Fine Artists Materials Inc. to sell the product.
http://www.sltrib.com:80/1999/nov/11021999/business/43497.htm

TIME, Nov. 1 -- In the latest Nature Neuroscience, ANTONIO DAMASIO and his colleagues at the University of Iowa describe two young adults--a woman, 20, and a man, 23--who suffered early injuries to the prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain thought to serve as a kind of moral and social compass. Both made remarkable recoveries until they began to display serious behavioral problems.
http://www.pathfinder.com/time/magazine/articles/0,3266,33165,00.html

SEATTLE PRESS-INTELLIGENCER, Nov. 1 -- ERNEST PASCARELLA, the Petersen professor of higher education at the University of Iowa, is currently updating his earlier research, which found that selective and pricey schools aren't necessarily the deciding factor in helping students make big bucks after graduation. "I have a problem with the research that suggest students who go to selective schools make more money," said Pascarella. "I don't think those studies take into account the ambition of the students. The kinds of aspirations that might get them into an Ivy League school are the same kind of skills that would help them become a doctor at almost any school they attend."
http://www.seattlep-i.com:80/business/sngl01.shtml
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Oct. 31 in the WASHINGTON POST.
http://washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/business/feed/a617-1999oct31.htm

BOSTON GLOBE, Nov. 1 -- JOHN STRECK, whose graduate research at the University of Iowa involved Internet voting, is quoted in an article about the state of Iowa's plans to test Internet voting for the first time in the state's history. ''It redistributes the balance of power,'' said Streck. ''Certainly, it would add to convenience and add potential for greater voting blocs, but what would be the hurdles put in place? Who's got access to the Internet? On Indian reservations, it's still only 50 percent penetration of telephones.''
http://www.globe.com/dailyglobe2/305/nation/Iowa_to_put_Internet_voting_to_the_test+.shtml

THE OREGONIAN, Nov. 1 -- DAWN GRUEN, who graduated from the University of Iowa with a master's degree in social work and received 15 minutes of fame five years ago when she and her husband, Rolf, were chosen as a "typical" American family and a perfect example of democracy's success by Russian President Boris Yeltsin, died from cancer on Monday (Oct. 25, 1999) at age 52. She had advised hundreds of couples on balancing career and family and had helped an untold number of new mothers through the depression that often follows childbirth.
http://flash.oregonlive.com/cgi-bin/or_nview.pl?/home1/wire/AP/Stream-Parsed/OREGON_NEWS/o1071_PM_WA--Obit-Gruen
The same ASSOCIATED PRESS article ran Oct. 31 on the SEATTLE TIMES Web site at:
http://www.seattletimes.com/news/obituaries/html98/obit_19991031.html

>LINCOLN (Neb.) JOURNAL-STAR, Nov. 1 -- Orrin Wilson, president of Lincoln's U.S. Bank, has announced that he will retire in June. A UNIVERSITY OF IOWA graduate, Wilson began his banking career with the Northern Trust Co. of Chicago in 1962.
http://www.journalstar.com:80/archives/103099/loc/sto1

COMMUNITY COLLEGE WEEK, Nov. 1 -- U.S. Secretary of Education Richard Riley spoke on behalf of Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Al Gore in a speech at the UNIVERSITY OF IOWA in October.

COMMUNITY COLLEGE WEEK, Nov. 1 -- The University of Iowa is investigating an incident in which the e-mail addresses of 40,000 students and faculty were offered for sale on the Yahoo! auction site. MARK SCHANTZ, the university's general counsel, says the language used in the offer could be interpreted as evidence supporting the allegation that the university's e-mail directory is being sold for the purpose of spamming, or sending mass e-mail.

COLLEGE & RESEARCH LIBRARIES NEWS, November 1999 -- A brief item says that GARY FROST has been appointed conservator at the University of Iowa.

EUROPEAN AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN, November 1999 -- A team of University of Iowa engineers is studying how conventional airbags work in order to help researchers design safer airbags for new cars and trucks. According to Professor BARRY BUTLER, preliminary findings show that at least two modifications may enhance airbag safety. First, a reduction in the amount of propellant used could lessen the explosive force of inflation. Second, to compensate for this loss of force, an aspirator could be installed behind the dashboard.

FASTCOMPANY.COM, November 1999 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, an historian and professor at the University of Iowa at Iowa City who specializes in the history of work, worries that work is fast replacing religion in providing meaning in people's lives. "Work has become how we define ourselves," he says. "It is now answering the traditional religious questions: Who am I? How do I find meaning and purpose? Work is no longer just about economics; it's about identity."
http://www.fastcompany.com/online/29/betrayed.html

ORTHOPEDICS TODAY, November 1999 -- To help understand the nature of sports-related osteoarthritis (OA), JOSEPH A. BUCKWALTER, M.D., chairman of the department of orthopedic surgery at the University of Iowa, reviewed the literature related to the topic at the recent "Stepping Away from OA" conference in Bethesda, Md. "If we look at the available clinical experience and data, I would suggest that particularly high-risk activities are those that subject joints to direct high levels of impact, either acute or repetitive," Buckwalter said.

LINGUAFRANCA, November 1999 -- The magazine features University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, who as Donald McCloskey decided to have a sex-change operation.

FAST COMPANY, November 1999 -- BENJAMIN HUNNICUTT, a professor at the University of Iowa and expert on the history of work, is interviewed for a story on the history of the work day. Hunnicutt, author of "Kellogg's Six-Hour Day" (Temple University Press, 1996 ) and a forthcoming book, "Saving Work: A Failing Faith," believes that our jobs have assumed too much importance in our culture: "Work has become our new religion, where we worship and give our time," he says.
http://www.fastcompany.com/online/29/betrayed.html

LINGUAFRANCA, Fall 1999 -- University of Iowa economics professor DEIRDRE MCCLOSKEY, as well as her book about her decision to have a sex-change operation, "Crossing," are the subjects of a lenghthy article.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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